Accelerated Math™ - Lenoir County Public Schools

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Accelerated Math™ - Lenoir County Public Schools

Getting

Results

with

with

Accelerated Math


Getting Results

with Accelerated Math


The Accelerated products design, Accelerated Math, AccelScan, Advanced Technology for Data-

Driven Schools, STAR Math, NEO 2, Renaissance Place, Renaissance Responder, and TOPS,

are trademarks of Renaissance Learning, Inc., and its subsidiaries, registered, common law, or

pending registration in the United States and other countries. All other product and company

names should be considered trademarks of their respective companied and organizations.

ISBN 978-1-59455-294-6

© 2009 by Renaissance Learning, Inc.

All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America.

This publication is protected by U.S. and international copyright laws. It is unlawful to duplicate

or reproduce any copyrighted material without authorization from the copyright holder. If this

publication contains pages marked “Reproducible Form,” only these pages may be photocopied

and used by teachers within their own schools. They are not to be reproduced for private

consulting or commercial use. For more information, contact:

07/09

Renaissance Learning, Inc.

P.O. Box 8036

Wisconsin Rapids, WI 54495-8036

(800) 338-4204

www.renlearn.com


Contents

Introduction ...................................................1

Accelerated Math Basics

q The Purpose of Accelerated Math: Powerful Practice .................5

Using Accelerated Math with Students

w Accelerated Math Practice and Instruction .........................15

e Beginning Tasks ..............................................18

r If You’re New to the Program: How to Get Started ..................22

t When You Have More Experience: Differentiated Instruction

with Differentiated Practice .....................................28

Managing Accelerated Math in Your Classroom

Appendix

y Procedures and Routines for Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

u Procedures and Routines for Teachers .............................40

i Accelerated Math with Primary Students ..........................45

o Troubleshooting...............................................48

Common Software Tasks: Renaissance Place ..........................53

Common Software Tasks: Desktop...................................61

Sample Reports ..................................................68

Additional Materials ..............................................73

Index ...........................................................79

iii


Introduction

Congratulations! You have purchased one of the most effective tools for fostering

growth in mathematics—Accelerated Math. As with all tools, the results that you

and your students achieve with the software will depend on what you do with it.

When used casually, Accelerated Math reinforces learning of math concepts. When it

is used thoughtfully and consistently, students get excited about math, math anxiety

fades, and achievement accelerates.

In this book, we describe some of the techniques that maximize the potential of

Accelerated Math. First we explain the underlying goals of Accelerated Math and the

software’s basic functions. Then we describe two approaches to using it with

students. After that, we tell you what you need to do to get started, and finally, we

recommend classroom management routines so that everything will run smoothly.

The appendix contains step-by-step instructions for the most common software tasks,

along with helpful reproducible forms.

We hope that what you find here will inform and inspire you. Bear in mind,

however, that this is only an introduction. To learn more about other professional

development opportunities, visit our website: www.renlearn.com.

1


Accelerated Math

Basics


q

The Purpose of Accelerated Math:

Powerful Practice

Practice is essential to learning. Research shows that practice builds the neurological

connections needed for deep understanding. It also alters the neurons in the brain so

that a skill can be performed automatically. Moreover, practice provides teachers

with opportunities to immediately check learning and address individual weaknesses.

When instruction is followed by practice and practice is based on individual needs,

learning accelerates.

In many math classrooms, however, students are unable to take full advantage of the

power of practice. Teachers teach the same lesson to every student, and all students

work the same problems. Days, and sometimes weeks, go by between the time

students are taught a math concept and their learning is tested. Teachers spend hours

hand-scoring tests, after which they generally move on to new objectives. The

result Frustration, both for students who fall behind and students who could move

faster. And for teachers, who know they are not serving every student’s needs.

Accelerated Math is designed to enable a different kind of teaching and learning.

It does this by:

• Distributing personalized practice assignments based on student performance.

• Providing results immediately so that you can take timely action.

• Scoring student work automatically, thus giving you more time to teach.

• Fostering students’ sense of control over their own learning.

• Making practice fun for students by ensuring their success.

How Accelerated Math Works

Accelerated Math involves a few basic steps:

1. You schedule time for math practice, either as part of your already established

math period or in addition to it.

2. Using whatever materials you wish, you teach a concept to the entire class, a

small group, or an individual. (We’ll talk more about these choices later.) You

assign math objectives in Accelerated Math software, and the computer prints

personalized assignments.

3. Students work their practice problems on paper, record their answers, and

submit them to the computer, usually via a scanner. Accelerated Math software

immediately checks the answers and prints a TOPS Report. The computer prints

each student’s next practice assignment, based on his or her performance.

4. You and your students analyze the results, and you use the information to plan

next steps.

5


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Principles of Effective Practice

For math practice—and, indeed, any kind of practice—to be effective, it must follow

certain principles. These are the principles upon which Accelerated Math is built.

Dedicate Time to Practice

If you have ever tried to learn a new skill, you know you must spend time practicing

it. It’s just common sense: You can take four hours of piano lessons a week, but if

you only practice five minutes a day, you’ll never master Mozart. You have probably

learned, too, that practice must be scheduled; whenever you try to fit it in around

other tasks, it rarely happens. The same holds true for math. Students need a lot

of math practice on a regular basis. That means making it a routine part of the

school day.

Practice What You Need to Practice

Suppose you signed up for piano lessons with a teacher whose twenty students

displayed a wide range of abilities. Now imagine that your teacher gave everyone

the same music to practice. Would all of you improve Probably not. A beginner

would not learn much if he constantly struggled to play complex tunes, nor would

the accomplished player benefit from a steady diet of easy material. To avoid

this situation, Accelerated Math allows you to specify the objectives with which

individual students practice. If students master objectives quickly, they can move

on. If they need additional practice, Accelerated Math provides it.

Practice Until You Know It

What happens when you practice a skill half-heartedly The time comes when you

need to use that skill—a piano recital maybe!—and it isn’t there. The only way to

ensure you’ve really learned something is to practice it until you can demonstrate

mastery. That’s why Accelerated Math software keeps track of how a student is

doing with every objective. When the student meets certain criteria on practice

assignments for an objective, the software concludes the student is proficient enough

to be tested. If the student meets certain criteria on a test, the software then reports

that the objective is mastered.

Instruction Informs Practice, and Practice Informs Instruction

The best kind of practice is linked to instruction: A teacher teaches you something,

and then you practice it on your own. But the reverse is true, as well. The best kind

of instruction is based, at least in part, on what happens during practice. A good

piano teacher watches her students as they practice. So does a good football coach

and a good math teacher. All of these instructors know that if a student is having

trouble in practice, it’s time to review or reteach. To help you plan instruction,

Accelerated Math software summarizes the results of student work on reports,

which we’ll describe later.

Practice Boosts Confidence

Practice means doing something repeatedly. That kind of exposure reduces fear

and builds confidence. This is especially important for students who feel anxious

about math. They fear it because they believe they can’t do it. That attitude follows

them through life and keeps them out of careers for which math is essential.

6


The Purpose of Accelerated Math: Powerful Practice

Accelerated Math breaks this pattern. It engages students in math without

overwhelming them and, under the guidance of a thoughtful teacher, gives them

enjoyable and successful experiences.

Review Cements Learning

Use it or lose it, as the old adage says. Accelerated Math incorporates this principle

by continuing to give students problems on objectives they have mastered. We call

these “review” problems, and they appear automatically on practice assignments

when at least two weeks have passed since the student mastered the objective. In

fact, an objective is not “retired” until a student successfully reviews it.

Accelerated Math Is a Tool That Thinks

As we pointed out earlier, Accelerated Math software is a tool, but it is a different

kind of tool than a hammer or a screwdriver. Accelerated Math “thinks.” That’s why

it can do a lot of work on its own, somewhat like a

robot. It’s important to remember, however, that

Accelerated Math can never be as smart as you.

While it keeps an eye on your students’ math

practice, it knows nothing about them as complex

human beings.

For this reason, teachers who get the best results

with Accelerated Math understand its capabilities

but they also retain control. Sometimes they let the

software do its work automatically; other times, they

give it instructions. It’s like having a programmable

thermostat in your house. You can program its

settings, letting it automatically run the furnace to

68 degrees at 6 a.m. when you arise and then letting

Teacher

• Teaches lessons

• Makes plans

• Works one-on-one with students

Accelerated Math

• Prints assignments

• Checks answers

• Keeps track of results and reports on

student progress

• Generates assignments or

recommends next steps based on

a student’s performance

the house cool down to 55 degrees at 8 a.m. after you’ve left for work. But you can

also operate it manually as circumstances warrant, on a holiday, for example, when

you’d like the house to be a little warmer than 55 degrees in the middle of the day.

To help you understand how Accelerated Math thinks, let’s look first at the practice

material the software draws upon. Then we’ll describe the logic it uses to distribute

that material.

Accelerated Math Can Produce Four Kinds of Assignments

The software draws upon four assignment types. Two are created by you and the

computer as a kind of joint project, and two are completely controlled by you.

• Practice Assignment. This is an assignment intended for day-to-day practice.

You assign objectives, and the software puts the practice assignment together

based on a student’s previous performance. A practice assignment may include

problems on a new objective, older objectives the student is still learning, and

objectives the student has mastered but are up for review. Think of the practice

assignment as the workhorse assignment. If you were practicing the piano, for

7


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Accelerated Math Problems

By default Accelerated Math problems

are presented in multiple-choice

format. We call them assistedresponse

problems because having

a choice of answers helps students

know if they are on the right track.

After students work a problem, they

can see if their answer is among the

choices. If it isn’t, they know they

need to try a different strategy. The

answer choices for assisted-response

problems are not random, however.

They include answers produced by

making common mistakes. By looking

at an incorrect answer choice, you can

often identify misconceptions. The

software can also generate freeresponse

items—problems that do

not have a choice of answers. You

must correct them by hand, however,

using an answer key that the

software provides.

example, an equivalent assignment might be a few tunes that

incorporate a newly taught skill, a few tunes that you haven’t yet

mastered and need to keep working on, plus a few tunes that you

once mastered but your teacher wants you to review.

• Regular Test. This is the workhorse test, and it, too, is put

together by the software with your input. When Accelerated

Math sees that a student is ready to take a test on an objective,

it alerts you. Then you tell it to go ahead and create one of these

regular tests. A student has to take a test to prove mastery of an

objective. Think of the piano-playing analogy again. When

your piano teacher believes you are consistently doing well

with a particular skill or group of skills, she might ask you to

demonstrate those skills in a formal situation before declaring

them mastered.

• Exercise. You might think of an exercise as a manually created

practice assignment. Instead of the software deciding which

objectives to include, you decide. You also decide which

students should receive the exercise.

• Diagnostic Test. A diagnostic test is a manually created test. As

with an exercise, you decide which students should get the test

and which objectives to include. Typically, you would use a

diagnostic test at the front end of your instructional cycle, to

see what students know and what they need to learn. Regular

tests are used at the back end, after a student has practiced an

objective and is ready to demonstrate mastery.

Most of these assignments can be used for different purposes and in different orders.

(On page 9, you’ll find a chart that summarizes these four types of assignments, along

with more details about them.) On page 10, we show an example of how a teacher

and her students might proceed through them. If this looks complicated, don’t worry.

Beginning Accelerated Math users usually start out using only a couple of assignment

types rather than all four. We’ll explain how in the next chapter.

8


The Purpose of Accelerated Math: Powerful Practice

Accelerated Math Assignment Types

Type of

Assignment

What Is

Included

Who

Configures

How It’s

Printed

Common

Uses

Criteria for

Success

Practice

New objectives,

objectives with

which the

student needs

more work,

and review

objectives.

Problems are

assisted

response.

The software

determines

the content

based on the

objectives

assigned by

the teacher and

the student’s

previous

performance.

Automatically

printed by the

software when

answers for

the previous

assignment are

scanned. Can

also be printed

by the teacher.

For daily

practice of

objectives

taught.

A student must

correctly work

5 of the last 6

problems on an

objective to be

considered

ready to take

a test on it.

Exercise

Any objectives

the teacher

chooses. The

objectives and

problems can

be identical for

all students or

different.

Problems can

be assisted

response or

free response.

The teacher

selects the

objectives and

the number

and type of

problems.

By the teacher.

For reteaching,

intervention,

homework,

and any other

additional

practice on

specific

objectives.

A student must

correctly work

5 of the last 6

problems on an

objective to be

considered

ready to take

a test on it.

Regular

Test

Objectives

assigned by

the teacher

with which the

student has

been successful

on practice

assignments

or exercises.

Problems can

be assisted

response or

free response.

The software

automatically

selects

appropriate

objectives.

By the teacher.

To test mastery

of objectives.

A student must

correctly work

4 of 5 problems

on an objective

for it to be

considered

mastered.

Diagnostic

Test

Any objectives

the teacher

chooses. Any

objectives

not on a current

assignment can

be included,

even those

with which the

student has

not been

successful.

Problems can

be assisted

response or

free response.

The teacher

selects the

objectives.

By the teacher.

To place

students in an

appropriate

level of work

and to enable

students

to quickly show

mastery of

objectives.

A student must

correctly work

4 of 5 problems

on an objective

for it to be

considered

mastered.

9


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

One Way to Use All Four Assignment Types

Mrs. Brown

creates a

diagnostic test

to see if her

students know

odd and even

numbers. Some

do, and for them

the software

records the

objective as

mastered.

A few students

do poorly with

the objective,

however, and the

software takes

note of that.

For students

who did not show

mastery of odd

and even

numbers, Mrs.

Brown teaches

the concept to

them in a small

group. The

students work

practice

assignments

printed from the

software until

they demonstrate

proficiency.

Some students

need more

practice than

others. The

software notices

that and

automatically

distributes more

work to those

who need it.

Teachers new to Accelerated Math

rely primarily on two, rather than

four, types of assignments:

Students do practice assignments

for an objective and show mastery

with a regular test.

Despite extra

practice, one

student continues

to struggle with

the objective. Mrs.

Brown prints an

exercise for this

student and uses

it to reteach

the concept.

Accelerated Math

keeps track of

each student’s

performance and

signals to Mrs.

Brown when a

student is ready

to take a regular

test on this

objective. Mrs.

Brown prints the

test. If the student

does well on the

test, the software

notes that the

objective has

been mastered.

Accelerated Math Uses Symbols to Quickly Communicate With You

Because Accelerated Math is a personalized practice program, most of the time different students

will be doing different things. You can see where each student is at by looking at the symbols

displayed in the software. (You can also view reports, which we’ll show you later.) If you have

the older desktop version of the software, the symbols appear in an area called the Assignment

Book. If you are using the newer web-based version powered by Renaissance Place, click a

student’s name in the Assignment Book to go to the Student Detail screen, which shows the

symbols. (See p. 18 if you’re not sure which version you have.)

10


The Purpose of Accelerated Math: Powerful Practice

Status Symbol Description

Assigned

Ready to Work

Working

Ready to Test

Testing

Mastered

Intervene

Diagnosing

Reviewed

Hold

green

green

green

yellow

yellow

blue

red

yellow

gray

gray

The teacher has assigned this objective to

the student.

The student has done some work on this

objective but needs more.

The student has a practice assignment or

exercise that includes this objective.

The student has done well with the

objective and is ready to take a test on it.

The teacher has printed a regular test that

includes this objective.

The student has done well with this

objective on a test.

The student needs the teacher’s help.

The teacher has printed a diagnostic test that

includes this objective.

The student has successfully worked review

problems on this objective.

The teacher does not want the student to

receive assignments on this objective.

Symbols indicate that most students are

ready to test on objective 1, students are

working on assignments for objective 2,

and the teacher has assigned objective 3

but students do not yet have a printed

assignment for it.

11


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

The Software’s Logic

Like a good teacher, Accelerated Math software looks for proficiency and for

problems. But like any piece of technology, it is smart about some things and not so

smart about others. Here are a few things to remember about how the software thinks:

If you assign an objective, the software feels free to give the student work related to

that objective. If you don’t, it won’t. So if you assign a lot of objectives at once, the

software will churn out practice assignments for them—even if you haven’t taught

these objectives to your students. Conversely, if no objectives are assigned, a student

won’t get any work, even if he is ready for it. What does this mean for you That

timing is important. You must think about when to assign objectives so that students

receive problems for those objectives when you want them to. We’ll give you details

about how and when to assign an objective in another chapter.

The software looks at all of the problems a student has completed to see if she knows

an objective. That means a student can show she is ready to take a test by doing well

on either a practice assignment or an exercise. Similarly, she can prove mastery of an

objective on either a diagnostic test or a regular test.

Summary

ACCELERATED MATH BASICS

• The purpose of Accelerated Math is to enable powerful practice.

• The software can produce four types of assignments: practice assignments,

exercises, regular tests, and diagnostic tests.

• Assignments can be used for different purposes. Those new to the software

usually rely primarily on practice assignments and regular tests.

Experienced users may use all four assignment types.

Accelerated Math is a tool that “thinks.” You must understand the software’s

logic in order to use it wisely.

12


Using Accelerated

Math With Students


w

Accelerated Math Practice and Instruction

There are many ways to use Accelerated Math—in a regular math class, a remedial

class, for homework, for summer school, for after-school or alternative education

programs—but they all fall roughly into one of two frameworks: group instruction

with differentiated practice, or differentiated instruction with differentiated practice.

We say “roughly,” however, because the edges blur on even these two frameworks.

Once you begin using Accelerated Math, you will receive data on students as

individuals. To respond to their needs as individuals, you will have to do at least

some differentiated instruction. Many teachers find that as they become comfortable

with the software, they are more able to differentiate.

If you are new to Accelerated Math, think about how much differentiation you

want to incorporate and when. To help you make that decision, we describe below,

in general terms, what the two frameworks might look like as a teacher becomes

experienced with the software. In the next chapter, we’ll give you details about how

to implement them.

Group Instruction With Differentiated Practice

Let’s say Ms. Stanley is a brand-new sixth-grade teacher. She has the state standards

for sixth grade, along with a math pacing guide that all of the teachers in her district

follow. Because she is so new, she decides she’d like to use the lessons in the

textbook for math instruction.

Ms. Stanley compares the objectives in the Accelerated Math sixth-grade library

(a “library” is simply a set of objectives) to her pacing guide. There are a few

differences so she decides to print the Accelerated Math objective list, which is

called the Objective List Report, and keep it near her computer so she can refer to it

easily when she assigns objectives. She also administers a STAR Math assessment to

her students. The results tell her which students are likely to find sixth-grade math

just right, who will find it easy, and who may need extra attention.

As the school year proceeds, Ms. Stanley essentially runs a two-tiered program: She

has an instructional strand and a practice strand. Her routine is to teach a lesson to

the whole class out of the textbook and then assign the objective in Accelerated

Math to the whole class. However, some students master the objectives quickly and

others need more help and practice. To keep the fast-moving students engaged, she

assigns them related but harder objectives and allows them to work together to learn

the concepts. (Even when students are working on the same objective, Accelerated

Math gives them different problems.) A few days a week, Ms. Stanley sets aside

time to work with struggling students in a small group.

15


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Differentiated Instruction With Differentiated Practice

Now let’s visit Ms. Stanley a couple of years down the road. She knows the state

standards inside and out, she has learned how to maintain an orderly and productive

classroom environment, and she has used Accelerated Math for two school years.

When Ms. Stanley administers a STAR Math assessment, she sees that her students

vary widely in their ability to do math. She wants all of them to grow as much as

they can so rather than stick to the textbook she decides to base her instruction as

well as practice on individual student needs.

Ms. Stanley installs three libraries of objectives to use with her students: the

fifth-grade, sixth-grade, and seventh-grade. She places students in the libraries

based on their STAR Math scores. Because she doesn’t want to waste time teaching

skills that students already know, she creates diagnostic tests for each library that

include the beginning objectives. Some students show mastery of an objective on

the diagnostic test and thus skip the practice phase. Other students stumble with an

objective, at which time Ms. Stanley provides individual or small-group instruction

and assigns follow-up practice assignments in Accelerated Math. When students are

ready to test, the software creates a regular test with which they show mastery. As

the school year progresses, Ms. Stanley continues with this sequence: diagnostic test,

instruction with individuals and small groups, practice, and regular test. There’s a lot

going on, but Ms. Stanley has taught her students to work independently, to help

each other, and to ask for her help in appropriate ways. She also relies heavily on

Accelerated Math reports as she plans each day.

Mastered Objectives = Math Growth

The more objectives a student masters, the more growth you will see on

standardized and state tests. Our research shows that a minimum of four objectives

per week (two objectives per week for grades 1 and 2) is the pace that students must

maintain to make substantial progress. This translates to about 40 minutes of math

practice a day. Whichever approach you use—a pacing-guide approach, such as the

one Ms. Stanley first adopted, or a student-focused approach as you saw in her

classroom a few years later—be sure that you keep students on target to master the

recommended number of objectives.

To do that, we urge you to monitor a couple of numbers: a student’s average score

on practice assignments and on regular tests. If a student maintains an average of at

least 75 percent on practice assignments and 85 percent on regular tests, she will

move steadily through practice and testing to mastery of math concepts. In chapter 7,

we’ll introduce you to reports that will help you monitor this data.

16


Accelerated Math: Practice and Instruction

Summary

ACCELERATED MATH PRACTICE AND INSTRUCTION

• The software can be used in a variety of settings and in different ways.

• Those new to the software often begin an implementation by using a

textbook for whole-group instruction and Accelerated Math for

differentiated practice.

• In the most powerful implementations, teachers differentiate instruction as

well as practice.

• For the most growth, students must master at least four math objectives per

week (two per week in first and second grade) and maintain an average of

75 percent on practice assignments and 85 percent on regular tests.

17


e

Beginning Tasks

Before you begin making assignments in Accelerated Math, you’ll need to do some

preliminary planning, assemble a few resources, and prepare your room.

Prepare to Use the Software

As we mentioned earlier, students do Accelerated Math work with paper and pencil

on assignments that are printed from the computer. That means they do not need to

sit at individual computers to use the program. You do, however, need at least one

computer in your classroom to manage the program, along with a printer to print

assignments. (A laser printer is best because it prints faster.) You also need to

connect a scanner to the computer. It is convenient, though not necessary, to have

two computers: one on which you manage the software and one that’s for students

to use when they scan their answers. That way, if you want to do something in the

software, you won’t have to interrupt students who are scanning.

Figure out which version of the software you will be using since many of the

program screens and software steps are substantially different. Take a look at the

Welcome screens below. If your Welcome screen looks like the one on the left,

you have the desktop version of Accelerated Math. If it looks like the one on the

right, you have the web-based version, which is powered by a program called

Renaissance Place.

Renaissance Place users should find that their classes and student names have been

entered by the technology administrator for the school or district, who will also

provide login information. Desktop users may need to set up classes and add and

enroll students themselves. You’ll find instructions for these and other common

software tasks in the appendix. Note that instructions for Renaissance Place users

begin on page 53 and for desktop users on page 61.

18


Beginning Tasks

You also need to have the scanner software,

which is called Quick Scan in the desktop

version and AccelScan in the Renaissance

Place version. It must be loaded and open on

the computer in order for scanning to work.

Administer STAR Math or Another

Standardized Test

Use STAR Math or another standardized

assessment to determine each student’s level

of math proficiency. If you administer STAR

Math, which is a Renaissance Learning

product, you can check the STAR Math

Accelerated Math Library Report to see in

which library it recommends you place each

student. (Instructions for viewing this report

are on page 53 (RP) and page 62 (desktop).)

For a diverse class, the assessment could

recommend many different libraries. If you are

new to Accelerated Math, you may want to initially forgo these recommendations

and use the same library for all students—either your grade-level library or the

library recommended for the majority. Use the assessment data to identify students

who are likely to need more practice with basic skills and students likely to

need enrichment.

View the Assignment Book and Add Objectives

DESKTOP: Before Students Can

Begin Math Practice

In the Management program, follow these

steps to set up the database before you

begin making assignments:

• Add your classes

• Add your students

• Enroll your students in classes

• Enter your school year, marking

periods, and days off

• Install your libraries

• Add objectives to the Assignment Book

• Print a Class Objective List Report

• Assign an objective of your choice to

students

• Print the first practice assignment

(see chapters 4 and 5)

For the teacher, the Accelerated Math Assignment Book is where the action is.

When you log into the software, you’ll go here to assign work to students, print

reports, and check student progress. If you have the desktop version of the software,

you get to the Assignment Book by clicking Classroom, choosing a class, and

clicking the Assignment Book button. In Renaissance Place, simply click

Assignment Book under the Accelerated Math tab.

19


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

After you decide which library to use, add the objectives from that library to the

Assignment Book. Then print the list. Compare the objectives to your curriculum,

state standards, and/or pacing guide, and decide how you want to sequence the

objectives. You can move objectives up or down in the Assignment Book, or you

can keep them in the existing order and assign them in whatever sequence fits your

instruction. We recommend that if you are new to Accelerated Math, keep the

objectives in the order in which they were installed; print an Objective List Report,

place it by your computer, and assign objectives in the software as needed by

referring to this list. (See pages 54 and 55 (RP) or pages 63 and 64 (desktop)

for instructions on adding objectives, creating an Objective List Report, and

reordering objectives.)

Assemble Instructional Materials

How will you be teaching math concepts With textbooks Power lessons

Manipulatives Other materials that you have created or accumulated over the

years Decide what will work best for you and have it near at hand. Also think

about what resources students might draw upon. Many teachers find that students

can learn a number of objectives on their own if they have instructional material

available to them.

Figure Out How Answers Will Be Entered

Originally, students could only use scan cards to record their answers to problems

on Accelerated Math assignments and tests. Today they can also use Renaissance

Responders or NEO 2 keyboards if you have them available. Figure out which

hardware students will be using and familiarize yourself with how it works. We give

you tips for preparing students to use scan cards and scanners, the most commonly

used hardware, in the section on classroom management. For information on using

the other devices, see the software manual.

Prepare Your Room

Make sure the computer and printer that students will be using is easy for them to

access. Have extra paper on hand so that when the printer runs out you won’t need

to hunt for it. Put a stapler and a box of staples next to the printer; you’ll want

students to keep their assignment, their work, and their reports together. You’ll also

need a folder for each student, pencils, erasers, a couple of boxes or baskets to hold

papers, and blank paper on which students can work problems. If you are using a

scanner, each student must have his own set of scan cards. Renaissance Place users

need four: one for practice assignments, one for exercises, one for regular tests, and

20


Beginning Tasks

RENAISSANCE PLACE: Before Students Can Begin Math Practice

These tasks must be done before you can begin making assignments. Some are performed by you

and some by other staff.

Task

Install libraries

Enter district, school, calendar information, teachers,

and students

Add courses and classes, and assign teachers

Create an Objective List by adding objectives from a

library to the Assignment Book

Print an Objective List Report

Assign an objective of your choice to students

Print the first practice assignment (see chapters 4

and 5)

one for diagnostic tests. Desktop users only need three, as they can use the same

scan card for both kinds of tests. The scan cards all look the same; the student

simply checks a box to indicate its use. We recommend that students also color-code

their cards, but we’ll tell you about that, and about how to use all these things, in a

later chapter.

Teach Routines to Students

Technology Staff

or Administrator

Accelerated Math practice will run much more smoothly if students are given clear

instructions on how to complete assignments and tests, enter their answers, show

their work, review reports, store their papers, and ask for help. Plan on figuring

out these routines and teaching them to students before or during the first few

weeks they use Accelerated Math. See chapter 6 for specific suggestions.




Teacher





Summary

BEGINNING TASKS

• Prepare to use the software.

• Administer STAR Math or another standardized test.

• View the Assignment Book and add objectives.

• Assemble instructional materials.

• Figure out how answers will be entered.

• Prepare your room.

• Teach routines to students.

21


If You’re New to the Program: How to Get Started

The simplest way to begin an Accelerated Math implementation is by primarily

delivering whole-class instruction, perhaps with a textbook. As we talked about in

the last chapter, choose the library that matches your scope and sequence or pacing

guide and add the objectives to the Assignment Book. Print an Objective List Report

(see the example below) and keep it near your computer as a reference. You might

also jot the page in your textbook that relates to the objective in front of the

objective number. That will save you time later. Also, if you then distribute the

objective list to your students, they will know where to get help if they need it

while working a problem. When all this is ready, follow the steps on the following

pages, referring to the appendix for software instructions as needed.

objective List Report

This report lists the objectives that have

been added to the Assignment Book for

the class.

22


If You’re New to the Program: How to Get Started

The Day Before You Begin

Remember we said earlier that Accelerated Math

considers any objective that you assign fair game

for an assignment, and if you don’t assign an

objective, the software ignores it. So the day

before your first lesson, choose the objective

you would like to teach first. Assign it to all

students, and then print a practice assignment for

all students. This way, the assignment will be

ready for you to distribute after you finish the lesson, and it will contain problems

for only the objective you just taught. Now think

ahead. What objective will you teach second

Teacher tasks:

Plan the first lesson

Assign objective of your choice

Print the practice assignment

Assign second objective of your choice

Make overhead of TOPS Report

Assign that but don’t try to print anything. By

assigning it, you’re simply letting the software

know that when a student submits answers to

problems related to the first objective, it’s okay

for the computer to automatically print a second

assignment that includes problems for the

second objective.

It’s a good idea to select an objective for the first

assignment that students already know, either

because it’s easy or you’ve already taught it. When students encounter immediate

success, the program gets off to a good start. Plus it enables everyone to focus on

learning how the software works rather than figuring out the answers to

the problems.

Day 1: Do a Few of the Basic Tasks

Teacher tasks:

Teach the first objective you assigned

Explain the TOPS Report

Student tasks:

Learn the first assigned objective

Complete the practice assignment

Score the practice assignment

Review the TOPS Report

Rework incorrect problems

Hand in work

Printing the First

Practice Assignment

You must print a student’s very first

practice assignment. After that, as

long as an objective is assigned, the

software will automatically print a

new practice assignment when

students scan the answers for their

current assignment.

Teach your lesson on the first objective you chose.

Then take a few minutes to project an overhead

of a TOPS Report. (See the example on page 24

and the reproducible form on page 69 of the

appendix.) Explain that this report prints after the

student scans her answers and tells the student

which problems she got right and wrong. Point out

where that information is located on the report.

Hand out the practice assignments that you

printed. Instruct students to complete the problems

and show their work. Have them circle their

answers on the practice assignment and record

them on the appropriate scan card. Allow students

to run their own scan card through the scanner,

according to a routine that you have developed and explained. (If you are using a

Renaissance Responder or NEO 2, teach students how to work with that device.)

Teacher tasks:

Review student work

Plan next steps

23


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

tops Report

This report gives you and your

students immediate feedback about

the assignment just completed and

shows cumulative data for the marking

period and school year.

After a student submits his answers, the software will check them and print a TOPS

Report and a new practice assignment. Instruct students to review the TOPS Report

and rework any problems they answered incorrectly, getting help from the textbook

or another student. (They will not be able to resubmit answers to the software,

however.) After that, have them staple together their TOPS Report, practice

assignment, and any papers they used to do their work. Tell students who scored

either 100 percent or got only one problem wrong to put their packets in one

basket. Instruct students who got more than one problem wrong to put their packets

in a second basket. Tell all students to save their new practice assignment for the

next day.

To plan for the next day, review the TOPS Reports. Did most students have

trouble If so, prepare to reteach the objective in a new way to the entire class.

If only some students had trouble, prepare to move forward with the second

objective that you chose.

Day 2: Allow Students to Branch Out

Teacher tasks:

Teach the second objective you chose

Reteach the first objective as needed

to a small group

Assign a third objective

Student tasks:

Complete the practice assignment

Score the practice assignment

Review the TOPS Report

Rework incorrect problems

Hand in work

If most students are ready, teach a lesson to the

class on the second objective. Afterwards, meet

with students who need your help with the first

objective; review TOPS Reports and work papers

to see what is causing them difficulty. While you

are doing this, the other students can complete

the practice assignment that printed the day

before, which includes problems for the second

objective. After class, review student work and

plan next steps.

Teacher tasks:

Review student work

Plan next steps

24


If You’re New to the Program: How to Get Started

Succeeding Days: Continue the Cycle to Testing and Mastery

As you continue to assign objectives and teach,

students complete practice assignments. The

software will keep track of how students are doing

with each objective. When a student correctly

works five out of the last six problems for an

objective, Accelerated Math will indicate that

the student is ready to take a regular test on that

objective. When a student is ready to test on three

to five objectives, print a regular test. (See page 56

(RP) or page 65 (desktop) for instructions.) Give

the student a quiet environment and instruct her to

complete the test in the same way she would do a

practice assignment. A TOPS Report will print,

letting you and the student know which objectives

have been mastered and which have not. A student

must correctly work four out of five problems on a

test before an objective is considered mastered.

(See the chart on page 9, which shows the criteria for advancing from one status

to another.)

Teacher tasks:

Assign objectives

Teach objectives

Reteach to the whole class, small

groups, or individuals

Student tasks:

Complete and score

practice assignments

Review TOPS Reports, rework

problems, and hand in assignments

Take regular tests to show mastery

Review mastered objectives

Teacher tasks:

Review student work

Print tests as needed

Plan next steps

Two weeks after mastering an objective a student will begin receiving review

problems on practice assignments—one review problem per objective mastered.

When the student correctly answers three out of the last four review problems for an

objective, the software will not give him any more work on it. If the student attempts

eight review problems on an objective without meeting this criteria, the software will

flag the student as needing intervention.

Pacing

Control the pace with which the software distributes assignments by assigning

objectives thoughtfully. For example, if you plan on teaching a group of objectives

together, assign them all at once. If you foresee students will have problems with a

set of objectives, assign them one by one. Make it a habit to review problems in the

Library Guide or the software before assigning any objectives. Does your textbook

present an objective differently than Accelerated Math If so, you’ll want to

point out the differences to students so they know how to approach the practice

assignment. Desktop users will find the Library Guide on the software CD.

Renaissance Place users can look at page 59 for instructions on locating the Library

Guide. If you have Renaissance Place, you can also see sample problems by clicking

Manage Objectives in the Assignment Book. Click the icon next to the objective to

see the examples.

When Students Get Behind

Inevitably, some students will advance more slowly than others. You have a number

of options for helping them:

• Pair up students. Even when students are working on a practice assignment for

the same objective, the software will give them different problems. Assign a

25


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

buddy to every student—a peer with whom they can consult when they have

trouble with a problem. Or identify “gurus” for various objectives. (See page 38

for details.) Make sure students know that the best way to help someone is not

to give them the answer but to teach them the strategy for working the problem.

• As you become experienced with Accelerated Math, review TOPS Reports as

quickly as you can—within a few minutes of printing—rather than waiting until

the end of the period. See if you can provide immediate one-on-one instruction.

This cuts down waiting time, and students can move forward faster.

• If a number of students are having trouble with the same objective, pull them

together for a short lesson. Work a few problems together. Then print an exercise

for that objective and have students complete it on their own.

• Be consistent with the requirement that students show you their work, not just

choose an answer. Analyze the work to identify what students are doing wrong

and help them with that specific issue.

Watch Out for the Intervene Symbol

If a student completes a certain number of problems without meeting the criteria for

testing, mastery, or review, the software displays a (red) (for “Intervene”) next to

the student’s name onscreen and on reports. When an objective is marked Intervene,

the software does not give a student any more problems on the objective until you

take action.

The Intervene Symbol During Practice. If the software flags a student for

intervention while he is working on practice assignments, print an exercise with

eight problems. Or, print an exercise with six problems along with the objective

examples so you have a total of at least eight problems on hand. Work the first

problem together and have the student work the second one out loud to you. Then

have the student work the remaining problems independently. If the student answers

five of the last six problems correctly on the exercise, Accelerated Math will

consider the student ready to test. If the student does not, the software will display

a (green) (for “Ready to Work”), indicating that the student needs to keep working

on the objective; provide more instruction and print a new practice assignment

or exercise.

The Intervene Symbol During Testing or When Working on Review Problems. If

the software flags a student for intervention during testing or review, meet with

the student and correct the errors together. If you feel the student understands

the material, print a diagnostic test. If the student passes the test, the software

will consider the objective mastered. If she does not pass it, the software will

display a (green) (for “Ready to Work”), indicating that the student needs to

keep working on the objective; provide more instruction and print a new practice

assignment or exercise.

26


If You’re New to the Program: How to Get Started

Letting Students Get Ahead

Just as some students will struggle, others will quickly meet success. Most teachers

find that these students can usually move forward, either on their own or working

collaboratively. They may need a little instruction from you, or they may be able to

teach themselves by drawing upon their textbook or other instructional materials that

you provide. As with struggling students, you can print exercises and use them to

teach brief power lessons to advanced groups.

Summary

IF YOU’RE NEW TO THE PROGRAM

• Assign objectives from the library that matches your curriculum.

• Teach to the whole group. At first, keep everyone on the same objective.

• Use practice assignments for on-going math practice.

• Monitor student performance by reviewing TOPS Reports.

• Print regular tests when students are ready to show mastery.

• When students struggle, reteach the objective or pair them with more

able students.

• When you’re ready, have students who can progress more rapidly work

collaboratively or provide instruction to them in a small group.

• Teach routines so that assignments are completed efficiently.

27


t

When You Are More Experienced: Differentiated

Instruction with Differentiated Practice

Students make the greatest gains with mathematics when both instruction and

practice are differentiated. We designed Accelerated Math to help you with this task.

Most teachers find, however, that differentiation requires a dramatic change in how

they run their classrooms. In a differentiated classroom, you review data often, plan

frequently, and interact with individuals and small groups almost constantly. You

also teach students procedures for working independently and collaboratively

without disturbing others (including you). The payoff is that students become

more responsible for their own learning, and they learn more.

Set Up Your Libraries and Classes

Begin by identifying each student’s

current level of math ability with an

assessment like STAR Math. Choose

the Accelerated Math library or

libraries that are recommended by

STAR Math or print Objective

List Reports and review them to

decide which libraries will be most

appropriate. If you decide to use more

than one library, we recommend that

you set up separate classes in the

software and place students in them

Matching Objectives to

Your Curriculum

You can add, delete, and reorder

objectives in the Assignment Book if

you would like to more closely match

your curriculum. Instructions are in the

appendix on pages 54–56 (RP) and

pages 63–64 (desktop). Alternatively,

you can keep objectives in the order

in which they appear but assign them

in the order you prefer.

based on the library they will be using. We also recommend that you keep the

Objective List Reports near your computer so that you can refer to them when you

assign objectives.

Before Class Begins

Teacher tasks:

Plan diagnostic testing

Plan routines

Prepare your room

Create and print diagnostic tests

Your first goal in a differentiated classroom is to

identify the right level of daily work for each

student. With Accelerated Math, you can use

diagnostic tests to pinpoint the specific objectives

students already understand and the ones with

which they need more practice.

28


When You Are More Experienced: Differentiated Instruction with Differentiated Practice

Before you begin a differentiated implementation, print a diagnostic test for each

student. (Remember that while the software automatically prints practice assignments,

you must manually create and print diagnostic tests.) You can create them for

the objectives that appear first in each library, or the ones that come first in any other

scope and sequence you are following. For example, let’s say you are using the

fifth-, sixth-, and seventh-grade libraries. You might create a diagnostic test for each

student depending on the student's current level of math ability: one that includes

problems on the first three to five objectives in the fifth-grade library, one that

includes problems on the first three to five objectives in the sixth-grade library, or

one that includes problems on the first three to five objectives in the seventh-grade

library. The software will include five problems for each objective.

Your second big goal in a differentiated classroom is to have students work

independently and collaboratively so that they don’t constantly need your

attention. That means you must teach them or reinforce procedures and routines for

completing assignments, using the printer and scanner, reviewing the TOPS Report,

and asking for and receiving help. Decide ahead of time what you would like these

to be, and arrange your room to facilitate independent and group work, small-group

instruction, quiet testing, and, if you are using an AccelScan scanner, scanning. We

suggest you print exercises on an easy objective to use when teaching routines. We

provide more details and recommendations for all this in chapter 6.

Day 1: Begin Diagnostic Testing and Introduce Routines

Teacher tasks:

Distribute exercises

Distribute diagnostic tests

Teach routines

Student tasks:

Learn routines

Complete diagnostic test

Score diagnostic test

Review TOPS Report

Hand in work

Explain and demonstrate how to complete an

assignment and fill out a scan card, as well as how

to use the scanner. Have students practice all this

using an exercise that you printed the day before.

Then have students complete the diagnostic tests.

If a student correctly answers four out of five

problems for an objective on the diagnostic test,

Accelerated Math will consider the objective

mastered. If a student is unsuccessful, the

software will keep track of that data, too.

Teacher tasks:

Review student work

After a student submits her answers, the

Plan next steps

software will check them and print a report

Print diagnostic tests and/or practice called the TOPS Report. (See the example on

assignments as needed

page 69.) Have students staple the report, the

diagnostic test and their work papers together,

and turn in the packets. Students who mastered all the tested objectives or had only

one wrong answer can place their packets in one basket. Students with more than

one wrong answer place their packets in another basket.

29


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Review each student’s TOPS Report, and make plans for the next day. Keep in mind

that your goal is to identify the objectives students need to practice. So for students

who showed mastery, print another diagnostic test. If some students are already

struggling, print practice assignments for them. The software will automatically

include problems on objectives with which they had trouble. Be aware that you only

need to print a student’s first practice assignment. After that, the software prints

them automatically as long as objectives are assigned.

The Next Few Days: Continue Diagnostic Testing and/or Begin the

Practice Cycle

Teacher tasks:

Teach objectives

Teach and reinforce routines

Create and distribute diagnostic tests

Student tasks (if still testing):

Complete diagnostic test

Score diagnostic test

Review TOPS Report

Hand in work

Student tasks (if practicing):

Learn objective

Complete practice assignment

Score practice assignment

Review TOPS Report

Rework incorrect problems

Hand in work

Teacher tasks:

Review student work

Plan next steps

As long as students show mastery of objectives,

continue to give them diagnostic tests on

additional objectives. When you see that a

student is encountering math concepts he doesn’t

know, discontinue diagnostic testing, and move the

student into the practice cycle.

To begin the practice cycle for a student, decide

which unmastered objective you want one or more

students to learn first. Provide instruction. Then

have the students complete a practice assignment

and scan their answers. (Be sure to teach them

procedures for this first. We give examples in

chapter 6.) As with diagnostic tests, the software

will check answers and print a TOPS Report. As

long as a student has objectives assigned and not

yet mastered, it will also print another practice

assignment based on the student’s performance.

The TOPS Report will show which problems the

student got right and wrong. Instruct students to rework any problems they answered

incorrectly. If they need help, encourage them to consult their textbook, other written

resources you have on hand, or a classmate before approaching you. (See page 38

for more information on a procedure called “3 B4 Me.”) Then have them staple

together their TOPS Report, practice assignment, and work papers. Students who

scored 100% or answered only one question incorrectly can place their work in one

basket and then turn to the new practice assignment. Those who need help from you

can place their work in another basket.

To plan your next steps, review TOPS Reports. Continue to print diagnostic tests as

needed. Once students are in the practice cycle, however, your planning tasks will be

to assign the next objective or group of objectives that you want a student to work

on, to identify who needs instruction, and to prepare short lessons for individuals

and small groups.

30


When You Are More Experienced: Differentiated Instruction with Differentiated Practice

Succeeding Days: Instruction, Practice, Testing, Mastery, and Review

Teacher tasks:

Assign objectives

Teach objectives

Reteach objectives to small groups

or individuals

Student tasks:

Complete and score practice

assignments

Review TOPS Reports, rework

problems, and hand in

Take regular tests to show mastery

Review mastered objectives

Teacher tasks:

Review student work

Plan next steps

Print regular tests as needed

Within a week or two of steady diagnostic testing,

all students will have moved into practice. At this

point, you will be regulating student work in

conjunction with this “thinking” software.

Remember that Accelerated Math will feel free to

include on a practice assignment any objective you

assign and will ignore any objective you

don’t assign. That means you will want to assign

objectives carefully. Don’t assign an entire library

at once or students will feel overwhelmed and

discouraged when they attempt to tackle problems

on objectives they haven’t learned. On the other

hand, don’t neglect to assign objectives; if you do,

students will be idle and their progress slowed.

You may find that more able or more confident

students can sometimes work ahead, teaching

themselves with materials that you provide.

As you assign objectives and deliver instruction, students will complete practice

assignments and Accelerated Math will keep track of how they’re doing. When a

student correctly works five out of the last six problems for an objective, the

software will consider her ready to take a regular test on it. Our general

recommendation is that when a student is ready to test on three to five objectives,

print a regular test. You can, however, print a test for any number of objectives.

(See page 56 (RP) or page 65 (desktop) for instructions.) For example, if a student

has been struggling, you might print a test on only one or two objectives so the test

will be smaller. After the student completes the test and scans his answers, a TOPS

Report will print, telling you and the student which objectives have been mastered

and which have not. A student must work four out of five problems correctly on a

test before an objective is considered mastered.

Two weeks after mastering an objective, a student will begin receiving review

problems for it on a practice assignment. When the student correctly answers three

out of the last four review problems for an objective, the software will not give

him any more work on it. If the student attempts eight review problems without

meeting this criteria, the software will flag the student as needing intervention.

For instructions on what to do when an Intervene symbol appears, see page 26.

You’ll find that a lot is going on at once in a differentiated Accelerated Math

classroom! For that reason, most teachers find that life is easier for them and their

students when they set up a regular structure for the day. It might look something

like this:

• First five minutes: Preparation. The teacher briefly outlines what’s going to

happen in class that day: “Today, I would like …” On the board, she writes

the names of the students she wants to assemble for small-group instruction

or one-on-one time with her. Then students retrieve their folders and get down

to work.

31


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

• Next 15 minutes: Small-group instruction. The teacher meets with a small

group in a designated area of the room. The other students work on their

practice assignments.

• Rest of the period: Individualized practice. Everyone works on practice

assignments. The teacher circulates around the room or has students come to

her desk for one-on-one help. Students also assist each other. See page 38 for

suggestions on identifying student helpers or “gurus.”

Some teachers like to have all students take regular tests on the same day each

week—every Friday, for example. Students will move faster, however, if they test

when they are ready. Just be sure to provide them with a quiet testing environment.

We give you some ideas about how to do that in the next chapter.

Monitoring Progress

In addition to reviewing TOPS Reports, you can monitor student progress by

viewing the Assignment Book; in Renaissance Place, click a student’s name in the

Assignment Book and go to the Student Detail screen. In addition, we recommend

that you get in the habit of viewing two reports: the Status of the Class Report,

which shows you each student’s assignment status and identifies who needs

intervention, and the Diagnostic Report, which summarizes each student’s progress

with all objectives and alerts you to students having trouble. We provide examples

and tell you more about how to use these reports on pages 41-44.

Summary

WHEN YOU’RE MORE EXPERIENCED

• If your students show a wide range of ability, consider using more than one

library of objectives.

• Use diagnostic tests to identify the right level of daily work.

• Use practice assignments for on-going math practice and print a regular test

when a student is ready to show mastery.

• Teach routines that enable students to work independently or collaboratively

during most of their math practice time.

• Provide whole-class, small-group, and individualized instruction as needed.

• Monitor progress and plan instruction by viewing TOPS Reports, the Status

of the Class Report, and the Diagnostic Report.

32


Managing Accelerated

Math in Your Classroom


y

Procedures and Routines for Students

To get results with Accelerated Math, it’s essential that you establish procedures and

have students practice them until they become routine. This enables students to work

without you, which in turn frees you up to help individuals and teach small groups.

If you find yourself chained to your desk, if students stand in long lines, or if you

feel exhausted after math class, then you know you need to establish more efficient

procedures for basic tasks.

Whenever you want students to learn a new classroom procedure, we recommend

you do the following:

1. Break the procedure into steps. Explain and model each step.

2. Ask a few students to demonstrate the procedure before the entire class.

Tell the others to notice if it was followed correctly or if steps were missing.

3. Create a poster listing the steps, if appropriate. Place the poster near the spot

where the procedure must be followed.

4. Have all students practice the procedure. Don’t expect perfection. Correct

mistakes and acknowledge students who follow procedures well.

5. Review the procedure throughout the year.

Below we describe procedures that many Accelerated Math teachers use. See pages

74-78 for step-by-step instructions that you can transfer to posters.

Maintaining Math Folders

For maximum efficiency, students must keep their materials organized and near at

hand. Give each student a folder in which to store scan cards, assignments, and

reports. Students can tuck their scan cards into library card pockets within the folder.

(See the examples below.) Have students color-code the scan cards by marking

35


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

the top of each one with a highlighter pen—blue for the scan card for practice

assignments, yellow for the scan card for regular tests, and so on.

When you print tests for students, take a few minutes before class to clip them to the

outside of the folder or slip them inside on top of other papers. This way, you won’t

need to waste time handing out assignments at the beginning of math class.

Teach students to leave their folders in a file box or other designated place in the

classroom at the end of each math period. This helps ensure that materials won’t get

lost and also gives you access to students’ work whenever you want to see it.

Taking Notes During Lessons

We recommend that students take notes during your lessons. This way they will have

something to refer to as they complete practice assignments and rework missed

problems. Give students precise instructions on how to take good notes and model

the procedure. You may also want to put an example of a notebook entry on a poster.

Here is a suggestion for a note-taking procedure:

• Write the date of the lesson, the name and number of the Accelerated Math

objective, and any corresponding textbook pages at the top of the notebook page.

• Accurately copy sample problems from the lesson.

• Indicate the steps in the solution.

• Highlight or underline the key points.

A reproducible form for taking notes is in the appendix. Some teachers like to

supplement student notes by printing the sample problems from the Library Guide

and having students keep them in their notebooks for reference.

Completing Practice Assignments, Exercises, and Tests

Showing Work

Show students how to fill in their name and the form number on the scan card.

Instruct them to complete the entire assignment, exercise, or test before bubbling

answers on the card. That means doing each problem, showing work either on the

assignment or test itself or on a separate piece of paper, and circling their answer

choices. After all this is done they can fill in the bubbles on the scan card. In our

experience, this method makes students less likely to bubble an answer on the

wrong line.

The best way to figure out why students

answered problems incorrectly is to examine

their work. For this reason, we urge you to

require them to show their work either right

on practice assignments and tests or on

separate sheets of paper. This means, too,

that students won’t simply guess at answers

or randomly fill in bubbles just to finish

their assignments.

36


Procedures and Routines for Students

Using the Scan Cards and the Scanner

Students need instruction on how to use scan cards.

Take the time early on to thoroughly teach this

routine task, and you won’t need to spend time later

troubleshooting. As you notice common scanning

mistakes, point them out to the whole class in a

nonjudgmental way so that students learn how to

avoid them. Here are the most important points

to emphasize:

• Be sure you have the right scan card.

• As you bubble in answers, check that the

question number on the scan card matches the

question number on the assignment or test.

• Press firmly and fill in the bubbles completely.

Bubble Buddies and Scan Masters

If you teach young students, pair

them up as Bubble Buddies. Tell them

to check each other’s card before

they scan it to make sure it’s filled in

correctly. If you teach older students,

you might identify a few students as

Scan Masters. Pick students with an

eye for detail who always seem to

know why a card won’t scan.

• Before scanning, look to see that you have ended on the correct problem number

and have only one answer for each question.

• Erase any stray marks.

Copy form number

from assignment.

Which type of

assignment

Designate one card for regular tests

and another for diagnostic tests.

Reuse scan card until a

new form number is

printed on assignment.

37


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Set up a system so that students can take turns at the scanner in a fair and organized

manner. Here are some suggestions:

• Have students write their names on the board when they finish an assignment or

test. After one student scans, she erases her name. This is the signal for the next

student on the list to take her turn at the scanner.

• As students are ready to scan, have them take a card with a number on it. After a

student scans, he quietly calls out the next number.

• For younger students, use tape to mark a batter’s box and an on-deck circle on

the floor. Teach students to stand in the batter’s box while scanning and in the

on-deck circle while waiting. This ensures that only two students are up at one

time. All the other students wait in the dugout (their seats).

Instruct students to bring their scan card, practice assignment, and any paper

showing their work to the scanner. After scanning, have them staple the TOPS

Report to the other papers. Students who answered all problems correctly then put

their work in a basket labeled “Wow!” or perhaps simply colored green. Students

who missed some problems bring their papers back to their desk so they can correct

their mistakes.

Make sure students who are waiting to scan have productive work to do, either

another Accelerated Math assignment or an activity that you give them. To cut down

on wait time, allow students to scan throughout the day and not just during math

period—when they’ve finished work on other subjects, for example, and before and

after school.

Correcting Mistakes and Preparing for a Discussion with the Teacher

When students make mistakes on practice assignments, require them to use their

TOPS Reports to identify the problems

they got wrong. (You have the option to

not print the correct answer on the

TOPS Report. See “TOPS Report”

under Preferences in the software.)

Then have them rework the problems,

getting help as needed from their notes,

the textbook, other materials you have

on hand, or another student. We suggest

you teach students a procedure that we

call “three before me” (3 B4 Me). This

means that students must use three

Student Gurus

Many teachers identify students who

are “gurus” on particular objectives

and can teach their peers. The

Student Grouping Report will show

you which students are actively

working on the same objectives.

Create a chart showing who knows

what so that students can work

together and seek help from gurus.

resources to figure out how to work a problem before asking you for help. If

students still have questions, they write them down on their assignment so they can

remember to bring them up with you.

After students have finished correcting their work, they place their packet of papers

in a basket labeled “Oops!” (If students answered only one problem incorrectly and

38


Procedures and Routines for Students

they understand their error, their packets can go in

the "Wow!" basket.) It could also be colored red or

yellow, or any other color that distinguishes it from

the green basket.

Taking Tests

Establish a way to identify students who are taking

tests, and make sure everyone knows not to disturb

them. You might print tests on colored paper.

Alternatively, testing students could keep a

brightly colored cup on their desk, they could

move to a special section of the room, or they

could place a U-shaped sign made of file folders

around themselves.

We recommend that you set up the following rules

so that students take tests consistently:

• No talking when taking a test.

• Only your test, scan card, and blank paper

can be on your desk. Put books and other materials away.

• Finish your test before the end of math period.

Some teachers prefer to scan answers to tests themselves rather than allowing

students to do it. This reinforces the fact that taking a test to show mastery is a

different task than practicing. In this case, teachers set up a third basket, and have

students, after completing a test, paper-clip their scan card to it and drop the packet

in the testing basket for the teacher to scan.

Summary

PROCEDURES AND ROUTINES FOR STUDENTS

• Have students maintain math folders.

• Teach students how to take notes during lessons.

• Show students how to fill out scan cards, complete assignments, and show

their work.

• Establish procedures for using the scanner, correcting mistakes, and preparing

for a discussion with you.

• Set up rules and procedures for testing.

39


u

Procedures and Routines for Teachers

Your most important routine is to monitor student practice. You can do this by

viewing reports and by meeting with students regularly. In this chapter, we suggest

procedures for reviewing the most frequently used reports. We also describe

routines for planning and managing instruction.

Monitor Daily Performance with the TOPS Report

As we mentioned earlier, we

recommend that students place TOPS

Reports in two baskets: one labeled

“Wow” for those who didn’t miss any

problems or just one, and one labeled

“Oops” for those who need your help.

Review TOPS Reports within a few

minutes of printing if possible, starting

with the reports at the bottom of the

“Oops” pile. Students are primed for

instruction right after scoring an

assignment; plus you want to reach

them before they repeat their errors on

the next assignment.

You can stay seated and call students

to you or circulate around the room.

Keep the discussion brief, especially

if the student understands his

mistakes. If the student has not

been able to correct his errors,

examine his work and help

him understand what he is

doing wrong. Work a problem

together and then ask the

student to return to his desk

and work the remaining

problems on his own. If the

student missed problems on

several objectives, discuss

the simplest objective first.

Math Error or Scan Card Error

Reviewing the TOPS Report enables

you to see if a student missed a

problem because of a scan card

mistake. Look at the TOPS Report on

page 69, for example. The dash under

“Your Answer” for problem 7 shows

that the student did not record an

answer. The question mark for

problem 8 indicates that the student

recorded more than one answer for

that problem. This tells you that the

student made a mistake filling out the

scan card. In a situation like this, you

will want to check the student’s

answers on her assignment and then

rescore the assignment. (You may

want to make an overhead of this

report example to show students.)

40


Procedures and Routines for Teachers

Wait until he has reworked the problems for that objective before moving on to

the others.

While meeting with students having difficulty is your highest priority, don’t neglect

those who are doing well. Acknowledgment from the teacher for a job well done

motivates students to keep working hard.

Use the Status of the Class Report to See Who Needs Work or Help

In addition to reviewing TOPS Reports, we recommend that you check the Status of

the Class Report daily, especially if you are running a differentiated classroom. This

report provides a snapshot of the class. It can help you make plans for the next math

period. In addition, you might place it on a clipboard and have it in hand as you

touch base with students during the math period.

We show you an example of a Status of the Class Report on page 42. (A full-page

example is on pages 70-71.) Here are the most important things to check.

• Notice first the Assignment Status section. Skim it to see who needs to have an

objective assigned or “needs work,” which means you must manually print a

practice assignment.

• Look at the Objectives Ready to Test column. If a student is ready to take

a test on three or more objectives, print a test.

• Skim through the dates in this section. Was anything printed more than a

few days ago If so, you’ll want to check in with the student and find out

why the work hasn’t been scored.

• Now review the Intervention Needed section to see who needs your help and

with which objectives. Check the column that lists objectives by number and

name. Are any students having trouble with the same objective Can you pull

them together for small-group instruction Which students must you meet with

individually Plan on getting to all of the students listed here the next time

you see them.

• Look at the section called Objectives Causing Difficulties. These students have

also been struggling but not for as long as the students listed for intervention.

Plan on meeting with these students too for small-group instruction.

• Finally, look at the Outstanding Assignments section. Look at the dates to see if

you need to follow up with any students.

41


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Status of Class Report

This report provides an overview of the

class’s current work and helps you plan

next steps.

Review the Diagnostic Report Weekly to Check Overall Progress

The Diagnostic Report gives you a snapshot of the class as a whole, and we

recommend that you review it at least once a week. When you are starting out with

Accelerated Math, you may want to focus on just a few pieces of data: the number

of objectives mastered and the average percent correct for practice assignments,

exercises, regular tests, and diagnostic tests. The number of objectives mastered tells

you how a student is performing relative to his classmates. Average-percent-correct

data alerts you to students who are struggling. If a student’s average falls below 75

percent on practice assignments or 85 percent on regular tests, he is unlikely to

master many objectives.

42


Procedures and Routines for Teachers

The Diagnostic Report also uses codes to flag students having difficulty. If most of

your students have a diagnostic code next to their name, your class may be working

in a library that is too hard. To see a full-page example of a Diagnostic Report, go to

page 72.

Diagnostic Report

This report provides summary data on

student performance. Review it weekly to

monitor student work and identify those

who need help.

Plan Every Day

You’ll get the most out of Accelerated Math if you routinely use the data it provides

to adapt instruction to the needs of each learner. The software can help you decide

what you need to teach, what you need to reteach, who needs help, and who can

move forward.

Develop a planning routine that you follow daily. Here is one suggestion.

1. Review the Status of the Class Report. Print tests as needed and attach them to

students’ folders.

2. Plan your instruction. If you are starting out with Accelerated Math and

primarily delivering whole-class instruction, assign the relevant objective

and decide on what you will use to teach your lesson. If your classroom is

differentiated and students are working on many different objectives, check the

43


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Status of the Class Report to see who needs to have objectives assigned. Identify

who is ready for instruction on a new objective—a small group, individuals

Assemble or print any materials you may need.

3. Plan intervention. Take another look at the Status of the Class Report. Are

any students listed as needing intervention or having difficulty with certain

objectives How will you help these students Do you need to meet with them

yourself Could you refer them to a student guru

4. Finally, make the plan for the day apparent to students. Use the board or some

other visual device to note if you will be starting out with a lesson and, if so,

with whom.

As you gain more experience with Accelerated Math, you’ll find yourself adjusting

your instructional schedule according to the objective. Instead of teaching a short

lesson each day followed immediately by practice, you might devote an entire period

to either one complicated objective or a number of related objectives. Then students

would use the next day for practice. Alternatively, you might spend the period

teaching short lessons to two or three separate groups.

Make Success Visible

Students get excited when they can see their progress. Help them keep track of the

objectives they master, and establish a routine in which you recognize their

success. Here are a few ideas:

• Print a certificate to congratulate

students for the number of

objectives mastered. We have

one available in the software.

• Have students maintain a graph

on which they keep track of the

number of objectives they master.

• Give students an Objective List

Report as a syllabus. Students

can check off objectives as they

master them.

• At the end of each month, list the names of students who have averaged at least

75 percent on practice assignments and 85 percent on regular tests.

Summary

PROCEDURES AND ROUTINES FOR TEACHERS

• Monitor daily performance with the TOPS Report.

• Use the Status of the Class Report to see who needs work or help.

• Review the Diagnostic Report weekly to check overall progress.

• Plan every day.

• Make success visible.

44


i

Accelerated Math with Primary Students

Thousands of first- and second-grade students use Accelerated Math successfully.

We have found, however, that a few modifications make the program run more

smoothly. We recommend that you create assignments that are easier for primary

students to navigate and that you take a little more time teaching them routines such

as how to complete assignments and scan answers. Young students also benefit from

visual aids that remind them of the steps they need to follow when using the

program. Below are a few tips for working with first and second graders.

Change Software Preferences for Printing

Alter the format of assignments, exercises, and tests so that they are easier for

young eyes to read. We recommend that you change the answer placement option to

vertical, which means that each answer choice will appear on a separate line. You

can also change the font size to large, which is 14 points, but that will require more

paper. For instructions, see the Changing the Page Layout of Assignments section on

page 58.

Prepare Tracking Aids

Create a tool for students that will help them bubble answers on the correct lines on

the scan cards. You can laminate bookmarks or simply distribute sticky notes. Some

teachers like to cut the bottoms off library pocket cards or envelopes; a student can

then slip a scan card into the library pocket or envelope and pull on the card to

reveal one line at a time.

Teach Students How to Complete Assignments

Print an identical exercise for everyone to do together that

includes only two problems. Students won’t actually scan the

answers for this exercise so you can print it for one student,

white-out the student’s name, make photocopies, and delete the

assignment from the software.

Make a transparency and distribute copies of the exercise to

students. Show them how to draw a line between the problems to

separate them visually. Model working the problems and circling

answer choices on the exercise itself. Write the letter for each

answer choice in the left margin. Complete both problems before

introducing the scan card.

45


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Practice Filling Out Scan Cards

Many teachers take a week to teach young students how to use a scan card. Begin by

making a transparency of a scan card and a photocopy for each student. Distribute

the copies to students and have them mimic what you do on the transparency. On

day one, show them where to write their name. On day two, show them how to fill

in the bubbles for the form number. On day three, refer to the exercise that you did

together a few days earlier and show students where to bubble in the first answer

choice. Instruct them to place their finger on line 1 of the scan card as they fill in the

bubble. On day four, repeat the process with the second answer choice. On day five,

do another two-problem exercise as a group, select answers, and fill in the bubbles

on the scan card, following the same procedure.

On succeeding days, do exercises together until students seem ready to try the

procedure independently. It’s also a good idea to create pairs of Bubble Buddies.

(See page 37.) Emphasize that the role of a Bubble Buddy is to see that the answer

choices bubbled in on the scan card match the answers on the exercise. They don’t

review or correct each other’s work.

Teach and Display Procedures for Using the Scanner

Model and have students practice the steps below. Take photos as they do each step

and display the photos on a bulletin board. If students are able to read independently,

also include captions that describe each step.

• Collect a practice assignment or exercise from the printer.

• Sit at your desk and figure out the answers to the problems.

• Fill out a scan card.

• Bring all your work to the scanner.

• Feed the scan card through the scanner.

• Collect the TOPS Report and the next assignment if one prints.

• Staple the TOPS Report to the assignment you just did.

• Place the packet in a basket for the teacher—the green basket if you got 100

percent, the red one if you didn’t.

• Return to your desk.

Take a “celebration photo” of all students holding their TOPS Reports, and post

that, too.

Use Exercises First

After students have gained some experience with Accelerated Math, print eight

problems for one objective on an exercise, identical for all students. Or, print six

problems for one objective on an exercise, identical for all students, along with the

objective examples so you have at least eight problems on hand. Do two problems

together and have students do the remaining problems on their own. The software

will look at the answers for the last six problems on the exercise to see if a student

is ready to test.

46


Accelerated Math with Primary Students

When students are familiar with this process, print exercises with different problems

and observe how well students complete them independently. When you feel

students are able to work on their own, you can switch from exercises to practice

assignments, which the software will automatically differentiate based on each

student’s performance. (Some primary teachers continue to use exercises with

identical problems throughout the year. Doing so gives them maximum control. If

you think you might like to follow this procedure, be aware that if students only do

exercises, they never receive review problems.)

Set Up a Signal System

Hand out cups, construction-paper tents, or small signs on wooden sticks that

students can use to signal you if they need help when they are working problems.

Green means everything is okay; red means they have questions; yellow means they

are taking a test.

Summary

ACCELERATED MATH WITH PRIMARY STUDENTS

• Change software preferences for printing.

• Prepare tracking aids.

• Teach students how to complete assignments.

• Practice filling out scan cards.

• Teach and display procedures for using the scanner.

• Use exercises first.

• Set up a signal system.

47


o

Troubleshooting

Accelerated Math is a complex piece of software, and students are unpredictable

people. Sometimes things seem to go wrong! Here are a few common situations with

suggestions for how to deal with them.

The scanner keeps rejecting the scan cards. I know I can phone for help, but I

don’t want to stop the day’s math practice. What do I do

You can enter students’ answers manually using your computer. That way they can

continue to score their work and get new assignments. (See the Score or Rescore an

Assignment Manually steps on page 58 (RP) or 65 (desktop).) When you have a

chance, diagnose the scanning problem. Are students waiting for the scanner to push

out the card or are they pulling it Are there stray marks on the card Try adjusting

the scanner setting so that it is not so sensitive. Also try using a new card, filling in

the answers that were on the old one. This often works if the old card was worn or

had erasures.

What should I do when a student “loses” an assignment

Reprint it. You can choose to include the problems that were on the original

assignment or different ones. See Reprinting or Deleting Assignments on page 57

(RP) or 66 (desktop) for instructions.

I understand that if a student mistakenly bubbles two answer choices on

the same line, the software can’t check either problem. But I don’t want

the student’s work on the assignment to be wasted. Can the assignment

be rescored

Yes. You need to do it manually, however, not with the scan card. We call this

keyboard scoring. You’ll find instructions on page 58 (RP) or 65 (desktop).

I have a student who is frequently absent. She has missed a lot of work, and she

looks discouraged. What should I do

If she wasn’t in class when you taught objectives that have been assigned to her, you

can put those objectives on hold. Then you can release the holds as you help her

catch up with what she has missed. If you’re not able to provide instruction yourself,

pair her with students who have done well with the objectives. See page 55 (RP) or

page 64 (desktop) for instructions on putting objectives on hold.

48


Troubleshooting

I like to give my students homework, but I hate correcting papers. Can I use

Accelerated Math for homework assignments

Yes! Exercises are perfect for this. You can choose the exact objectives—either the

same one for every student or different objectives for different students. You can also

control the size of the assignment by designating the number of problems you would

like for each objective. Many teachers like to send home exercises that are not in

multiple-choice format. We call these “free response.”

With its flexibility and limitless problems, Accelerated Math works well in

numerous situations such as summer school, intervention programs, or after school.

I’m a new teacher and I don’t have many resources to draw upon. Are there

any “extra” materials in Accelerated Math

Accelerated Math can generate many, many problems for the same objective.

Exercises, especially, make for good instructional materials. Here are a couple of

different ways to generate them for this purpose.

• For complex objectives, print identical exercises containing eight problems.

Or, print identical exercises containing six problems along with the objective

examples so you have at least eight problems in total. During your lesson,

demonstrate how to work one problem and then work one or two together as a

class. During practice time, have students finish their exercises independently

and score their answers.

• If you want to work a number of problems together as a group, print an exercise

for one student and then delete the assignment in the software. White-out the

student’s name and make photocopies for everyone. Work through the entire set

together during your lesson. Students do not score answers.

• If you are working one-on-one with a student, print a short free-response

exercise, which will contain three to five problems. Guide the student through the

first one, and then ask the student to work the remaining problems, explaining

each step to you as he does so.

I want to have more differentiation in my classroom, but I have a hard time

keeping track of which objectives students are working on. I don’t want to have

to sit in front of the computer all day. Any ideas

Make classroom activity more visual. For example, some teachers create a large

chart that lists objectives across the top and student names down the side. As

students master objectives, they put a checkmark under the objective and next to

their name. Another idea is to print different types of assignments on different

colored paper. If a practice assignment is white, for example, an exercise could be

pink, a regular test yellow, and a diagnostic test blue. A glance around the classroom

will remind you of what each student is working on.

I need to spend time helping my students prepare for standardized tests. Do I

need to stop using Accelerated Math while I do that

No. Let the software program help you. Give students free-response diagnostic tests.

These will pinpoint weaknesses in your students’ math skills.

49


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Is it okay to use a diagnostic test for my midterm and semester tests

Of course. Configure the test any way you like it. The software will guide you

through a number of options. You can include up to 100 problems. You can also

preview the test before you print it.

The program is using more paper and toner than I anticipated. What can I do

to conserve

Many teachers find that local businesses are very willing to donate old letterhead or

used paper that has only been printed on one side. In addition, you can change the

font size in the software so that more problems appear on each page, which will cut

down on the amount of paper needed. Next year, take a look at your school supply

list. Can anything be removed If so, you might consider requiring students to

supply a ream of paper for Accelerated Math use. To reduce the amount of toner

needed, set the printer to draft mode. If your school is considering purchasing

new printers and you have the Renaissance Place version of Accelerated Math, we

recommend you buy a duplex printer, which will print assignments on both sides of

a piece of paper.

I would like to learn more about how to use Accelerated Math. Where should

I look

There are numerous tools to help you use Accelerated Math successfully in your

classroom. Refer to these resources when you need additional help or when you’re

ready to advance the use of your program.

• Resources in the software: For each library, there is a Scope and Sequence,

which lists the objectives in order, and a Library Guide that shows several

sample problems for each math objective in the library. For instructions on

locating the library documentation, find Access the Library Guide and Scope

and Sequence on page 58 (RP). (Desktop users will find the Library Guide on the

software CD). You can also see sample problems by clicking the View Example

icon next to an objective name in the software. There are also documents in

Renaissance Place that detail beginner and advanced implementation strategies.

To find these documents, click Resources under Accelerated Math on the

Renaissance Place Home page.

• The Renaissance Learning web site: Go to www.renlearn.com to learn about

other educators’ success stories, view on-demand sessions that demonstrate

common software steps, find answers to your technical questions, or read about

the research supporting Accelerated Math.

• Model Classroom and Renaissance Certification: By enrolling in this program,

you can connect with other Model educators to share ideas. To learn more about

Renaissance Certification, call (800) 656-6740 or go to the Renaissance Learning

web site.

• Additional professional development: Remote or onsite professional development

sessions are available to help you maximize the power of Accelerated Math.

50


Appendix


Instructions for Common Software Tasks

Renaissance Place Version

Using STAR Math

Locate Pretest Instructions

1. Click Resources under STAR Math on the Renaissance Place Home page.

2. Click Pretest Instructions.

Print Student User Names and Passwords

1. Click Reports under STAR Math on the Renaissance Place Home page.

2. Click Student Information.

3. Select customization options and click View Report.

4. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe Reader buttons to

save or print it. (Do not use the browser’s print option.) If the document opens

in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu and choose Print.

Set the Monitor Password

1. Click Preferences under STAR Math on the Renaissance Place Home page.

2. Click Testing Password.

3. Check the box next to Monitor and enter the password you wish to use.

4. Click Save.

5. Click Done.

Adjust Math Instructional Level (if student is working above or below

grade level)

1. Click Student Settings under STAR Math on the Renaissance Place

Home page.

2. Click Edit. (Resetting a Math Instructional Level will override the default

grade placement for the student's first STAR Math test.)

3. To change a student’s Math Instructional Level, type it in the field at the end

of the row for that student.

4. Click Save after making all of your changes.

5. Click Done.

Print Reports

1. Click Reports under STAR Math on the Renaissance Place Home page.

2. Click the name of the report you wish to print.

3. Select options and click View Report.

4. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe Reader buttons to

save or print it. (Do not use the browser's print option.) If the document opens

in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu and choose Print.

53


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Setting Up Accelerated Math

Note: Set-up tasks for the Renaissance Place version of Accelerated Math are usually

performed by school or district technology staff. These tasks include installing

libraries; entering district, calendar, school, teacher, and student information; and

adding and assigning classes and teachers. Instructions for these tasks are in the

software manual.

Working With Accelerated Math Objectives

Create an Objective List for Each Class Assignment Book

Before students can work with Accelerated Math, you must create an objective list

and link it to your class.

1. Click Assignment Book under Accelerated Math on your Home page.

2. View the list options in the light green box on the Assignment Book page.

You will see at least two of the following options:

• Grade x Objective List. A default objective list for the library shown

that cannot be edited.

• An existing objective list. An objective list that has already been

created (e.g., a default Accelerated Math list (Library List), an

administrator’s list (Shared List), or one of your lists (My List)).

• New objective list that I will create. A new objective list that you

can edit in the future if necessary.

3. Choose New objective list that I will create and click Select. (For more

detailed instructions for the other two options, see the Accelerated Math RP

Software Manual.)

4. Enter a name for the objective list and click Next >.

5. Click Add All in the row for the library that you want to add to your list.

6. Click Done.

Create Additional Objective Lists

Administrators and teachers can create additional objective lists. An objective list

must be linked to a class before it can be used with students.

1. Click Libraries under Accelerated Math on your Home page. If necessary,

select a school from the drop-down list.

2. Click Manage Objectives on the left side of the page.

3. Click Create New List on the left side of the page.

4. Enter a name for the objective list and choose your options:

• Choose Standard (for objectives for the Assignment Book)

or Extended Response (for objectives used on the Extended

Response page).

• Choose a permissions option. Shared lists can only be created by

administrators, but can be used by others in the school or district.

Private lists can be created by administrators or teachers.

5. Click Next >.

6. Click the drop-down list and choose to add objectives by library. (For more

detailed instructions for the other options, see the Accelerated Math RP

Software Manual.)

• Click Add All in the row for a library to add all the library's

objectives to the list.

54


Instructions for Common Software Tasks: Renaissance Place Version

• Click Add to select individual objectives to add from a library; then,

check objectives and click Add. You can click Remove All in the

row for a library if you accidentally added that library's objectives, or

click the X next to an objective to remove it from the list.

7. Click Done when finished adding objectives.

Print the Objective List Report

1. From the Assignment Book, click More Reports....

2. Click Objective List.

3. Choose a class. Decide whether or not to include extended-response

objectives, and click View Report.

4. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe Reader buttons to

save or print it. (Do not use the browser's print option.) If the document opens

in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu and choose Print.

Assign Objectives to Students

1. From the Assignment Book, select a student by clicking the box next to

the student’s name. To assign to all students, click the box at the top of

the column.

2. Click Assign.

3. Click the box next to the objective number for each objective you wish

to assign.

4. Click Assign.

5. Click Done.

Unassign or Hold Objectives

Note: Unassigning objectives and putting objectives on hold must be done

separately. Only objectives that have been assigned can be unassigned.

1. View the Assignment Book for the class that needs objectives unassigned or

put on hold.

2. Check the box next to each student who needs an objective unassigned or put

on hold. Or, to select all students, check the box next to Student at the top of

the column.

3. Click Hold/Unassign/Reset on the left side of the page.

4. Check the box next to each objective that you want to unassign or put on hold.

5. Click Unassign or Hold.

6. Click Done.

Reorder Objectives in an Objective List

Note: If you are working with a default-order list, you cannot reorder objectives.

1. From the Assignment Book, click Manage Objectives.

2. Click Reorder.

3. Click Reorder by Objective.

4. Check the box for the objective you want to move. You can move several

objectives at one time.

5. Enter a number next to Move Up or Move Down and click the button. To

move an objective to a specific position in the objective list, type the position

number next to Move To and click the button.

6. Click Save.

55


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Add Additional Objectives to the Objective List

1. From the Assignment Book, click Manage Objectives.

2. Under Manage Objectives, click Add/Remove.

3. Click Add All to add an entire library or Add to select specific objectives

from a library.

4. Click Done.

Working with Accelerated Math Assignments

Print a Practice Assignment

1. From the Assignment Book, check the box for each student who needs a

practice assignment. Or, to select all students, check the box next to Student

at the top of the column.

2. Under Activities, click Print Practice.

3. Choose the size of the assignment (small, medium (default), or large) and

click Print.

4. If the preference is set to preview assignments before they print, the

assignment will open in Adobe Reader or the Macintosh OS X Preview

program. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe Reader

buttons to save or print it. (Do not use the browser's print option.) If the

document opens in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu and

choose Print.

Print an Exercise

1. From the Assignment Book, check the box for each student who needs an

exercise. Or, to select all students, check the box next to Student at the top of

the column.

2. Under Activities, click Print Exercise.

3. Under Answer Format, select Assisted-Response (multiple choice) or Free-

Response (short answer).

4. Enter the number of problems per objective you wish to include.

5. If you are printing an exercise for more than one student, select Individual

or Identical under Problem Generation.

6. If you selected the Identical Free-Response format, choose either a global

answer key or individualized answer keys.

7. Check the box next to each objective you wish to include on the exercise.

8. Click Print.

9. If the preference is set to preview assignments before they print, the

assignment will open in Adobe Reader or the Macintosh OS X Preview

program. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe Reader

buttons to save or print it. (Do not use the browser's print option.) If the

document opens in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu and

choose Print.

Print a Regular Test

1. From the Assignment Book, check the box for each student who needs a

regular test. Or, to select all students, check the box next to Student at the top

of the column.

56


Instructions for Common Software Tasks: Renaissance Place Version

2. Under Activities, click Print Test.

3. Enter the maximum number of objectives you wish to include.

4. Select Assisted-Response (multiple choice) or Free-Response (short answer).

5. Click Print.

6. If the preference is set to preview assignments before they print, the

assignment will open in Adobe Reader or the Macintosh OS X Preview

program. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe Reader

buttons to save or print it. (Do not use the browser's print option.) If the

document opens in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu and

choose Print.

Print a Diagnostic Test

1. From the Assignment Book, check the box for each student who needs a

diagnostic test. Or, to select all students, check the box next to Student at the

top of the column.

2. Under Activities, click Print Diagnostic.

3. Under Answer Format, select Assisted-Response (multiple choice) or Free-

Response (short answer).

4. If you are printing a diagnostic test for more than one student, select

Individual or Identical under Problem Generation.

5. If you selected the Identical Free-Response format, choose either a global

answer key or individualized answer keys.

6. Check the box next to each objective you wish to include on the

diagnostic test.

7. Click Print.

8. If the preference is set to preview assignments before they print, the

assignment will open in Adobe Reader or the Macintosh OS X Preview

program. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe Reader

buttons to save or print it. (Do not use the browser's print option.) If the

document opens in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu and

choose Print.

Score an Assignment Using AccelScan

1. For Windows, select Programs from the Start Menu or , and then select

AccelScan. For Macintosh, double-click on AccelScan in the folder in which

the program is installed. You may want to add a shortcut to AccelScan on

your desktop.

2. When the display shows Ready to Scan, insert the scan card into the scanner

face up with the form number going into scanner first. (If you have the older

1100 USB model, insert the scan card face down.)

3. Wait for the scanner to grab, read, and release the scan card.

Reprinting or Deleting Assignments

Note: Scored assignments cannot be deleted.

1. From the Assignment Book, check the box for the student.

2. Under Activities, click Reprint/Delete.

3. Choose the assignment type and click Reprint or Delete.

4. If reprinting, choose to print the same problems or different ones; then,

click Reprint.

57


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

5. If the preference is set to preview assignments before they print, the

assignment will open in Adobe Reader or the Macintosh OS X Preview

program. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe Reader

buttons to save or print it. (Do not use the browser's print option.) If the

document opens in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu and

choose Print.

Score or Rescore an Assignment Manually

1. From the Assignment Book, click Keyboard Score.

2. Enter the assignment’s form number and click Score or Rescore.

3. Select answers and click Save.

4. Click Done.

Working with the Intervene Symbol

For Intervention on Practice:

1. From the Assignment Book, click Intervene next to the Intervene

symbol (red) in the Action column.

2. Choose Print Exercise and click Next >.

3. Select Assisted-Response (multiple choice) or Free-Response (short answer)

and enter the number of problems per objective you wish to include.

4. Click Print.

5. If the preference is set to preview assignments before they print, the

assignment will open in Adobe Reader window or the Macintosh OS X

Preview program. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe

Reader buttons to save or print it. (Do not use the browser's print option.) If

the document opens in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu

and choose Print.

For Intervention on Test or Review:

1. From the Assignment Book, click Intervene next to the Intervene

symbol (red) in the Action column.

2. Choose Print Diagnostic Test and click Next >.

3. Select Assisted-Response (multiple choice) or Free-Response (short answer).

4. Click Print.

5. If the preference is set to preview assignments before they print, the

assignment will open in Adobe Reader window or the Macintosh OS X

Preview program. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe

Reader buttons to save or print it. (Do not use the browser's print option.) If

the document opens in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu

and choose Print.

Changing the Page Layout of Assignments

1. Click Preferences under Accelerated Math on the Renaissance Place

Home page.

2. If necessary, select your school and class.

3. Click Page Layout.

4. Select a font size and style for answer placement. You can also choose

whether or not to include the list of objectives on an assignment. Click Save.

58


The Purpose of Accelerated Math: Powerful Practice

Printing Reports and Accessing Resources

Reprinting a TOPS Report

1. From the Assignment Book, check the box for each student who needs a

TOPS Report reprinted.

2. Under Reports, click TOPS.

3. If you selected one student, click Reprint in the Action column for the

assignment. (If more than one student was selected, TOPS Reports will

automatically generate for the students’ most recent assignments.)

4. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe Reader buttons to

save or print it. (Do not use the browser's print option.) If the document opens

in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu and choose Print.

Print Reports

1. From the Assignment Book, click the report you wish

to print under Reports. Or, click More Reports... to see more options.

2. To customize, click Customize This Report. Select options and click

View Report.

3. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe Reader buttons to

save or print it. (Do not use the browser's print option.) If the document opens

in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu and choose Print.

Access Math Resource Documents

1. Click Resources under Accelerated Math on the Renaissance Place

Home page.

2. Click the name of a resource category.

3. Click the name of the document you wish to view.

4. If the document opens in Adobe Reader, click the Adobe Reader buttons to

save or print it. (Do not use the browser's print option.) If the document opens

in the Macintosh Preview program, click the File menu and choose Print.

Access the Library Guide and Scope and Sequence

1. Click Libraries under Accelerated Math on the Renaissance Place

Home page.

2. Click the name of the library.

3. In the Library Documentation section, click the title of the document that

ends with "SS.PDF" to view the Scope and Sequence. Click the title of the

document that ends with "LG.PDF" to view the Library Guide.

Access the Software Manual

1. In the upper-right corner of the Renaissance Place Home page, click Manuals.

2. Click the name of the manual you wish to view under Accelerated Math.

59


Instructions for Common Software Tasks

Desktop Version

Using STAR Math

Add Classes to STAR Math

1. Begin at the School Screen. Click Classes.

2. Click Add.

3. Create the class name and password.

4. Click Assign Teacher.

5. Select the teacher from the list or click New to add a new teacher.

6. Click OK.

Add Students to STAR Math

1. To return to the School Screen, click the School button in the lower left

corner, and click Students.

2. Click Add.

3. Enter the student’s first name, last name, password, and grade level.

(Other information is optional.)

4. Click the Characteristic Tab to select optional characteristics. (To add

characteristics, go to the preferences screen, double-click Student

Characteristics, and enter characteristic names.)

5. Click OK.

Enroll Students in STAR Math

1. Begin at the School Screen. Click Classes.

2. Select a class and click Enroll.

3. Select the students that you wish to enroll in your class. Click Add >> to add

individual students or Add All >> to add all students.

4. Click OK.

Adjust Math Instructional Level (if student is working above or below

grade level)

1. Begin at the School screen. Click Students.

2. Click a student’s name and click Edit.

3. Click the arrow next to MIL. (Resetting a Math Instructional Level) will

override the default grade placement for the student's first STAR Math test.)

4. Click OK.

Set the Password Preference for STAR Math

1. Begin at the School screen. Click Preferences.

2. Double-click Testing Password to set the password preference.

3. Click Finish or OK when done.

61


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

62

Print Student Passwords for STAR Math

1. Begin at the School screen. Click Reports.

2. Click Student Detail.

3. Click the Custom tab. Make selections in wizard and click OK. Be sure to

click the Show Password box.

4. Click Finish.

5. Click the Print tab.

Print STAR Math Reports

1. Begin at the School screen. Click Reports.

2. Click a report name. Click the Custom tab. Make selections in wizard and

click OK.

Setting Up Accelerated Math

Add Classes to Accelerated Math

1. Click the Go drop-down menu and click Classes.

2. Click Add.

3. Create a class name and password.

4. Click Assign Teacher.

5. Select the teacher from the list or click New to add a new teacher.

6. Click OK.

Add Students to Accelerated Math

1. Click the Go drop-down menu and click Students.

2. Click Add.

3. Enter the student’s first name, last name, and password. (Other information

is optional.)

4. Click the Characteristic Tab to select optional characteristics. (To add

characteristics, go to the preferences screen, double-click Student

Characteristics, and type in characteristic names.)

5. Click OK.

Enroll Students in Accelerated Math

1. Click the Go drop-down menu and click Classes.

2. Select a class and click Enroll.

3. Select the students that you wish to enroll in your class. Click Add >> to add

individual students or Add All >> to add all students.

4. Click OK.

Enter the School Year, Marking Periods, and Days Off

1. Click the Go drop-down menu. Under School, click Preferences.

2. Double-click School Year and click Edit. Make selections in wizard and

click OK.

3. Read the information and click Next.

4. Enter the start and end dates of the school year. Click Next.

5. To add a new marking period in the Marking Period panel, click Add. Enter

the information and click OK.

6. To add additional marking periods, click Yes. Enter the information and

click Add.


Instructions for Common Software Tasks: Desktop Version

7. When finished, click Done and Next.

8. In the Days Off panel, click Add to enter a day off. Enter the information and

click OK.

9. To add more days off, click Yes. Enter the information and click Add.

10. When finished, click Next. Review the Summary panel and click Finish

(Windows) or Done. (Macintosh).

Install Libraries

Note: Only those with an Administrator password can install libraries. Libraries

must be installed before teachers can add objectives to their class Assignment Book.

If you received a library CD that starts its own library installer, use that instead of

following the steps below.

1. Insert the library CD.

2. Click the Go drop-down menu and click Libraries.

3. Click Install.

4. Read the information and click Next.

5. Select “I received an Installation Code from Renaissance Learning” and

click Next.

6. If the Select Location panel appears, go to step 8. If not, click Select Location

and go to step 7.

7. Select the CD drive and click OK (Windows) or Choose (Macintosh).

8. Click Next.

9. Enter the installation code that you received.

10. Read the information and click Next.

11. Click Finish (Windows) or Done (Macintosh).

Working with Accelerated Math Objectives

Add Objectives

1. Begin at the Assignment Book. If asked to add objectives, click Yes. Click the

Assignment Book drop-down menu and click Add Objectives.

2. Select the library from which you wish to add objectives and click Next.

3. If you wish to add all of the library’s objectives, click Yes and Next. Go to

step 7.

4. If you only want to add some of the library's objectives, click No and Next.

5. Select the objectives you wish to add, and click Add >>. To select more than

one objective, hold down the Ctrl key (Windows) or the key (Macintosh)

as you click the objectives. You can also select a group of objectives by

clicking the first one, holding down the Shift key, and clicking the last one.

To remove objectives, select them and click


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Change the Order of Objectives

1. Begin at the Assignment Book. Click the Assignment Book drop-down menu,

and click Reorder Objectives.

2. Select objective(s) and use the buttons on the right to reorder.

3. To save your changes and exit the dialog box, click OK. To exit without

saving your changes, click Cancel.

Assign an Objective

1. Begin at the Assignment Book. To assign an objective to all students,

highlight the objective name by clicking it. To assign an objective to

individual students, click the cell that is next to a student’s name and

under the objective.

2. Click Assign.

Unassign an Objective

1. Begin at the Assignment Book and click the cell that is next to the student’s

name and under the objective.

2. Click the Assignment Book drop-down menu, and click Unassign.

Put an Objective on Hold

1. Begin at the Assignment Book and click the cell that is next to the student’s

name and under the objective.

2. Click the Assignment Book drop-down menu, and click Hold.

Set State Tags

1. Begin at the Assignment Book. Click the Assignment Book drop-down menu,

and click Objective Standards.

2. If you want to mark all available standards, click Add All >>.

3. If you only want to mark some standards, highlight them, and click Add >>.

4. If you decide that you don't want to mark some standards that you added,

click


Instructions for Common Software Tasks: Desktop Version

3. Click Exercise and click Next.

4. Select Assisted-Response (multiple choice) or Free-Response (short answer).

Click Next.

5. If you are printing an exercise for more than one student, select Identical or

Individualized. Click Next.

6. Enter the number of problems per objective you wish included.

7. Click Finish or Back to make changes.

Print a Regular Test

1. Begin at the Assignment Book. Click a student’s name.

2. Click Print.

3. Click Test and click Next.

4. Select Assisted-Response (multiple choice) or Free-Response (short answer).

Click Next.

5. Type in the maximum number of objectives to be included.

6. Click Finish or Back to make changes.

Print a Diagnostic Test

1. Begin at the Assignment Book. Click a cell. Holding down the Ctrl key

(Windows) or the key (Macintosh), click cells to select students

and objectives.

2. Click Print.

3. Click Diagnostic Test and click Next.

4. Select Assisted-Response (multiple choice) or Free-Response (short answer),

and click Next.

5. If you are printing a Diagnostic Test for more than one student, select

Identical or Individualized and click Next.

6. Click Finish or Back to make changes.

Score an Assignment Using Quick Scan

1. For Windows, select Programs from the Start menu and click AM Quick

Scan. For Macintosh, double-click on the AM Quick Scan icon.

2. When the software displays “Ready to Scan,” insert a scan card into the

scanner face up with the form number going into the scanner first. (If you

have the older 1100 USB model, insert the scan card face down.)

3. Wait for the scanner to grab, read, and release the scan card.

Score an Assignment Manually

1. Begin at the Assignment Book. Click Score.

2. Type in the assignment’s form number and click Score.

3. Select answers and click Next.

4. Click Finish and click Done.

Rescore an Assignment

1. Begin at the Assignment Book. Click Score.

2. Enter the assignment’s form number and click Rescore.

3. Select answers and click Next.

4. Click Finish.

65


Getting Results with Accelerated Math

Reprint an Assignment

1. Begin at the Assignment Book and click the student’s name.

2. Click the Assignment Book drop-down menu and click Reprint.

3. Select the assignment type and click Next.

4. Select how you would like the assignment to be reprinted and click Next.

5. Click Finish.

Delete an Assignment

1. Begin at the Assignment Book and click the student’s name.

2. Click the Assignment Book drop-down menu, and click Delete Assignments.

3. Select the assignment type and click OK.

Working with the Intervene Symbol

For Intervention on Practice:

1. Begin at the Assignment Book. Select the cell(s) showing the Intervene

symbol (red).

2. Click Print.

3. Click Exercise and click Next.

4. Select Assisted-Response (multiple choice) or Free-Response (short answer)

and click Next.

5. If you are printing an exercise for more than one student, select Identical or

Individualized and click Next.

6. Enter the number of problems per objective you wish to include and

click Next.

7. Click Finish or Back to make changes.

For Intervention on Test or Review:

1. Begin at the Assignment Book. Select the cell(s) showing the Intervene

symbol (red).

2. Click Print.

3. Click Diagnostic Test and click Next.

4. Select Assisted-Response (multiple choice) or Free-Response (short answer),

and click Next.

5. If you are printing a test for more than one student, select Identical or

Individualized and click Next.

6. Click Finish or Back to make changes.

Printing Reports and Accessing the Software Manual

Reprint a TOPS Report

1. Begin at the Assignment Book. Click the student’s name.

2. Click the Reports button and select TOPS.

3. Click Preview and select the TOPS you want to print.

Locate and Print Reports

1. Begin at the Assignment Book.

2. Click the Reports button.

3. Select the report you wish to print.

4. Click Print.

66


Instructions for Common Software Tasks: Desktop Version

Print Certificates

1. Click the Go drop-down menu. Under Classroom, click Reports.

2. Click Certificate.

3. Click the Group, Date, or Options buttons to customize.

4. Click Preview or Print.

Access the Software Manual

1. Insert the Accelerated Math product disc into the computer’s CD-ROM drive

and view the contents.

2. Double-click the Extras folder.

3. Double-click the Manuals folder.

4. Double-click the AMManual icon to open the manual in Adobe Reader.

5. To print, click the File drop-down menu and click Print.

67


68 Reproducible Form © 2008 Renaissance Learning, Inc.


Reproducible Form © 2008 Renaissance Learning, Inc.

69


70

Reproducible Form © 2008 Renaissance Learning, Inc.


Reproducible Form © 2008 Renaissance Learning, Inc.

71


72

Reproducible Form © 2008 Renaissance Learning, Inc.


75

Reproducible Form © 2008 Renaissance Learning, Inc.


Index

AccelScan, 19

advancing students, 26

Assigned symbol, 11

assignments

completing, 36, 45

types, 7-10

Assignment Book, 10, 19, 20, 21, 22,

28, 32

average percent correct, 16, 42, 44

baskets for completed assignments,

20, 24, 29, 30, 38, 39, 40, 46

Bubble Buddies, 37, 46

certificate, 44

chart showing objectives mastered,

49

computers, 18, 20

desktop, 18, 19

Diagnosing symbol, 11

diagnostic code, 43

Diagnostic Report, 32, 42-43

diagnostic test

definition, 8, 9

using, 8, 9, 10, 16, 26, 28-32,

49, 50

differentiation, 15-16, 28-32, 43, 49

exercise

definition, 8, 9

using, 10, 26, 29, 46, 49

folder, 20, 35-36

formatting assignments, 45

free-response problems, 49

graph for charting objectives

mastered, 44, 49

gurus, 26, 38, 44

help, providing, 25-26

holding objectives, 48

Hold symbol, 11

homework, 49

instruction, 23, 43

differentiated, 15-16, 28-32

linked to practice, 6

small-group, 16, 31, 41

using exercises for, 49

whole-class, 15, 23-24

Instructional materials, 20

Intervene symbol, 11, 26, 31

intervention, 26, 31, 41-44

libraries

choosing, 15, 16, 19, 22, 28

definition, 15

installing, 19

Library Guide, 25, 36, 50

Mastered symbol, 11

mastery

and growth, 15

and red "I," 26

and review, 25

criteria for, 9, 25

showing, 8, 12

monitor, 16, 24, 32, 40-44

motivation and success, 44

NEO 20

note-taking, 36

reproducible form for, 73

Objective List Report, 15, 20, 21, 22,

28, 44

objectives

adding, 19, 21, 22, 28

assigning, 12, 15, 20, 21, 22-23,

25, 28, 30, 43

mastery criteria, 9, 16

mastery of, 12, 16, 25, 26

79


80

minimum for growth, 16

ordering, 20, 28

viewing status, 25, 49

pacing, 25

pacing guide, 15, 20, 22

paper, 18, 20, 50

planning, 18, 24, 30, 40-44

practice assignment

and objectives, 12, 23-24

average percent correct, 16, 42

criteria for success, 9

definition,7-8, 9

printing, 23

using, 8, 9, 10, 23-24, 30-32

primary students, 45-47

printer, 18, 20, 50

problems, 15, 49

assisted-response, 8

free-response, 8, 49

review, 31

viewing samples, 25

procedures (See routines)

Quick Scan, 19

ready to test, 12, 25, 31, 41

Ready to Test symbol, 11

Ready to Work symbol, 11, 26

regular test

average percent correct, 16

criteria for taking, 9

definition, 8, 9

using, 10, 16, 25, 31

when to print, 32, 41

Renaissance Place, 18

Assignment Book, 10, 19, 32

scan cards for, 20-21

set up, 21

Renaissance Responders, 20, 23

reports, 40-43

reprinting an assignment, 48

rescoring an assignment, 48

review, 7, 9, 25, 31, 47

Reviewed symbol, 11

routines for students

for completing work, 36, 45

for organizing materials, 35

for receiving help, 38, 47

for showing work, 36

for taking notes, 36

for taking tests, 39, 49

for using the scanner, 37-38, 46

routines for teachers

for planning, 43-44

for recognizing success, 44

for reviewing reports, 40-44

routines posters, 74-78

scan cards, 23

color coding, 35-36

mistakes with, 40

organizing, 35

routine for using, 37-38

with primary students, 45-46

scanner, 5, 18, 20, 23

problems with, 48

routine for using, 37-38

with primary students, 46-47

scoring manually with keyboard, 48

set up, 18-21, 22, 28

showing work, 36

software instructions

desktop, 61

Renaissance Place, 53

standards, 15

STAR Math, 15, 16, 19, 28

Status of the Class Report, 32,

41-42, 44

Student Grouping Report, 38

symbols, 10-11, 26

testing symbol, 11

tests, taking, 39

time for practice, 5, 6, 16

Three Before Me (3 B4 Me), 30, 38

TOPS Report, 23, 24, 26, 29, 30, 38,

40, 46

reproducible form, 69

tracking aids, 45

Working symbol, 11


About

Renaissance Learning

Renaissance Learning is the world’s leading provider of computer-based assessment

technology for pre-K–12 schools. Adopted by more than 75,000 North American schools,

Renaissance Learning’s tools provide daily formative assessment and periodic

progress-monitoring technology to enhance the curriculum, support differentiated

instruction, and personalize practice in reading, writing, and math. Renaissance Learning

products help educators make the practice component of their existing curriculum more

effective by providing tools to personalize practice and easily manage the daily activities

for students of all levels. As a result, teachers using Renaissance Learning products

accelerate learning, get more satisfaction from teaching, and achieve higher test scores

on state and national tests.

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