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1 Evaluating patient education material of medications ... - PAINWeek

1 Evaluating patient education material of medications ... - PAINWeek

1 Evaluating patient education material of medications ... -

1 Evaluating patient education material of medications commonly used in palliative care Ebtesam Ahmed 1,2 , Maha Saad 1,3 , Magon George 1 , Feroze Karanjia 1 , Jasmine Thomas 1 1 St. John's University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Pharmacy Practice, Queens, NY, USA, 2 Department of Pain Medicine and Palliative Care. Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY, USA, 3 Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY, USA Purpose Palliative care is a specialized medical care for patients with serious illnesses; it focuses on providing patients with relief from symptoms such as pain, dyspnea, agitation, secretions, anxiety, and nausea. A number of medications are commonly used to treat the above listed symptoms. Often times, these medications are prescribed based on a non- Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved indication. Patient information material is a major source of knowledge for patients and their families. The aim of this study is to evaluate patient information material of medications used in palliative care and its availability in different languages; specifically focusing on drugs prescribed under off-label indication. Method A list of medications was compiled from the International Association of Hospice and Palliative Care (IAHPC) as well as drugs commonly used in palliative care clinical practice. The medicationspatient information material was then evaluated for inclusion of palliative indications and its availability in multiple languages. Four drug information databases and resources were consulted for that purpose: Lexi-Comp, Micromedex, Drug Facts and Comparison, and Medline Plus. In addition, a total of 10 palliative care specific websites were also checked for availability of patient drug information material. Results A total of 40 medications were identified as commonly used in palliative care, 17 were prescribed based on their FDA approved indication, 16 were prescribed based on non-FDA approved indications, and 7 were being used for both approved and nonapproved indications in palliative care. Upon consulting the different resources, comprehensive patient education material was available only for medications used based on their FDA approved indication. Micromedex had the highest percentage (28.6%) of off-label uses in palliative care for healthcare providers. Compared to other databases, Lexicomp provided the most (26.8%) patient education material about medications use in palliative care under non-FDA indication. Facts and Comparisons had the least amount of information regarding palliative non-FDA indications for both providers and patients (17.9% and 1.8% respectively). Although, MedlinePlus is a commonly utilized database for patient information, it was not found to be the best source for non- FDA indications in palliative care. Patient education materials were available in multiple languages for all drugs commonly used in palliative care. For non-FDA approved indications, the patient education material did not clearly address palliative indications. These indications were, at best, extrapolated from the FDA approved indication as in the case with gabapentin (used for neuropathy) or mentioned under the side effects profile, as it is the case with scopolamine for dry mouth. Palliative care organizations provided a wealth of information about the definition and goal of PC, however when the drugs used were mentioned it was only in the context of symptom management; patient education material was not available. Conclusions

  • Page 2 and 3: There is definitely a need for the
  • Page 4 and 5: Results The mean VAS pain score at
  • Page 6 and 7: aclofen occurring approximately 1 h
  • Page 8 and 9: 5 Consequences of OxyContin patient
  • Page 10 and 11: 6 Evaluation of the abuse potential
  • Page 12 and 13: 7 Effects of renal impairment and h
  • Page 14 and 15: 8 Assessment of residents with pain
  • Page 16 and 17: 9 The impact of pharmacist driven E
  • Page 18 and 19: 10 Retrospective Analysis of the Cl
  • Page 20 and 21: 12 Swimming suppresses interleukin-
  • Page 22 and 23: OxyContin using a threshold of 3 ph
  • Page 24 and 25: In real-world clinical practice, G-
  • Page 26 and 27: Results Mean ‘At the Moment Drug
  • Page 28 and 29: program (M = 3.76, SD = 0.90). Resu
  • Page 30 and 31: Results Experiment 1: The mean base
  • Page 32 and 33: Within a week of the initial inject
  • Page 34 and 35: OC/APAP than for IR OC/APAP. APAP T
  • Page 36 and 37: high-fat and low-fat states; mean O
  • Page 38 and 39: after dosing. Fluctuation of APAP p
  • Page 40 and 41: after IR OC/APAP, 23.1% after CR OC
  • Page 42 and 43: equivalent dose of IR OC/APAP admin
  • Page 44 and 45: significantly different from zero a
  • Page 46 and 47: TEAE in the single-dose studies, an
  • Page 48 and 49: one-fifth (19.6%, n = 923,594) of t
  • Page 50 and 51: (79.7%). Among the ER cases, in add
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    without IR opioids). Stratified ana

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    30 Determination of physicochemical

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    that was difficult to recover in a

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    33 Constipation prevention: a Joint

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    34 Effect of paroxetine, a CYP2D6 i

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    35 Functional improvement associate

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    36 Case study describing an innovat

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    37 Evidence-based virtual reality f

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    38 Survey of patient perspective on

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    40 Abuse potential of oxycodone/nal

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    41 The Opioid Abuse Risk Screener (

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    42 Treadmill exercise combined with

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    44 A phase 3, randomized, double-bl

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    45 Safe and effective high-dose opi

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    46 Effect of hepatic impairment on

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    47 Effect of renal impairment on th

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    48 Treatment of episodic tension-ty

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    49 A novel formulation of ibuprofen

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    50 A novel formulation of ibuprofen

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    51 Prescription amphetamine misuse

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    52 Assessment of the pharmacokineti

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    53 Assessment of the use of oral fl

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    54 Identifying clinicians' practice

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    55 Accuracy of the bead-based multi

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    Results The majority of veterans (6

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    Conclusions This pilot study contri

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    59 Effect of topical diclofenac (Pe

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    60 Lubiprostone for treatment of op

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    diarrhea (11.3%), nausea (9.9%), an

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    Conclusions Prescribing chronic opi

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    controls, P < .001), and to accurat

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    65 Effect of banning office dispens

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    significantly higher rates of back

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    and oxymorphone ER groups, respecti

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    CR OC/APAP compared with intact dos

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    lower at later time points (0-4 h,

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    17 patients (4.5%) reported a total

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    72 Comparison of the heated lidocai

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    73 Breakthrough pain and its associ

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    of Opioid Therapy for Chronic Pain

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    The absolute bioavailability of nal

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    There were no deaths, serious AEs (

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    Conclusions We conclude that the in

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    Conclusions Prescription drugs, and

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    80 Exploring high rates of abnormal

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    Conclusions Low cost pain panels wi

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    efficacy profile as well as demonst

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    The choice of OxyContin as the prim

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    A less-discussed role of abuse-dete

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    only 58% of the prescription pain r

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    eported having chewed opioids (83.3

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    state in the multiple-dose study, w

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    day 1 in the multiple-dose study wa

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    (day 7). 3) Single daily injections

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    91 Comparison of heated lidocaine/t

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    92 Should buprenorphine be called a

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    93 Patient satisfaction associated

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    This study found that the introduct

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    matched controls). In addition, of

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    97 Application of epidural implanta

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    99 Medication use evaluation of hig

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    100 Opioid-sparing effect of alpha-

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    102 Long-term maintenance of improv

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    egimens are recommended, as well as

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    label periods. Vital signs during t

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    event (TEAE). TEAEs with CR OC/APAP

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    precision (n = 20) and total precis

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    108 Use of a biomarker panel for th

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    110 Culture matters: a web-based tr

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    111 Fibromyalgia and bullying: a co

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    questions, frequency, means, and si

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    114 Long-term safety and efficacy o

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    116 Search for inflammatory markers

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    118 Opioid risk assessment among ph

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    COGNITIONS: Arthritis Self-efficacy

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    not KODIAC-05 (34.9%, P = .202). Si

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    Forest plots of the respective subg

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    scores reported by patients prior t

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    In general, people were satisfied w

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    125 TD-1211 demonstrates a durable

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    127 Family medicine physicians' con

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    128 Pediatric opioid use and safety

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    129 Long-term pain management with

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    Results Two hundred fifty 5 article

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    Due to the nature of claims data, t

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    Conclusions The incidence of OIC (r

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    analyses showed that compared to no

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    Results Mean ‘High' VAS E max was

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    Conclusions Patients in US were exp

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    137 The impact on pain interference

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    treatment response. Findings should

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    Conclusions As expected in this pop

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    when painCAS Beta was not in use (

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    Forty one subjects received their a

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    Two core applications of TPM ® are

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    144 Trypsin-Labile Opioid Prodrugs

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    146 Abuse Resistance of Trypsin-Lab

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