Dark-Side-of-Dairy-report-2014

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Dark-Side-of-Dairy-report-2014

The Dark Side of Dairy – A Report on the UK Dairy Industry

Nanny State (2012):

The Truth about Goat’s Milk

Goats’ milk comes from happy animals on small rural

farms. Right Well, that’s what the industry wants

you to believe. However, you don’t have to scratch

very far beneath the surface to find a far more

unpalatable truth. In short, the kids are not all right.

Through a series of ground-breaking undercover

investigations Viva! has shone a light on the rapidly

expanding goat’s dairy industry in the UK – including

farms that supply the UK’s biggest supermarkets.

Our exposé has documented illegal mutilations of

baby animals and other legal but extremely painful

procedures – including the disbudding of baby goats,

painful castrations with a tight rubber band fitted

above billy goat’s testes so they gradually shrivel

(without pain relief).

In May 2012, we filmed undercover at Upper Enson

Farm (Britain’s largest grazing goat herd) in

Staffordshire, who milk around 1,800 goats for

Delamere Dairies – who supply M&S, Waitrose, The

Co-op, Sainsbury’s and a number of other major UK

retailers. In September/October 2011, we also filmed

at Bromes Farm in Somerset, which farms around

1,200 zero-grazed goats and supplies Tesco.

The system works the same way for dairy goats as it

does for dairy cows – females are used to replenish

the herd, but males can’t produce milk so they are

either killed at birth or kept for meat for the growing

ethnic market. Almost all kid goats suffer at least

one painful mutilation – and often without

anaesthetic.

See the video from our investigation at

www.whitelies.org.uk or go to our YouTube page

www.youtube.com/user/vivaorg.

We filmed goats with abnormally distended udders

and swollen teats, lame goats with overgrown

hooves, sores, goats who couldn’t stand up, piles of

dead carcasses, intensified zero-grazing farming

practices and unwanted billy goats. It is this

intensification that has allowed the industry to

surpass the production of 2 million litres a year in

Britain for the first time.

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