Visual Language Magazine Contemporary Fine ARt Vol 4 No 3 March 2015

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Visual Language Magazine Contemporary Fine Art Vol 4 No 3 March 2015 features American Artist Robert Duncan, Mary Jane Q Cross, Canadian Artist David Francis, Barbara Rudolph, and South African Artist Sabine Barbar. This issues features figurative, Landscape and Realism.

Visual Language is the common connection around the world for art expressed through every media and process. The artists connect through their creativity to the viewers by both their process as well as their final piece. No interpreters are necessary because Visual Language Magazine crosses all boundaries.

VL

Visual Language

VL

March 2015 Volume 4 No. 3

Mary Jane Q Cross

maryjaneqcross.com

Features: Robert Duncan . Mary Jane Q Cross . David Francis . Barbara Rudolph . Sabine Barbar

contemporary fine art


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contemporary fine art

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March 2015 Vol 4 No 3

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Mary Jane Q Cross

Classical and Realistic Fine Art

New Hampshire artist Mary Jane Q Cross is emotionally and spiritually present in all

of her paintings. Painting with her fingers became necessary after developing a tremor

that made brushwork difficult. Good coping skills and an eye that sees beauty and truth

in most everything she sees has given her work a broad scope of interests that develop

not only into paintings but poems as well. We hope you take away a vision of paintings

remembered and poems repeated.

VL Cover Artist

http://www.maryjaneqcross.com/

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Victoria Pendragon

“Storm Tree”

victoriapendragon.artspan.com


content VL

Cover Artist Mary Jane Q Cross 3

Realism

Painter’s Keys - Sara Genn 11

Robert Duncan 32

Robert Duncan was born in Salt Lake City in 1952 and

grew up in a large family of ten children. He spent the

summers helping his grandparents on their 10,000 acre

cattle ranch in Wyoming.

Mary Jane Q Cross 50

New Hampshire artist Mary Jane Q Cross

is emotionally and spiritually present in

all of her paintings. Painting with her fingers

became necessary after developing a

tremor that made brushwork difficult.

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 5


David Francis 64

When did you realize you loved art and wanted to be an

artist

It sounds cliché’, but it seems like I have always loved to draw.

Once of my earliest memories is waiting for my father to finish

the Sunday newspaper, so that I could sit down and start copying

the funnies.

Barbara Rudolph 94

When did you realize you loved art and wanted

to be an artist

I have loved art for as long as I can remember.

Even when I was a little girl I loved to draw. I

didn’t make the full time jump into becoming an

artist until I was in my mid 20’s.


content VL

Sabine Barber 114

I was born and raised in South Africa. Growing up on

a beautiful farm in Mpumalanga, most of my childhood

was spent outside in the sun, running barefoot through

the dirt, climbing in trees and daydreaming in the garden.

I also spent countless hours doodling, using any

scraps of paper I could find, filling the pages with princesses,

mermaids, unicorns, playing out my fantasies

using pencil or ballpoint pen. In my early teens, I began

taking private lessons in oil and pastel painting, which

opened up a wonderful world to me. I found a new, colourful,

way to express myself. Art was a part of my life,

a part of my day-to-day. It helped me escape; it made

me happy!

Index Directory of Artists and Galleries 134

In alphabetical order, you can easily find all featured artists

and advertising artists, along with featured galleries in our

index directory.

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 7


“Phalaenopsis” Pastel

Richard Levine

Pastel Painter Landscape and Figurative

www.richardlevine.net

email: artisanrichard@gmail.com

Davis & CO Fine Art

dandcgallery.com


Mark Yearwood

Fire and Rain 48’’x36’’ Mixed Media on Canvas

MarkYearwood.com

Select Prints available at Nuvango.com/markyearwood


VL

visual language magazine

Contemporary Fine Art

Visual Language Magazine Staff

Editorial

Editor -in-Chief Laurie Pace

Contributing Editor Lisa Neison-Smith

Consulting Editor Nancy Medina

Feature Contributor Sara Genn Painter’s Keys

Feature Writer Dave Justus

Feature Editor Art Reviews Hall Groat II

Feature Contributer Barry Scharf

VL Sponsor ARTSPAN Eric Sparre

Advertising

Contact: VisualLanguageMagazine@gmail.com

Marketing and Development

Executive Director Business/Management Stacey Hendren

All Artwork is Copyrighted by the Individual Artists.

Visual Language Magazine Vol 4 No 3

defrancispastels.com/

robertduncanstudios.com

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The Painter’s Keys

Robert and Sara Genn

The limitations game

January 23, 2015

“I am good at only two things,” said Claude Monet, “and those are gardening and painting.” The son of a grocer, Monet

knew he wanted to be an artist at age five. At forty-three he relocated to Giverny to build his garden. The cataracts

Monet developed as he aged limited his colour vision at the warm end of the spectrum. In 1923 he underwent surgery

to remove the cloudy lens of his right eye, leaving him aphakic -- a condition that allows a person to see normally

blocked ultraviolet wavelengths. With his new eye Monet mixed electrifying, revelatory blues.

I’m not recommending the removal of eye parts, but it’s worth exploring a limitation in search of its hidden edge. I remember

plopping into an alpine meadow once while Dad set up a video camera nearby. He sat in his homemade easel

and slipped into a familiar zone. I was noodling a few tuber-shaped glaciers onto the side of a battleship mountain in

too many strokes. In the cabin that evening we reviewed the tape.

“Would you look at those tight moves” Dad mused. What I saw were his relaxed, zen-like drags and dobs -- a floating

meditation. Over at the edge of the scene my elbow fluttered up and down like a one-armed weaver at a loom. I cringed.

He said, “I could use your dash and vigor -- And you should consider this: Look three times, think twice, paint once.”

The Painter’s Keys - Sara Genn

“Argue for your limitations and, sure enough, they’re yours,” wrote Richard Bach. We returned to the meadow the

following day and swapped techniques. “Easy does it,” I whispered, loading the brush, letting the mountain offer her

strokes and digging into a zone of special care. That evening Dad and I hung the day’s efforts and climbed under the

covers of our single beds for a cabin crit. Thrillingly my potatoes had become recognizable patterns of nature. Dad

praised the progress and I puffed like a lovebird, but then he motioned toward the paintings on his side of the room.

There dazzled light and speedy poems -- and the magical hand of abstraction.

Sincerely,

Sara

PS: “The vistas of possibility are only limited by the shortness of life.” (Winston Churchill)

Esoterica: Consider this: Limitations are an access point for focus, discipline, resourcefulness and the development of

voice. They’re clues to uniqueness and form-style and point of view -- requirements of all works of art to communicate

and connect. “In abandoning the vagueness of the sketch,” wrote Eugene Delacroix, “the artist shows more of his personality

by revealing the range but also the limitations of his talent.” We fear our limitations will define us, yet they’re

the hurdles necessary for refinement and courage. They’re the builders of character, and paintings need character. “The

greatest progress in life,” said Yogi Bhajan, “is when you know your limitations, and then you have the courage to drop

them.”

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Artwork (l to r): Laurie Justus Pace, ‘The Gathering One’- Original Oil on Canvas, 3

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2” x 48”; Larisa Aukon, ‘Continental Divide’ - Original Oil on Panel 24” x 36”;

; Dominique Samyn, ‘Sage’- Acryilc & Venetian Plaster on Panel, 40” x 32”;

Wynn, ‘Joy Ride’ - Mixed Media Sculpture, 26” x 32” x 9”


f i n e a r t

Life in Colors

“Portrait of a Young Woman”, Oil Pastel, 9 x 11”

Connie Chadwell

www.conniechadwell.com


Abstract/Realistic Drawing and Pastels

Elaine Vileria

Lilacs in Abstract

elainevileria.artspan.com/


Phyllis DeQuevedo

“A Work in Progress”

Katie

JP Foucart


mantikstudio.com

Joy Shared


Jonelle T. McCoy

“Swirling Spiraling Snow” 20”x16”x1.5” Gallery Wrap

Cool colors, coarse texture and whimsical spiraling lines all create a stunning

visual equine portrait of cold and heavy layered snow. Nostalgia and the

mysteries of nature’s frozen precipitation emanate from this painting.

jonellemccoy.com


“The Guardian"

Oil 16" x 20"

www.caroljosmidt.com

carol@caroljosmidt.com


michalsart.com

Michal Ashkenasi


Michal Ashkenasi

Abstract Figurative

and Minimalistic Paintings and Photography

Rain

michalsart.com


Title: March Morning, Horseshoe Bay, Southampton, Bermuda

Size: 30x36”

Medium: Oil on Linen


John Whitton Bria

JohnBria.com


Joyce Pihl

http://joycebpihl.org/

Keepers of the Land Nature’s Glory Fall Splendor


Joyce Pihl

Autumn 2

http://joycebpihl.org/


Filomena Booth

"Gemstone" 1

12"x12"x1.5.

filomenabooth.com


Energy . Color . Passion

"Gemstone" 2

12"x12"x1.5.

filomenabooth.com filomenabooth.com


Corey

Watson

facebook.com/coreywatson.art

coreywatson.art@gmail.com

phone: 209-352-7943


Aspen S P A C E S

Heart Path 40x30 (c) Lelija Roy

Lelija Roy aspenspaces.com aspen.spaces@gmail.com


BAUER

Logan Bauer

Logan Bauer spent much of his elementary and secondary school years overseas. He took his first

painting class in London, England at the age of 13 years old. Upon his return to Arizona, he continued

to take art classes at Phoenix College, and it was not until recently that painting stopped

being a part time endeavor or hobby, but it became a full time commitment.

He presently paints out of his studio located in Northern Arizona near Prescott.

LoganBauer.com


Landscapes, Life Drawings, Still Life, Figurative Portraits

LoganBauer.com


Robert Duncan

Painting the Joys in Life

Playing with Molly © Robert Duncan A Welcome Fire © Robert Duncan December in the Country ©

http://www.robertduncanstudios.com/


Chicken Wranglers © Robert Duncan

Robert Duncan An Evening in Paris © Robert Duncan The Goat Girl © Robert Duncan

http://www.robertduncanstudios.com/

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Robert Duncan

Painting the joys in life.

Robert Duncan was born in Salt Lake City in 1952

and grew up in a large family of ten children. He

spent the summers helping his grandparents on

their 10,000 acre cattle ranch in Wyoming. The

Green River ran through their land from its source

high in the Rocky Mountains. It was surrounded

by beautiful open country and he fell in love with

the rural lifestyle. He drew constantly from the age

of five, and when he was eleven, his grandmother

gave him his first set of paints and paid for three

oil painting lessons. He studied art at the University

of Utah and had worked as a commercial artist

before his full-time dedication to the fine art of the

American West.

Robert has traveled extensively throughout his career

to visit museums and study the great artists

he admires. His travels have included journeys to

Russia, Scandanavia, many trips to Europe, and

frequent trips to the East Coast and Canada. Robert

was elected into the Cowboy Artists of America

at 29 years of age and won two silver medals in

their annual exhibition at the Phoenix Art Museum.

The Cowboy Artists of America is the most respected

organization in Western American Art. After five

and half years with the Cowboy Artists, Robert

decided to resign in order to put less emphasis

on western art and devote more time to painting

his family, friends and the beautiful countryside of

Midway and the Heber Valley, UT. Duncan has

shown his original paintings for over 30 years with

Trailside Galleries in Scottsdale, Arizona and Jackson,

Wyoming. He has been invited to numerous

shows around the country including the Masters of

the American West Exhibition at the Autry National

Center, The Great American Artists Show in Cincinnati,

and numerous others. Robert’s print and

posters were carried for many years by New York

Graphic Society in New York City.

Wanting more control over his own work Robert

created his publishing company Robert Duncan

Studios, that now publishes and distributes all of

his Limited Edition Prints, Posters, Art Cards, and

Calendars. His work is carried in galleries, frame

shops and gift stores across the US, Canada, Europe

and New Zealand. Robert and his wife Linda

have six children. They, along with a lively assortment

of animals, live in the small town of Midway

in northern Utah.

http://www.robertduncanstudios.com/

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Wishes in the Meadow © Robert Duncan

http://www.robertduncanstudios.com/

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Robert Duncan

Good Times © Robert Duncan

Evening at Port Clyde © Robert Duncan

http://www.robertduncanstudios.com/

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Time for Milking © Robert Duncan

Pumpkins for Sale © Robert Duncan

http://www.robertduncanstudios.com/

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VL Robert Duncan

Way Up North © Robert Duncan

Winter’s Arrival © Robert Duncan

http://www.robertduncanstudios.com/

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Celebration © Robert Duncan

http://www.robertduncanstudios.com/

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 39


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Robert Duncan

Follow Me Not © Robert Duncan

http://www.robertduncanstudios.com/

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Celebration © Robert Duncan

http://www.robertduncanstudios.com/

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discover art . inspire collectors

Arturo Samaniego

DAVIS&CO f i n e a r t g a l l e r y

dandcgallery.com


engage discussion . celebrate life

dandcgallery.com

Kyle Wood

Home is where the art is.

dandcgallery.com


Bob Coonts

COONTS

Prancer

Sugar

www.bobcoonts.com


“Prancer II”, 36”x60”, Acryllic on Canvas

Tetons

www.bobcoonts.com


LauriePace.com


The Good People

The Spirit of the Paint

Viewing a Laurie Justus Pace painting is

a rich experience that drips with color

and emotion. Her passionate works are

alive with movement, boldly created

with a wide brush and a palette knife.

She loves working with oils, dramatically

carving out the paint and transferring

her energy to the canvas and ultimately

on to the viewer.

Laurie Justus Pace

The Good People Beach Walk 32 x 48 Oil on Canvas

http://www.ellepace.com/paintings-for-sale/

The La Jolla Gallery

TheLaJollaGallery.com

LauriePace.com


Eric Bodtker

Les Alpilles and Olive Trees in Saint Remy de Provence

ericbodtker.com


Sanda Manuila

sandamanuila.artspan.com

Carpe Diem


VL

Mary Jane Q Cross

Now We See in a Mirror Darkly”

http://www.maryjaneqcross.com/

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http://www.maryjaneqcross.com/

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 51


VL Mary Jane Q Cross

Born in 1951, Mary Jane Q. Cross’s life was a life full of questions and a yearning for order. This was

the underpinning of Cross’s future career as a Classical Realism painter whose large body of work is

marked by logic, cohesion, and an aura of storytelling that is poetic and consoling.

As a Worcester Art Museum School art student in the 1970’s, Cross was a ‘closet Realist’ as she endured

the era’s dominant mantle of Expressionism. Reading of formal artists with her shared realism

vision – DaVinci, Sargent, Bouguereau, Godward, Mary Cassatt -- was a point of encouragement at

this time. Studying such painters, among other Masters of earlier centuries, inspired Cross in her personal

quest to acquire the skills of Classical painting.

After 40-plus years of this visual journey, Cross continues to produce a body of work that presents a

sense of needed and appreciated refreshment in the midst of modernity’s fast pace. Cross’s resonant

theme is of respectfully uncovering the many complex layers of women. Appealing to both women and

men alike, her work presents women’s beauty as a deep comfort and a restful joy, when idealistically

and, perhaps, Biblically examined. In a contemporary culture that perceives the sexuality of women in

an increasingly objectified manner, Cross’s work offers a breath of hope. Her work presents a delicate

beauty that she believes young women, in particular, are actually striving for – a beauty that, in the

artist’s opinion, reflects an image of women as God intended them to be: Creation’s crowning jewels.

“If you do not have life, you cannot give life,” states Cross. “If my work has anything, it has an authentic

response to life. My paintings are stories. They depict the quiet rest that comes to a soul only after

it has determined to deal with circumstances head-on, with grace and tact instead of grumbling and

complaining. My paintings reflect and inspire a determination to focus on beauty, even in the midst of

ashes. This is something I have had to live.”

For the past 21 years, a serious right-sided tremor has limited Cross’s ability to hold a brush. Thus,

Cross paints with her fingers; whatever minimal brush strokes the artist employs are guided by a prosthetic

device. A documentary titled Q. Cross: The Painter behind the Portraits, on youtube, details her

journey back to painting in the after-years of the tremor’s on-set. The artist has also compiled a book,

Poems of a Painter, Paintings of a Prayer, in which she speaks of how she has come to deal with this

physical challenge that she cannot change and yet has witnessed a greater dream come out of what

were initially tragic circumstance.

The simultaneous heartache and joy that Cross experiences daily is seen in her paintings – and it is

heard in the poems that she writes as an accompaniment to each of her works. The combined presentation

of painted image and printed word has enriched the meaning of her work.

The public is a telling barometer of the penetrating resonance of the artist’s work. Cross’s paintings

are regularly displayed by the Art Renewal Center Salon Exhibitions (where Cross is an ARC Associate

Living Master), click for ARC Masters Gallery the International Guild of Realism (where she was

awarded Best of Show in 2013), the American Society of Traditional Artists, the Salmagundi Club, and

the Allied Artists of America.

RIght: Bad Moon Arising

http://www.maryjaneqcross.com/

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http://www.maryjaneqcross.com/

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VL Mary Jane Q Cross

Imperishable Comfort

http://www.maryjaneqcross.com/

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Grace Wrapped in this Life of Many Colors

http://www.maryjaneqcross.com/

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VL Mary Jane Q Cross

Simply Speak No Evil

http://www.maryjaneqcross.com/

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Noah’s Daughter in Law in the Dovecote

http://www.maryjaneqcross.com/

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VL Mary Jane Q Cross

As many as 30,000 people a year also view Cross’s work at outdoor venues. Viewers who cannot afford

the originals are still enthusiastically pleased to own limited edition prints. Collectors who can afford these

multi-faceted jewels get to live with a palpable part of Cross’s personal vision, crafted with her personal touch.

Mary Jane Q. Cross, www.maryjaneqcross.com, builds a body of memorable work in a studio, built by her

husband and hugged by New England’s quiet countryside, as she threads the fabric that mirrors her own life

into her work. Her quest is a worthy one.

http://www.maryjaneqcross.com/

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The Return of the Dove to the Ark

http://www.maryjaneqcross.com/

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Barbara Haviland

Wildflowers

Barb’s Garden Art

https://barbara-haviland-art.squarespace.com/

www.BarbaraHavilandFineArt.com


Key Lime Tart - 12 x 12

Vicki Rees

Visit my website.

vlrees.com

TippingPaintGallery.com


LINCOLN

Debbie Lincoln


NowOrNever-debbie.blogspot.com/


VL

http://www.defrancispastels.com/


David Francis

Master Pastelist

http://www.defrancispastels.com/


VL David Francis, Master Pastelist Pastel Society of America

When did you realize you loved art and wanted to be an artist

It sounds cliché’, but it seems like I have always loved to draw. Once of my earliest memories is waiting for

my father to finish the Sunday newspaper, so that I could sit down and start copying the funnies.

Who has been your mentor, or greatest influence to date

I was fortunate that when I started creating art (in my 30’s, kind of a late start) I met three people that were

very influential in my early art career. The first person was Joan Reid who taught an adult educations art

class, she introduced me to Ron Peer, a local portrait and landscape artist. He was always very patient with

my early attempts, and managed to find something good in them while giving me constructive criticism. The

third is Trudi Smith. She is a signature member with the Pastel Society of American and she pushed me to

apply for membership with the group, even to the point of selecting the piece that I submitted for jurying. I

was thrilled and surprised when I received signature status on that first application.

Who is another living artist you admire and why

I have several artists that I admire today and follow their work on social media sites. Anthony Waichulis for

his tromp l’oeil still lifes, Robert C. Jackson for his incredible still life set-ups and the interplay of his subjects,

Teresa Fishcher for the incredible still life paintings of old toys, my favorite subject matter. I also follow the

work of Patricia Tribastone, a fellow pastel artist with incredible skills. All of these artist, along with being

accomplished painters, have the ability to inject a sense of humor and fun into their work, along with telling a

story.

What is your favorite surface to create work on or to work with Describe it if you make it yourself.

My favorite surface to work on is Pastelbord, made by Ampersand. It is a Masonite board with a surface of

gesso and marble dust. This surface holds a lot of pastel and holds up well to blending, and multiple layering

techniques. I love the fact that it comes in standard sizes from 5x7 to 24x36 and that when a pastel is

finished, you can frame it immediately, using spacers between the artwork and the glass.

What are your favorite materials to use

I have been a pastel artist for the last 30 some years. As most pastellists, I am not brand loyal. I look for

color, hardness/softness, and availability. So, currently on my work table are Rembrants, Giraults, Unisons,

Terry Ludwigs, and Derwent and Conte pastel pencils.

Do you have a favorite color palette

I really don’t have a favorite palette. It really depends on the subject matter and it changes from painting to

painting. I do tend to favor a lot of the earth tones for backgrounds and whatever my still lifes are sitting on.

How often do you work on your artwork How many hours a week

I try to work a little bit every day. Some days it might only be an hour, other days (and these are my favorites)

it might be 7 or 8 hours in the studio.

http://www.defrancispastels.com/

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Out of the Bag

http://www.defrancispastels.com/

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VL

David Francis, Master Pastelist Pastel Society of America

Mouse Trap

http://www.defrancispastels.com/

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Clements Book Shelf

http://www.defrancispastels.com/

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David Francis, Master Pastelist Pastel Society of America

Buck Rogers

Mickey Mouse

http://www.defrancispastels.com/

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TIny Tim

http://www.defrancispastels.com/

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David Francis, Master Pastelist Pastel Society of America

What is the one thing you would like to be remembered for

I would like to be remembered as an artist that gave to younger beginning artists the same support and

encouragement that I received when I was starting out.

There are many culprits that can crush creativity, such as distractions, self-doubt and fear of failure.

What tends to stand in the way of your creativity

I find that the biggest obstacle for me is myself. Having a studio in my home is too easy to be distracted by

things going on in the house. I have dealt with self-doubt and the fear of failing thing, too.

How do you overcome these obstacles

For the around the house stuff, I have tried to set a schedule that from when I get up, (usually around 6:00

am) until noon is set aside for my studio time. My wife has gotten pretty good at accepting this. For the

self-doubt and fear of failure, I’ve made a conscious decision to just keep submitting my work to shows and

when the rejections come in, I glance at them and toss them out.

What are your inspirations for your work

The inspirations for my work are all around me. As I have been focusing on old toys and games, I go to

a lot of garage sales looking for those little nuggets that get my interest going, but other people see it as

something to get rid of.

What is your favorite way to get your creative juices flowing

I love to look at the new work by artists that I follow, I love going to shows and openings, and in general just

looking at art gels gets me going.

Which work of yours is your favorite

The trite answer would be “the next one”, but I actually have a couple. One is called “In the Bag”, which

I’ve entered in several shows, but has never been accepted, and another is my newest one, called “To The

Rescue”.

http://www.defrancispastels.com/

Space Race

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Getting to know you Q&A

What is your favorite color in your closet N/A

What book are you reading this week Game of Thones (second time)

Do you have a favorite television show Several, CSI, Criminal Minds, Big Bang Theory, Walking Dead,

Sixty Minutes

What is your favorite food All of them, but true favorite Honey Glazed Ham

What color sheets are on your bed right now N/A

What are you most proud of in your life My wife of 44 years, Linda, our three kids, Lori, Dave, and Dan,

and our six grandkids, Paige, Jared, Mina, Alexander, Asher, and Emma

Who would you love to interview James Gurney, Anthony Waichulis

Do you have a passion or hobby other than painting What is it

Music, I used to play and perform; now I just love listening.

Who would you love to paint Michelle Obama, any of my artist friends

If you were an animal what would you be and why N/A

If you were stranded on a desert island and could only take three things, what would they be N/A

Share something with us that few people know about you.

That sometimes I dance in my studio when I’m working.

If you could live anywhere in the world, where would you live

Sedona, AZ. Beautiful part of the county and incredible colors.

http://www.defrancispastels.com/

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And So It Goes 22 x 28

Roseanne Snyder

roseannesnyder.blogspot.com


“Dennis”

Suzy Pal Powell

suzypal.blogspot.com

Bluecanvas.com/suzypal


Dyan Newton

Colors of Life

Hill Country Living

DyanNewton.com

http://one-painting-a-day.blogspot.com

Contact: dyansart1@yahoo.com


vanessa katz

Coco #14

www.VanessaKatzArt.com


Nancy Medina

Painting Under the Tuscan Sun

A Painting Dream Getaway

During the Peak of Poppy Bloom Season

June 6-13, 2015

Tuscany, Italy

www.nancymedina.com


“Celebrating the stories and legends of Texas and

the Great Southwest through original art, prints and books.”


601 E Hwy. 82 - Nocona, Texas 76255 . 940-825-7226

www.TexasTrailArtGallery.com . Facebook: Texas Trails Art Gallery

Tuesday through Saturday 10 to 6 . Sunday 1 to 5 . Closed Mondays.


Judy Mackey

“Patience” Oil on Canvas

“Patience 2” Oil on Canvas

“Patience 3” Oil on Canvas

“Patience 5” Oil on Canvas

www.JudyMackey.com


Judy Mackey

No Worries” Oil on Canvas

www.JudyMackey.com


Roberta McGowan

visualwestphotography.com


Visual West Photography

VisualWestPhotography.com

“Leader”


www.paradicranch.com


Jacquie McMullen

Pastel Artist

Stories in Landscape

www.paradicranch.com


LADY L

Colors Make Me Happy

Small Blessings 24 x 30 inches

Acrylic on Canvas

ellepace.com/lady-l-artist

ladylart.blogspot.com


She began painting at age 2 on small pieces and by age 3 moved up to

full size canvas. Lady L is the granddaughter of Texas Artist Laurie Pace.


Red Earth Red

ZoradArt.com


Mary Jo Zorad

contemporary fine art

ZoradArt.com

Lyrical #122A Red


VL Lisa McKinney

Had I Known

92 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Lisa-McKinney.com

lisamckinneyartprints.com

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 93


VL

Interview

Barbara Rudolph

http://www.barbararudolphfineart.com/

94 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


http://www.barbararudolphfineart.com/

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VL Barbara Rudolph

Interview

When did you realize you loved art and wanted to be an artist

I have loved art for as long as I can remember. Even when I was a little girl I loved to draw. I didn’t

make the full time jump into becoming an artist until I was in my mid 20’s.

Who has been your mentor, or greatest influence to date

I had a couple of college professors that were very encouraging to me. They were also very honest

about communicating the difficulties I would face when pursuing art as a full time career which made

me work even harder. My late father was always encouraging of my artistic ventures. He was also

“accidentally” the reason I made a major change in my painting theme. It was unfortunately not until

after his passing that I pursued painting “birds in art” full time and gained success at it.

Who is another living artist you admire and why

I don’t have a specific mentor today but I know of a few well known wildlife artists that I like to follow that

paint in a realistic style. I also have a few friends that are phenomenal artists that I can occasionally

ask to critique my work. Here are a few artists that I truly admire but have never met: Carl Brenders,

Nancy Howe, James Offeman, Grace Kim and Julia Hargreaves. They all do outstanding work. There

are many others too.

What is your favorite surface to create work on or to work with Describe it if you make it yourself.

When I paint on canvas I prefer to have it custom stretched. The canvas quality is better and tighter. I

sand it lightly to remove most of the texture if I can. I then almost always do 2-3 coats of black gesso.

I let it dry a few days and then do an oil ground. I stock pile the primed and ready to go canvas in my

studio so that when the ideas are flowing...I can begin to paint on them right away. I also sometimes use

Ampersand panels, however I still find I have to prime them first. The reason is because they tend to

absorb the paint up way to quickly if you don’t. They do not work well on large scale paintings because

they warp. I do like to use them for 11x14” size and under. They are a time saver because I don’t have

to sand them. I purchase the “smooth” surfaces, which usually have to be ordered online. The local

art stores usually only carry the medium tooth surface, which would be great for people who paint with

thick paint.

What are your favorite materials to use

My absolute favorite paints are the “Lukas 1862 Finest Artists Oil Paints” from Germany. They are rich

and buttery.

http://www.barbararudolphfineart.com/

96 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Molly 24 x 18

http://www.barbararudolphfineart.com/

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VL

Barbara Rudolph

Tell Me a Story 30 x 24

http://www.barbararudolphfineart.com/

98 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Do you have a favorite color palette

I tend to like a lot of variations of brown and other natural colors.

How often do you work on your artwork How many hours a week

I try to paint every day. Some days are spent on planning and getting ready to paint the still life by taking

photographs etc. I never count the hours, but I spend a lot of time in the studio.

What is the one thing you would like to be remembered for

I would like to be remembered in some way….maybe for leaving behind some exceptional works in

the future. Hopefully remembered as someone who is friendly, kind, funny and can also leave behind

paintings that can bring joy to others.

There are many culprits that can crush creativity, such as distractions, self-doubt and fear of

failure. What tends to stand in the way of your creativity

Stress!

How do you overcome these obstacles

Taking a break and getting outside to photograph.

What are your inspirations for your work

Nature, wildlife and also seeing other really great artists works can be very inspiring to me

What is your favorite way to get your creative juices flowing

Photographing birds and wildlife works for me. Also just about anything can inspire me if I am paying

attention to light and color on an object.

Which work of yours is your favorite

I like to think that whatever painting is on my easel at the moment is my favorite because that helps me

stay inspired to finish it. It does’t always work that way, but if I can get off to a great start and stay “inspired”,

then I enjoy the process so much more. One of my past favorites was called “Tell Me A Story”

with a little bird on an old antique typewriter.

http://www.barbararudolphfineart.com/

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VL

Barbara Rudolph

To Kill a Mockingbird 18 x 24

Right Page: The Music Lesson 48 x 24

http://www.barbararudolphfineart.com/

100 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


http://www.barbararudolphfineart.com/

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VL Barbara Rudolph

Bluebird Watching 14 x 11

Rigt Page: All That Jazz 24 x 18

http://www.barbararudolphfineart.com/

102 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Steadfast 30” x 48” x 1.5” Canvas

http://www.barbararudolphfineart.com/

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VL Barbara Rudolph

http://www.barbararudolphfineart.com/

104 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


Getting to know you Q&A

What is your favorite color in your closet

That would be a toss up between red and fuchsia

What book are you reading this week

Orphan Train

Do you have a favorite television show

The Good Wife, Chicago Fire

What is your favorite food

Italian

What color sheets are on your bed right now

Ivory

What are you most proud of in your life

Making a living as an artist, and my daughter

Who would you love to interview

One of the artists that I mentioned earlier in the interview would be nice.

Do you have a passion or hobby other than painting What is it

Photography

Who would you love to paint

I would like to try to paint some figurative works in the future

If you were an animal what would you be and why

A bird. I would like to fly

If you were stranded on a desert island and could only take three things, what

would they be

A pocket knife, the bible and my reading glasses

Share something with us that few people know about you.

I spend way too much time alone

If you could live anywhere in the world, where would you live

Paris, France

http://www.barbararudolphfineart.com/

VisualLanguageMagazine.com - VL Magazine | 105


Palette

Knife

Painters

Paletteknifepainters.blogspot.com


Paletteknifepainters.org


Kimberly Conrad

“Pouring Color Into Your Life”

Moving Metals Cerulean B-6 18” x 18”

KimberlyConradFineArt.com


Moving Metals

Moving Metals Cerulean B-5 18 “ x 18”

KimberlyConradFineArt.com


DAILY PAINTERS ABSTRACT GALLERY

DailyPaintersAbstract.blogspot.com

Carol A. McIntyre

“Floating Winds, “ 28x21, Oil on Canvas


DailyPaintersAbstract.blogspot.com

DAILY PAINTERS ABSTRACT GALLERY


DianeWhitehead.com


Diane

Whitehead

“Animals are my muse. The scratch

of the paw, pounce of a hoof, gesture

of the head, alert ear, quiet stride,

powerful shape, ancient wisdom.

All come to play with the shapes I see

as I paint.”

DianeWhitehead.com


VL

Sabine Barber

http://www.sabinebarber.com/

114 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


http://www.sabinebarber.com/

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VL Sabine Barber

I was born and raised in South Africa. Growing up on a beautiful farm in Mpumalanga, most of my

childhood was spent outside in the sun, running barefoot through the dirt, climbing in trees and daydreaming

in the garden. I also spent countless hours doodling, using any scraps of paper I could

find, filling the pages with princesses, mermaids, unicorns, playing out my fantasies using pencil

or ballpoint pen. In my early teens, I began taking private lessons in oil and pastel painting, which

opened up a wonderful world to me. I found a new, colourful, way to express myself. Art was a part

of my life, a part of my day-to-day. It helped me escape, it made me happy!

Then, as they say, life got in the way and before I knew it, I grew up, finished school and went to

college. Afterwards, I found myself at a crossroad. Young, brave, and eager to experience the “real

world” out there, I followed my family to Germany (I soon learnt it may as well have been the moon!).

There, I ended up in some day job and earned money – the way the “real world” dictates. I rarely

picked up a paintbrush anymore. It just didn’t “fit” into my serious grown-up world. And besides, it

had only ever been a fruitless hobby anyway, so what was the point, right I didn’t leave myself much

time to miss Africa, since I had convinced myself that I made the right decision emigrating - that life

was better here than in my crime-ridden home country. I would just have to get used to it here and

learn to deal with the homesickness and whatever other feelings of restlessness I had. So I soldiered

on and kept myself busy. Eventually, I married my wonderful husband (also a South African) and in

the years that followed, we became the proud parents of two beautiful children. I thought that finally

I would have all I would ever need to feel “complete” again.

After our son was born, I lost my day job, which I didn’t really mind, because being a mother was my

new full-time job anyway, and I was happy to stay at home for him and, later, our daughter. When

both my children were old enough to go to Kindergarten, I suddenly found myself alone for a few

hours in the mornings.

It was during that time that I started feeling more restless, bored, and really, really homesick! I needed

an outlet, something to do. In an epiphanic moment, I put on some African music, dug out my old

pastels and over the course of a few days painted a portrait of an African woman, carrying her child

on her back. I remember looking at it for ages afterwards and thinking how much I MISSED this. And

how much better I felt! And then I did another painting a few days later – another African portrait.

Then another one…. I didn’t know what I was going to do with the paintings afterwards or where this

was going, but I just couldn’t help myself. I dug out old photos, contacted friends in South Africa for

some “holiday shots” from safaris, the Kruger National (wildlife) Park, or for just any photos capturing

life in Africa. I poured over these references – some purely for inspiration and to reminisce. After

completing a few portraits, I decided to try my hand at wildlife, for variety. At first, I worked primarily

with pastels (because it is so much quicker to tidy up and store away before the kids returned home

from Kindergarten). Then, as my confidence grew I braved the “big, white, scary canvas” to attempt

an oil painting for the first time in years. It was exhilarating! Of course, oils take forever to dry, so I

opted for the water-based variety. My children, in the meantime, were well-trained at keeping their

inquisitive little fingers away from the easel and “mommy’s paintings”, while they dry.

Right Page: Catch of the Day

http://www.sabinebarber.com/

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http://www.sabinebarber.com/

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VL

Sabine Barber

Three years have passed since that “epiphanic moment”, and I haven‘t stopped painting! The more I

painted and the more encouragement I got from friends and family, the more I WANTED to continue.

Now, it fills a void in my life that I cannot explain and I don’t want to give it up anymore. I hadn’t dared to

think of having a life as an artist, but for the first time I wondered if this could be more than “just a hobby”.

I found a small, local gallery in Germany that hung up my art and offered me a small platform to get

myself „out there“. I was also invited to display some of my work at various businesses around our area.

While the feedback has always been good, the sales have much catching up to do (although this might

be more a question of location and target audience). Nevertheless, to me it was a big step to “expose

myself”, artistically. And it is only the beginning.

I have recently started branching out to new themes that inspire me to paint. My children inspire me.

The beautiful landscapes and season changes in Europe inspire me. People in history inspire me. While

I don’t think I will ever stop painting “Africa” entirely, I must admit I get a particular rush from painting

portraits. There’s something about painting a face that is so calming and gratifying to me: The beginning

stages and outline of a face, a body, a look. Then comes the “ugly phase” where the whole painting looks

a mess and I am almost tempted to throw the damn thing in the bin. But then there’s that redeeming

moment where it actually starts to LOOK like someone again and I power through, slowly reaching the

final stages of completion.

At present, I live in England. (Yes, we moved again recently!). While I still don’t know where or how to

best approach this new art venture, I feel like I am in a better location “artwise”. I hope to someday have

my own studio, my own solo exhibition and one day make art my “day job”. While I may still be at the

beginning of such a dream, I can say that with each “Africa” painting, the feeling of homesickness is

becoming less and less and with every brush stroke, I feel my sense of self coming back.

Burning Sky

http://www.sabinebarber.com/

118 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


http://www.sabinebarber.com/

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VL

Sabine Barber

Frangipani Plumeria

http://www.sabinebarber.com/

120 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com


San Girl

http://www.sabinebarber.com/

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VL

Sabine Barber

Ibhubesi

http://www.sabinebarber.com/

122 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com

Prismatica


Lalibela Boy

http://www.sabinebarber.com/

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Alejandro Castanon

www.vinodipinte.com

Vino Dipinte Art Gallery

602 Orient St San Angelo, TX 76903


alejandrocastanon.com


KRISTINE KAINER

www.kristinekainer.com

www.kristinekainer.blogspot.com


Texas Art

www.kristinekainer.com

www.kristinekainer.blogspot.com


Artists of Texas

artistsoftexas.org


NO WHERE BUT TEXAS

artistsoftexas.blogspot.com

dailypaintersoftexas.blogspot.com


Felicia Marshall

“Dressed Up”

“Alone”

Left page: “Sunshine on Hope”

FeliciaMarshall.blogspot.com


VL

Index of Features and Advertisers

Alejandro Castanon 124-125

Artists of Texas 128-129

Barbara Haviland 60

Barbara Rudolph 94-105

Bob Coonts 44-45

Carol Jo Smidt 19

Connie Chadwell 14

Corey Watson 28

Daily Painters Abstract Gallery 110-111

Daily Painters Gallery 132-133

David Francis 64-73

Davis and CO Gallery 42-43

Debbie Lincoln 62-63

Diane Whitehead 112-113

Dyan Newton 76

Elaine Vileria 15

Eric Bodtker 48

Felicia Marshall 130-131

Filomena Booth 26-27

Index Features and Advertisers 134

Jacquie McMullen 86-87

John Whitton Bria 22-23

Jonelle T McCoy 18

Joyce Pihl 24-25

Judy Mackey 62-63

Kimberly Conrad 108-109

Kristine Kainer 126-127

Lady L 88-89

Laurie Pace 46-47

Lelija Roy 19

Lisa McKinney 92-93

Logan Bauer 30-31

Mark Yearwood 9

Mary Jane Q Cross 3, 50-59

Mary Jo Zorad 90-91

Michal Ashkenasi 20-21

Mirada Fine Art Gallery 12-13

Nancy Medina 78-79

Natahlie Kelly 135

Painters Keys Sara Genn 11

Palette Knife Painters 106-107

Phyllis De Quevedo 16-17

Richard Levine 8

Robert Duncan 32041

Roberta McGowen 84-85

Roseanne Snyder 74

Sabine Barber 114-123

Sanda Manuila 49

Suzy Pal Powell 75

Texas Trails Art Gallery 80-81

Vanessa Katz 77

Vicki Rees 61

Victoria Pendragon 4


Nathalie Kelley

“Christmas Candy” 8 x 10

“Blowing Off Steam”

nathaliekelleyart.com


VL

visuallanguagemagazine.com

136 | VL Magazine - VisualLanguageMagazine.com

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