Visual Language Magazine Contemporary Magazine Vol 3 no 8

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Vol 3 No 8 Visual Language Magazine Contemporary Fine Art featuring Waterscapes, Landscapes, Seascapes and more. Cover Artist is Kathryn Wilson. Featured are VL Top Artists to Collect are Carol Jo Smidt, David Terrar, Jonelle T. McCoy, Vanessa Katz and Russ Mackensen: CFAI.co Colors on My Palette Rae Andrews; Visual Language Studio Visit with William Beebe, Dawn Waters Baker and photographer Brian Bennett: Artspan Discovery Carol Engles; Visual Language Studio Visit with Artspan Artist Valerie Travers; Hall Groat Sr shares Learning to See Takes Practice; Artspan Spotlight with Jean Howard; CFAI.co Art Showdown; CFAi Juried Show ; VL Photographer John Lomba. Visual Language Magazine published through Graphics One Design. Visual Language is the common connection around the world for art expressed through every media and process. No interpreters are necessary because Visual Magazine crosses all boundaries.

Visual Language

VLcontemporary fine art

features

William Beebe

Valerie Travers

Dawn Waters Baker

Jean Howard

Brian Bennett

John Lomba

VL

August 2014 Volume 3 No. 8

Kathryn Wilson

www.artbykathrynwilson.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 1


VL

visual language

contemporary fine art

VisualLanguageMagazine.com

Subscribe Free Today.

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July 2014 Vol 3 No 7

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Kathryn Wilson

Contemporary Fine Art

VL Cover Artist

Kathryn is a North Carolina pastel artist, formally

trained in graphic arts, illustration and drawing. Kathryn

turned to fine art in the early 1990’s when she

took pastel classes at a local community center. She

is primarily a studio painter, with the occasional foray

into plein air painting. Since 2005, she has been a

full-time painter and actively participates in juried art

competitions, community art activities and has taught

pastel and oil pastel painting. Kathryn is a member of

The Pastel Society of North Carolina, the Visual Art

Exchange in Raleigh and is a co-founder of the Oil

Pastel Society, an international organization.

http://artbykathrynwilson.com

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Connie Dines

Artful Exposures One Frame At A Time

Bleeding Hearts

“A Pregnant Moment”

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www.artfulexposures.com


contentVL

Cover Artist Kathryn Wilson 3

Diverse Color and Composition by Artspan Artist

Kathryn Wilson.

Painter’s Keys - Robert Genn 11

VL Artist Features - 16

Carol Jo Smidt, David Terrar, Jonelle T. McCoy,

Vanessa Katz and Russ Mackensen

CFAI Colors on My Palette 42

Rae Andrews

Read the up close and personal interviews from CFAI.co

Find out more about the artist, their inspirations and how they

approach their work.

VL Studio Visit with William Beebe 52

“Art has always been in my blood, but I took a circuitous

route in becoming a full-time professional artist. In my junior

year of college I signed up for a portrait painting class

hoping to improve my GPA.”

VL Studio Visit with UK Artist Valerie Travers 68

Travers can trace that tenacity back more than five hundred years, through

a family tree that took root in Guernsey, a tiny island off the coast of Normandy,

in the 1400s. A bailiwick of the British Crown, the land covers barely

30 square miles floating in the English Channel, but it has provided all

the foundation Travers needed to become the artist, and the person, she

is today.

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VL Studio Visit with Dawn Waters Baker 84

Dawn feels like her first language was beauty. That was how

her heart was stirred to art.

Hall Groat II Learning to See Takes Practice

by Hall Groat Sr. 98

When you look at the great paintings of the world, it`s a good idea

to know how the artist has led your eye around his work. This

is especially important for an artist who is studying how to make

better art. One artist’s work that comes to mind is Rembrandt, and

especially his portraits. It’s fun to watch people gazing upon the

masters and listening to their comments.

ARTSPAN.com New Works - 100

Do not miss the new works posted every day on

Artspan.com This month features Carol Engles.

ARTSPAN Spotlight with Jean Howard 108

Who has been your mentor, or greatest influence to date

My father was an architect and did some watercolor renderings of

his projects. I think that I always loved drawing. When I was 13 he

gave me some art books and about that time I knew that I wanted to

be an artist. He was my greatest mentor.

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contentVL

VL Studio Visit with Photographer Brian Bennett 114

I was born and raised in South Africa. Growing up on a beautiful farm

in Mpumalanga, most of my childhood was spent outside in the sun,

running barefoot through the dirt, climbing in trees and daydreaming in

the garden.

CFAI.co Figurative Juried Show 122

First Place Linda Popple

Second Place Carol Smith Myer

Third Place Bob Shepherd

CFAI.co Artist Showdown Maritime & Seascape Art 130

First Place Rae Andrews

Second Place Anton Zhou

Third Place Sharon Sieben

VL Artspan Photographer John Lomba 142

My photography career goes back to the early 1980’s using a 110 Minolta

Instamatic and then waiting 2 weeks for them to be developed, which

seemed like an eternity! I recall ‘discovering’ a few blurry shots of my

thumb blocking the lens! Not exactly what I had envisioned.

Directory of Artists and Galleries 160

In alphabetically order you can easy find all featured artists

and advertising artists, along with featured galleries in our

index directory.

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Artist of the Day

“Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.” ― Edgar Degas

Sign up today.

Carol Jo Smidt

“My paintings are a result of a thoughtful, ongoing, creative and intuitive process. Creating art is a spiritual

journey. It is somewhat of a surprise where a painting will lead me. I find that my paintings are more

vivid and saturated than real life. I see color in a subject and intensify those hues in a painting.

One of my goals is to bring honor and respect to the subjects that I paint. As a creator of art, I want the

viewer to have a positive connection with my paintings.” Carol Jo Smidt

http://www.caroljosmidt.com/

artistofthedayvl.blogspot.com

If you want to be featured as an Artist of the Day, contact Visual Language Magazine.

VisualLanguageMagazine@gmail.com


Carol Jo Smidt

“A Pale Horse" Oil 9 x 12

www.carol@caroljosmidt.com

carol@caroljosmidt.com

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VL

visual language magazine

Contemporary Fine Art

Visual Language Magazine Staff

Editorial

Editor -in-Chief Laurie Pace

Executive Editor Lisa Kreymborg

Contributing Editor Lisa Neison-Smith

Consulting Editor Nancy Medina

Feature Contributor Robert Genn Painter’s Keys

CFAI Contributor Kimberly Conrad

Feature Editor Art Reviews Hall Groat II

Feature Contributer Barry Scharf

VL Sponsor ARTSPAN Eric Sparre

http://vanessakatzart.com

Advertising

Contact: VisualLanguageMagazine@gmail.com

Marketing and Development

Executive Director Business/Management Stacey Hendren

All Artwork is Copyrighted by the Individual Artists.

Visual Language Vol 3 No 8

http://DavidTerrar.artspan.com

http://Dandcgallery.com http://WilliamBeebe.com

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The Painter’s Keys

Robert and Sara Genn

What’s your ministry

June 20, 2014

Robert Genn’s

Studio Book

In a recent commencement address at the Maharishi University of Management in Fairfield Iowa, comedian Jim Carrey describes

the moment he gave a name to his life’s calling. “The purpose of my life had always been to free people from concern,”

says Jim. “I dubbed it, ‘The church of freedom from concern,’ or ‘FFC.’ I dedicated myself to my ministry. What’s yours”

As artists, we may or may not have a name for the ineffable value we’re striving to offer the world. Each of us -- a ministry of

one -- goes to our studio and practices a set of our own directives. This daily work is an offering to others while remaining a

personal mission and a private devotion. Our actions are individually designed but, in their uniqueness, strike a resemblance

to those of others:

We put in hours.

We make a habit of observing the world with compassion and appreciation.

We honour the imagination.

We sign our name to our craft.

We’re sensitive to input and output.

We go to our room to cultivate ideas on a solo path.

We know we’re not alone.

The Painter’s Keys - Robert Genn

Jim Carrey’s dad was a struggling accountant who dreamed of being a comedian. The lessons he offered young Jim included the

power of playfulness and the idea that you can fail at what you don’t want, so you might as well take a chance on doing what

you love. Early on, Jim realized he was his dad’s second chance at an impossible dream, so he devoted his life to the mission he

was born to carry. In 2012, at the age of 50, Jim Carrey took up painting and opened his first solo show in Palm Springs. “The

purpose of art,” he wrote in his artist statement, “is to bring people into presence.”

Sincerely,

Sara

PS: “All there will ever be is what’s happening here. Decisions we make in this moment are based in either love or fear. So many

of us choose our path out of fear, disguised as practicality.” (Jim Carrey)

“My father used to brag that I wasn’t a ham, I was the whole pig.” (Jim Carrey)

Esoterica: Growing up in our house, we would see some early original lithographic drawings hanging in the hallway near our

bedrooms -- fast, loose sketches filled with casual élan. One in particular is of a little girl in knee socks. She’s drawn twice on

the same page -- a quick exercise, and then a second sketch -- a second chance at crafty effortlessness. In the lower right hand

corner is a small, hand-lettered bit of text. It reads: “Love something Serve it.” And underneath is my Dad’s signature.

“How will you serve the world What do they need that you can provide The effect you have on others is the most valuable

currency there is.” (Jim Carrey)

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“Seagrasses #1, Cape May.” © 2011 Robert Hopkins

Robert Hopkins

Photography

roberthopkins.artspan.com

Email: rchopkins@optonline.net


“Dune Fence” © 2000 Robert Hopkins

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Michal

Ashkenasi

Photography

AS

Flow 3

michalsart.com


HKENASI

Enhanced Photography

Abstract 4

michalsart.com


VL

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Artists to Watch and Collect

Carol Jo Smidt

David Terrar

Jonelle T. McCoy

Vanessa Katz

Russ Mackensen

Visual Language Magazine Featured Artists this month

delve into the beauty of each of the five different artists and

their unique approach to creativity.

Carol Jo Smidt has a strong emphasis on color, design

and drawing in her paintings. Throughout her painting career,

animals have been her major interest. David Terrar

was very influenced by reading about the struggle between

man and water. Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huck Finn,

Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea come to mind. In

his paintings, water represents life. Water is essential for

life. Water is calm and beautiful, or violent and dangerous

with hurricanes and storms. Jonelle T McCoy found a

cathartic release from years of inner strife and turmoil by

painting her passionate emotions using horses on canvas.

The Paso Fino breed she loves deeply connects with her

through their spirit called brio, which is their heart and soul,

and their astonishing beauty and intelligence. Vanessa

Katz found moving from the UK to sunny California brought

the contrast between the dull, grey, cold, rainy days in the

city and the bright sunny color in the desert as dramatic and

was the inspiration to begin painting again after a long absence.

Russ Mackensen spent forty years as an architect

before discovering the joys of Oil Pastels.

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 17


VL Carol Jo Smidt

www.caroljosmidt.com

I was an artist from the age of 4, drawing horses

and other animals. My passion for art continued

with my formal art education beginning at the St.

Paul School of Art through graduate studies at the

Savannah College of Art and Design.

Drawing from my background in graphic design,

I have a strong emphasis on color, design and

drawing in my paintings. Throughout my painting

career, animals have been my major interest.

My paintings are a result of a thoughtful, ongoing,

creative and intuitive process. Creating art

is a spiritual journey. It is somewhat of a surprise

where a painting will lead me. I find that my paintings

are more vivid and saturated than real life. I

see color in a subject and intensify those hues in

a painting. At times, just a title will evolve into a

subject that I need to capture in paint.

One of my goals is to bring honor and respect to

the subjects that I paint. As a creator of art, I want

the viewer to have a positive connection with my

paintings.

Win Place Show

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Running Horses

Stallions Running

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VL David Terrar

www.davidterrar.artspan.com

I was very influenced by reading about the struggle between

man and water. Mark Twain’s The Adventures of

Huck Finn, Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea come

to mind. In my paintings, water represents life. Water is

essential for life. Water is calm and beautiful, or violent

and dangerous with hurricanes and storms.

Just like water, we go through periods of calm beauty, or periods of turmoil and difficulty. Huck Finn

had a raft to carry him down the Mississippi and from one difficulty after another. I believe we all have

a raft or boat to carry us through the difficulties and beauties of life. We may call it a family, a career,

religion, whatever it is, it’s there to help us get through life. Many of my paintings are of Chesapeake

Bay work boats, some are old and rickety and barely seaworthy. The boats represent the lifelong struggle

to go out on the water, day after day against the water, rain, and brutal sun to put food on the table

and support a family. My paintings memorialize the story of their struggle.

Chesapeake Bay Work Boats,Tilghman

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Quiet January at Blackwater Marsh, Maryland

Kent Island Narrows, Maryland

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VL Jonelle T. McCoy

http://www.jonellemccoy.com

“There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside

of a man.”

Winston Churchill

For Oklahoma woman artist Jonelle T. McCoy this famous quote rings

quite true. Jonelle has found a cathartic release from years of inner strife and

turmoil by painting her passionate emotions using horses on canvas. The Paso Fino breed she loves deeply

connects with her through their spirit called brio, which is their heart and soul, and their astonishing beauty

and intelligence. They give her the inspiration to breathe life onto canvas with a wide range of emotion

through the use of expressive poses in movement alongside color for mood.

Jonelle is a self taught artist whose professional life began with becoming a scenic artist since 1987. She

retired in April 2014 to pursuing her career in fine art full time. She had always been artistic and could be

found creating from early childhood. Five months after getting married in 2001 her husband’s disabling work

injury caused the already emotionally complex artist to sink into a decade long spiral where her personal art

suffered, and she laid down her brushes. She continued to work in the scenic arts, but that was using her talents

for someone else’s ideas, not hers. In December of 2009 the blockage was released, her muse returned

and she started to paint in earnest, at first rediscovering what she could do, and then after experimentation

of a childhood art school project memory she developed her signature line style which has changed, evolved

and refined in the last few years. Her chosen medium, heavy bodied acrylic paint, allows her further discovery

with the introduction of new types, soft body, liquid, high flow and spray paint. She is giving thought to eventually

trying oils again in the near future.

Jonelle is a generous person at heart, and enjoys the reward of giving when she can, and her art has been

her biggest way to do so. She’s donated to individuals, organizations and horse rescue efforts from the sale of

paintings. She found that the small sized 60 day series she creates annually to help raise money for donation

has given her a fantastic challenge to push for new ideas, and some have become studies for larger works.

Perigee Moon 36x36x1.5

Perihelion Sun 36x36x1.5

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http://mccoysgaitedhorseartworks.com

Break Free 18x24

Jonelle feels that the painting of the horses has opened her life back up in a whole new way- connecting

her with her inner self and clearing out the old stale distressing vibes and replacing them with a

positive outlook and the ability to focus these emotions more easily to find peace in life. Like the antsy

horse who’s been cooped up in a stall ready to fly out into the pasture to revel in life and release energy,

she is ready to continue her quest to climb ever higher, excelling, stretching, exploring and evolving

her art to be even more powerfully expressive to the viewer.

Zero to 60

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VL Vanessa Katz

http://www.VanessaKatzArt.com

Vanessa Katz moved from London, England to the desert in Southern California with her husband,

daughter and doggies sixteen years ago. The contrast between the dull, grey, cold, rainy days in the

city and the bright sunny color in the desert was dramatic and was the inspiration to begin painting

again after a long absence.

“The sunshine makes everything look so vibrant and alive and makes me feel that way too!” Trees,

landscapes, animals and everyday life provide her with a wealth of subject matter and abstraction and

contemporary non-representational work gives her the freedom to create purely from her imagination

and emotions.

“I hope to evoke emotion and a stirring of the heart through my work and when my collectors let me

know this is their experience, it fills my heart with joy knowing how art can connect and nourish us at

such a deep level”.

Vanessa attended Putney School of Art in London and still attends many workshops to learn new

techniques from other artists. She finds the process of learning while experimenting creates much

excitement and is very empowering.

Vanessa invites you to visit her website and her very active Facebook page and looks forward to seeing

you there.

Destination

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Desert Sand


Aria

Azure

Desire 1 Desire 2

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 25


VL

Russ Mackensen

http://rmackensenfineart.com/

Having worked as an Architect for over 40 years I produced a lot of drawings and renderings of projects,

but was not involved in fine art. Yet I have been “seeing” projects in lights and darks, texture, composition,

movement and color. All these elements of architecture are the same ones that artists apply to their works.

In 2009 I decided to try Oil Pastels. A drawing medium that allows my mind to naturally transfer what I “see”

onto the ground I’m working on. I soon discovered this was a medium not too well known or understood.

An application of pure pigment in stick form, similar to Dry Pastels. They are relatively new in the art world

being developed as a fine art medium for Picaso in the 50’s.

My approach to creating realism in my work is seldom attempted due to its difficulty. With a limited palette

of colors to work from the direct application of one color is not viable. Working on 400 grit sandpaper everything

is mixed right on the final location, so any mistakes are not easily repaired.

In my life and my art I strive to give praise to the Creator of all who forgives my mistakes and allows me to

share the beauty I see with those who view my art.

A Blue Plate Special

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My Cup Runneth Over

Rose 1

Cosmos in Glorious Light

Copper Pomegranates & Oranges

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Roseanne Snyder

Contemporary Landscapes

West Texas Spring – 16 x 20

roseannesnyder.blogspot.com


Resilience

D A L T O N

Judy Wilder Dalton

Contemporary Fine Art

Finding Art in Life and Life in Art

judywilderdalton.com

wilderartist.blogspot.com


Tuesday’s Bouquet

Abstract Collage Paintings

laurareed.artspan.com


Laura Reed

Life Experiences

A Bouquet for Monday

laurareed.artspan.com


Carolyn Burger

"Painting the beauty of Southwest Florida."

CarolynBurger.com


VL REES

Contemporary Realism and Beyond

Below Lake Johnson 12 x 16 inches Oil

www.vlrees.com

www.TippingPaintGallery.com


Aspen S P A C E S

Lelija Roy www.lelija.net aspen.spaces@gmail.com


STEPHANIE PAIGE

Contemporay Artist

Stephanie Paige

La Jolla . Santa Fe . San Diego . Denver . Scottsdale . Napa Valey . Walnut Creek . Lagua Beach

Resting Sky 48” x 48” Mixed Media made with Textured Marble Dust Plaster

Visit Stephanie’s Representing Galleries

NEXT SHOW is at Pippin Contemporary on June 20th 2014

Mirada Fine Art Gallery . Denver, CO. Ph.303-697-9006

Calvin Charles Gallery . Scottsdale, AZ . Ph.480.421.1818

Pippin Contemporary . Santa Fe . Ph.505-795-7476

Contemporary Fine Arts Gallery . La Jolia, CA. Ph.858.551.2010

Christopher Hill Gallery . Napa Valley, CA. Ph. 707.963.0272

STEPHANIEPAIGESTUDIO.COM


Terrye Jammaer Philley

Gulf Coast Artist

Title: Sea Watch

Medium: Oil on 14 x 11 Stretched Canvas

TerryePhilley.com


“For A While Became Forever”

Oil on Canvas 30” x 40”

Allegorical Painting

Sanda Manuila

sandamanuila.artspan.com

36 x 24


Letting the Sunshine In

Valerie Travers

Working in Acrylic, Oil, Pastel, Mixed Media Landscapes,

Seascapes, Abstracts, and Florals

ValerieTravers.com


WILSON

Kathryn Wilson

Contemporary Paintings in Pastel, Oil Pastel and Acrylic

Wind Dancers

artbykathrynwilson.com


discover art . inspire collectors

DAVIS&CO f i n e a r t g a l l e r y

“Summer Nights at the Galleries of Old Town Spring”

Saturday July 12th 5-9 p.m.

Saturday August 2nd 5-9 p.m.

Saturday September 6th 5-9 p.m.

Home is where the art is.

dandcgallery.com


engage discussion . celebrate life

dandcgallery.com

Arturo Samaniego

at Davis&Co


CFAI.co Colors On My Palette

Rae Andrews

http://www.yessy.com/raeandrews

http://www.cfai.co/#!colors-on-my-palette-interview/cy2z

When did you realize you loved art and wanted to be ‘an artist’

I guess I was exposed to art at a very early age, around 5 I think. My mother’s sister was the other professional artist in

my family, although my grandfather (I am told) was also an artist and a poet. My mother was very creative in her own

way as well, she was a professional cake decorator. My sister was also a wonderful draughtsman. So it was all around

me. I spent a lot of my youth with my aunt, Hazel Johnson; she was my greatest influence.

Who has been the greatest influence from your past to mentor you to this career

Well the greatest influence in getting me into this career has to be an Australian artist by the name of Judith White. I

took lessons from her in my early twenties, and subsequently began teaching at her art school in Sydney. She urged me

to go to college and get my art degrees. She also secured a teaching position for me at the Charles Sturt University just

northwest of Sydney (Australia) where I taught for over 25 years in their summer and winter schools.I went on to own

my own art school as a result of this journey.

Who is your mentor today, or another artist you admire and why

Oh that’s an extremely hard question.

I work in all mediums, so admire many artists.I particularly love a free and less disciplined approach to any painting,

no matter what medium.

For each medium my favorites will change, as I said, a hard question to answer.

What is your favorite surface to paint on Describe it if you make it yourself.

This varies with each medium, but paper seems to be my most used substrate.

What brand of paints do you use

Oils are usually varied, Rembrandt, Old Holland,Winsor and Newton to name a few.

Pastels I like Schmincke, Rembrandt, Sennelier, Unison mostly.

Watercolors, usually Winsor and Newton, but I also use Da Vici and Rembrandt.

Do you have a favorite color palette

No not really, I seem to always go for a dramatic contrast with my palettes. Strong warms against cools and visa versa.

For example I love painting with a majority balance of analagous cool colors,with a ‘pop’ of warms.Of course the opposite

with more warms and a ‘pop’ of cool will work too. Value or tonal contrast is another way I achieve this.

What is your favorite color in your closet

Well right now turquoise, or even lime green.

What subject appears the most in your paintings and why

Water. I love movement and drama, water seems to give me great satisfaction to paint.

How often do you paint How many hours a week

I try to paint daily, sometimes life changes that pattern, but mostly I put in at least 30 hours a week.

Read more at http://www.cfai.co/#!colors-on-my-palette-interview/cy2z

42 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Sydney Shoreline

Reflected Glory

Read more at http://www.cfai.co/#!colors-on-my-palette-interview/cy2z

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 43


ROD SEELEY

Unique Award Winning Digital Art

Digital Art & Digital Fractal Art, mixed technique frequently

enchanced with digital paint technique.


RodSeeleyArt.com


Collectors Discover New Art Daily.

International Voices - Speaking Through Art

Professional Artists - Join the CFAI Family.

Membership Includes:

• Personal Coaching on Individual Art Marketing Strategies

• Heavy Brand Marketing of CFAI.co Member Artists

• Promotion of Artist’s Work on Multiple Social Media Sites

• Promotion of Artist’s Events and Workshops

• Professional Gallery Page on the CFAI.co Website

• Over 100 Specialty Art Blogs to Choose From

• Monthly Artists Showdowns Free for Members

• Quarterly Juried Competitions at a Discounted Rate

• Eligibility for Inclusion in the Annual Collectors Book

http://www.cfai.co


KENNY

Simon Kenny

Into the Breach

As Tomorrow Falls

simonkenny.artweb.com

Email: simonkenny@eskayfineart.co.uk


CHAPMAN

Elizabeth Chapman

Contemporary Abstract Artist

melizabethchapman.artspan.com


“I Have Stepped into the River...”

Victoria Pendragon

www.victoriapendragon.com


goldenkstudio.com


Cindy Sorley-Keichinger

Wildlife & Nature Artist

Golden K Studio

goldenkstudio.com

email: goldfarm@telusplanet.net

Conflict of Interest – 16x16 Acrylic


www.williambeebe.com


VL

William Beebe

www.williambeebe.com


VL

Studio Visit William Beebe

A Creative Realist

Art has always been in my blood, but I took a circuitous

route in becoming a full-time professional artist.

In my junior year of college I signed up for a portrait

painting class hoping to improve my GPA. Up until

then my life had been all about sports. I had always

been a doodler though, drawing in pencil and seeing

the world in black and white. The thought of being an

artist never crossed my mind until I discovered the

world of oil painting. My portrait-painting teacher that

semester greatly encouraged me and the seed was

planted!

After graduating from the University of Maryland with

a Studio/Fine Art degree the pragmatic side of me

took over. I was 23 years old, newly married and living

in the suburbs of Washington, DC. I couldn’t find

a job in art because I didn’t study graphic arts. I found

myself working as a bookkeeper and then back at the

U. of MD for my second degree in Accounting. Then

I spent a year in tax accounting followed by several

years as an accountant in private industry. I never felt

like it was my destiny.

In the meantime, my father died suddenly from cancer

as my mother was fighting her own long battle with

cancer. My father was the one who had told me to do

what makes me happy. My mother was the one who

took me to art galleries and saved my drawings. They

were giving me the gift of developing a life compass. I

was now at a crossroads and that inner compass was

pointing me in a new direction.

My wife, Jen, and I decided to take a much-needed

vacation to Maine and it was there that I became inspired

to paint! I came home from that special trip

and painted a schooner docked in Boothbay Harbor.

I started painting more, dreaming of living in Maine

and painting as a vocation. Before long we decided

to take a leap of faith.

Now I find myself looking back on 24 years of being

a full-time artist. I appreciate every day of “going to

work” and am extremely grateful to have been able to

pursue my passion of painting for a living.

The Maine paintings I produced early on ranged from

lighthouses, to working waterman scenes, to the

small coastal fishing villages and islands. My work

attracted the attention of Mr. Charles Cawley, an avid

art collector and the CEO of MBNA, an international

credit card company. He started collecting my work

and eventually hired me to become the resident artist

for MBNA!

For nine wonderful years I had the honor of having

my paintings featured on the cover of MBNA’s quarterly

reports. Along with paintings of their many office

buildings around the world, they encouraged me to

continue painting Maine scenes for their collection.

Over time I became more narrowly focused on capturing

the beauty of the Maine Windjammer fleet.

Hundreds of schooners used to work the Maine waters,

hauling lumber and limestone. I was intrigued by

how few of them are left and saddened by the thought

that someday they will be gone. Each ship has a long

history, some dating over one hundred years!

Many hours of painting in the smallest of details were

spent on each ship. I wanted to pay tribute to each

ship by recording an accurate interpretation of it on

canvas to hopefully last for another hundred years.

My maritime paintings have been exhibited in numerous

gallery and museum shows throughout the years

including the Farnsworth Art Museum in Rockland,

ME and at the Coos Art Museum in Coos Bay, OR,

where I won a Merit award in the 12th Annual Maritime

Art Exhibition. Additionally my work has been a

part of several Marine Masters Exhibitions in Mystic,

CT and Thomaston, ME and the 26th Annual International

Marine Art Exhibition at the Maritime Gallery at

Mystic Seaport.

www.williambeebe.com

54 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


“I consider myself a creative realist, using touches of impressionism to go beyond representation.

Achieving a painterly work is a high priority. I try to approach each new work with fresh eyes, allowing

myself moments of spontaneity in the painting process and appreciating it when the paint

surprises me.”

Taber on a Reach, 24x24, oil on board - SOLD

www.williambeebe.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 55


VL

Studio Visit William Beebe

When we moved to Virginia in 2002, I was a little concerned

that I might have trouble finding that same

passion for painting that I found in Maine.

Then one day I heard that the state of Virginia had built

a replica of an historic wooden pilot schooner named

Schooner Virginia. After doing a little research I found

out that it was going to be docked in Portsmouth, VA.

When I walked up the dock and saw the Virginia for

the first time I was taken aback. The tall ship with its

beautiful black shiny hull and gold engraved letters on

the bow spelling VIRGINIA had grandeur to it. I took

hundreds of detail pictures that day in Portsmouth.

I had found new inspiration and immediately started

planning a series of paintings featuring the Schooner

Virginia.

Every year there is a Great Chesapeake Bay Schooner

Race that begins in Annapolis, MD at the Bay

Bridge and continues on down the Bay. I witnessed

and photographed the Virginia and the Pride of Baltimore

II in a nose-to-nose race under ideal sailing

conditions. It was a powerful moment for me.

During that race I also photographed the Pride of Baltimore

II, the Lettie G. Howard out of New York, and

other smaller schooners, which sail the waters of the

Chesapeake.

My first painting of the Virginia was a large commissioned

piece featuring the tall ship cutting through

the dark water with speed and grace. I was honored

when approached by the folks at the Schooner Virginia

to have reproduction giclee prints made from

this painting to help with their annual fundraiser. We

worked closely with the Mariners’ Museum in Newport

News, VA to produce these quality prints.

Subsequently, I completed four more Schooner Virginia

paintings in competitive races with sister ships

to complete my series.

I’ve discovered that like art, a need to be near the

water is in my blood. Being able to combine the two

callings as a maritime artist has turned out to be a

dream come true!

The Victory Chimes, 20x30, oil on board

www.williambeebe.com

56 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Leading the Way, 20x24, oil on board

www.williambeebe.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 57


VL

Studio Visit William Beebe

Storm Approaching, 24x36, oil on board

Offshore Challenge, 24x28, oil on board

www.williambeebe.com

58 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


A Spirited Race, 18x24, oil on board

On the Wind, 24x36, oil on board

www.williambeebe.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 59


VL

Studio Visit William Beebe

www.williambeebe.com

60 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


The Virginia, 30x40, oil on board - SOLD

www.williambeebe.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 61


lorado Homes & Lifestyles

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32” x 48”; Larisa Aukon, ‘Continental Divide’ - Original Oil on Panel 24” x 36”;

; Dominique Samyn, ‘Sage’- Acryilc & Venetian Plaster on Panel, 40” x 32”;

n Wynn, ‘Joy Ride’ - Mixed Media Sculpture, 26” x 32” x 9”


Coastal Wildflowers

Eric Bodtker

ericbodtker.com

Davis&CO

dandcgallery.com


Connie Chadwell

ConnieChadwell.com

HackberryStreetStudio.blogspot.com


www.valariewolf.com

www.zebrajazzstudio.com

Lauriepace.com

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sts.com www.BarbYoungPhotography.com www.mindycolton.com


VL VL

Valerie Travers

Treasured Island

With water on all sides,

Valerie Travers stays connected.

by Dave Justus

http://www.valerietravers.com

68 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


http://www.valerietravers.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 69


VL Artspan Studio Visit Valerie Travers

“I work standing up, since I paint almost exclusively

on canvas,” Valerie Travers says, describing

her artistic process. “But then, I hardly sit

down in the course of a day in any case. Once

I’m absorbed and a painting is going well, I lose

all sense of time. I tend to keep going until I drop!”

Travers can trace that tenacity back more than

five hundred years, through a family tree that took

root in Guernsey, a tiny island off the coast of

Normandy, in the 1400s. A bailiwick of the British

Crown, the land covers barely 30 square miles

floating in the English Channel, but it has provided

all the foundation Travers needed to become

the artist, and the person, she is today.

“I have always loved water,” she says—little wonder,

as it surrounds her on all sides. From growing

up on the island, she believes, “my love of the

sea is firmly embedded in my very being, and in

my work. As a child I spent the summer on the

beach, swimming and making sandcastles with

moats, trying desperately to stop the walls from

crumbling when the tide rushed in.”

Those toppling sandcastles were an early bellwether

for what awaited her when she first moved

into her current house on Guernsey. “I am living

in my Great Aunt Alice’s home,” she notes. Travers

bought the fixer-upper from family, feeling a

connection to the homestead, and has lived there

more than 28 years. “I was very close to Auntie

Alice. She adored animals, loved her garden, and

was a dressmaker by trade… we just fitted together

so well. So being here means such a lot to

me, and I know that she is pleased I’m here, looking

after things as she would wish and making it

into the home it is today.”

The house, and the island itself, seems imbued

with the long family history that has shaped Travers

and her work. “I have the old values and the

sense of belonging to this island, and always will,”

she says. From far back, her family had always

been growers, farmers, and fishermen, living

off the food they caught or cultivated. Her great

grandfather was once awarded a cup for a prize

cow by no less a luminary than Queen Mary.

http://www.valerietravers.com

70 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com

After the war, her RAF veteran father wed her

mother and bought a home with greenhouses.

“It was a hard life,” she recalls. “They worked all

hours, as all of my relatives did, but the fun they

had and the laughs they shared I will always remember.

Hard work doesn’t mean hardship, does

it Sometimes, the simple life is the best.”

The family penchant for hard work pushed her to

excel in her studies, attend night school for shorthand

and typing, and try her hand at a variety of

careers, from surgeon’s P.A. to a secretary for a

legal firm and the police force. “But there was always

something missing,” she says. “I knew I was

not totally fulfilled.” Her childhood creativity—explorations

into art, music, crafts, equestrianism,

and other activities—had not yet found a way to

bloom through the concrete of adult life.

Perhaps it was her lifelong love of the water that

first prodded her to dab a brush into watercolors.

“It was a ‘Eureka’ moment,” she says of the occasion,

now more than two decades past, when

she first took up painting seriously. “I had found

the missing link at last. I fitted it in between looking

after my children and running the home, and

always found time to pick up a brush, even if it

meant starting my day an hour earlier.”

When watercolors began to lose their luster, she

moved on to oils, which she still employs enthusiastically.

Though not initially enamored of pastels,

she later gave them another chance and found

that they were the perfect tool for capturing the

images and emotions she wanted to express on

the canvas. While she currently focuses on acrylics

and oils, she is quick to point out that every

medium has its advantages

“I believe that artists reach for colors intuitively,”

she says of selecting her tools. “In my opinion,

being self-taught has allowed my expression to

come through at a steady pace and gradually develop

into my own personal style.” Though she

feels she is still developing as an artist, she notes,

“I do enjoy painting a variety of subjects, but there

is a definite leaning toward certain colors and the

way I apply paint.”.

Right: Stairway to Heaven


http://www.valerietravers.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 71


VL Artspan Studio Visit Valerie Travers

Gently Receding

http://www.valerietravers.com

72 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Leafy Entanglement

http://www.valerietravers.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 73


VL Artspan Studio Visit Valerie Travers

Rushing In

Symphony in Blue

http://www.valerietravers.com

74 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Travers shares her studio space with a rescue

dog, Truffles, as well as three cats who occasionally

check on her progress. Though she sometimes

paints with mood music, often she will let

herself be inspired by the sounds of Guernsey

itself: rustling trees and singing birds. The cumulative

effect is a sense of peace in the room that

finds its way into her art.

“Paintings often appear out of nowhere,” she

says. “I just pick up a brush and see what develops.

Occasionally I choose to paint a particular

scene that has captured my imagination,

but even then I allow myself artistic license to

change parts of the piece if necessary.” Over

time, as her style has developed and changed,

Travers has managed to surprise even herself.

“For the past two years or so, I have felt the need

to paint abstracts. If anyone had told me that I

would be an abstract artist, I would have said

that was the furthest thing from my mind. But I

enjoy the process so much; it’s totally liberating

and releasing. So here I am today, painting abstracts

alongside my seas and skies.”

Travers’ star continues to rise in the art world,

with Best in Show awards both locally and internationally,

along with representation from Davis

& Co. Fine Art Gallery in Houston, Texas. Even

so, back on Guernsey, she does what her family

has always done, working hard and living life

as simply as she can, raising her two sons on

the same beaches where she once left her footprints,

refining her art and discovering who she

is.

Even on a tiny island, Valerie Travers has plenty

of exploring left to do.

Valerie’s Great Grandfather with Queen Mary

http://www.valerietravers.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 75


VL Artspan Studio Visit Valerie Travers

Fresh as a Daisy 20 x 20

Letting the Sunshine In

http://www.valerietravers.com

76 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


http://www.valerietravers.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 77


VL

Artspan Studio Visit Valerie Travers

Glowing

Evening Flight

http://www.valerietravers.com

78 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Beneath the Surface

Deep Within 30 x 40

http://www.valerietravers.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 79


DORON

MELISSA DAVIS DORON

Melissa Davis Doron captures the bold of life and the subtle nuances of nature.

www.artistdoron.com

Davis&CO

DandCgallery.com


JANINE KILTY

“Tryst” Oil on canvas 40” x 30”

www.janinekilty.com


Natural Art for the Nature Lover in You!

The Little Red Barn” Acrylic, 16x20 Unframed

Terri Holland

terrihollandartstudio.weebly.com


Linda McCoy

Title: Sunset and Vine, Sonoma County

Linda McCoy Gallery and Fine Art Instruction

209 S West Street, Mason, Ohio

www.lindamccoyart.blogspot.com

Email: lindamccoyart@live.com

clairebullfineart.com

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/claire-bull.html


Cloud Canyon

http://dawnwatersbaker.com/


VL

Dawn Waters Baker

http://dawnwatersbaker.com/


VL Studio Visit Dawn Waters Baker

Dawn feels like her first language was beauty. That was

how her heart was stirred to art. Born and raised a missionary

kid she learned to look for it in the cracks and

crevices of lives much harder then her own. In college,

she learned how to find her own way to express her

heart through painting. Dawn’s husband is a gentle gift

who likes quiet as much as she does. They have three

kids and with them the quiet left. It birthed a joy found

in working on what’s important and striving for love in

all things.

She likes to think of her work as a “glimpse of the mystery.”

The metaphors of life held in branches, cloud

wisps and water. There is something that compels

Dawn to paint, not what is literally seen but what is felt.

For her, the window into the spiritual is nature. It seems

to be the image that she is invited to pass through into

something much richer and deeper and full of beauty.

Her art is collected by many businesses as well as private

owners. Some of which are: Dallas Theological

Seminary, Dallas Eye Care Associates, Dallas Baptist

University, She currently finished five original drawings

for the book, “Why, O God” published by Crossway

books. She is a member of Artists of Texas. Dawn is

affiliated with Mary Tomas Gallery in Dallas Design

District, Smith Klein Gallery in Boulder, Colorado and

currently with the summer group exhibit at White Stone

Gallery in Philadelphia, PA. Her work has been in National

shows including The National Weather Biennale,

CIVA Contemporary Images of Mary and Ex Nihilo at

Roberts Wesleyan College. Her work is available internationally

through Veritasse based in London, England.

http://dawnwatersbaker.com/

86 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Enchanted Tree

http://dawnwatersbaker.com/

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 87


VL Studio Visit Dawn Waters Baker

Misty Mountain

http://dawnwatersbaker.com/

88 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


To the Lowest Place

http://dawnwatersbaker.com/

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 89


VL Studio Visit Dawn Waters Baker

Rise

http://dawnwatersbaker.com/

90 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


John 1

http://dawnwatersbaker.com/

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 91


www.foundworlds.com


Denise Bossarte

Found Worlds Photography

www.foundworlds.com


BAUER

Logan Bauer

LoganBauer.com


LoganBauer.com

BAUER

Logan Bauer


Howard Tweedie

A Passion for Plein Air

www.howardtweedie.com

Right Page: “Wharf on Sydney Harbour”

Left Page: “Argenton, Early Spring”


HowardTweedie.com


VL Hall Groat II

Learning to See Takes Practice

By Hall Groat Sr.

When you look at the great paintings of the world,

it`s a good idea to know how the artist has led your

eye around his work. This is especially important

for an artist who is studying how to make better

art. One artist’s work that comes to mind is Rembrandt,

and especially his portraits. It’s fun to watch

people gazing upon the masters and listening to

their comments. A great portrait painter captures

your eye through his ability to lead you through his

composition. It’s a good idea to know how an artist

captures your attention with his work because

it may heighten your appreciation and enable you

to discriminate between greatness and mediocrity.

There are many books that diagram composition

and it may be a good idea to study them before you

visit an art museum. This is especially important if

you are a student in art school.

A t the price of altering one’s notion of the grandeur

found in a great portraits painted by Rembrandt,

let me share comments that are commonly heard

from the general public at the National Gallery of

Art in Washington , D. C., as visitors marvel at the

portraits: “I love the way he paints the eyes of his

subject.”, “ I just can’t stop staring at the expression

on the old gentleman’s face in the portrait.”, “

He certainly captures the spirit of his subjects and

my eyes are drawn to the face and the expression

in his eyes.”, “ She is such a beautiful woman in

this Rembrandt portrait—I can see her spirit in her

eyes.“

How your eye is led to the center of interest in

the painting is worth understanding and may take

study. It is a good idea to look at other parts of a

great painting and attempt to discover what has

brought your attention to this final crescendo—that

tiny highlight in the eye that captures the viewer.

And you better know why—especially if you are an

art student.

Rembrandt van Rijn was born in 1606 in Leiden.

He never traveled more than sixty miles from Amsterdam

and judging by his thousands of drawings,

etchings and countless paintings and self- portraits,

he would not have had time. He was an artist who

was dedicated and considered the greatest in history.

Sorry Vermeer, but he produced much more

art than you. They are two of my favorite painters in

history. After visiting Art museums all over Europe,

I can think of no other artists greater than these two

Dutchmen. I am proud to have at least one small

Rembrandt etching in my collection. Vermeer was

less prolific than Rembrandt, although arguably the

best in the opinion of some art critics.

My wife Rosemarie and I traveled the world visiting

every major museum that we could possibly

take in. It was our hobby, and she being an educator,

always read the titles and descriptions of

each piece of art. As aforementioned in my “early

years”, I am a lazy reader. I just studied the pictures

and never took as much interest in what was written

beneath the art. She read everything available

on every subject. Later in life, she recommended

books for me as “mandatory reading.” Although I

enjoyed them all, I always seemed to look at the

pictures first. I suppose that would be my natural

inclination. I do not read novels, but love history

and anthropology. I consider myself a victim of the

age of specialization, although I was characterized

by the late Anna Olmstead, who wrote the art review

for The Post Standard for many years as “a

peripatetic painter”. She had me dead to rights in

that review. I believe artist Jan De Ruth was aware

of my jumping from one subject matter to another in

my art as well. Historians dislike artists who do not

work in series, as they are harder to write about. To

hell with conformity!

In studying art in museums, my son Hall II and I

took the Amtrak to Chicago one year to review the

work at the Institute and other galleries. We enjoyed

the Peter Paul Ruben’s and we discussed his

use of color to great extent. How to make Ruben’s

red is a mystery and perhaps a lost art. I was surprised

to see works by Ivan Albright whose work

was used for the first movie I saw as a kid—”The

Picture of Dorian Gray”. He was one wacky artist

that I will never forget, with his ghoulish portraits.

This was the first movie performance for actress

Angela Lansbury, an academy award winner.

http://hallgroat.com

98 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Monhegan-Island-Maine-23x36-By-Hall-Groat-Sr.

We did Chicago on foot and took in the highlights,

but returned to the Institute and went through the

collection a second time. The guard said, “You guys

do not need another ticket—glad to see you back.”

We met David Hockney who was preparing for his

one man show on this viewing. On our return trip to

Syracuse my son ran into an old classmate and we

had a great beer party on Amtrak. Learning to see

is an ongoing dedication for an artist, and being on

a railroad while studying industrial complexes along

the way provides one of my favorite subjects to paint.

On one of our three trips to the U. K., my wife and I

went through the National Portrait Museum, The British

Museum and several others. However, it was the

contemporary German painter, Lucian Freud whose

work stays with me the longest. He is the grandson

of Sigmund Freud, and perhaps that explains his

sex-crazed subject matter. In my humble opinion,

Lucian Freud is the best living figure painter in the

world. The visceral quality in his brushwork is loaded

with emotion and the stark nakedness of his subjects

can only be excused by his tremendous power as a

painter. I’m still learning to see, and studying art is an

ongoing passion for a working artist.

http://hallgroat.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 99


VL artspan.com

Carol Engles carolengles.artspan.com

100 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


The Perfect Place to Find Art

Carol Engles

carolengles.artspan.com


Laurie Justus Pace

LauriePace.com


The Painted Pony On The Lamb

32 x 48 Oil on Canvas

http://www.robertkellyhomegallery.com/


Kyle Wood

kwoodfineart.com

104 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com

kylewoodfineart.blogspot.com


kwoodfineart.com

"Beyond The Gate II"

18" x 24" Oil on Canvas


Barbara Haviland

“Living and Painting Life”

Gus the Pelican 12 x 9 Oil

George Ranch 11 x 14 Oil

BarbaraHavilandFineArt.com


Living near the coast in Southeast Texas, Barbara Haviland enjoys

the diversity of the land and it’s habitation. A reknowned Floral Artist, Barbara

has opened her paintings to capture the flavor of the coast.

PB Lighthouse 12 x 9

Nat’s Amaryllis 12 x 9 Oil

BarbaraHavilandFineArt.com


VL

Artspan Spotlight Jean Howard

ARTSPAN Artist Spotlight

When did you realize you loved art and wanted to be an artist

I don’t remember exactly when I first wanted to be an artist.

Who has been your mentor, or greatest influence to date

My father was an architect and did some watercolor renderings of his projects. I think that I always

drawing. When I was 13 he gave me some art books and about that time I knew that I wanted to be an

artist. He was my greatest mentor.

Who is another living artist you admire and why

The artists that I admire are Richard Diebenkorn and Hans Halls. I know that they are dead but I am not

influenced as much by today’s artists.

What is your favorite surface to create work on or to work with Describe it if you make it yourself.

I like to work on handmade watercolor paper when I do watercolors and canvas for oils..

How often do you work on your artwork

I work in chunks, solid for awhile and then NOT for

awhile.

What are your inspirations for your work

I am inspired by things that I see, sometimes

unexpectedly.

Yellow Rock, 40”x40”

108 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


St. Ives #6, 48”x48”

St. Ives #3. 36” x 36”

Mexico Rocks, 40”x 40”

http://www.jeanhoward1.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 109


VL

Artspan Spotlight Jean Howard

ARTSPAN Artist Spotlight

Ocean Sky 1, 40”x 40”

http://www.jeanhoward1.com

110 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Laguna Beach Overlook # III, 40”x 40”

http://www.jeanhoward1.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 111


VL

Artspan Spotlight Jean Howard

ARTSPAN Artist Spotlight

Getting to know you Q&A

What is your favorite color in your closet I don’t have a favorite color. I thought about this

question a lot. I am more interested in a relationship between colors. My closet reflects this also.

What book are you reading this week I am reading “behind the beautiful forevers” by Katherine

Boo.

What is your favorite food I love lobster.

What color sheets are on your bed right now My sheets are beige.

Do you have a passion or hobby other than painting What is it My other interests include

gardening and duplicate bridge.

If you were an animal, what would you be and why I would like to be a seagull to fly around the

banks of the ocean.

Who would you love to paint

I love to paint the Ocean

Share something with us that few people know about you.

I am a very private person.

If you could live anywhere in the world, where would you live I would love to live in

Laguna Beach.

http://www.jeanhoward1.com

112 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Velvet Evening, 48” x 48”

Big Black Rock, 48”x 48”

http://www.jeanhoward1.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 113


VL

Walla Walla Valley Photography

Brian Bennett


VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 115


VL Washington Photographer Brian Bennett

https://www.facebook.com/WallaWallaValleyPhotography

Walla Walla Valley Photography

Brian Bennett of Walla Walla Valley Photography

got his start behind the lens when his deaf mother

became ill. With complications including a choclear

ear transplant, pancreatitus and a stroke all at once,

Brian saw only one way to reach his mother.

“She was so far gone after the stroke we didn’t know

if she would ever be able to respond to us again.”Brian

stated in a brief interview with our publishers.

Brian started taking photo’s of things his mother was

familiar with, brought the photo’s to her bedside and

then shared the stories that his mother once shared

with him adding his own spin on the story testing to

trigger a reaction from her.

“I recall being at the point where you just want to

through your hands up in the air and give up, but

then it happened”.

After a long struggle at trying to get his mother to respond,

suddenly one day she sat up in bed, looked

dirrectly at Brian and said “THAT’S NOT WHAT

HAPPENED”.

Brian now uses his photography skills to bring familiar

photo’s to those who cannot go out and see

for themselves. “Some are sick, some elderly, some

crippled up, some have just moved away and are

still curious to see the old places in the Walla Walla

Valley.

You can visit Brian’s page on Facebook and see

over 2000 images shot with his Canon 60D.

Brian still cares for his mother who is now doing well

in an assisted living home in the Walla Walla Valley.

He can be found gardening or in most cases doing

what he loves, taking pictures.

116 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


https://www.facebook.com/WallaWallaValleyPhotography

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 117


VL Washington Photographer Brian Bennett

https://www.facebook.com/WallaWallaValleyPhotography

118 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


https://www.facebook.com/WallaWallaValleyPhotography

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 119


Kimberly Conrad

“Pouring Color Into Your Life”

CoastalLivingArt.com

Days of Summer 36”x48”x1.5”

Poured Acrylic on Canvas


CoastalLivingArt.com


CFAI.co Juried Show

CFAI.co Spring 2014

Figurative Juried Competition

First Place

Linda Popple

Vintage Swimsuit

http://lindapopple.fineartstudioonline.com

http://www.cfai.co/#!show-winners/cyep

122 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Second Place

Carol Smith Myer

Heidi

http://www.carolmyer.com

http://www.cfai.co/#!show-winners/cyep

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 123


CFAI.co Juried Show

CFAI.co Spring 2014

Figurative Juried Competition

Third Place

Bob Shepherd

Cold Shoulder

http://portraitsbyshep.com

http://www.cfai.co/#!show-winners/cyep

124 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Honorable Mentions

Cheryl Smith - Skye

Sally Fraser - Down the Mountain

Carmen Beecher - Train to Firenze

Linda Dalton Walker - Spring

http://www.cfai.co/#!show-winners/cyep

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 125


Mary Jo Zorad

contemporary fine art


ZoradArt.com


DAILY PAINTERS ABSTRACT GALLERY

“Thankful” 36”x48”x2.0” Oil on Canvas

DailyPaintersAbstract.blogspot.com


DailyPaintersAbstract.blogspot.com

Barbara Van Rooyan Blue Canyon II

Dawn Reinfeld

DAILY PAINTERS ABSTRACT GALLERY

DailyPaintersAbstract.blogspot.com


CFAI.co Artist Showdown

CFAI.co Artist Showdown

May 2014 - Maritime and Seascape Art

http://www.cfai.co/#!showdown-winners/cb0j

First Place

Rae Andrews

Sydney Shoreline (First Place Entry - Right Page)

http://www.yessy.com/raeandrews

Left Page : Reflected Glory

130 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


http://www.cfai.co/#!showdown-winners/cb0j

Well Traveled

http://www.cfai.co/#!showdown-winners/cb0j

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 131


CFAI.co Artist Showdown

http://www.cfai.co/#!showdown-winners/cb0j

Second Place

Anton Zhou

Lisbon Lakeshore

http://www.antonzhouartwork.com

132 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


http://www.cfai.co/#!showdown-winners/cb0j

Third Place

Sharon Sieben

Sail Away VIII

http://sharonsieben.com

http://www.cfai.co/#!showdown-winners/cb0j

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 133


DianeWhitehead.com


Diane

Whitehead

“Animals are my muse. The scratch

of the paw, pounce of a hoof, gesture

of the head, alert ear, quiet stride,

powerful shape, ancient wisdom.

All come to play with the shapes I see

as I paint. “

DianeWhitehead.com

DianeWhitehead.com


Lary Lemons

theartgallerysaintjo.com


theartgallerysaintjo.com


CFAI.co July Artist Showdown

“Do you have what it takes”

Barbara Haviland

“Still Life”

www.cfai.co/#!artist-showdown/chic


cfai.co

Summer 2014 Juried Competition

ABSTRACTION

Joan Fullerton

$500 in total cash prizes

Plus much more!

www.cfai.co/#!juried-shows/c19ne


L i s a M c K i n n e y


Lisa-McKinney.com

lisamckinneyfineart.blogspot.com


VL

VL

Photographer Spotlight

John Lomba

www.jglomba.com

142 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


www.jglomba.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 143


VL

Photographer Spotlight Artspan John Lomba

John Lomba Maritime Photography

www.jglomba.com

“My name is John Lomba, and I have the honor and pleasure of being asked once again to

submit some of my favorite maritime-related images to Visual Language Magazine. I was

asked to give a bit more detail about myself, which for me is not so easy to do, as I prefer to

let my images do the talking. As the old saying goes “a picture is worth a thousand words”.

I believe that I am a better photographer than writer, and by the time you finish this brief bio I

expect you will feel the same way! I had also made a submission to the August 2013 publication

for those of you who wish to see my 1st contribution to VL Magazine.

My photography career goes back to the early 1980’s using a 110 Minolta Instamatic and then

waiting 2 weeks for them to be developed, which seemed like an eternity! I recall ‘discovering’

a few blurry shots of my thumb blocking the lens! Not exactly what I had envisioned.

A few years later, I upgraded to 35mm and even set up my own black & white darkroom in

dad’s basement on beautiful Cape Cod. It was around this time when my love of photography

first started to take it’s effect.

After a 4-year stint at a local Maritime college, mixed in with a somewhat brief stint of sailing

on various merchant vessels, I now find myself now living in the greater New York City metropolitan

area after working shore-side at various posts within the maritime field.

In 2010, I had my ‘ah ha’ moment when I realized that my career and interest in the maritime

field could make a seamless marriage with photography as well. Initially a skeptic of digital

photography, and somewhat of a ‘newbie’ in the website world, I am now proud to say I have

my own website (thank you Artspan!) at www.jglomba.com. Please feel free to look around.

Someday, I tell myself and remind Mrs. Lomba as well, I will get that sail boat to take yet more

photos but from a different perspective.

www.jglomba.com

144 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Imagine

www.jglomba.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 145


VL

Photographer Spotlight Artspan John Lomba

Sail

www.jglomba.com

146 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Sandy Hook, NJ

www.jglomba.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 147


VL

Photographer Spotlight Artspan John Lomba

RTC 502

www.jglomba.com

148 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Emelina

USCG Bainbridge

www.jglomba.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 149


VL

Photographer Spotlight Artspan John Lomba

Rake

www.jglomba.com

150 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Sealand Racer

www.jglomba.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 151


Venus 30 x 40

Clay Heji

www.vinod

www.vinodipinte.com

Vino Dipinte Art Gallery

602 Orient St San Angelo, TX 76903


ipinte.com

Celestial 24 x 36

Morgan Grasham

www.vinodipinte.com


KRISTINE KAINER

www.kristinekainer.com

www.kristinekainer.blogspot.com


Texas Art

www.kristinekainer.com

www.kristinekainer.blogspot.com


Artists of Texas

artistsoftexas.org


NO WHERE BUT TEXAS

artistsoftexas.blogspot.com

dailypaintersoftexas.blogspot.com


Debbie Grayson Lincoln

Texas Contemporary Western Illustrator

NoworNever-Debbie.blogspot.com

DebbieLincoln.com


Felicia Marshall

feliciamarshall.blogspot.com


Advertisers

Anton Zhou 132

Artists of Texas 156-157

Barbara Haviland 106-107

Bob Shepherd 124

Brian Bennett 114-119

Carol Engles 100-101

Carol Jo Smidt 8, 9, 18-19

Carol Smith Myer 123

Carolyn Burger 32

CFAI 138-139

Cindy Sorley-Keichinger 50-51

Clay Heji 152

Connie Chadwell 65

Connie Dines 4

David Terrar 20-21

Davis & CO Fine Art Gallery 40-41

Dawn Waters Baker 84-91

Debbie Lincoln 158

Denise Bossarte 92-93

Diane Whitehead 134-135

DPAG 128-129

Elizabeth Chapman 48

Eric Bodtker 64

Felicia Marshall 159

Hall Groat 98-99

Howard Tweedie 96-97

IEA 66-67

Janine Kilty 81

Jean Howard 108-113

John Lomba 142-151

Jonelle T McCoy 22-23

Judy Wilder Dalton 29

Kathryn Wilson Cover, 3, 39

Kimberly Conrad 120-121

Kristine Kainer 154-155

Kyle Wood 104-105

Lady L 161

Laura Reed 30-31

Laurie Pace 102-103

Lelija Roy 34

Linda McCoy 83

Linda Popple 120

Lisa McKinney 140-141

Logan Bauer 94-95

Mary Jo Zorad 126-127

Melissa Doron 80

Michal Ashkenasi 14-15

Mirada Fine Art 62-63

Morgan Grasham 151

Rae Andrews 42-43, 130-131

Robert Hopkins 12-13

Rod Seeley 44-45

Roseanne Snyder 28

Russ Mackensen 26-27

Sanda Manuila 37

Sharon Sieben 133

Simon Kenny 47

Stephanie Paige 35

Terri Holland 82

Terrye Philley 36

The Art Gallery 136-137

Valerie Travers 38, 68-79

Vanessa Katz 24-25

Victoria Pendragon 49

Vino Dipinte 152-153

VL Rees 33

William Beebe 52-61


LADY L

Colors Make Me Smile

ladylart.blogspot.com

ellepace.com/available-work-of-lady-l


http://davethepaintingguy.com/podcast/

162 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com

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