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Statement of the CEDAW Committee on Gender and Climate Change

Statement of the CEDAW Committee on Gender and Climate Change

Statement of the CEDAW Committee on Gender and Climate

ong>CEDAWong>, 44 th session New York, 20 July – 7 August 2009 ong>Statementong> ong>ofong> ong>theong> ong>CEDAWong> ong>Committeeong> on Gender and Climate Change The ong>Committeeong> on ong>theong> Elimination ong>ofong> Discrimination against Women (ong>CEDAWong>) expresses its concern about ong>theong> absence ong>ofong> a gender perspective in ong>theong> United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and oong>theong>r global and national policies and initiatives on climate change. From ong>CEDAWong>’s examination ong>ofong> State Parties reports, it is apparent that climate change does not affect women and men in ong>theong> same way and has a gender-differentiated impact. However, women are not just helpless victims ong>ofong> climate change – ong>theong>y are powerful agents ong>ofong> change and ong>theong>ir leadership is critical. All stakeholders should ensure that climate change and disaster risk reduction measures are gender responsive, sensitive to indigenous knowledge systems and respect human rights. Women’s right to participate at all levels ong>ofong> decision-making must be guaranteed in climate change policies and programmes. As ong>theong> report ong>ofong> ong>theong> Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change noted, climate change has differential impacts on societies varying among regions, generations, ages, classes, income groups, occupations and gender lines. Women are ong>theong> main producers ong>ofong> ong>theong> world’s staple crops, but ong>theong>y face multiple discriminations such as unequal access to land, credit and information. Particularly at risk are poor urban and rural women who live in densely populated coastal and lowlying areas, drylands and high mountainous areas and small islands. Vulnerable groups such as older women and disabled women and minority groups such as indigenous women, pastoralists, nomads and hunters and gaong>theong>rers are also ong>ofong> concern. Safety nets and insurance for social protection are essential to national adaptation plans as part ong>ofong> poverty reduction strategies. i However, many women do not have access to health care facilities and social security. ii And while ong>CEDAWong> recognizes that all women have ong>theong> right to adequate standards ong>ofong> living, housing and communications as well as immediate shelters during crisis situations due to natural

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