Landscape Considerations

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Landscape Considerations

Landscape Considerations

•Fourth leg in the

ecological forestry stool!

• Must have spatial

context for stand- level

activities!


Patch content

matters!


The Landscape Checklist

What larger spatial scale

issues do we need to be

addressing in our managed

landscapes


•Management of environmentally

and culturally sensitive areas

Landscape thresholds (addressing

cumulative effects

•Roads and other human-created

networks

•Distribution of management

activities in time and space


Sensitive areas within the matrix

that need special consideration

•Aquatic and wetland ecosystems

– most important element of landscape

•Specialized habitats

– physically distinguished

– cliffs, rock outcrops, caves, etc.

•Biological hotspots

– not physically distinguished

– spawning, calving habitat; source areas

•Refugia

•Culturally important areas


Specialized habitats

– physically distinguished

– cliffs, rock outcrops, caves, etc.


Sensitive areas within the matrix

that need special consideration

•Biological hotspots

– not physically distinguished

– spawning, calving habitat; source

areas

•Refugia


Landscape Thresholds

Minimum levels of some structure

or condition

Maximum levels of some condition


Black-backed woodpecker.

Photo: Dr. R. Hutto


Three-toed woodpecker.

Photo: Dr. R. Hutto


Mountain Bluebird. Photo: Dr. R. Hutto


Olive-sided Flycatcher. Photo: Dr. R. Hutto


Western meadowlark.

Photo: Dr. R. Hutto


Roads and other humancreated

networks


Distribution of management

activities in time and space


Lot of things that you can do

spatially (how you arrange the

harvest units) and with patch

content to change the way the

landscape will function


Important interactions between

•Harvest patch size

•Harvest patch content

–What is left behind -- legacies

•Harvest cutting cycle

–Rotation period


Landscape Checklist

• Identifying and providing for appropriate

management of environmentally and

culturally sensitive areas in the managed

landscapes (meso-reserves)

Landscape thresholds – minimums and limits

on specific conditions and activities

• Concerns with road systems & other human

networks

• Distribution of management activities (e.g.,

timber harvesting) in space & time

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