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BITRE | Working paper 74

Figure C1 Growing interest in vehicle identification from several road

transport perspectives

Traffic

manager

From traffic management

to vehicle management

Vehicle identification

after traffic offence

Traffic

regulation

Service

providers

Addressing for

tailor-made services

Tracking and tracing

of (missing) vehicles

Fleet

owners

Maintenance

Tracking and tracing

in the production process

Insurance

companies

Automotive

industry

Source: van Koningsbruggen and Oldenburger (undated, p. 2).

A major appeal of RFID is that there is a much wider market than transport, offering

the promise of cost reductions due to economies of scale and the spreading of

the cost of research and development across a much larger market than transport

alone.

Figure C2 illustrates the potential uses for active RFID technology over the next

ten years, with agriculture, libraries, manufacturing, financial and leisure sectors

accounting for almost 40 per cent of demand. Passenger transport/automotive is

roughly of the order of consumer goods/retail, military and correctional facilities.

Tags can become ‘electronic number plates’, if attached to the car in such a way that

the tag is destroyed if attempts are made to remove it. Alternatively, they can be built

into the actual number plates (e-plate) designed to shatter if an attempt is made to

remove them, and even to transmit a warning of the attempt.

RFID number plates, or e-plates, have been commercially available since 2004.

A British firm, Identec Solutions AG, is trialling e-plates with the aim of providing

an encrypted and secured ID code that could be registered to a British Ministry of

Transport database, preventing tampering, cloning and other forms of fraud that

plague the current ANPR systems.

142

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