Automation keeps manufacturing alive! - Fastems

fastems

Automation keeps manufacturing alive! - Fastems

Fastems oy Ab customer magazine 1 • 2007

Automation keeps

manufacturing alive!

Automating

production enhances

both productivity

and quality

FPM –

A new standard

for fl exibility

Manufacturing

industry experts

convene in Tampere

1 • 2007 | 1


SYSTEM

INTEGRATOR

Editorial ..................................................................2

Fastems at EMo 2007: Automation

keeps manufacturing alive! .......................3

Fastems strengths its support

in North America .............................................4

Masco and Fastems team up

to drive down cost .........................................6

“The only limit for robot cells is

our imagination” ...............................................8

Automating production enhances

both productivity and quality ..............10

FPM – A new standard for flexibility ....12

FPc raises efficiency in

small machine shops .................................14

RPc-20g increases productivity

of production machines ..........................16

Fastems and Finn-Power

cooperation expands .................................17

The multi-skilled Teleservice Team

keeps customers’ systems running ....18

Manufacturing industry experts

convene in Tampere ....................................20

Time-off ...............................................................22

Tids and bits ......................................................23

Published by FASTEMS Oy Ab

No. 1/2007

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Helena Reilin, Fastems Oy Ab

helena.reilin@fastems.com

ENGLISH EDITION:

Sari Lehtonen-Lammi, Imageneering Oy

LAYOUT:

Imageneering Oy

EDITORIAL ADDRESS:

System Integrator

Fastems Oy Ab

Tuotekatu 4, 33840 TAMPERE, FINLAND

Tel. +358 (0)3 268 5111

Fax. +358 (0)3 268 5000

PRINTED BY:

Kirjapaino Hermes Oy, Tampere,

Finland 2007

CONTRIBUTORS:

Tomas Agdahl

Tim Erman

Robert Humphreys

Jarmo Hyvönen

Janne Konttila

Klaus Maurmaier

2 | 1 • 2007

Matti Nurminen

Janne Näsström

Michael schott

Peter springfeld

Pekka Tuhkanen

Jens von Weissenberg

MANuFAcTuRINg

TEchNoLogIEs –

ENAbLINg

TEchNoLogIEs

E d i t o r i a l

We are facing perhaps the biggest challenge of our times. Asian economies are rising and

manufacturing focus is turning to the East. This change has begun and it will continue. In 2025,

most of the working hands between 30-40 years of age will be found in Asia. so, who is going

to do the manufacturing work in Europe and the usA? Is European manufacturing dying? No.

success factors in Europe will depend on skilled people and their efficient tools.

our strategic task is to develop these tools and see that the 8760 yearly production hours

are efficiently used despite fewer hands to do the work. With this development we don’t just

help our customers, but also the entire manufacturing industry. As manufacturing is increasingly

carried out by sMEs, it is our task to offer solutions applicable both to larger and smaller

companies. Fastems solutions will support the manufacturing strategies of both production

types. The innovative FPM concept and our new and agile robot cells provide good examples

of such products.

New manufacturing technologies need to enable fast and cost effective material flow from

bottom to top, from the first component to ready-to-use machinery. Therefore, we concentrate

on solutions that connect machine tools and technologies together without any borders or

closed standards. We offer solutions for companies who see that it is important to develop

their manufacturing strategy according to best practices and according to the latest available

technology. These companies are interested in creating effective and sustainable manufacturing.

such manufacturing allow the flexibility for future challenges.

Our goal is to ensure quality time for our customers. Time that means seeking new business

opportunities, rather than guessing what went wrong with the production equipment, why the

utilization rate of machine tools is so poor, why the throughput time too long, how staff can be

kept motivated, or how the quality level can be raised as high as possible.

At Fastems, we commit to solving those problems for you, and we want to be known for the

success of our customers. our latest solutions will be showcased at EMo 2007, in hannover.

I hope you visit us at EMo, and receive something precious to take back home. something that

will help you in your daily work, ideas that will raise your competitiveness in this ever-tightening

business, as well as tools that enable you to win the order.

Jarmo Hyvönen,

cEo

Fastems group


Fastems at EMO 2007:

Automation keeps

manufacturing alive!

PREsERvINg ThE MANuFAcTuRINg INDusTRy Is A vALuAbLE goAL ThAT FAsTEMs

shAREs WITh ITs cusToMERs.

At EMO 2007, we will continue our role as

an international pathfi nder in fl exible factory

automation solutions for lean manufacturing.

Th e latest technology highlights

showcased at EMO will be introduced also

in this magazine on pages 10‑14.

automate for more

production hours

Th e goal for Fastems products, services and

partnership is to ensure that the annually

available 8760 production hours are utilised

as effi ciently as possible. Th e over 600 FMS

and nearly 100 FPC pallet containers in-

stalled worldwide have already proven their

ability to increase global competitiveness

in the mechanical engineering, vehicle and

aerospace industries.

open doors into the

metalworKing world

Th e doors of the EMO exhibition in Hannover

will be open from 17 to 22 September 2007.

Th e absolute leading trade fair in the

world of metalworking displays on the largest

fairground premises of the world an unequalled

width and depth of products and

services throughout all production areas,

READ MORE:

pages 10-14!

from machine tools to precision tools, auto- automation

components to customised systems.

Exhibitors from all over the world once

again will put their effi ciency and innovative

power to the test before the best qualifi ed

international specialists.

Th e visitors of EMO come from all levels

of the trade, e.g. they are entrepreneurs,

board members and managing directors,

department heads as well as employees and

skilled workers. Th ey work in the fi elds of

production, operations scheduling, construction,

R+D, as well as purchasing.

1 • 2007 | 3


FASTEMS strengthen

its support in NORTH

expanded service support

In January 2006 Fastems LLC was created to

keep up with global demand for automation.

Since then Fastems LLC based near Cincinnati

has been building its support structure

for the US market. Expansion has included

service engineers based on the West Coast

and in the Mid West USA. In the latter part

of 2007 Fastems will add US based ‘teleservice’

to their support portfolio. Teleservice

enables Fastems to remotely access any

system supplied giving customers a greater

level of service support and helping to maximize

the uptime of their Fastems system/s.

deepening product support

With over 120 years of production engineering

experience, Fastems LLC product

managers, led by Vice President Robert

Humphreys, can off er our partners deep

technical support.

Pete Newbery, George Petruck and

Don Gargiulo off er this technical support

in the East, Mid West and West of the USA

respectively. Th ese highly experienced engineers

can provide automation solutions to

our customers.

4 | 1 • 2007

Robert Humphreys, VP of Fastems LLC.

it’s all aBout increased

productivity

We asked Robert Humphreys, VP of

Fastems LLC, for his take on automation,

the demands of manufacturing in North

America today, and how Fastems’ product

managers work with customers.

Q. What does Fastems automation o� er the

customer in today’s manufacturing world?

A. “Th e key to meeting the requirements

of the changing face of manufacturing is to

off er automated systems with a competitive

edge that increases productivity.”

Q. You mention the changing face of manufacturing,

what exactly do mean by this?

A. “I recently attended a Manufacturing

Summit where speakers from around the

Product Manager George Petruck,

Mid Western Area.

world presented their views of manufacturing

today in the global economy, and none

summed it better than John Byrd, the President

of AMT (Th e Association for Manufacturing

Technology). He said, ‘that although

many say that manufacturing in North

America is in decline and dying, contrary to

this manufacturing (in North America) is

in fact changing and evolving.’ Yes, there are

less people employed in manufacturing but

productivity is at its highest ever, this has

been achieved through change and investment

in technology. Th e only way to survive

is to become more productive.”

“So going back to my fi rst answer, I believe

that the systems that Fastems off ers enable

companies to change and invest in technology

that increases productivity. Th e key

words here are ‘increased productivity’.”

Q. How does Fastems LLC help and enable

customers in the US to change and evolve?

A. “Each of our 3 product managers can of-


s AMERICA

fer automation solutions that result in productivity

increases. Typically we work with

our machine tool partners and the end user

and create a production solution, the aim is

to increase productivity.”

truly flexiBle manufacturing

Next, we asked about how diff erent customers

use their Fastems systems, and what opportunities

these bring.

Q. What is a typical Flexible Manufacturing

system and does it � t a certain pro� le or

industry?

A. “Interestingly, although we have over 60

FM systems throughout North America and

Western Area

Don Gargiulo

in many diff erent industries, none fi t a typical

size or profi le. We have systems ranging

from a single machine to multi-machine

installations, some with high volume production

with low variety and many with low

volume batch production with high variety.

We have systems manufacturing parts in

aerospace through to automotive through to

medical, OEM through to subcontractors.

All systems aim to increase productivity, we

can make a one off whilst maximizing spindle

utilization, quite oft en over 90% whilst

employing minimum labor.”

Q. What would you say to customers interested

in knowing more about Fastems?

A. “I’d very much welcome any machine tool

dealer or end customer to contact one of our

product managers – aft er all, the best solutions

come from open discussion.”

System Integrator would like to thank Vice

President Humphreys for taking the time to

talk to us.

Mid Western Area

George Petruck

Eastern Area

Pete Newbery

Fastems LLC

1 • 2007 | 5


Masco Fastems

team up to drive down cost

WhILE PRoDucTIvITy Is uP IN

ToDAy’s bRAvE NEW WoRLD oF

MANuFAcTuRINg, cosT Is ThE

DRIvINg FoRcE. FLExIbILITy Is KEy

IN TWo AREAs: ThE MAchININg

cELL, AND ThosE PRovIDINg ThE

EquIPMENT. A sToRy oF shARED

vIsIoN ThAT bINDs TWo coMPANIEs

IN A sPIRIT oF PARTNERshIP.

6 | 1 • 2007

Machinery Sales Company, also called

Masco, knows that providing solutions is

good for its business – and is even more critical

to their customer’s prosperity (let alone

survival) – than selling standalone machines.

Such fl exible thinking has brought

Masco and Fastems together, in a shared

vision of “cost” and how it impacts manufacturers.

“Price, quality, delivery: that is always

the triangle,” states Garry Frost, Masco’s

President of the City of Industry, California

fi rm. “It’s very diffi cult to obtain all three.

Parts produced with too high labor content

will move to off shore production, you’ve got

to reduce operator content,” says Frost.

Four years ago Masco began to see the value

in teaming up with Fastems USA., “We

started to exploit the possibilities and realized

that Fastems FMS was the right product

for the market,” said Frost. And thus, the

seeds of partnership took root.

offer solutions, not Just

machines

Recognizing the possibility of providing

cost-driven solutions, Masco introduced

Fastems to Viking Products, Inc., where they

sold two Kitamura HX400i units combined

with a Fastems FMS. Another case is an installation

at Aluminum Precision Products

(APP), the system has helped to drive down


Bill Minna APP seen next to Fastems

system with Garry Frost of MASCO,

discussion future expansion.

costs whilst increasing productivity. Both

cases show Masco as a “solution-driven”

company.

Fastems is very flexible, they can integrate

different machines into the same

system. This flexibility helps to bring the

solution to the cost, giving the end customer

more options. It was just sort of possibility

that APP’s Bill Minna liked.”

automating at app

“APP has a long history of cell manufacturing,”

says Frost. “Bill Minna liked the

possibility of using different machine sizes,

or even different makes of machine in the

same cell.” APP and Masco worked together

to specify the Kitamura machines with the

Fastems’ FMS and its advanced software

system.

“On an operator level, the man-cell

controller interface is very well thought out,”

continues Minna. “It allows a quick learning

curve for existing shop floor personnel.”

“APP has set its sight a high level of unattended

operation, the Fastems system is enabling

us to do just that,” adds Minna. APP

compete in a Global market, with a shortage

of workers and qualified operators they had

no choice but to automate, streamline and

go lean.

“Beautiful friendship”

People like APP’s Bill Minna have realized

that in today’s manufacturing life: either the

product is cost-competitive, or it goes offshore.

When Masco and Fastems team up

to make such good things happen, it brings

to mind Humphrey Bogart’s memorable

“Casablanca” exit line: “Louis, I think this

is the beginning of a beautiful friendship,”

concludes Frost.

Increasing

productivity

at APP

Aluminum Precision Products constantly

looks at ways to improve efficiencies and

reduce cost through lean manufacturing,

total quality management and continuous

process improvement. APP has invested in

two Kitamura HX500s and one HX630 horizontal

machining center integrated into a

Fastems MLS_MD FM system (Multi-Level

System) to achieve their goal.

One of its products, a large landing gear, exemplifies

APP’s goal of increasing productivity

through flexibility.

“With this machine tool investment we

have cut machining time from 45 to about

18 minutes,” notes APP’s machine engineering

manager, Bill Minna. Another jet

engine part was being produced at about six

parts per hour, now that part is at a rate of

8 to10 per hour, adding that “the Fastems

system enables quick reload of parts at the

load stations, helping to maximizes spindle

utilization’.

“We do many different parts a month

and run quite a bit through this cell,” adds

Minna. The 27.2m (89.2feet) long cell has

multi level storage for 42 pallets, most of

which have aluminum tombstones that APP

manufactures.

Keeping customers happy

Specializing in the forging of aluminum

and titanium precision parts, APP had a

demand to produce the aforementioned

jet engine part. “The customer asked us

to forge and machine double the previous

quantity, we needed capacity immediately”.

Masco was able to fill all our requirements

with a Kitamura HMC, 12,000 RPM spindle,

plus a number of other innovations

“We had been looking at a Fastems system

for some time, at this moment we have

three Kitamuras integrated and are considering

adding another. We won’t have to extend

the Fastems system as there is enough

space to integrate a fourth machine.”

Minna says that his operators and maintenance

personnel like the system “very

much. “They were easily trained,” he notes.

“We started installing the system about

January 4, after we came back from Christmas

shutdown, and it was up and running

by February 1. It’s been running ever since.

Reliability has been great. It has enabled us

to get greater productivity and compete in

an ever-changing market”.

1 • 2007 | 7


“The only

limit for robot

cells is our

imagination”

8 | 1 • 2007

TWo FAsTEMs RoboTIzED

PRoDucTIoN cELLs ARE hELPINg oNE

oF sWEDEN’s LARgEsT MEchANIcAL

ENgINEERINg coMPANIEs To bEcoME

EvEN MoRE coMPETITIvE.

“ThE INsTALLATIoN hAs ExcEEDED

ouR ExPEcTATIoNs,” sAys HARRY

RAjALA, PRoDucTIoN MANAgER AT

PARTNERTEch IN KARLsKogA, sWEDEN.

PartnerTech is a group of companies that

develops and manufactures products for

several of the industry’s leading brands.

They manufacture everything from telecommunications

equipment to defense

materials. The factory in Karlskoga is one

of the largest cutting machining factories

in the world, with approximately 100 CNC

machines.

Competition in the field is fierce and

PartnerTech has an ambitious investment

program. One priority is the automated

material handling. The company invests in

new machines with the required technology

and also in material handling equipment

that complements existing machines.

Fastems presented a turn-key solution

with a portal robot that docks with the


machine,” says Kent Sandberg, who is in

charge of the investment program.

more advanced tasKs

The first robotized production cell was installed

at the beginning of 2006. It was a

Fastems RPC-20G modular portal robot that

was mounted on a 15-year-old Okuma CNC

lathe. Fastems delivered the complete system

pre-programmed and installation was over

in less than a week. After a couple of days of

training and fine-tuning, the system went

into production.

“The robot cell has functioned almost

perfectly from the very first moment,” comments

operator Tomas Forsberg.

The original idea was that the life of an obsolete

machine could be extended with the

help of a robot and the system could keep

producing at least fairly simple components.

However, the system worked so well that the

robot cell was soon assigned to more advanced

production tasks.

time for inspections

With the success of the first robot cell, the

idea to robotize another machine followed

quickly. The machine next door was an Index

G300 lathe with nine spindles and was

selected to be upgraded. The second Fastems

RPC-20G was installed at the end of 2006,

this time with the aim of fine-tuning a machine

that was used for machining advanced

components with tight tolerances. The products

in this case were defense materials that

required inspection at an individual level.

“I can now manage several machines

and I have time to inspect the products

while the robots are charging and emptying

the lathes,” says Tomas Forsberg.

“We have yet to exhaust the full potential of the robot cell. The limit is set by our imagination,”

says Harry Rajala (left) to which Kent Sandberg agrees.

The process starts by placing the blanks

on pallet trolleys in the cell. The robot picks

up one blank at a time. The control systems

of the robot and the lathe communicate with

each other and the robot loads the lathe with

work pieces. Once machining is complete,

the lathe is emptied and the robot switches

to standby mode for a moment. If the operator

presses a button, the finished work piece

is delivered for inspection through a “letterbox”.

Otherwise, the work piece is placed on

the pallet and the next blank is picked up.

“Production continues even if I do not

have the time to receive the work piece,” says

Tomas Forsberg.

flexiBle productivity

Fastems programs the robot cell on-site. The

basic program is adapted to new products

by operating the robot in manual mode and

teaching it the new operations. The process

is simple and PartnerTech was able to rapidly

change production once the potential of

the system was understood.

Both machines are operated five days a

week in a three-shift. When manufacturing

products that do not need individual inspection,

the magazine is loaded by the last shift

of the week and the machine then runs automatically

until the pallets are empty.

“We have yet to exhaust the full potential

of the robot cell. There is more to be

done. The only limit is our imagination,”

says Harry Rajala.

According to Mr. Rajala, evidence shows

that the investment is producing a better return

in terms of productivity, flexibility and

availability than PartnerTech expected.

The second robot cell was installed on one of

PartnerTech’s more advanced machines, a

nine-spindle lathe.

1 • 2007 | 9


Automating production enhances

both productivity and quality

Fastems Flexible Manufacturing System increases machine utilization

AuToMATINg MANuFAcTuRINg PRocEssEs Is oNE oF ThE MosT DEPENDAbLE

METhoDs oF INcREAsINg ThE uTILIzATIoN oF MAchINEs AND EquIPMENT,

AND ENsuRINg RELIAbLE PRoDucTIoN WITh coNsIsTENTLy hIgh quALITy. by

succEssFuL AuToMATINg MANuFAcTuRE oF ThEIR RANgE oF sAFETy vALvE

housINgs, ThE PRojEcT TEAM REsPoNsIbLE FoR vALvE boDy PRoDucTIoN AT ThE

hohENWEsTEDT PLANT oF LEsER gMbh & co. Kg, IN gERMANy, ALso AcquIRED A

sERIEs oF ExTRA RATIoNALIzATIoN soLuTIoNs IN ThE PRocEss. IN TWo hoRIzoNTAL

MAchININg cENTREs, AuToMATED FEED-IN AND REMovAL oF WoRK PIEcEs Is

PERFoRMED by A FLExIbLE MANuFAcTuRINg sysTEM FRoM ThE FINNIsh coMPANy

FAsTEMs.

Originally founded as a brassfoundry in

Hamburg in 1818, the company known today

as Leser GmbH & Co. KG has enjoyed

a success story that has lasted almost two

hundred years. Working from the outset as a

supplier, it has always concerned itself with

effective development, setting new trends

and pointing the way forward wherever possible.

The company developed its first safety

valves for use in steam boilers in 1885 and,

even back then, the safety of people and the

10 | 1 • 2007

environment was the goal of Leser products.

It was in the 1970s that the company then

switched its focus to safety valves.

Safety valves secure equipment and

pipeline systems against unwanted pressure

surges in a wide range of industrial plants,

subsequently preventing explosions and protecting

people, the environment and equipment

from injury or damage. Generally

speaking, they form the last link in the safety

chain. For this reason, it is essential that they

The Fastems MLS-MD system connects two

DBF 630 machining centres to a Flexible

Manufacturing System.

work flawlessly. This means demands with

regards to development, design and manufacturing

quality are high.

“The Leser Company is one of the world’s

leading manufacturers of quality safety

The automatic stacker crane operates shelves

with a maximum height of 20 meters and up

to 150 meters long.


valves,” says CEO Joachim Klaus with a

smile. “Our product range comprises a total of

seven product groups with 38 types of safety

valves. With a wide variety of materials and

valve sizes in nominal widths from DN 10 to

DN 400, 1/2“ to 16“, the company provides

safe solutions for all industrial applications.

Annual production is currently around 75,000

safety valves and is increasing constantly, and

we expect considerable growth in demand

for our larger safety valves in particular.” “In

light of this forecast,” adds production planning

manager Kai‑Uwe Weiss “it was decided

two years ago that a replacement investment

was necessary for two of our older machining

centres. We solved the challenges facing us

by means of an automation project, which we

called ‘Innopac’.

automation solution

requirements

“As with all automation projects”, admits

Joachim Klaus, “we too wondered how we

might solve one of the key problems, namely

how to integrate, for our business, batch size

one manufacturing orders into the automated

manufacturing process.” “Based on our team’s

experience” notes Kai-Uwe Weiss, “we added

an additional requirement in our specifications

in the call for tenders: the two machining

centres had to be capable of machining

the clamped pieces in one or at maximum

two clampings with a horizontal spindle”

“Today we know that it was precisely by

meeting this requirement”, stresses Joachim

Klaus, “that were able to achieve such good

results for rationalization. Whereas before six

or seven clampings on various machines were

necessary, we now manufacture our safety

valve housings using one or at the most two

clampings.”

rationalization solutions in

manufacturing

Matthias Hoffmann learned the job of a

machine setter in the company and became

involved in the automation project right

from the start. He says that, “all machine

pallets in the Flexible Manufacturing System

are loaded and unloaded in the two loading

stations. These carry either clamping

systems for small parts or hydraulic chain

clamping systems for machining valve housings.

This type of clamping ensures the tension

is distributed evenly across the entire

workpiece and also enhances the quality of

the processing. It’s also a lot faster, taking 30

seconds at the most.”

“The machining centres we chose”,

explains Kai-Uwe Weiss, “are DBF 630s,

which are made by Doerries Scharmann

Technologie GmbH. With these, the clampings

previously required for machining on

the lathe are no longer necessary. This was

A compact MLS-MD system (Multi-Level-System) and, from left: Machine operators Heiko

Rathjen, Matthias Hoffmann with Klaus Maurmaier, Fastems Sales Manager for Germany,

Production Planning Manager Kai-Uwe Weiss and Frank Turm, CNC Programmer.

one of the key reasons it was worth using a

Fastems Flexible Manufacturing System for

automation. Additionally though, automated

production processes ensure a high processing

quality – the machining quality of the

valve seat sealing surfaces is one of the defining

criteria for the quality of a safety valve.

Secondly, we needed to integrate an automatic

joining operation in the machining process.

This involves automatic assembly and subsequent

machining of the valve seat socket in

the safety valve housing, which is monitored

by the control system. The standard versions

of the DBF 630 machining centres also contribute

greatly to reducing the clamping work.

Bearing all these things in mind, we made

Doerries Scharmann Technologie GmbH the

general contractor for implementing our automation

plan. Doerries Scharmann then got

the Finnish company Fastems involved in the

project, whose Flexible Manufacturing System

provided the basis for fully automated operation

of the two DBF 630 machining centres.”

automated worKpiece handling

“Our goal,” says Kai-Uwe Weiss, “of having

at least every third shift unmanned could

only be achieved by automating in-feed and

removal of workpieces. The Fastems Flexible

Manufacturing System offers, as other companies

have told us, the best options for automatic

operation of machining centres. Users

of Fastems Flexible Manufacturing Systems

really do get closer to the aim of using the

8760 hours theoretically available each year

more productively. Besides the recommendation

by Doerries Scharmann, we were also

convinced of the value of the Fastems Flexible

Manufacturing System by the fact that

nearly all the best known tool machine manufacturers

have installed Fastems systems

and all speak highly of them.

“We work with cast parts,” Kai-Uwe

Weiss reminds us. “Cast parts are not always

homogenous. This means you have to reckon

on a tool break even during unmanned

night shifts.” “When this happens,” adds

Klaus Maurmaier “the machine detects the

tool break and reports this to Fastems system

control and the pallet is removed and

marked. Before continuing with a new pallet,

the FMS control system checks whether all

tools are still available, replacing broken tools

if necessary.”

fast implementation

“Even looking back today,” says managing director

Joachim Klaus, “the decision we made

shortly before Christmas 2005 with regards

to the complex rationalization project was the

correct one. The Fastems system was installed

back in September 2006 and the team that

did it was great – they assembled it within ten

days. By November the machining centres

were connected up to the Fastems Flexible

Manufacturing System. And they were wired

up to the Fastems Control System in no time

at all too – less than three days. It was at this

point we realized we were dealing with professionals.

And we were able to witness how

well it performed straight away. Even while

the automatic manufacturing system was being

commissioned, we received a large order,

which we were able to turn out rapidly.”

1 • 2007 | 11


12 | 1 • 2007

FPM

– A new standard for fl exibility

ThE FAsTEMs FLExIbLE PALLET MAgAzINE, FPM, Is A coNFIguRAbLE, FLExIbLE

MANuFAcTuRINg sysTEM ThAT oFFERs you vERsATILITy IN sIzE, MAchINE NuMbER

AND coNTRoL FEATuREs. INTRoDucED AT EMo 2007, ThE NEW gENERATIoN FPM Is

READy To ENhANcE youR PRoDucTIvITy WITh sEvERAL NEW FEATuREs.

EMO

highlights

highlights

2007


Th e Flexible Pallet magazine provides a cost eff ective alternative

for more fl exibility, when the tailored MLS system seems too big

an investment and the FPC container is not quite enough anymore.

Based on standard modules with confi gurable options, FPM creates

an ideal and easily aff ordable solution for machining workshops to

increase their automation level and unmanned production.

“FPM is a standard product that ensures fl exibility and expandability,”

says Matti Nurminen, R&D Manager of Fastems. “Th is

product has been developed to improve the effi ciency of your entire

workshop, as it can grow along with your goals from a one to ten

machine system, if needed.”

made for users

A new control system provides FPM users with an easy-to-learn

and easy-to-use graphical interface that guides and supports users

in their diff erent tasks and manufacturing operations. “Th ese control

functions are not only simple to use but also extremely fl exible,”

Nurminen emphasises. “Th e control system extends in response to

your needs and the same system supports manufacturing of both

large batches and single parts.”

“A further advantage is the working ergonomics. Th e loading

station has been designed to allow users to work in more comfortable

and ergonomic positions,” Nurminen continues.

matched with production

Th e modular system grows together with your production goals – as

far as your vision can take you. “At its smallest, the system consists

of a machine tool, loading station and storage rack for 12 machine

pallets,” Janne Konttila, Product Manager of Fastems points out.

“With extension modules you can increase the storage capacity to

more than 100 machine pallets and ten machine tools”

“Another interesting option is the multi-face machining functionality

of the control system, which enables automatic scheduling

of parts without the operator’s involvement. Th is allows making the

most urgent pieces fi rst and helps minimise the number of required

pallets and tools,” Konttila continues.

plug and produce

“Th e new generation FPM has also been designed with special focus

on quick installation and easy maintenance”, Konttila states. “Confi

gurable standard modules ensure quick installation and start-up,

which means that the investment pay-back starts rapidly,” he states.

“As a reliable system, FPM supports preventive maintenance. For in-

Matti Nurminen (left ) and Janne Konttila.

High usability with

a new generation

graphical user interface.

Th e stacker crane is

suitable for modern

MCs.

stance, easily accessible lubrication points permit servicing without

extra disassembly.”

“Of course, you can also request Fastems comprehensive service

packages and make your easy maintenance no maintenance at all.

Th is way you can concentrate solely on your core business,” Konttila

concludes.

ideal for machine manufacturers

Th e FPM’s strengths are evident not only to parts manufacturers but

also to machine suppliers who gain the opportunity to easily integrate

state-of-the-art pallet automation into their machines.

“Th e confi gurable, simple and user-friendly system is easy to

supply with diff erent machines for various customers. Th e open

control interfaces allow machine suppliers to customise their own

functionalities, such as reporting. Also, the exterior appearance can

be adapted to the machine supplier’s own colours. When needed we

will give full support for integration and training,” Matti Nurminen

says, listing benefi ts.

FPM off ers an excellent example of Fastems off ering to machine

manufacturers. “We want to serve machine suppliers with easy automation

integration. In the future, we will put even more emphasis

on the features that ensure easy supplier-specifi c customising.”

1 • 2007 | 13


ThE FLExIbLE PALLET hANDLINg coNTAINER, FPc, PRovIDEs A cosT-EFFEcTIvE

sTART ToWARDs FAcToRy AuToMATIoN AND AchIEvINg FuLL usE oF ALL 8760

PRoDucTIoN houRs IN A yEAR. ThE sTANDARD PAcKAgE hAs bEEN uPDATED WITh

NEW vALuE-ADDINg FEATuREs AND Is NoW RELEAsED As ThE FPc vERsIoN 4.0.

14 | 1 • 2007

The FPC is a standard solution for integrating

up to two equal machines in a smart way.

As such it offers new possibilities for small

manufacturers and subcontractors that are

striving for additional production output

from one or two machining centres.

FPC

raises efficiency in small machine shops


EMO

highlights

highlights

2007

attractive in price

Th e FPC provides a complete FM system in a

container. Compared to a conventional pallet

pool the FPC does not diff er much in price

but it has a smaller footprint and is more effi -

cient at delivering fi xtured components to the

Th e Fastems Flexible Pallet Container (FPC) expands from a single container unit to a full-scale

three-machine system, turning your machining centres into automated FM systems.

machine spindles. Th e FPCs are as well suited

to machining one-off s and small batches as

they are to series production.

more speed and efficiency

Modern machining centres are good at

maximising metal-cutting and minimising

air-cutting by off ering high-speed and highpower

spindles, fast axis movements and

rapid tool changes. But a machine is only able

to deliver its high production potential aft er

the fi xtured workpiece has been presented to

the spindle. Th is is where our FPC comes in,

increasing pallet turnaround speed signifi -

cantly compared with twin-APC or palletpool

systems.

start with one and expand to two

Th e container range comprises four models

covering pallet sizes from 400 mm x

400 mm up to 1,000 mm x 1,000 mm and

loads of up to 3.2 tonnes. Th e latter is the

heaviest duty system and accommodates

four pallets on one level, while the lightest

system with a 750 kg load capacity stores 12

pallets on two levels.

Only one FPC may be needed at the

outset, but a second can be retrofi tted at any

time, increasing the pallet capacity of the

lightest system to 24. At a maximum a twomachine-system

is possible.

up and running in a day

Each FPC container is confi gured to suit the

particular machining centre. Th e entire system

can be unpacked, connected electrically

and mechanically, and taken into operation

the same day.

in control

Th e FPC’s control system is based on the

Windows PC-based MMS, also used in other

Fastems systems. Th is system is responsible

for scheduling automatic pallet transfer on a

fi rst-in, fi rst-out basis between load stations

and machining centres – and via the store if

the intended machine is occupied. Manual

override is available for promoting a rush job

to the head of the queue.

every time and everywhere

A further benefi t off ered by MMS controls,

is the wealth of management data, including

machine, load station and crane utilisation

fi gures, reasons for spindle down-time, as

well as daily, weekly or monthly production

reporting.

Th is information can be available on the

factory fl oor, in the offi ce, or anywhere in

the world via the web. Machine status monitoring

and analysis provide interesting options,

as does the sending of remote alarms

via mobile phone text or e-mail messages.

1 • 2007 | 15


RPC-20G

increases productivity of production machines

FAsTEMs’ MoDuLAR RoboT cELLs cREATE A NATuRAL FIRsT sTEP FoR youR

FAcToRy AuToMATIoN. ThE RPc-20g oFFERs you A coMPLETE soLuTIoN FoR

INcREAsINg ThE PRoDucTIvITy oF youR PRoDucTIoN MAchINERy. AT EMo, WE

WILL shoWcAsE ThE LATEsT vERsIoN oF ThIs sTATE-oF-ThE-ART RoboT cELL.

Th e RPC (Robotized Production Cell) series

of robot cells enables companies to increase

the utilization rate of existing machinery with

a small investment.

RPC-G is a modular robot cell designed

for the loading and unloading of workpieces to

various CNC machines and especially lathes.

“With this cell you can easily cope with

large variations in production volumes and

with the readily available options you can

adapt it to other applications, including workpiece

fi nishing and gauging, says Ari Lylynoja,

product manager for RPC-20G.

“Th e product consists of a single transferable

unit that enables fast installation and, if

necessary, easy relocation of the system,” he

continues.

new construction for more

possiBilities

Th e updated RPC-20G has been designed

with a new and narrower construction,

16 | 1 • 2007

which reduces the required fl oor space and

minimizes the risk of transportation damage.

With its new improved construction, RPC-

20G allows for easy integration to large turning-milling

centers.

Th e new version also off ers a wider selection

of options, including automatic tool

change and a deburring brushing station, as

well as a machine vision system.

automate with minimum effort

With this robot cell both new and existing

machines can be automated with minimum

eff ort. Th e gantry concept provides good

accessibility to the machine tool in manual

mode, as well as easy implementation of diverse

material feed designs that can be geared

EMO

highlights

highlights

2007

to the workpieces, quantities, and physical

size.

“Th e RPC further allows for quick and

fl exible adaptation to today’s rapidly changing

production requirements, as well as offering

the operators more freedom for item

handling.”


FAsTEMs AND FINN-PoWER AgREE To coNTINuE MANuFAcTuRINg AND

DEvELoPINg MATERIAL AuToMATIoN coMPoNENTs FoR FINN-PoWER’s NIghT

TRAIN FM sysTEMs.

On May the 7th, 2007, Fastems and Finn-

Power signed new cooperation agreement to

manufacture and develop material automation

components for Finn-Power’s Night

Train FMS. The agreement is in force from

1.9.2007 whereafter the full supply responsibility

shifts to Fastems on 1.1.2008.

This agreement continues cooperation

between Fastems and Finn-Power, the Finnish

sheet metal turret punch machine maker.

For the last few years Fastems has already

been manufacturing stacker cranes for Finn-

Power.

leading sheet metal technology

Finn-Power is one of the world’s leading

sheet metal working technology and

machine suppliers. A significant portion

of Finn-Power’s turnover is generated by

automated cell and system products that

are capable of unmanned production. The

market demand, especially of high technology

products, is increasing and the company

supports its global development strategy

through deep cooperation with selected

partners. This cooperation aims to harness

competitive advantages from both new construction

solutions and more focused production

capacity.

growth and cooperation

One element of Fastems’ growth strategy

is to deliver proven system components to

customers outside their own direct customer

segments, and the new agreement is a good

example of this. The close cooperation be-

Tomas Hedenborg, CEO,

Finn-Power (left) and Jarmo

Hyvönen, CEO, Fastems.

Fastems and Finn-Power

cooperation expands

tween Fastems and Finn-Power offers both

parties a competitive advantage, with Finn-

Power gaining added value from the expert

partner in their own field. As such, the Finn-

Power Night Train FMS® brand will continue

to be combined with Fastems’ trade

name addition. Machine interfaces, control

systems, installation-service and spare part

services will remain at Finn-Power.

“Tight cooperation between Fastems

and Finn-Power, the leaders in their respective

fields, benefits both companies and their

customers. At Fastems, we are delighted

to be serving customers in new markets

with our technology and know-how. This is

what mutual success is all about, ” says Juha

Pihlajamaa, Product Manager, Finn-Power

products.

1 • 2007 | 17


WhEN A vIsIToR ENTERs FAsTEMs’ LoWER Lobby

IN ThE LAhDEsjäRvI oFFIcE IN TAMPERE, FINLAND,

ThE FIRsT ThINg ThEy sEE Is A gLAss WALL, bEhIND

WhIch ThERE ARE sEvERAL MoNIToRs. NExT To

ThEsE Is A gRouP oF PEoPLE FocusED oN ThEIR

WoRK AND coNTINuousLy TALKINg oN ThEIR

PhoNEs. ThIs Is A vIEW FRoM ThE hEART oF

FAsTEMs’ REMoTE sERvIcE – FAsTEMs TELEsERvIcE.

The multi-skilled

teleservice

team keeps the customers’

systems running

18 | 1 • 2007


Th e mission of Fastems’ Teleservice is to

keep both the customers’ production running

and Fastems’ 8760 promise. Teleservice

serves Fastems’ automation customers

around the clock. Teleservice is open to all

automation customers and the goal is that

all fault calls should come through Teleservice.

Th e offi cial service hours of Teleservice

are from 7 am to 4 pm CET. Calls made

outside these hours are connected to the

Call Center, from where they are directed

either to service managers or the Teleservice

team, according to a calling list.

Th e members of the Teleservice team

are, Juha Holma, Kirsi‑Maria Alho and

Jens von Weissenberg. Jari Kalliomäki will

also join the Teleservice team for the summer.

Teleservice provides strictly FMS support,

and of course sometimes the problems

may also relate to the robot cells that are

integrated to an FMS.

service in any language

“Teleservice work requires both technical

and soft ware knowledge and on top of

that you should also have good language

skills and a lot of customer service spirit”,

describes Juha. People who fulfi ll all these

criteria are few and far between, but the

members of the team have many kinds of

skills. Th e other resources available in the

company are utilized in addition to the

skills found within the team – the soft ware

team being the most important resource for

Teleservice. Also, if no one can speak the

customer’s language, the team is happy to

get help from someone at Fastems who can.

Th e main goal is to make the situation easy

for the customer.

teleservice can fix it

“Our customers can experience many

kinds of problem situations, but usually the

problem can be solved on the phone. If the

symptoms of the problem can be identifi ed,

we can oft en establish a remote connection

and fi x it remotely. It is, however, also

common that the customer cannot pinpoint

the problem. In these cases, we can usually

work out what is wrong by systematically

asking questions to identify the source of

the problem, and aft er that we can solve it,”

Timo says. “If the fault is technical, we fi nd

out which component is broken. Sometimes

the customer can change the parts

themselves, or if they cannot we will send a

mechanic from our local service offi ce. Teleservice

constantly keeps in touch with the

mechanics and electricians. If the problem

is a soft ware issue, we contact the soft ware

team: they defi nitely have the best soft ware

knowledge in the company”, describes Juha.

a team for every situation

Juha Holma also puts in a good word for

his team. “We have a good team. Our relationships

with each other are good and

everyone works enthusiastically”, tells Juha.

“Work at Teleservice requires customer

service spirit and fl exibility. At times, having

a good temper also helps. Aft er all, we

are the customer’s fi rst contact in problem

situations and sometimes they are quite upset

when they call us”, continues Juha. “Th is

work requires you to get along with people,

both coworkers and customers.”

In Teleservice work you need to be able

to separate work from your free time. Th e

work is hectic and you spend a lot of time

on the phone. Th e work is also about making

things happen, fi guring out problems

and consulting. When you leave work it

is good to be able to turn your mind away

from it and relax. Luckily all the team members

have young children who make it easy

to put work aside.

Fastems is on a roll and we are pursuing

new customers all the time. We do not

forget our old customers though, because

they are an important resource and will

become more important when the upswing

ends. According to Fastems’ strategy we

should keep in mind the importance of existing

customer relationships.”

“All in all, work at Teleservice is interesting.

Th e work is performed locally and

there is no need to travel, but the days can

still be very diff erent. We don’t exactly receive

a lot of thanks or praise, but nonetheless

Teleservice keeps our customers’

expensive systems running and brings them

savings”, sums up Juha.

1 • 2007 | 19


Faster, more efficient, more flexible, more customer-oriented, less harmful to the environment

Manufacturing industry experts

convene in Tampere

how to Become a gloBal

marKet leader

Mikko Leino, the Director of Manufacturing

Technology Services at Nokia Corporation,

gave a speech on the first day of the conference.

He described the technology and production

strategies that Nokia uses to manage

the manufacturing of customized products

and their delivery chain on a global market.

Leino described the immense proportions

of Nokia’s manufacturing apparatus:

20 | 1 • 2007

“Nokia’s products are used by 850 million

people daily, and 11 devices are produced

every second – for a total of almost a million

devices every day. Almost 400 components

need to be produced for each device.”

Two preconditions to becoming a global

market leader are – an optimized global

delivery chain, and subcontractors that are

tightly integrated into the manufacturing

process. Customer-oriented variation is of

utmost importance for Nokia’s products, and

TAMPERE WAs oNcE AgAIN ThE

hosT FoR A sIgNIFIcANT EuRoPEAN

MANuFAcTuRINg INDusTRy EvENT. ThE

TAMPERE MANuFAcTuRINg suMMIT

2007 WAs hELD AT ThE TAMPERE

uNIvERsITy oF TEchNoLogy oN 6-7

juNE 2007. ThE sEMINAR gAThERED

TogEThER 200 REPREsENTATIvEs

FRoM MANuFAcTuRINg INDusTRy

coMPANIEs AND AcADEMIA

To DIscuss ThE DEvELoPMENT

oF INvENTIvENEss AND ThE

FuTuRE coMPETITIvENEss oF ThE

MANuFAcTuRINg INDusTRy.

Vice President Massimo Mattucci,

Comau S.p.A.

it is important to be able to implement the

variations as late as possible.

choosing the right direction

for the future

Massimo Mattucci, the Executive Vice President

of the Italian company, Comau S.p.A,

remarked that the challenges Nokia is facing

are common to the entire manufacturing

industry. It is important to quickly react to

the customer’s needs, to be close to the cus-


tomer, and to have a functional subcontracting network.

“New value-adding services and products, new business models,

and the development of industrial processes, structures and education

have been recognized as pan-European means of improving

the competitiveness of the manufacturing industry and supporting

changes in industrial structure,” Mattucci remarked.

The significance of environmental factors in industrial production

is constantly increasing. The increased awareness of the environment

presents new challenges, but on the other hand it also creates

new opportunities.

challenges for europe

“The global business environment represents a difficult challenge for

the manufacturing industry,” stated Professor Reijo Tuokko, program

coordinator of the SISU 2010 technology program from Technology

Center Hermia Ltd. Professor Tuokko went on to list several

key factors that the manufacturing industry will need to focus on

in the future: “competitiveness, increased productivity, and added

value. Likewise, inventiveness, high-quality education, and top-class

expert knowledge will also be essential. Europeans must also take

care of their own environment and its conservation. Reduction of

energy consumption and emissions affects the competitive situation

and therefore wide international cooperation is necessary.”

“The future of the manufacturing industry has been a concern

in several European countries in the past few years. The European

Union has founded a workgroup to prepare suggestions on how the

manufacturing industry will be able to prevail in Europe. Industry

remains a significant factor in promoting social welfare and for that

reason it is important to develop and take into use innovative new

approaches and methods for retaining the competitiveness of the

manufacturing industry,” said Risto Kuivanen, Vice President of

R&D at the Technical Research Center of Finland. He is also an active

participant in both the FoF and I*Proms networks.

examples of success

At the Tampere Manufacturing Summit, good examples were shown

as ways for Finnish and European companies to succeed on the glo-

Francesco Jovane.

Mikko Leino, Nokia Corporation.

bal market. Presentations on top-class European research projects

were a part of the program. These projects had sought improvements,

for example, through the use of ICT, robotics, and flexible

automation. One of the themes of the event was also the significance

of India from the European point of view, both as a market and as a

competitor.

Fastems Oy Ab was one of the organizers of the event and took

care of most of the practical arrangements, as well as the program

of the second day. At the end of the second day Fastems introduced

some practical automation solutions/products that improve productivity.

Heikki Hallila presented a new investment tool he had developed.

Janne Konttila described Fastems’ new FPM concept, which

will be officially introduced at the EMO 2007 exhibition in Hannover

in September. Jani Granholm reviewed Fastems’ latest system

control technology and Heikki Huovinen introduced Fastems’ newest

robotics applications.

After the presentations, the event participants had the chance to

take company tours at Nomet and Sisu Diesel. The company visits

received a lot of praise from the participants and served to make

Fastems’ automation solutions more tangible to the visitors.

meeting and networKing

The event participants also had the opportunity to mingle with each

other during the evening banquets. These events gave the participants

the chance to create new contacts and share experiences. At

the end of the second day Fastems held a get together for both our

Finnish and our regular European customers. This was the first time

a Fastems Quality Time Club event was extended to our customers

outside Finland. In the future we are planning to activate our regular

customer club throughout Europe.

1 • 2007 | 21


t i M E - o F F

Diving into sky

soME oF us FLy hIghER, AND MICHAEL SCHOTT, FAsTEMs sERvIcE

ENgINEER IN gERMANy hAs PuT ThIs PhRAsE INTo PRAcTIcE IN

coNcRETE TERMs. AFTER 20 yEARs oF sKyDIvINg, hE sAys, hE KNoWs

Why ThE bIRDs sINg.

We all know that Fastems technology can

take your factory automation to new heights.

But who would have guessed that a Fastems

service engineer in Germany could invite

you for a tamdem jump from 4000 metres.

“In this jump, a non-jumper without

previous skydiving experience is safely fi xed

to my stomach and we jump together,” says

Michael Schott who, with his 20 year skydiving

career, also has a licence to train students

and non-jumpers.

3,500 Jumps recorded

As service engineer, Michael helps customers

to come as near to the 8760 production

hours a year as possible. In his leisure time,

22 | 1 • 2007

he has performed altogether 3,500 skydiving

jumps.

“I did my fi rst jump together with a tandem

master in 1987. I started my fi rst course

in the beginning of 1988 and since then I

have kept going skydiving whenever it’s possible

and whenever the weather is fi ne,”

Michael explains.

160 heart Beats per minute

For those who yearn to dive into the sky, there

are two diff erent ways to learn these skills.

“Th e conventional way is to make your

fi rst jump alone with a static line, which is

fi xed to the aeroplane and opens the parachute

automatically,” Michael says.

Michael Schott has 20 year skydiving career.


“Th e other possibility is AFF, Accelerated Free Fall, and then you

do the fi rst jump together with two instructors and pull your parachute

alone. Th e conventional training takes about four weeks, whereas the

AFF method can be carried out in fi ve days,” he continues.

“No matter if you choose conventional or AFF, you must always be

in excellent physical health because during a skydive jump your heart

beats up to 160 beats per minute,” Michael warns.

team spirit

Michael’s work is a combination of technological know-how and cooperation

skills. He has to understand and solve the technological problems

on customer sites, but it is as important to be able to communicate with

other experts. Teamwork is a key issue.

Enjoying the team spirit is also part of skydiving: “My favourite part

of skydiving is when a group of a minimum of two people fl y together to

form various fi gures. At the moment, the world record in this discipline is

400 people fl ying at the same time.”

“i Know why the Birds sing”

“When fl ying in the sky, I feel happy and concentrated. I focus on playing

my role in the formation correctly,” Michael says, describing his feelings

in the sky. “In addition to my own jumps, I enjoy teaching my students.

Th e goal is that they will be able to share the same unique feeling.”

“To put briefl y: Skydivers know why the birds sing. Flying in the sky

takes your troubles away, makes you feel free and without sorrow.”

t i d S & B i t S

new power in germany and usa

GERMANY, FASTEMS GMBH

Matti Kangas, service engineer, who started

on 1.12.2006, takes now care of service support

with eff ect from 1.7.2007.

Alex Becker, service technician for FMS

systems, started on 1.2.2007.

Andreas Gröbner, technician for electric

assembly is in charge of FMS commissioning,

eff ective from 1.3.2007.

Michael Stumpf, sales manager for Benelux,

started on 2.5.2007.

USA, FASTEMS LLC

George W. Petruck started as Product Manager

on 19.3.2007. He takes care of customer

support in the Mid-West region of the United

States of America.

Carol Haas started as Project Manager on

2.7.2007 based in West Chester she will be

responsible for all projecting matters.

Howard ‘Butch’ Clough takes care of Teleservice

since 14.5.2007, Butch will off er

customer remote connection support to help

maintain productivity of installed systems.

8760 hours

at your service

1 • 2007 | 23


INNOVATION

A fl exible

standard

Fastems’ EMO 2007 innovation – the FPM (Flexible Pallet Magazine) manufacturing

system – is the new standard in fl exible manufacturing. It is

developed for professionals like you, who want more than standard but are

unwilling to pay the high cost of customization. Thanks to its confi gurable

modules, the user-friendly FPM is ready to grow with your business.

Join us at emo 2007 in hannover from september 17 to 22 for more

top moments in fl exible manufacturing.

Our stand is located in hall 12, section B100.

fastems oy ab

Bultgatan 40 B

Via Bruno Buozzi, 61

Tuotekatu 4

S-44240 Kungälv, Sweden I-20097 San Donato

FI-33840 Tampere, Finland Tel. +46 (0)303 246 900 Milanese (MI), Italy

Tel. +358 (0)3 268 5111

Fax +46 (0)303 246 910 Tel. +39 02 365727.23

Fax +358 (0)3 268 5000

Hawley Mill-Hawley Road

Fax +39 02 365727.24

Hakkilankaari 2

Dartford, Kent DA2 7SY Fastems UAB

FI-01380 Vantaa, Finland

United Kingdom

Kalvarijos str. 38

Tel. +358 (0)9 3450 48

Tel. +44 (0)7818 427133 LT-46346 Kaunas, Lithuania

Fax +358 (0)9 3450 5623

Fax +44 (0)1322 282250 Tel. +370 37 291567

Heilbronner Straße 17/1

99, rue de Gerland

Fax +370 37 291589

D-73037 Göppingen, Germany F-69007 Lyon, France Fastems LLC, 9850 Windisch Road

24 | 1 • 2007

Tel. +49 (0)7161-963 800

Fax +49 (0)7161 -963 8049

Tel. +33 (0)4 3765 2000

Fax +33 (0)4 3765 2001

West Chester, Ohio 45069, USA

Tel. +1 513 779 4614

www.fastems.com

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