Visual Language Magazine Contemporary Fine Art Vol 4 No 1

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Visual Language Magazine Contemporary Fine Art Vol 4 No 1 Contemporary Modern Art, Abstract Art, Mixed Media and More. Cover Artist Andrew Baird VL Artists to Collect are Vanessa Katz, Valerie Travers and Elaine Vileria, Visual Language Studio Visits with Andy Baird, Sallie-Anne Swift, Slav Krivoshiev, Elizabeth Chapman and Demian Dressler; also included Barry W. Scharf featured writing and more. Visual Language is the common connection around the world for art expressed through every media and process. The artists connect through their creativity to the viewers by both their process as well as their final piece. No interpreters are necessary because Visual Language Magazine crosses all boundaries.

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Visual Language

Andrew Baird

BairdStudios.com

VL

Features: Andrew Baird . Slav Krivoshiev . Sallie-Anne Swift . Demian Dressler . Elizabeth Chapman

January 2015 Volume 4 No. 1

contemporary fine art


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visual language

contemporary fine art

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January 2015 Vol 4 No 1

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Andy Baird . Baird Studios

VL Cover Artist

Portrait Painting

By using abstract expressionist technique to compose the most beautiful female faces, Baird also

reminds us that – while soul may be divine and eternal – even the prettiest face is a secret, minute

world of whirling particles, brought together in aesthetic perfection by Great Mother Nature – and

here enhanced by one of the brightest contemporary artists working in portraiture today.

By combining the unlikely duo of portraiture – which thrives on likenesses and naturalness – with

abstract expressionism – which tries to avoid likenesses and subjects from nature, Andy Baird has

created a new and original hybrid art form: the action-painted portrait. Such originality and invention

by mavericks creates new areas of value in art. Baird is one such genius.

Bairdstudios.com

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Victoria Pendragon

“Flute Song, Moon”

victoriapendragon.artspan.com


content VL

Cover Artist Andrew Baird 3

Andy Baird A different slant on Portrait Painting.

Painter’s Keys - Sara Genn 11

Top Artists to Collect 22

Vanessa Katz, Valerie Travers, Elaine Vileria

The Value of Line Andy Baird 50

I was born in Denver, Colorado. There is a

thing about being a long-time Colorado family,

so I like to point out that I am a fifth-generation

Colorado native. The first Baird came here in

1867. Colorado has always been my home,

and I cannot think of any other place as home.

Sallie-Anne Swift 72

“Do or Die”

“We had purchased a new apartment and I was

wanting to do something special for the entry, so I

decided to do a HUGE 8’ x 6’ painting… this was

definitely going to prove to be one of my biggest

challenges.”

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Who Stole the Fairy Tales Slav Krivoshiev 96

“The hidden metaphors in his compositions challenge the viewer to

look far beyond the surface. His colors and use of texture are metaphors

in their own right. Yet as one stands before his work warily, so

exactly does the allegory in the painting mimic the other reality - is it

the fear one might recognize in a scene expressing a reality kept at

a distance His works intimately connect places and times of familiar

stories and myths with unfamiliar visions.

“A Creative Psychology” 124

By: Barry W. Scharf

Now that we have entered the new year of 2015

I have been contemplating what makes a person

creative and how they arrive at an expressive output.

I often go through thoughts of how I can better

myself and improve my work and a few questions

always come to mind. The why and how of what

makes me an artist.”

“Interview with Elizabeth Chapman” 132

At what age did you realize you were an artist

As long as I can remember I was creating and making

stuff. I was always an artist but did not realize it until I was

about 45 and working as a High School art teacher. It was

there that I realized I was more of an artist than a teacher.

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content VL

It’s the Little Things that Count Demian Dressler 158

So, everyone is wanting to know: what is your new

“mystery medium” What can you share with us about

how you create your beautifully vibrant abstracts

Well, the short answer is abstract macro photography, hybridized

with traditional painting using acrylics, watercolors,

and whatnot. I apply these painted media on what I call a

screen, often film, paper or plastic, and then I spend ridiculous

amounts of time finding the perfect field to capture a

photographic image. This image is then transferred to panel.

Many people don’t realize that the photographed field is

often less than an inch square when they look at the wall

art. On some of the final works I will add further layers of

paint, or use chips of diamonds, meteorite dust, rose quartz

or other minerals, some gold leaf, or whatever lends itself

Index Directory of Artists and Galleries 180

In alphabetical order you can easily find all featured artists

and advertising artists, along with featured galleries in our

index directory.

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Mark Yearwood

“After Summer Storm" 48x36 Mixed Media on Canvas

MarkYearwood.com

Select Prints available at Nuvango.com/markyearwood


Richard Levine

Pastel Painter Landscape and Figurative

“Stonington Harbor”

www.richardlevine.net

email: artisanrichard@gmail.com

Davis & CO Fine Art

dandcgallery.com


VL

visual language magazine

Contemporary Fine Art

Visual Language Magazine Staff

Editorial

Editor -in-Chief Laurie Pace

Contributing Editor Lisa Neison-Smith

Consulting Editor Nancy Medina

Feature Contributor Sara Genn Painter’s Keys

CFAI Contributor Kimberly Conrad

Feature Writer Dave Justus

Feature Editor Art Reviews Hall Groat II

Feature Contributer Barry Scharf

VL Sponsor ARTSPAN Eric Sparre

Advertising

Contact: VisualLanguageMagazine@gmail.com

Marketing and Development

Executive Director Business/Management Stacey Hendren

All Artwork is Copyrighted by the Individual Artists.

Visual Language Magazine Vol 4 No 1

coreywest.artspan.com

conniechadwell.com

vlrees.com

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The Painter’s Keys

Robert and Sara Genn

January 2015

Robert Genn’s

Studio Book

I’m standing in a white room with a digital projector that blasts a square of white light on a white wall. In the centre is

a shaky drawing of a light switch. A cartoon finger comes up from the lower left hand corner and flips the switch. The

projection goes black, then light, then black, then light, while an accompanying soundtrack reverberates off the walls,

“Click. Clack. Click. Clack.”

Someone mutters, “He’s taking a swipe at that guy who won the Turner.” “What guy” asks his friend. “You know, The

Lights Going On and Off Guy.” The Turner Prize, named for J. M. W. Turner is presented annually to a British artist

under 50. Organized by the Tate, the winner gets £40,000. In 2001, Martin Creed won for his installation, Work No.

227: the lights going on and off, in which lights in an empty room go on and off at 5 second intervals.

Today at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, the work of Scottish artist David Shrigley is showing. To give

you an idea, we’ve put some examples of his work here. In addition to Light Switch, 2007, the show includes a robot

vacuum with felt tipped pens attached to it, which drives around making drawings on the floor, an inflatable, badly-drawn

swan, and a wall painting of a black dot. There’s also a room that invites museum-goers to take part in a life

drawing session, though the model isn’t live. Instead, a disproportionate sculpture of an anatomically awkward man is

the focus. At timed intervals it blinks and releases liquid into a bucket at its feet. Visitors apply themselves earnestly to

their masterpieces, with a museum docent on hand to replenish supplies of paper and pastels.

The Painter’s Keys - Sara Genn

Out in the foyer, the artist has built a freestanding gift shop and stocked it with tea towels, buttons, books and postcards.

“He’s saying what everyone’s feeling,” someone whispers near the cash register. I fondle a button that reads, “I

speak for everyone.”

Sincerely,

Sara

PS: “At a time when political correctness is valued over honesty I would also like to say “Right on!” (Madonna, on live

television, while handing Martin Creed the Turner Prize for Work No. 227: the lights going on and off)

“In the end, everything is a gag.” (Charlie Chaplin)

“Wit is educated insolence.” (Aristotle)

Esoterica: Also on view at The National Gallery of Victoria is the first retrospective of the work of French fashion designer

Jean Paul Gaultier. “Fashion is not art. Never,” says Gaultier. Nevertheless, red spotlights and velvet-lined rooms

showcase the designer’s underwear-as-outerwear, man-skirts, garbage bag dress, kilts made from flea market finds,

mermaid gowns and pink satin cone-shaped bras. “Fashion is about what you look like,” says Gaultier, “which translates

to what you would like to be like.” Says David Shrigley, “I don’t think I’ve ever made any conscious decision to be a

comic artist, but to me there’s something quite anarchic about comedy.” As for the Turner Prize -- Shrigley was a finalist

in 2013. His iphone App Light Switch can be downloaded for free, so that you, too, can turn the lights on and off.

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miradafineart.com

Andrew Baird

Nancy

Original Acrylic on

Canvas

53” x 45”


Mirada Fine Art

is truly proud to

represent

andrew

BAIRD

5490 Parmalee Gulch Rd.

Indian Hills, CO 80454

(only minutes from Denver)

www.miradafineart.com

303-697-9006

info@miradafineart.com

5490 Parmalee Gulch Rd.

Indian Hills, CO 80454

(only minutes from Denver)

www.miradafineart.com

303-697-9006

info@miradafineart.com

Mirada Fine Art owner Steve Sonen and the work of Andrew Baird.


f i n e a r t

Life in Motion

“Tango Charm” 11 x 14 inches Charcoal

Connie Chadwell

www.conniechadwell.com


Phyllis DeQuevedo

“A Work in Progress”

One Heart 23” H x 4” W x 7” D

mantikstudio.com


Jonelle T. McCoy

“Fire Run” 30 x 24 inches

Blending texture and color

for an equine portrait with depth and richness.

jonellemccoy.com


“Forest Path"

Oil 11" x 14"

www.caroljosmidt.com

carol@caroljosmidt.com


Michal Ashkenasi

“Abstract 1”

michalsart.com


“Abstract 2”

Michal Ashkenasi

Abstract Figurative

and Minimalistic Paintings

michalsart.com


Adirondack Series: The Great Range From The Brothers, October

54” x 84”


John Whitton Bria

JohnBria.com


VL

VL

TOP ARTISTS

to Watch and Collect

Vanessa Katz

Elaine Vileria

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Valerie Travers

Visual Language Magazine Featured Artists this

month delve into the beauty of each of our selected

artists and their unique approach to creativity.

Vanessa Katz’s Trees, landscapes, animals and

everyday life provide her with a wealth of subject

matter and abstraction and contemporary non-representational

work gives her the freedom to create

purely from her imagination and emotions.

Valerie Travers Her subjects are quite varied but

she is fond of seascapes and skies - they form a

large part of her work. This is more than likely due

to the fact that she grew up and lives on the small

island of Guernsey, surrounded by beautiful beaches.

Elaine Vileria Although I enjoy working in both

genres of abstraction and realism, my style in the

past couple of years, has taken a turn toward surrealism

and fantasy. In addition to this style, I have

developed a fondness for the technique of pointillism,

where the intensity of a color fades, as you

lessen the dots, or, you simply meld them together

with another color.


VL

Vanessa Katz

www.VanessaKatzArt.com

Vanessa Katz moved from London, England, to the desert in

Southern California with her husband, daughter, and doggies

sixteen years ago. The contrast between the dull, grey, cold,

rainy days in the city and the bright sunny color in the desert

was dramatic and was the inspiration to begin painting again

after a long absence.

“The sunshine makes everything look so vibrant and alive and

makes me feel that way too!”

Trees, landscapes, animals and everyday life provide her with

a wealth of subject matter and abstraction and contemporary

non-representational work gives her the freedom to create

purely from her imagination and emotions.

“I hope to evoke emotion and a stirring of the heart through my

work and when my collectors let me know this is their experience,

it fills my heart with joy knowing how art can connect and

nourish us at such a deep level”.

Vanessa attended Putney School of Art in London

and still attends many workshops to learn

new techniques from other artists. She finds the

process of learning while experimenting creates

much excitement and is very empowering.

Vanessa invites you to visit her website and her

very active Facebook page and looks forward to

seeing you there.

www.VanessaKatzArt.com

www.Facebook.com/AbstractArt4U

“Azure” 30 x 30

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“Shoji 2” 11X14 Collage on Paper

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VL Vanessa Katz

www.VanessaKatzArt.com

Infinity 60 X 36 - Acrylic, Ink & Gold Leaf finished with Poured Resin

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Vanessa Katz

www.VanessaKatzArt.com

Perspective 40 x 30

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Eternal 60 X 36 Acrylic on Cradled Wood Board finished with Poured Resin

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VL Valerie Travers

http://valerietravers.com

Valerie began her journey into art when very young but it was 22 years ago when she became passionate

about it. Being at home looking after her two children gave her the opportunity to spend time developing her

skills. From the very first year, she exhibited and won awards and has continued in that vein ever since.

Her subjects are quite varied but she is fond of seascapes and skies - they form a large part of her work. This

is more than likely due to the fact that she grew up and lives on the small island of Guernsey, surrounded by

beautiful beaches.

“I paint mostly in oils and acrylics but pastels are also a favourite and I dip into these from time to time. My

paintings have increased in size over the years and I now paint on canvases measuring approximately 30 x 40

inches. Obviously if commissioned to paint something smaller I will, but that is my preference.

I paint intuitively for the most part and often begin by picking up a brush and loading it with whatever colour

appeals. From there the magic begins and I develop the painting as I go along.”

Valerie is represented by Davis & Co Gallery, Spring, Houston, Texas.

Website:- www.valerietravers.com

Glowing - Oil on Canvas - 24 X 30

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Fire in the Sky - Oil on Canvas 30 x 20

Reflective - Oil on Board 25 x 16

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Valerie Travers

http://valerietravers.com

Holding On a Little Longer - Oil on Canvas - 30 X 40

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VL Valerie Travers

http://valerietravers.com

Spring Optimism - Acrylic on Canvas - 24 x 30

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Disappearing Tide - Oil on Canvas - 30 x 40

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Elaine Vileria

http://elainevileria.artspan.com

Over the years, I have had the fortune to teach art, to

students pre-K through 12th grade. As far back as I

can remember, I knew that art would be a major relevance

in my life. My favorite Christmas present of all

time was an art instruction book, complete with drawing

paper and pencils, to help me learn to draw.

Although I enjoy working in both genres of abstraction

and realism, my style in the past couple of years has

taken a turn toward surrealism and fantasy. In addition

to this style, I have developed a fondness for the

technique of pointillism, where the intensity of a color

fades as you lessen the dots, or, you simply meld them

together with another color.

I have been asked more than once, “How do you come

up with these ideas How do you envision the subjects

that you draw”. I guess it would be compared to an

author writing a fiction or fantasy book, but the idea is

created in the mind of an artist - and that visualization

is transformed through the hand and tools of the artist.

I received my Masters degree from Nazareth College,

in Rochester, NY. My work has been in exhibitions

throughout the United States, as well as in

France. I have solely developed and coordinated

three art exhibitions for cancer survivors.

Chromium 6

The Old Fishing Shed

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Marathon Man 14.5 X 19.5

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Elaine Vileria

http://elainevileria.artspan.com

Aspen 19.5 X 18

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Mechanical Creativity 15 x 20

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VL Elaine Vileria

http://elainevileria.artspan.com

Solar Eclipse

Right: 1920’s Dancer 14.5 X 20

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Joyce Pihl

Fall in the Woods

Autumn Five 18” x 24”

Milkweeds With Red 18” x 24”

http://joycebpihl.org/


Joyce Pihl

Big Red 24” x 30”

http://joycebpihl.org/


Filomena Booth

Energy . Color . Passion

filomenabooth.com


filomenabooth.com


Dyan Newton

Colors of Life

“Virginia Pride”

http://one-painting-a-day.blogspot.com

Contact: dyansart1@yahoo.com


Aspen S P A C E S

Dream Weavers 48 X 48 (c) Leija Roy

Lelija Roy aspenspaces.com aspen.spaces@gmail.com


BAUER

Logan Bauer

Logan Bauer spent much of his elementary and secondary school years overseas. He took his first

painting class in London, England at the age of 13 years old. Upon his return to Arizona, he continued

to take art classes at Phoenix College, and it was not until recently that painting stopped

being a part time endeavor or hobby, but it became a full time commitment.

He presently paints out of his studio located in Northern Arizona near Prescott.

LoganBauer.com


Landscapes, Life Drawings, Still Life, Figurative Portraits

LoganBauer.com


Photo by Lydia Bittner-Baird

http://bairdstudios.com/


VL

The Value of Line

Andy Baird

http://bairdstudios.com/


VL

Andy Baird

“The Value of Line”

I was born in Denver, Colorado. There is a thing

about being a long-time Colorado family, so I like

to point out that I am a fifth-generation Colorado

native. The first Baird came here in 1867. Colorado

has always been my home, and I cannot think of

any other place as home.

I knew I would be an artist when I was seven. I used

to watch my aunt paint horses, and I won a schoolwide

art contest in second grade. After high school,

I went to a commercial art school. I discovered a

love for oils and figure painting, and I went to the

University of Northern Colorado for my degrees in

Art Education.

As a freshman, I ended up in graduate-level painting

courses, along with a few required under-grad

courses. By my sophomore year I had to catch up

on required courses, one of which was ceramics.

I was not happy, until I learned that ceramics involved

using a wheel and kilns. I loved working on

the wheel and my painting fell by the wayside. My

master’s project was on Native American pottery,

and I figured out the secret to Maria Martinez’s metallic-black

hand-polished finish. My pots were hand

polished, disassembled and reassembled, resulting

in ancient look.

By the time I became a high school teacher, galleries

were selling my high-end pottery. Robert Redford

bought my first pot sold in my Santa Fe gallery,

and that got me national attention.

When blown-glass overtook the pottery market,

I returned to painting, always looking for current

trends. When I travel, I visit galleries and look for

interesting and intriguing art. I like to get the pulse

of what the nation is thinking.

I had a student so advanced that he needed new,

challenging assignments. He made excellent contour

drawings, so I asked him to “draw” a face by

scribbling, without an outline, using chalk pastels.

This became a standard assignment in my advanced

drawing classes. I was inspired to work with

the technique myself, using liquid paint.

http://bairdstudios.com/

My high school let me paint in an empty classroom

in the summer. I spread canvases on the floor and

walked on them, experimenting with different paints

and tools. Dribbling paint prevented the precision

needed for small subjects, so I worked on large

canvases. My process evolved into walking around

a stretched canvas, better control over the streaming,

being able to visualize the image from a distance,

and creating fun, new images. My first show

was a success, so I felt that I was working on the

right art at the right time.

My paintings are sometimes compared to Jackson

Pollack’s. Long before I started this technique, I

had seen reproductions of Pollack’s paintings, and

I did not care for them. After seeing Pollack’s original

work, I became an absolute fan. I love how the

many layers of paint create depth to his paintings.

There is also a connection to Chuck Close, whose

pixel-like sections compose portraits, and Georges-Pierre

Seurat, who used dots of paint to compose

scenes. Optical blending enables the perception

of the image. I might call my work “Seurat

meets Jackson Pollack meets Chuck Close”.

My work is a branch of the American Pop Art tradition,

similar to Warhol’s Campbell Soup cans. I

talked to friends, clients, and artists, and noticed

what is popular in check-out lines. That led me to

deliberately work with a glamour look, almost the

commercial look from fashion magazines. I follow

the overall Pop Art philosophy, putting art in daily

life, off the pedestal.

I’m selective about the images needed for that

“look”. I’m inspired by ads, photos with the right

light, shade and image, or students or friends with

promising faces. Whatever the source, it’s up to me

to create the look of popular culture in my paintings.

I also paint images of things that had a big impact

on my teenage years – the Statue of Liberty, the

Campbell’s Soup can. I met Andy Warhol at a show

in Denver. Warhol wrote a dedication to me in a

copy of his book (Andy Warhol from A to B and Back

Again), “To Andy from Andy”, with a little Campbell’s

Soup can drawing. Meeting him made such an impression

on me, and that’s why I’m so glad to be

able to exhibit the Pop art character of my work.

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Right Page: La Gitana

http://bairdstudios.com/

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Andy Baird

“The Value of Line”

Angela King Gallery, New Orleans

http://bairdstudios.com/

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My studio is a wonderful, old, pine-paneled cabin in Evergreen, Colorado. Each time I visit a

painting, I drip paint either to lose the image or strengthen it. I build layers of color until I see in

the painting that perfect quality that I'm looking for. After a month of work, a completed painting

will contain thirty to forty colors. The beauty of the process is that the face appears with a

personality, a life of its own.

I love to create. I've been an artist of many genres: a painter, potter, sculptor, photographer,

jewelry-maker, builder. I've been incredibly lucky that my family has always championed me

as an artist. I know no other life. I meet with other artists of all abilities and work with different

media and styles, but I especially love the development of my drip-paintings. Often, the end

result of my work surprises and fascinates me.

I like it that people find it interesting to study each painting, to think about its creation, and to

trace the lines of paint. This is artwork that actively involves the viewer, and when a viewer is

invited to participate and enjoy, the art is more complete. The fascinating diversity of faces and

the endless ways to portray them captivates and connects us all.

Photo by MaryLynn Gillaspie

http://bairdstudios.com/

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TITLE

http://bairdstudios.com/

Ken Olin 48 X 60 Oil on Canvas

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Photo by Lydia Bittner-Baird

STORY

Ken 48 X 60 Oil on Canvas

http://bairdstudios.com/

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Andy Baird

“The Value of Line”

Victor Reading Oil on Canvas

STORY

http://bairdstudios.com/

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http://bairdstudios.com/

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http://bairdstudios.com/

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Andy Baird

“The Value of Line”

http://bairdstudios.com/

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VL Andy Baird

“The Value of Line”

http://bairdstudios.com/

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Malcom Genet, an art consultant in New Orleans,

writes that, “Andy Baird is the first artist to unite drip

technique with portrait painting. In the art world, we

call these post-Modern hybrids ‘original,’ in the sense

that they make painting new again. Andy Baird stretches

our imaginations by pairing two unlikely styles into

clearly innovative works.”

The traditions that inform my work are explained by

art consultant Michael J. Miller, who writes, in part:

“Andrew Baird has created a new and original hybrid

art form: the action-painted portrait. He combines the

unlikely duo of portraiture, which thrives on likenesses

and naturalness, with abstract expressionism, which

tries to avoid likenesses and subjects from nature.

Such originality and invention by mavericks creates

new areas of value in art. Baird is one such genius.

Surrealist painters in 1920’s Paris were first to fling

or drip paint, marveling at the ‘energy traces’ and lyrical

beauty of ‘accidental art.’ In the 1940s, American

painters expanded on Surrealist ideas and methods,

eliminating anything recognizable from their art, creating

the first American abstract expressionist works.

Jackson Pollock began non-traditional drip-painting,

composed on the floor on an un-stretched canvas,

radicalizing painting for the next half century or more.

Andrew Baird is in the direct line of the abstract-expressionists,

but one who reverses the order again,

by using this American avant-garde technique to paint

specific figures.

Another impetus for abstract expressionists was molecular/atomic

physics. Pop culture emerged around

‘atomic theory’, and Pollock’s flinging paint was splattering

lines of energy that reflected the orbits of electrons

around nuclei, which in turn echoed that of the

planets orbiting around the stars; this theme was often

expressed by the progressive artists of the day.

When Andrew Baird, one of the brightest contemporary

artists working in portraiture today, uses his abstract-expressionist

technique to compose the most

beautiful female faces, he reminds us that even the

prettiest face is a secret, minute world of whirling

particles, brought together in aesthetic perfection by

Great Mother Nature, and enhanced by the interpretation

of a uniquely talented artist.”

With input from and thanks to Malcom Genet, New

Orleans, and Michael J. Miller, San Francisco.

http://bairdstudios.com/

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VL Andy Baird

Right Page: Photo by MaryLynn Gillaspie

http://bairdstudios.com/

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http://bairdstudios.com/

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discover art . inspire collectors

DAVIS&CO f i n e a r t g a l l e r y

Home is where the art is.

dandcgallery.com


engage discussion . celebrate life

dandcgallery.com

Sherry Hogan

Davis&Co


Bob Coonts

COONTS

“Painted Lady” Acylic on Gallery Wrap Canvas 48” X 72”

www.bobcoonts.com


Corey

Watson

coreywest.artspan.com

coreywatsonart@gmail.com


Laurie Justus Pace

Night Gathering 36 x 36 Oil on Canvas

Mirada Fine Art Denver

LauriePace.com


Black and White

Midnight Roundevous Table for Two 36 x 36 Oil on Canvas

The La Jolla Gallery

The Spirit of the Paint

Viewing a Laurie Justus Pace painting is a rich experience that drips with color and emotion. Her passionate works are alive

with movement, boldly created with a wide brush and a palette knife. She loves working with oils, dramatically carving out

the paint and transferring her energy to the canvas and ultimately on to the viewer.

http://www.ellepace.com/paintings-for-sale/


VL

VL

Sallie-Anne Swift

http://sallieswiftart.com/

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http://sallieswiftart.com/

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VL Sallie-Anne Swift

Do or Die... Undertaking a 3D extra large format painting.

We had purchased a new apartment and I was wanting to do something special for the entry, so I decided

to do a HUGE 8’ x 6’ painting… this was definitely going to prove to be one of my biggest challenges.

The only area big enough for me to attempt this was in the middle of the construction zone of the new

apartment. It made sense to paint it in the apartment we were remodeling, with its stripped concrete

floors and the beaten up walls that were still in need of new plaster and paint… it was perfect… I could

make a HUGE mess and it didn’t matter.

I found a fabulous stretched canvas supplier in Orange County (artscanvasonline.com) and ordered my

8’ x 6’ deep edge stretched canvas.

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My New Studio

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Sallie-Anne Swift

Arrival of the Canvas

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To my sheer delight it was delivered to me the very next day, I was not expecting such a quick delivery service! I

gazed at the blank canvas before me for hours, contemplating what I was going to paint. It had to be something

special, this would be the largest 3D painting I had ever attempted. Yes I did say 3D, these are my newest creations

and something I had given a lot of thought to. At this point the largest I had done of these 3D paintings was

a 30” x 40”. Was I ready to attempt one this big… well why not, “you’ll never know unless you give it a go” and

I would give this my best shot! I had spent a lot of time testing my process, and resourcing materials, I want my

work to be UV light protective and I will only use materials with longevity, this is extremely important to me as an

artist because I want my work to last longer than a lifetime.

And so it begins… I wait until the weekend when the tradesmen aren’t there and lean my canvas against the dirty

wall, starting on the texture for the canvas first. This always acts as a guide for my paintings, a little like a sketch. I

feel a little under pressure to get as much done as possible before the workmen return on Monday morning so the

following day I begin painting. When I pack up my paint and wash my brushes and take a long look at my painting,

I am disappointed, it’s not quite what I had planned. I wait until the following weekend and then paint over the top

of it with white gesso so I can start again.

I have to admit I was feeling a little overwhelmed at this stage, thinking that this painting might get the better of

me, but I felt very determined. And so 2 weeks later I was back in front of my huge canvas painting over the top of

my disappointment. By the end of the weekend I was satisfied that I had made a good base painting and so I drew

up a plan (to scale) and ordered an 8’ x 6’ x .25” thick piece of acrylic with 22 holes to be drilled at exact points (as

marked on my plan). The acrylic was the most expensive part of this painting… I had to make this work now after

spending so much money on materials!

Applying Texture

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Sallie-Anne Swift

Applying Texture

First Layer of Acrylic

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Second Layer of Acrylic

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Sallie-Anne Swift

Attacking the Acrylic

We were off on holidays for five weeks and the acrylic would arrive during this time so I planned on finishing

upon our return. This gave me more time to plan and think about the next layer that would be painted (in the

reverse) of the base painting on the canvas. I am so inspired by the ocean and our new home looks straight

out over the Pacific Ocean so this would be my inspiration for my painting.

My acrylic had arrived when we returned and it was extremely heavy and awkward to maneuver, it required

help to get this into a position where I could paint comfortably and reach every inch of it. I decided to place

it on top of the canvas, in the middle of the living room floor, not something I would normally do, as I like to

look at the base painting while I paint the reverse of it. So now I would be painting blind and simply guessing

where things where but I wanted to protect our new floorboards. I placed plastic under and around the canvas

and plenty of drop sheets to protect the new floors, took a deep breath and began mixing my paint, ink

and epoxy resin. This preparation is vital to the outcome and I like to work quickly once I start with this so I

have to be very well organized before I start.

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http://sallieswiftart.com/

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Sallie-Anne Swift

I am ready and I start applying my combination of mixtures

onto the surface of the acrylic, I’m pretty much

guessing where I think everything should go, I know

the look I want to achieve but I am so nervous, I cannot

afford to mess up this piece of acrylic, it cost so much!

I am able to walk right around the acrylic laying flat on

the floor and this helped me get the perspective right.

I can’t work fast enough, my mixtures where getting

thick and tacky but I am almost done. I am not sure if

there is enough paint on this piece and I am concerned

my brush strokes are not big enough for this size canvas.

I remember standing back and thinking I wish I

had an old broom to use for a brush. But as it turns out I

needn’t have worried, I turned on the ceiling fan above

it, made sure all the doors where closed (as it must be

in a dust free environment) and walked out the door

leaving it to dry.

I don’t think I slept much that night. I had to wait 24

hours before it would be dry to the touch and dry

enough to move; it seemed a very long 24 hours. Finally

it was dry enough to move and with the help of my

willing husband we managed to move it in front of the

canvas that it would sit above, and against the wall it

would hang on. I was thrilled when I saw the two pieces

together, it was even better than I had imagined.

I stayed up late that night putting it together with the

stainless steel standoffs, all 22 of them. Again I had

to be extremely accurate where I drilled my holes to

accommodate the standoffs, they had to line up exactly

and there was no room for error.

Working on the Acrylic

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Sallie-Anne Swift

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Sallie-Anne Swift

Finally it was together and I was looking at the

finished piece, it would still take another 24

hours to be completely dry but it was done and

ready to hang. Oooh.. hang This was one extremely

heavy painting and I hadn’t given much

thought to how I was going to hang it. I found

some fabulous dry wall hooks on amazon.com

that would hold 200 lb each – perfect! When the

tradesmen arrived for work on Monday morning

they could hang this for me. It took 5 men to

hang this painting but it’s up and in it’s place

and every time I walk in through the front door,

I marvel at the sight of it and think to myself… I

did that and I feel so proud that I achieved this

goal, this enormous 3D painting looks fabulous

and the lighting makes all the difference in the

world.

For years I would transform my dining room

into a studio, pushing the table and chairs to

the side, throwing down drop cloths to cover the

floors and then setting up my portable easel on

wheels and my portable cart that housed my

paint, it would quickly became my work area.

It’s no wonder I would get depressed when we

were having dinner guests. This meant packing

away everything and moving it all into a storage

unit so the room could once again resemble a

place where we could entertain. I’ve lost count

how many times I have done this!

Eleven months of preparation, designing and

planning the remodel of our new apartment will

finally see me in my own dedicated studio…

YIPPIE! I’m still pinching myself! It is a home

studio, with plenty of space (even enough room

for an 8’ x 6’ painting and plenty of natural light

with breathtaking views that stretch across the

city to the mountains that are soon to have

snow capped peaks on them. No more packing

away my paints and brushes… I am one very

lucky and very happy artist!

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Hanging the Painting


Three Dimensional

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Sallie-Anne Swift

Finished Studio

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Finished 3-D Painting

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Eric Bodtker

Provence Villa with Les Alpilles

http://www.ericbodtker.com/


“On the other Side of the Dream” Oil on Canvas 24”x24”

Sanda Manuila

sandamanuila.artspan.com


Roseanne Snyder

“Coming Winter”

roseannesnyder.blogspot.com


Vicki Rees

Visit my website.

vlrees.com

TippingPaintGallery.com


Barbara Haviland

Red Hibiscus 24” x 20”

Barb’s Garden Art

https://barbara-haviland-art.squarespace.com/


Suzy Pal Powell

“At the Threshold” 36” x 60” Oil on Linen

“Kissing Cousins”

suzypal.blogspot.com

suzypal.com


VL

Studio Visit

Slav Krivoshiev

Who Stole the Fairy Tales

http://slavkk.in.gallerix.ru/


http://slavkk.in.gallerix.ru/


VL

Slav Krivoshiev

Who Stole the Fairy Tales

Slav Krivoshiev is a passionate Russian artist that

shares his stories vividly on canvas. Visual Language

first featured his work in January of 2014 and invited

him again to be a featured artist in this issue.

The hidden metaphors in his compositions challenge

the viewer to look far beyond the surface. His colors

and use of texture are metaphors in their own right. Yet

as one stands before his work warily, so exactly does

the allegory in the painting mimic the other reality - is it

the fear one might recognize in a scene expressing a

reality kept at a distance His works intimately connect

places and times of familiar stories and myths with unfamiliar

visions. Upon further exploration, one will discover

the figures in each painting hidden and woven

into the fabric of the canvas through his active use of

texture. Krivoshiev has said that his works of art evaluate

morality, questioning how we, as a society, relate to

people with different beliefs and the impact our evolving

modern civilization has on cultural practices and the

ethical norms.

Krivoshiev’s paintings present a culture and a time far

from our present reality, while bordering on the edge

of days that may come ahead. In this scope of work

there is a connection and continuity that is seeded

from today’s world unrest. Krivoshiev associates current

day with days lived two thousand years ago. His

stories cross eras, glimpsing moments past and present

as narratives develop in our minds while our eyes

search the surface for substantial details. The paintings

descend into the depths of an unknown time, a time of

yesterday while reflecting the tension and unbalance in

our world today.

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Above: Keeper of the Temple

Left: Beyond the Banned Land

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VL Slav Krivoshiev

Who Stole the Fairy Tales

The Cross in the Sea

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Prayer for Light

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VL Slav Krivoshiev

Who Stole the Fairy Tales

Oriental Flowers

http://slavkk.in.gallerix.ru/

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“Mythological Constructivism”

I define art that is created as a social myth. Constructive

basis is the mythological story, a fragment or a reference

to certain mythological hero, passage or detail,

but considered in the problems of the modern social environment,

resulting in a new mythological experience,

a new reflection, the result of a new social environment,

where a person lives, seeking and developing. Or the

environment in which obliged to live, according to the

circumstances are obviously controlled social power,

but he may often monitor and control them (the circumstances),

psychosocial myth of modern man. Art, which

has claim, does not give the answer, and ask precise

questions to the problems of modern life.

Mythological narrative transforms into an inverted form

of the contemporary reality. The ethical norm of the

contemporary society transforms into an inverted norm

to the normative content of the myth.

Mythological Constructivism uses the principle of enantiodromia

– a natural law saying that any given thing will

sooner or later change into its opposite. First described

by Heraclitus, it later occupied a central place in Jung’s

psychology and psychotherapy, explaining the interaction

between the opposites as well as the development

of processes in time.” Slav Krivoshiev

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VL Slav Krivoshiev

Who Stole the Fairy Tales

Legend of Istanbul

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Turkish Coffee

http://slavkk.in.gallerix.ru/

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Slav Krivoshiev

Who Stole the Fairy Tales

Starvation

http://slavkk.in.gallerix.ru/

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Women on Board II

http://slavkk.in.gallerix.ru/

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VL Slav Krivoshiev

Who Stole the Fairy Tales

Metaphysical Managing General Ship

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Women on Board III

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VL Slav Krivoshiev

Who Stole the Fairy Tales

Two Angels

http://slavkk.in.gallerix.ru/

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http://slavkk.in.gallerix.ru/

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Nancy Medina

Painting Under the Tuscan Sun

A Painting Dream Getaway

During the Peak of Poppy Bloom Season

June 6-13, 2015

Tuscany, Italy

www.nancymedina.com


“Celebrating the stories and legends of Texas and

the Great Southwest through original art, prints and books.”


601 E Hwy. 82 - Nocona, Texas 76255 . 940-825-7226

www.TexasTrailArtGallery.com . Facebook: Texas Trails Art Gallery

Tuesday through Saturday 10 to 6 . Sunday 1 to 5 . Closed Mondays.


Judy Mackey

“Patience” Oil on Canvas

“Patience 2” Oil on Canvas

“Patience 3” Oil on Canvas

“Patience 5” Oil on Canvas

www.JudyMackey.com


Judy Mackey

No Worries” Oil on Canvas

www.JudyMackey.com


Roberta McGowen

visualwestphotography.com


Visual West Photography

“Leader”

visualwestphotography.com


LADY L

Colors Make Me Happy

Daisy Pink 24 x 24 inches

Acrylic on Canvas

ladylart.blogspot.com

ellepace.com/lady-l-artist


She began painting at age 2 on small pieces and by age 3 moved up to

full size canvas. Lady L is the granddaughter of Texas Artist Laurie Pace.


Mary Jo Zorad

contemporary fine art

“You Have the Power” 12 x 12 Acrylic

ZoradArt.com

“Sedona”

16 x 20 Acrylic


VL Barry Scharf

Blood Moon by Barry W Scharf

124 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


A Creative Psychology

http://barrywscharf.squarespace.com/

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Barry W. Scharf

A CREATIVE PSYCHOLOGY

By Barry W. Scharf

Now that we have entered the new year of 2015, I

have been contemplating what makes a person creative

and how they arrive at an expressive output. I

often go through thoughts of how I can better myself

and improve my work and a few questions always

come to mind. The why and how of what makes me

an artist.

To answer this question we must look at the characteristics

that make a person want to be creative.

What is it that sets them apart from the crowd First

they must be inquisitive. They are always looking at

the world and asking questions about what they see.

What is that out there Why is it this way Is there

more to this then meets the eye How can I know

more about this

I believe these types of questions are historically the

basis of what great masters have asked in order to

form unique answers to what otherwise are images

and forms that have already been expressed. They

did not follow trends of their time but instead, by asking

questions set new ones in motion.

Next they are aware of their reality. They are sensitive

to the feelings and emotions they are having.

They are paying attention to sensory input that they

receive through sight, smell, taste, touch, hearing

and that elusive extra input that comes through intuition.

Most importantly they are present in the moment

undistracted from their reality with past or future

thoughts. Locked in an embrace with the content of

experience and the present moment of expression.

They dance the dance of creativity, INPUT…CON-

TENT…EXPRESSION.

At the same time what is avoided in a successful

creative process is equally important as what is embraced.

Most important is to overcome fear. Fear is

the most crippling component to the creative process.

It causes doubt and self-consciousness that

inhibits the free flow of ideas and process.

Another debilitating element is judgment. By this I

mean avoid the inner critic that is forever judging

every move you make. The “critic” can cause hesitation,

leading to questioning the conviction of your

expression, which will only lead to producing a watered

down and over thought version of what you

were truly after.

Now if this sounds difficult and a lot like work…it is!

True creativity is not for dabblers or the faint of heart.

It has been and always will be a place of strong exception,

a place where fleeting moments of genius

are captured and translated into the expressive act.

Great works of art often demonstrate a glimpse into

the mind of the “artistic warrior” that have found the

key to bringing together mind, body and spirit into

a single moment of expressive fervor to produce

something of a great value of consciousness in the

world.

http://barrywscharf.squarespace.com/

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Night Moon by Barry W Scharf

Aftermath by Barry W Scharf


VL

Barry W. Scharf

New Abstraction 82 by Barry W Scharf

http://barrywscharf.squarespace.com/

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y Barry W Scharf


VL

Lisa McKinney

Had I Known

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Lisa-McKinney.com

lisamckinneyartprints.com

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VL

Artist Interview

with Elizabeth Chapman

http://melizabethchapman.artspan.com/

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VL Elizabeth Chapman

At what age did you realize you were an artist

As long as I can remember I was creating and making stuff. I was always an artist but did not realize it until

I was about 45 and working as a High School art teacher. It was there that I realized I was more of an artist

than a teacher.

Who or what inspired you to make art in the beginning

My first painting was an oil painting. I remember standing by my mother’s easel working on my own little canvas.

She still has that painting.

What is your background in art

I consider myself to be self-taught, although I do have a B.S. Art Ed. As a teenager I took watercolor lessons

from a professional artist.

What role do you feel an artist has in society

I like what Georgia O’Keefe said about why she began those large flowers. She felt a need to help the busy

New Yorkers slow down and see the beauty in the flowers, so she painted them big. I guess that is how I see

artist as sensitive individuals that are pointing to and expressing the beauty of God’s creation. Creating spaces

in time for reflection.

Today, who has had the greatest influence on your work

There are so many artists that have influenced me and that I admire. However, I would have to say that it is a

local artist, Emily Frost, that has so encouraged me for so many years. I don’t know that the artist within me

would have emerged if it weren’t for the nurturing of the seed that she has done.

Give us an idea of what type of art materials you use and if you have a favorite color palette.

I work as an abstract expressionistic allowing my intuition to direct the decisions that I make concerning any of

the elements. The hardest can sometimes be just laying down that first mark. Once done, this will lead to the

next idea and so forth. I work with acrylic paints which in the beginning were frustrating to me as my formal

training in college was with oils. Acrylics dry much faster than oils and because of this I have taught myself to

work fast building layers up to reduce the drying time.

Life often gets in the way of creativity; how many hours do you spend creating or making art each

week.

I spend about 30 hours a week actually painting and probably around 15 hours a week photographing, listing,

promoting, etc., In the beginning, I disciplined myself as if it was a regular job 8-5 but as life does get in the

way I have learned to be much more flexible.

Right Page: Ascend 24” x 30” x 1.5” Canvas

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Gasing Up

Hornet Sunset

http://melizabethchapman.artspan.com/

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VL Artist Interview with Elizabeth Chapman

Arioso 30” x 48” x 3/4” Canvas

http://melizabethchapman.artspan.com/

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Alpa

48” x 48” x 1.5” Canvas

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VL Artist Interview with Elizabeth Chapman

Verdant 24” x 30” x 1.5” Canvas

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There are many culprits that can crush creativity, such as distractions, self-doubt and fear of failure.

What tends to stand in the way of your creativity

All of those.

How do you overcome these obstacles

I think it’s important to continue to paint even when you aren’t feeling like it. Many times once you begin then

the painting itself will take care of whatever obstacles there were. Much easier said than done. Encouragement

from others can go a long ways.

What food, drink or song inspires you or gets your creative juices.

Music is definitely inspirational to me. It can be what helps to get that brush pushing through the canvas. It can

also set the mood for that paintings visual expression. Don’t really snack while painting as I”m a messy painter.

Has your art evolved or changed in the past ten years If so, how

Definitely has change ALOT! Six years ago when I left my job as a high school art teacher to pursue being an

artist, I really had nothing as far as paintings go. I began with what I knew and that was painting realistic florals

with transparent watercolors. They were very realistic. A change in mediums forced me to begin working much

faster in a more abstract fashion.

Do you have a favorite piece of art

This is such a difficult question...it’s kinda like your favorite color or food. I feel like my favorites change from

day to day, season to season. Much to many favorites!

Do you find the artistic life lonely How do you counteract the solitude

I do find the artistic life to be a lonely life. In a way, this is a good thing because it causes you to be introspective.

It is a place of listening, pondering, reflecting and creating. It helps to have this type of time for creating

and expressing those thoughts visually. On the other hand, enough can be enough. I love getting out and being

around people in different settings, and spending time with friends and family.

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Steadfast 30” x 48” x 1.5” Canvas

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VL

Artist Interview with Elizabeth Chapman

What is the predominant color in your closet

I really can't say...definitely a mixture.

What book are you reading this week

This week I've taken an interest in reading Revelation, Genesis, Daniel and the Book of Esther in the Bible.

Do you have a favorite television show or movie

I don't watch much television, but do enjoy cooking shows. The Sound of Music will always be an all time

favorite.

What is your favorite food or what do you snack on while you are working

I'm a messy painter, no snacks while painting.

What colors are the towels in your bathroom

Well they use to be gold and a rich brown...but they’re quite faded now. Browns.

What is your favorite color

Changes with the seasons!

What color do you avoid

Personally, will stay away from orange as I was trying something on in a store one time, looked in the mirror

and thought I looked like a pumpkin. I don't have a problem painting with it.

What are you most proud of in your life

That would be my family. I am very thankful for them.

What has been your most embarrassing moment

There's probably been many, but those that happen to you when you’re so young seem to stick the best.

The one I'm thinking of now was when I was in the first grade. It was a small class and we each had an

easel for painting. One day I was standing at mine and I guess I must have gotten so into it...suddenly I

realized their was a puddle on the floor. Fortunately, I had a sensitive teacher that took care of the situation

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Dreamboat 24” x 30” x 1.5” Canvas

http://melizabethchapman.artspan.com/

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VL

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Wed 36" x 48" Canvas

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VL Artist Interview with Elizabeth Chapman

What jobs have you done other than being an artist

I was a stay at home mom to three children and a High School Art teacher. All other jobs were for short periods

of time.

Do you have a passion or hobby other than painting

My grandmother taught me how to sew when I was in the 6th grade. I loved fabric stores for all the colors and

making my own clothes. I still find sewing to be relaxing. I also love cooking and gardening. Love playing

with our grand daughter and not a hobby, but enjoy walking.

Who would you love to portray in Mixed Media or in paint

I would probably answer that us our grand daughter. Not that it would be realistic, but it would show all the joy

that there is in those child like qualities that we tend to lose as we settle into the rules of life.

If you were an animal what would you be and why

I've always loved watching the hippos at the zoo, probably because I love the water. As a kid, I lived in Venezuela

where the weather permitted swimming all year long. My family teased me that I was going to turn into

a fish. Another animal would be a dog, as we have two that are very well taken care of.

If you could live anywhere in the world where would you live

I don't know why, but I've always thought the Mediterranean area.

Share something with us that few people know about you.

Well. I can tell when i'm getting into a painting, as i've got this thing about having to kick my shoes off. I guess

it's a feeling of not being restrained. I also love to dance while painting, but never do that with an audience.

Name something you love and why.

I love spending time with our grand daughter. It is such a joy and it is my hope that we will have had a positive

influence in her life.

What is one thing you would like to be remembered for

Kindness.

Right Page: Seraphic 36” x 48” x 1.5” Canvas

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Go Shawk

http://melizabethchapman.artspan.com/

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Artist Interview with Elizabeth Chapman

Consider 30" x 60" x 1.5" Canvas

http://melizabethchapman.artspan.com/

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Palette

Knife

Painters

Paletteknifepainters.blogspot.com


Paletteknifepainters.org


Kimberly Conrad

“Pouring Color Into Your Life”

Moving Metals Cerulean B-6 18” x 18”

KimberlyConradFineArt.com


Moving Metals

Moving Metals Cerulean B-5 18 “ x 18”

KimberlyConradFineArt.com


DAILY PAINTERS ABSTRACT GALLERY

DailyPaintersAbstract.blogspot.com

Carol A. McIntyre

“Floating Winds, “ 28x21, Oil on Canvas


DailyPaintersAbstract.blogspot.com

DAILY PAINTERS ABSTRACT GALLERY


DianeWhitehead.com


Diane

Whitehead

“Animals are my muse. The scratch

of the paw, pounce of a hoof, gesture

of the head, alert ear, quiet stride,

powerful shape, ancient wisdom.

All come to play with the shapes I see

as I paint.”

DianeWhitehead.com


VL

VL

NOT SURE IF WE

TURE FOR HERE>

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VL

Getting Intimate

with

Demian Dressler

“It’s the little things that count.”

HAVE A FEAhttp://www.demianart.net/

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VL Intimate with Demian Dressler

“It’s the little things that count.”

VL: So, congratulations on your selection as a Top Master of Contemporary Art by Art Tour International,

and your upcoming exhibition in the Museum of Fine Art in Las Vegas. So, everyone is wanting to know:

what is your new “mystery medium” What can you share with us about how you create your beautifully

vibrant abstracts

Demian: Well, the short answer is abstract macro photography, hybridized with traditional painting using

acrylics, watercolors, and whatnot. I apply these painted media on what I call a screen, often film paper

or plastic, and then I spend ridiculous amounts of time finding the perfect field to capture a photographic

image. This image is then transferred to panel. Many people don’t realize that the photographed field is

often less than an inch square when they look at the wall art. On some of the final works I will add further

layers of paint, or use chips of diamonds, meteorite dust, rose quartz or other minerals, some gold leaf, or

whatever lends itself to the piece.

VL: You were raised on Maui, graduated with an Ivy League doctorate and still are a practicing veterinarian,

as well as a full time artist. How has this influenced your creative process

Demian: Well, I know Maui has been a big influence. I’ve always been attracted to the rawness, the intensity,

and the brilliance found in natural things, and my childhood was filled with this, the colors and forms

of Hawaii. This art is created with a very organic and natural process, in spite of the lens and paintbrush,

and what is brilliant or intense is what ends up in the final pieces. So there is a correspondence there. I

grew up without running water or electricity, so when I was not doing art I was surfing, spending time with

animals, and exploring the natural world. There is some magical essence, something vital that is found

both in good art and in the natural world. This has always been my inspiration. It could also be that I am

very restless and I constantly seek, which I suppose assists innovation a bit. As to the veterinarian hat, I

have done quite a bit of surgery for many years…here we work with the hands, look closely at things, and

go by feel a lot. People think of medicine as science, but it is equally art, it is intuitive, there is a sensitivity

that must come with it, an empathy, and the hands are a channel in this capacity, and feeling is central. So

I suppose its an amalgam of all of these life experiences.

VL: On your website (www.demianart.net), you have a quote: “Art should bring magic into our daily lives,

an escape to a different place, maybe even a different world, somewhere delightful, exciting and alive. This

is why I create.” Tell us about this.

Demian: Well, you’ve heard the saying, “It’s the little things that count” Sometimes it can be a moment

in time, when suddenly everything stops and this fantastic and wonderful image separates itself from its

surroundings and presents itself to us. It captures us, our attention. And it may take us away, somewhere

far off, an escape to something better than the day to day, the grind, the mill. This is what I want to convey

or produce for the viewer or collector. This is really why I am an artist- to offer this feeling, this magic, this

alive-ness and make it an accessible part of day-to-day living.

http://www.demianart.net/

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Homecoming

http://www.demianart.net/

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VL

Intimate with Demian Dressler

“It’s the little things that count.”

VL: Obviously your art has deep philosophical undertones. Would you say there is a larger purpose to

it

Demian: Yes, I would say there is. So much of our time is consumed being driven (or forced) doing

things that deaden us, and each moment is like currency- “time is money”, right Moments are the currency

of our lives in this way. And they are being spent, right now, and they are finite since we are only

given so many in a life. And all of this enforced moment-spending doing things can leave behind a dull

heaviness that weighs us down- it dims our vision and outlook. I offer my art as a way of bringing that

propulsive feeling of excitement back into life. Remember when we were kids Or when we fell in love

There was freedom, there was delight, there was something to look forward to, and it was real. This energy,

excitement, this hopeful state of mind, this alive way of being that we can again allow ourselves…

the art is directed towards that end.

VL: Well, it’s pretty clear you put a lot of thought into your work. What were your influences

Demian: There were many. But what is being reflected in my work now is the influence of the early Surrealists,

Automatism, and Carl Jung. I’m really endeavoring to bypass the conscious mind to access

what is deeper, to truly or authentically act as a conduit, to allow the pieces to presence themselves and

get myself out of the way. Every artist knows this experience, and I have some techniques I use to do

away with the obstructing part of the mind. I’m at my best when I’m not there (laughs).

VL: Yes, but you have written narratives for your pieces that bring them to life in an entirely different

world. Is this writing an intellectual process that differs from your artistic process

Demian: The words are just another way to access that vital essence…Henri Bergson called it élan vitale,

a kind of vital force which is beyond words and also beyond a canvass, paper, sculpture, a sunset,

the eye of an animal…all of these point to something, they intimate at something, and they open a road

or a channel to the intangible, to the very thing that makes us feel alive, that changes our lives when we

allow it, or when we witness it fully and absorb it. The differences in expression, or the form itself, in the

end don’t really matter- they are all just gateways.

Right Page: Intermezzo Divinus

http://www.demianart.net/

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http://www.demianart.net/

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VL

Intimate with Demian Dressler

“It’s the little things that count.”

Leviathan

Kosmogonia

http://www.demianart.net/

164 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


The Chalice of Discreation

http://www.demianart.net/

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VL

Intimate with Demian Dressler

“It’s the little things that count.”

Prismatica

http://www.demianart.net/

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“Well, you’ve heard the saying, “It’s the little things that

count” Sometimes it can be a moment in time, when suddenly

everything stops and this fantastic and wonderful

image separates itself from its surroundings and presents

itself to us.”

“It’s the little things that count.”

http://www.demianart.net/

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 167


VL Intimate with Demian Dressler

“It’s the little things that count.”

Tempering

http://www.demianart.net/

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Sear of Interlude

http://www.demianart.net/

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Alejandro Castanon

www.vinodipinte.com

Vino Dipinte Art Gallery

602 Orient St San Angelo, TX 76903


alejandrocastanon.com


KRISTINE KAINER

www.kristinekainer.com

www.kristinekainer.blogspot.com


Texas Art

www.kristinekainer.com

www.kristinekainer.blogspot.com


Artists of Texas

artistsoftexas.org


NO WHERE BUT TEXAS

artistsoftexas.blogspot.com

dailypaintersoftexas.blogspot.com


Felicia Marshall

“Dressed Up”

“Alone”

Left page: “Sunshine on Hope”

FeliciaMarshall.blogspot.com


VL

Index of Features and Advertisers

Alejandro Castanon 170-171

Andy Baird 3, 50-65

Artists of Texas 174-175

Artists Out of Bounds 22-41

Barbara Haviland 94

Barry Scharf 124-129

Bob Coonts 68

Carol Jo Smidt 17

Connie Chadwell 14

Corey Watson 69

Daily Painters 178-179

Daily Painters Abstract Gallery

184-185

Davis & CO 66-67

Demian Dressler 158-169

Diane Whitehead 156-157

Dyan Newton 46

Elaine Vileria 36-41

Elizabeth Chapman 132-149

Eric Bodtker 90

Felicia Marshall 176-177

Filomena Booth 44-45

Joenlle T McCoy 16

John Whitton Bria 20-21

Joyce Pihl 42-43

Judy Mackey 116-117

Kimberly Conrad 152-153

Kristine Kainer 172-173

Lady L 120-121

Laurie Pace 70 -71

Lelija Roy 47

Lisa McKinney 130-131

Logan Bauer 48-49

Mark Yearwood 8

Mary Jo Zorad 122-123

Michal Ashkenasi 18-19

Mirada Fine Art 12-13

Nancy Medina 112-113

Nathalie Kelly 181

Painters Keys Sara Genn 11

Palette Knife Painters 150-151

Phylis Mantik DeQuevedo 15

Ricahrd Levine 9

Roberta McGowen 118-119

Roseanne Snyder 92

Sallie-Anne Swift 72-84

Sanda Manuila 91

Slav Krivoshiev 96-111

Suzy Pal Powell 95

Texas Trails Art Gallery 114-115

Valerie Travers 30-35

Vanessa Katz 24-29

Vicki Rees 93

Victoria Pendragon 4


Nathalie Kelley

“Christmas Candy” 8 x 10

“Blowing Off Steam”

nathaliekelleyart.com


VL

visuallanguagemagazine.com

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