The Gilded Age - The Council of Independent Colleges

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The Gilded Age - The Council of Independent Colleges

The Gilded Age

A Seminar for Faculty Members

July 14–19, 2013 • Stanford University

Directed by Richard White

Margaret Byrne Professor of American History, Stanford University


The Gilded Age

Directed by

Richard White

Margaret Byrne Professor of American History, Stanford University

The seminar will be held at

Stanford University on July 14–19, 2013.

The Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) is pleased to announce a

multidisciplinary seminar on the Gilded Age for full-time faculty members

in history and related fields. The seminar, cosponsored by the Gilder

Lehrman Institute of American History, will be held at Stanford University

in Stanford, California. There is no fee to participate, and most of the

other costs of participation will be covered thanks to a generous grant

from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and support from the Gilder

Lehrman Institute of American History.

The Gilded Age—the long period from the end of the Civil War to roughly the turn

of the 20th century—has moved from being an embarrassing backwater of American

history to one of the most fruitful sources of new scholarship. Encompassing the

so-called Greater Reconstruction in the West and the South, mass immigration,

industrialization, violent class conflict, transformative new technologies, and explosive

growth, the era created the foundation for the modern United States. The Gilded Age,

as its name indicates, was one of staggering corruption but also of real reform. This

seminar will examine the era in its own right and also explore the larger pedagogical

problem of how to teach an era of the past that has so many parallels to contemporary

times. Both the Gilded Age and the last 30 years of American history have, for example,

featured weak presidencies, mass immigration, deep cultural conflicts, technologies

that have transformed daily life, bitter ethnic and religious conflicts, and a pervasive

sense that the country has lost its moorings. How do we learn from this past without

turning it into a mirror for the present

Cover image provided by the Spatial History Lab at Stanford University.


Richard White is a Pulitzer Prize finalist historian specializing in

the history of the American West, environmental history, and Native

American history. He is the Margaret Byrne Professor of American History

at Stanford University, a faculty co-director of the Bill Lane Center for

the American West, and the former president of the Organization of

American Historians. He received a MacArthur Fellowship in 1995 and

was awarded a Mellon Distinguished Professor Grant in 2007. White

is currently principal investigator for “Shaping the West,” a project in

the Spatial History Lab at Stanford University, which explores the construction of space by

transcontinental railroads during the late 19th century. He is the author of numerous books

including The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region.

His most recent book, Railroaded, published in 2011, describes the history of the

transcontinental railroads and how they transformed America in the decades after the Civil

War. It received the Los Angeles Times Book Award for History, the Gomroy Prize of the

Business History Association, and the Society of American Historians’ Francis Parkman

Prize. It was also a 2012 Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and Pen Center USA’s Literary Award

in Research Nonfiction.

PARTICIPANTS, LOCATION, and EXPENSES

Twenty-five participants will be selected by competitive nomination. All full-time faculty

members in history and related fields at CIC member institutions are eligible. The seminar

will take place at Stanford University, and housing will be provided on campus. Room, board,

books, and other expenses will be fully covered. Participants or their institutions will be

expected to provide transportation to and from Stanford; however, CIC will reimburse the

participant’s institution up to $200 for travel-related expenses following the seminar.

NOMINATION PROCESS

A faculty member who wishes to participate must be nominated by the chief academic

officer of the nominee’s institution. Each institution may nominate more than one individual,

and faculty members of any academic rank may be nominated. The nomination form is

available online at www.cic.edu/AmericanHistory and may be submitted by mail or online.

Each nomination package should consist of the following:

1. Nomination letter from the chief academic officer;

2. Completed nomination form;

3. Nominee’s curriculum vitae; and

4. Nominee’s statement of reasons for wishing to participate in the seminar and

anticipated results in the nominee’s teaching, research, or curricular development

(no more than one page).

NOMINATION DEADLINE

Please send the completed nomination in a single packet to CIC by February 1, 2013.

SELECTION OF PARTICIPANTS ANNOUNCED: March 1, 2013

Please submit nomination materials to:

Stephen Gibson, Director of Programs

American History Seminar • Council of Independent Colleges

One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 320 • Washington, DC 20036-1142

Phone: (202) 466-7230 • Email: sgibson@cic.nche.edu


One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 320 • Washington, DC 20036-1142

Phone: 202.466.7230 • Fax: 202.466.7238

Email: cic@cic.nche.edu • www.cic.edu

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