In this issue: - College of Education - Purdue University

education.purdue.edu

In this issue: - College of Education - Purdue University

ollege of Education

v o l u m e 2 : i s s u e 2 : s p r i n g 2 0 0 6

In this issue:

Global Reach

COE International Connections

Ackerman Professorship

Faculty Member Awarded Distinction

Scholarships

Increasing the Volume and Value


Greetings from Purdue University’s College of Education.

In this issue of the College of Education’s Magazine you will learn about

many exciting things occuring on the West Lafayette campus.

Spring is definitely here as evidenced by the robins that now grace

the lawns around campus, the Wabash peaking and receding on its

banks, and the absence of snow on the ground. And all of this follows

the warmest January on record. It is truly a wonderful time to be

contemplating the transitions we have experienced and the promise

spring brings to us all.

This is a busy time of year on campus as we prepare for the Spring Fest

weekend celebration, continue interviewing and hiring new faculty—

consistent with our strategic plan, and contemplate the graduation of

so many highly qualified teachers and future leaders. The College of

Education has been very successful in attracting the best possible new

faculty to our campus. This year we estimate that we will be adding eight

to ten new faculty to the College of Education.

In this issue of our College of Education Magazine we highlight

exciting events and initiatives. For example, our first fully endowed

professorship, the James F. Ackerman Professorship in Social Studies

Education, has been awarded.

Also highlighted in this issue are the many international activities of

our faculty and students. It is clear in this era of increased globalization

that our students and faculty need to be engaged not only locally but

globally in order to remain competitive. Our faculty and students are

engaged throughout the world—working with colleagues in Afghanistan

and South Africa. Our study abroad opportunities for our students, both

undergraduate and graduate continue to grow and expand.

As always I thank you for your support and hope to see you back on

campus soon.

Sincerely,

George W. Hynd

Dean, College of Education


v o l u m e 2 : i s s u e 2 : s p r i n g 2 0 0 6

focus on

GLOBAL REACH: The College of Education’s International Connections

CHINA page 4

KUWAIT page 5

MONGOLIA & AFGHANISTAN pages 6-7

NETHERLANDS page 8

SOUTH AFRICA page 9

RUSSIA page 10

POLAND page 11

FACULTY UPDATES

NAGC AWARDS page 12

ACKERMAN PROFESSORSHIP page 13

PEER EDITED JOURNALS page 14

RETIRING AFTER 20 YEARS page 15

NEW FACULTY & STAFF page 15

IN MEMORIUM pages 16-17

RESEARCH

SCIENCE LITERACY page 18

NEW PSYCHOMETRIC LAB page 19

College of Education Magazine

Beering Hall, Room 6124

100 North University Street

West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2098

Phone: 765-494-5832 | 800-213-9339

Email: tragnew@purdue.edu

Web: www.education.purdue.edu

About the contents: Guest writers are

identified in author by-line; all other

articles authored by Tonya Agnew.

College of Education Magazine is

published semiannually by the College

of Education. Copyright © 2006 Purdue

University, All rights reserved Purdue

University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907

USA, 765-494-4600. An equal access/

equal opportunity university.

ALUMNI

ROBERT FOERSTER (BA ’72, MA ’76) page 20

ALUMNI NEWS page 21

SCHOLARSHIPS

DEVITO SCHOLARS PROGRAM page 22

INCREASING THE VOLUME AND VALUE page 23

SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS pages 24-25

DEVELOPMENT

2005 DONOR HONOR ROLL pages 26-32

SPECIAL EVENT page 33

UPCOMING EVENTS

CALENDAR page 34

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Linda Austin’s Journey to an Ancient L and

4

or some a wall is a symbol of

division, separation or enclosure.

For Linda Austin, China’s

Great Wall symbolizes all that

has enabled her to survive breast cancer—resolve,

determination and strength.

In May 2005, Linda Austin, Director of

the Office of Field Experiences, traveled

to China with eighteen other delegates

as part of People to People International.

The primary goal of the trip was to investigate

China’s educational system but

Austin explored so much more.

“It was the chance

of a lifetime.”

Austin was selected to participate in

the People to People program by Edward

Pultorak, Delegation Leader of People to

People International. He states, “Linda

Austin was one of my top selections to

participate in this very important event.”

Once approached by

Pultorak, Austin was

thrilled to be part of

the delegation. “It was

the chance of a lifetime.”

The experience

was enhanced when

she found that her husband

was able to travel

as a guest with the

group.

People to People,

instituted in 1956 by

President Dwight D.

Eisenhower, works to

achieve mutual understanding

among people of all nations and

Austin’s trip to China certainly did just

that. “The trip built bridges with educators

and enhanced my appreciation of diversity,”

Austin explains.

Austin visited a variety of schools in-

cluding a private school, rural

school and a special needs

school—each with its own advantages

and deficiencies.

The private school in Beijing

emphasized high student achievement

and, in spite of the emphasis

in arts and physical education,

the dormitory rooms were all

identically stark. Among the barrenness

were rooms full of “musical”

color—80 piano practice

rooms. “The sound coming from

one of the rooms blew me away,”

describes Austin. The tuition paid by the

families affords the students equipment

and supplies that isn’t available to those at

rural schools.

“Although the rural school was quite

primitive, the expectations were still very

high,” Austin says of her visit to a village

school. “There was a real sense of

poverty.” But among the primitive and

poor conditions the students were receptive

to strangers. One

young girl even shared

her plum with the delegates.

Austin later

wondered if the young

girl had shared her

fruit allotment for the

week. It was a touching

experience to see

“a child that willing to

share with strangers.”

Sharing is what the

special needs school

was all about. The

teachers shared their

Paul and Linda Austin

knowledge, expertise

and even hugs with their students. In

contrast to the private school environment,

the special needs dormitory rooms

were bright, colorful and filled with personal

items. The school’s main goal is to

teach life skills so that the special needs

Great Wall of China

children can function in society. Art, music

and dance are used for rehabilitation.

Austin describes the “intense feeling of

love” that was apparent at the school.

Austin found the Chinese people to be

very open, proud and respectful. Through

her school visits, university visits and

trips to historical destinations including

Tiananmen Square, the Forbidden

City and the Great Wall, she has found

a “greater understanding of the personal

perseverance of the Chinese people.”

And perseverance is something that

Austin knows about. It is her personal

perseverance and resolve that aided in her

She has found a

“greater understanding

of the personal

perserverance of the

Chinese people”

fight against breast cancer just a few years

ago and pulled her through the emotional

and physical obstacles—obstacles also

overcome by the ancient Chinese people

that carried the boulders and built the

Great Wall.


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Jim Lehman Travels to Kuwait University

A F G H A N I S T A N C H I N A K U W A I T M O N G O L I A N E T H E R L A N D S P O L A N D R U S S I A S O U T H A F R I C A

Jim Lehman (left) with Kuwait

University faculty members

n February 2006 Jim Lehman, Head of the Department of Curriculum

and Instruction, visited Kuwait University’s College of Business

Administration to share information on teaching and learning with

technology. He traveled with three others from Purdue—Gerald Lynch,

Krannert Associate Dean for Programs and Student Services; Marne

Helgesen, Director of the Center for Instructional Excellence; and John

Campbell, Associate Vice President for Information Technology.

Kuwait University’s College of Business Administration is the only accredited

business college in the gulf region. They are striving to keep

pace with technological advances and trends. The two-day workshop

provided by the Purdue team, “Assessment of Student Outcomes & The

Use of Information Technologies for Teaching & Learning,” assists the

“We can expose our

students to other

perspectives and

possibilities.”

Kuwait faculty in their efforts.

“The Purdue team brought various strengths

to the workshops in Kuwait,” says Lehman.

“Gerald Lynch brought knowledge of the

discipline (business) and familiarity with

accreditation standards for schools of business.

Marne Helgesen brought expertise in

faculty development for teaching. John Campbell brought expertise in

the applications of technology for college teaching. I brought expertise

in instructional design and the educational applications of technology.”

The workshop was initially set up through Purdue’s Office of International

Programs, which is dedicated to the development of global education

and research opportunities for students and faculty. As a result

of their dedication Purdue University has been selected as one of five institutions

in the country to receive the 2006 Senator Paul Simon Award

for Campus Internationalization which is given by NAFSA—the largest

education organization in the world.

Central to thriving in this global society is having international opportunities

accessible and available. Purdue’s College of Education recognizes

the importance of providing wide-reaching programs and options.

Lehman explains, “We live in an increasingly interdependent and culturally

diverse global society. By learning about the educational systems

in other parts of the world, we can enrich the education of our students

here in the U.S. We can expose our students to other perspectives and

possibilities. In addition, this kind of activity builds bridges to other

cultures and promotes mutual understanding. There is a lot of mistrust

among Americans of Arabic peoples these days, but we found the Kuwaitis

to be very warm and welcoming. It was a great experience!”

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ongolia and Afghanistan

could be on the other side

of the world or just down

the hall for Purdue College of Education

students and faculty. As globalization in

education brings countries closer—in

coursework construct, credit-hour style

and international study travel—the distance

is getting smaller and the goals

more similar.

Thanks to the work of professor Charles

Kline, students in the College of Education

are experiencing first-hand the benefits

of learning alongside students from

other lands.

Work that began as help to educational

Temple museum of the Choijin L ama Ulaan-Baatar Mongolia

institutions in Mongolia and Afghanistan

soon led to students from those countries

enrolling at Purdue and opportunities for

Purdue students to benefit

from the exchange.

It all started in 1996 when

Kline learned that Mongolia

was looking for help converting

its university education

to a credit-hour system

similar to that in the U.S.

“I thought, ‘I could do that,’

so I responded,” Kline says.

The next thing he heard was a request to

come to Mongolia in three weeks. “I said,

‘How about six weeks?’” That was agreed,

and he headed to the distant country for

the task, working for the Department of

State through the U.S. Embassy and the

“My interest in educational

systems allows me to see

what’s being done elsewhere

and how the results

compare to what we do.”

U.S. Information Service. Very quickly,

he says, “I was hooked on working with

other countries.”

From 1996 to 2003,

Kline made six trips to

Mongolia. And the connection

continues, sometimes

with a short walk

down the hall to chat in

person with Purdue graduate

student Mash-Ariun

Bat-Erdene from Mongolia,

who’ll earn his doctorate

in educational administration

from Purdue this

year and is one of three

graduate students from

that country currently enrolled

in the College of

Education.

Kline met the graduate

student in Mongolia, where

Bat-Erdene was teaching at

the University of Science

and Technology.

6


Charles Kline—C onnecting with Other Nations for a Decade

A F G H A N I S T A N C H I N A K U W A I T M O N G O L I A N E T H E R L A N D S P O L A N D R U S S I A S O U T H A F R I C A

“We are in a transition from a centralized

administrative structure to a more

democratic administration,” Bat-Erdene

says. The opportunity to learn more

about how that works in the U.S. drew

him to Purdue. “I’ll return to higher education

administration, probably at the

same university,” Bat-Erdene says. “All

the experiences I’ve had as a research assistant

and teaching assistant will help me

boost the transition in my country. I will

try to guide it, introducing the way people

make decisions here, the leadership

style and spreading the power of decision

making.”

He’ll also apply lessons learned here on

“how students work on projects, how the

classroom is run and how professors handle

problems,” he says. “And I took

a couple of classes on campus and

building management, and worked

on a project.”

Bat-Erdene also appreciates that

other Purdue students have been

able to learn from him. “Not many

people know about Mongolia, so

whenever there’s an opportunity, I take it,

to present my country in informal ways

and sometimes in classroom settings,” he

says. “And I’ve developed very long-term

relationships. I’ll stay in contact.”

His country’s transition to the credithour

system has been an important step

forward, he says. “We believe that’s a huge

part of the globalization of education.

With the credit system, our graduates can

be accepted to universities in other countries

and not have to retake classes.”

Kline’s next opportunity for global work

“It’s necessary to open

avenues to the world for

Indiana students.”

came in Afghanistan, where he’s traveled

every year since 2003. He’ll return again

this May, and has plans for continued

work with educational systems there.

The Afghanistan work began with a

visit to Purdue by the Minister of Higher

Education. “Purdue signed an agreement

to continue the relationship and help in

any way we could,” Kline says. “We’ve

brought groups of Afghans here to see

how we do things. That’s ongoing. And

we have one Afghan student who’s been

working on his master’s in educational

administration.” That’s Abdullatif Rahmani,

currently back in Afghanistan, but

planning to return.

For Kline, the international connections

are vital, personally and professionally.

“I like seeing how other people live

and learning what they think America is

all about. My interest in educational systems

allows me to see what’s being done

elsewhere and how the results compare to

what we do.”

In Mongolia and Afghanistan, for example,

he’s learned that eligibility for

schooling beyond our sixth-grade level

is dependent on passing a test, with continuing

tests as the student progresses.

“By the university level, they’re dealing

with a very select group. We don’t have

that system here. In Indiana, we’re trying

to keep students in high school.”

Increasing the diversity base at Purdue

is another of his goals. “Bringing people

here exposes us to how things and people

are in other places. The alternative is to

reinforce stereotypes and encourage isolation

and the belief that our way is the

only way to do something.”

International students bring a tremendous

benefit to other Purdue students,

Kline says. “We are a state institution, and

a world-class institution, so it’s necessary

to open avenues to the world for Indiana

students.”

True globalization of education, he

says, will help Purdue students compete

and succeed with students from other

countries in venues that are international

in scope. “It means we have to

understand them better.”

Technology plays a role, but levels

of technological capability are often

quite different, depending on the

country. “I’m buying an LCD projector,

but that level of technology

is inappropriate for Afghanistan. And

it’s inappropriate in Mongolia, where

technology in a countryside elementary

school was marking on a wall with a stone

that left a color. They didn’t even have a

blackboard.”

Of his international work, Kline says,

“I think we can help them learn. And I

think we can learn from them.”

Written by Kathy Mayer

www.education.purdue.edu 7


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Brenda Capobianco’s Dutch C onnection

8

By learning diverse

teaching methods

Purdue’s science

education students

can improve

and grow.

n May 2006 Brenda Capobianco, Assistant

Professor of Curriculum & Instruction,

Lauren Schellenberger, and

Megan Grunert—both science education

graduate students at Purdue—will make

the eight hour flight from Indianapolis

to Amsterdam. They are traveling to the

Netherlands for the initial phase of a plan

to establish the Purdue University Science

Education International Collaborative

which will connect Purdue students

with Dutch science teachers and teacher

educators. Together they will share and

discuss ideas, initiatives and methods

and engage in action research.

The Netherlands, known for their tolerance

and their tulips, will offer a rich,

multi-layered experience for Schellenberger,

Grunert, and Capobianco. The

students will conduct classroom observations,

meet with science teacher educators,

trainers and researchers, as well as

visit historic monuments. In addition to

scholarly activities they will learn about

Dutch life and culture through their host

families.

This initial trip emphasizes the “development

of a collaborative, execution

of an intensive research program, and a

formal evaluation for subsequent phases,”

Capobianco explains. By learning diverse

teaching methods Purdue’s science education

students can improve and grow.

Capobiancos collaborative grew out

of a connection established by Jean Peterson,

Associate Professor of Counseling

and Development, with researchers

and teachers in the Netherlands. Once

Peterson learned that she and Capobianco

shared a mutual interest in action

research she invited her to participate.

“When I learned that she was into action

research, and since that is a big emphasis

in Europe these days, I quickly invited

her to get on board, and

she has moved quickly

ahead, establishing solid

relationships with Dutch

contacts and adding new

dimensions to the collaboration.”

reveals Peterson.

She feels the collaboration

is vital to “helping our

graduate students think

outside of the box, and

think ‘bigger,’ and help

them be more than just

followers.”

Capobianco hopes

“the graduate students

gain new knowledge and

understanding of how

Dutch teachers teach science, how educators

prepare science teachers, and how

action research can play a pivotal role in

contributing to this knowledge base. I also

hope graduate students gain an appreciation

for and a heightened awareness of the

Dutch culture and how we can learn so

much from our ‘critical friends.’”

Grunert is eager to participate in the

program. She says, “Having recently

learned about teacher action research, I

think it will be especially exciting to engage

in research while studying abroad. I

think the trip to the Netherlands will provide

me with new and exciting ideas and

experiences that I can bring back and share

with my peers in chemistry education.”

Schellenberger believes that “Graduate

students are in graduate school because

they want to become experts in their respective

fields, and international experience

is necessary in order for students to

really understand their field in a global

sense.” Capobianco hopes both students

gain a global perspective on education.

The aim is to return with greater knowledge

and an understanding and appreciation

of other cultures.

In the future Capobianco hopes to

broaden the program further--expanding

to include faculty and eventually offering

to host Dutch teachers, teacher

educators and researchers at Purdue. “I

hope to gain new knowledge about how

we can build upon our current collaboration

with Dutch science teachers and

science teacher educators. I look forward

to learning more about what issues in

science education are significant to the

Dutch and examine their efforts at addressing

them.“

When their trip concludes they all will

have to find room in their suitcases for

their newly acquired knowledge of teaching

and their memories of their profound

experience in the Netherlands.


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A Grad Student’s transformation

A F G H A N I S T A N C H I N A K U W A I T M O N G O L I A N E T H E R L A N D S P O L A N D R U S S I A S O U T H A F R I C A

B en Murray at the Lion Nature Preser ve

pend four weeks immersed in a

far-off land and you’ll certainly

be transformed. With the College

of Education’s Study Abroad program

in Pretoria, South Africa Ben Murray,

a Post-Baccalaureate student acquiring

his license to teach secondary math,

absorbed all of the culture, climate and

community that he could. He was captivated

by South Africa’s people, schools,

wildlife, and history and when he returned

to Purdue, he wasn’t

the same.

South Africa’s history

is filled with

conflict and authoritarian

approaches to

government. Segregationist

policies were strictly enforced

even as recently as the 1970s. “Nonwhites”

were not afforded the same advantages

as white citizens. Racial injustices

resulted in an immense backlog in

the education system.

But now, after years of repression and

segregation, South Africa is striving to

provide quality education to better prepare

all of its citizens. Naledi Pandor,

South African Minister of Education,

affirmed this commitment in the State

of the Nation address in February, 2006:

“We are building classrooms and schools

as quickly as we can, we are training

He was captivated

by South Africa’s

people, schools,

wildlife, and history.

teachers better, and we are working with

experienced teachers to develop cuttingedge

curricula and assessment tools.”

Murray was witness to the hard work of

the South African educators. He visited

all types of schools—from the impoverished

to the developed. “Teaching styles

differed from school to school along with

the opportunities available to each student,”

acknowledges Murray. However,

one common quality among the schools

was the upbeat and positive attitude of the

teachers. In spite of the challenges facing

them they utilized the available resources

to improve the country’s educational

system—even if it was just one child at a

time. The South African teachers viewed

the students’ abilities instead of deficiencies.

From them, Murray learned significant

techniques that he will fold into his

own teaching philosophy.

The school field experiences were

supplemented by side excursions to museums

and cultural destinations. Murray

visited families in

their homes, enjoyed

a traditional South

African meal, and

even went on safari.

These were great opportunities

for interacting

with local people. “I gained a lot

from these talks. I learned how they feel

about current issues in their own country

and what can and should be done to help.”

The trips to the Apartheid Museum and

the Hector Pieterson Memorial opened

Murray’s eyes to issues faced by South Africans.

“I now understand what Apartheid

is and all of its implications. The effects of

racial polarization were apparent.”

The South Africa study abroad trip was

overwhelming, humbling and thoughtprovoking

for Murray and left him wishing

he could have stayed longer than four

Lesedi Cultural Village

weeks. Enduring bonds were formed between

Murray, his fellow student travelers

and their local friends. In fact, he is

already planning a second trip to visit his

South African friends. Murray recommends

international journeys to other

students as a way to “help students mature

and become well-rounded.” It sounds

like he has the best souvenir of all: an enlightening

experience that will stay with

him forever.

In addition to the South America and Netherlands

programs the College of Education offers study abroad

programs in Honduras, Russia and Jamaica. Students gain

understanding and skills while acquiring credit towards

their degree. In addition they return with an expanded

knowledge of the world and increased sensitivity to other

cultures—preparing them for their careers and lives ahead.

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Journey to Recruit Russian Graduate Students

10

“This gives us an

opportunity to bring

fine scholars into our

graduate program.”

t least two and perhaps several

graduate students from Latvia,

Lithuania and Russia are headed

to the College of Education this

fall. They’ll be the first in the “Preparing

Democratic Educators in Eastern Europe”

program, a recruiting initiative spearheaded

by Lynn Nelson, associate professor in

the College of Education and the Regional

Director of the “Civics Mosaic Project”

linking American and Russian teachers.

Nelson’s current challenge is choosing

from a panel of exceptional candidates interviewed

on a 10-day February recruiting

trip. “All of them have wonderful experiences

as teachers and administrators, and

their English is uniformly very, very good,”

he says. He has two assistantship slots in Education,

and hopes to secure a few more.

Also making the trip, which included

more than a dozen stops in the three

countries, were Andrew Gillespie, associate

dean of Purdue’s International Programs,

and Anatoli Rapoport, a graduate

assistant who earned his bachelor’s degree

at the Tula Pedagogical University

in Russia and will join the Purdue Education

faculty this fall.

Their recruiting efforts began last November

when they asked Baltic and Russian

educators to recommend potential

graduate students. A Purdue team reviewed

the nominations, selected candidates

from each region and asked them to

submit interest essays. From those, they

chose finalists for personal interviews in

their home countries. On the trip, the

Boilermaker group also made presenta-

tions at two universities

in Moscow and

St. Petersburg. Both

drew good crowds,

indicating high interest

for the future.

The program offers

benefits to both

U.S. and international

students, Nelson believes.

“This gives

us an opportunity

to bring fine scholars

into our graduate

program, but that’s

just one piece of a dynamic

international

exchange,” he says.

“We think we can

enrich our students

by exposing them to

students from these

countries. It also gives

us opportunities to

carry on conversations

about democracy

and democratic

citizenship.”

Currently, the College of Education has

103 international graduate students, just

two of them from Russia and none from

the Baltics.

Nelson first visited in 1991, before coming

to Purdue in 1995. “Russia was on the

edge of democracy then. There were prodemocracy

demonstrations, and I felt

very much attached to the culture and the

idea of democratic education in Russia,”

he says. He’s returned many times, and

since 1999 he’s made three or four trips a

year to work on various programs.

Those include Purdue’s Russian

Maymester in St. Petersburg, offered annually

since 2003; his activities as regional

director of Civics Mosaic, an international

exchange program linking U.S. and

St. Basil Cathedral, Moscow, Russia

Russian partners in civics education; and

University Partnership, a program about

interactive teaching methods.

Nelson hopes all these activities will promote

closer connections between the U.S.,

Russia, Latvia and Lithuania. “This may

lead to partnerships with other universities

for short-term visits and ongoing contacts.

We want the students from Russia, Latvia

and Lithuania to go back and establish ongoing

contacts with Purdue and their universities,

our professors and their teachers,

and our students and their students.”

Written by Kathy Mayer


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Alumna Travels to Teach

A F G H A N I S T A N C H I N A K U W A I T M O N G O L I A N E T H E R L A N D S P O L A N D R U S S I A S O U T H A F R I C A

hat does an elementary school teacher do after retiring? If she is like

Thelma Hoyt (BS ’77, MS ’88) she keeps teaching. In 1995 Hoyt retired

from teaching kindergarten and first grade in the Lafayette School Corporation

and has since traveled to France, Switzerland and, most recently, Poland to

teach English to young professionals. These mission trips have allowed her to indulge

her passion for teaching—both for English and biblical studies.

Post-Communist rule, Poland is becoming an increasingly active member of European

organizations and has persistently pursued economic liberalization, but there is

still a lot of work to do. Poland, a country about the

“I loved what I did there

and went away feeling

like I had made an impact

in their lives.”

size of New Mexico with a population of 38 million,

has an unemployment rate of almost 20%—

currently the highest in the European Union—and

approximately 17% of the population lives below

the poverty line.

In spite of their hardships and obstacles Hoyt

found the Polish to be a very proud, hard-working

people—eager to learn English in the hopes of

improving their career opportunities and ultimately their lives. The students traveled,

some of them long distances, after work or school to meet with Hoyt or one of the other

two teachers.

Each session was scheduled for an hour but the students were so engrossed in the

studies that “We would often go for a couple of hours or more,” Hoyt explains. Excluding

Sundays, she taught for seven to ten hours each day of her three week trip to Sopot,

Poland but still had time for an occasional walk on the pier.

The experience was quite rewarding for Hoyt and she is planning a return trip this fall.

“I took away from Sopot the beauty of the people and the spirit of the people. I loved

what I did there and went away feeling like I had made an impact in their lives.”

Poland facts provided from World Fact Book 2005, published by the United States Central Intelligence Agency.

Pier in S opot, Poland

www.education.purdue.edu 11


Peterson and Mann Receive NAGC Awards

A C C O L A D E S A N N O U N C E M E N T S A W A R D S D E V E L O P M E N T S P R O M O T I O N S R E C O G N I T I O N

12

ach year the National Association

for Gifted Children

(NAGC) recognizes outstanding

contributions in the field of

gifted education. The College of Education

is honored to have two 2005 winners

among its faculty. Rebecca Mann and

Jean Peterson received their awards from

the NAGC during the annual conference

in November 2005.

NAGC recognizes

outstanding

contributions in

the field of

gifted education

Rebecca Mann, Associate Director of the

Gifted Education Resource Institute and

Clinical Assistant Professor of Educational

Studies, was recognized with the NAGC

Doctoral Student Award. The award is

given to doctoral students who have demonstrated

exemplary work in research, publications

and educational service as well as

their potential for future scholarship.

Mann’s interest in students with high

intellectual ability and learning disabilities

led her to earn a Ph.D. in Educational

Psychology with specializations in Gifted

and Talented Education and Special Education.

She received her degree in 2005 at

the University of Connecticut where she

worked with a team on a national study

designed to increase achievement in underachieving

high-ability students.

Prior to her doctoral studies she was

a gifted and talented coordinator, a resource

teacher and an elementary classroom

teacher in Colorado and New

Hampshire, where she was named the

2001 Educator of the Year of the Gifted.

Her interest in Gifted Education was

sparked by her twice-exceptional son.

“As I learned more about his disability,

dysgraphia and his strengths, I started to

notice these characteristics in other students

in my school.” explains Mann.

Jean Peterson, Associate Professor of

Counseling and Development in the Department

of Educational Studies, was also

recognized at the conference with the

NAGC Early Leader Award. The award

is given to an individual who has made

significant contributions in leadership

and service to the field of gifted education,

and who is in the first ten years of

his or her career after completion of the

last earned degree.

Peterson earned her Ph.D. in Counselor

Education from the University of Iowa in

1995. In the ten years since

earning her doctorate she

has published four books,

written many articles and

chapters and received several

grants. Her focus is on

the social and emotional

aspects of giftedness. Peterson

explains, “My work

has looked at the burden

side of being gifted.”

Prior to her doctoral

studies Peterson was a

classroom teacher for 24

years in Iowa, Minnesota,

South Dakota, and Germany.

She is a licensed mental health counselor

with considerable experience in counseling

gifted children and adolescents and

their families. She is a national award winner

for her research and also for her group

work, and her two “Talk with Teens” books

are used internationally.

The acknowledgement for Rebecca Mann

and Jean Peterson by the National Association

for Gifted Children is richly deserved

and proves what we already knew—they

are both outstanding educators.

Jean Peterson & Rebecca Mann


VanFossen Awarded Ackerman Professorship

A C C O L A D E S A N N O U N C E M E N T S A W A R D S D E V E L O P M E N T S P R O M O T I O N S R E C O G N I T I O N

Phillip VanFossen & George Hynd

fter a lengthy nationwide search,

Phillip VanFossen, Associate

Professor of Social Studies

Education and Director of the

James F. Ackerman Center for Democratic

Citizenship, was named the James

F. Ackerman Professor of Social Studies

Education in August 2005. He was officially

named to the position during a ceremony

in December 2005 at the

Dick and Sandy Dauch Alumni

Center. “I am truly humbled by

this honor, and I’m very grateful

to Mr. Ackerman for establishing

this endowment which made this

possible,” VanFossen says.

This appointment means that

VanFossen is now among only a handful

of named professors in social studies

education in the country. With his new

position, VanFossen hopes to be able to

expand the Ackerman Center to include

more academic projects in addition to the

many civic education projects it currently

sponsors. “I believe this named professorship

will give me a stronger voice in

the field of social studies education,” he

says. “In recent years, social studies has

taken a back seat, particularly in K-5

classrooms, due to standardized testing

requirements that force teachers to focus

on literacy, math and science.”

One of the first changes he will be mak-

James F. & Lois R. Ackerman and Purdue University share a

commitment to prepare new generations of Americans for the

highest office in the land—citizen. Their long-term support

has helped prepare Inciana educators to develop the ability to

integrate citezenship, economics and ethics into the classroom.

This vision led to the creation of the James F. Ackerman

Center for Democratic Citizenship and the James F. Ackerman

distinguished Professorship of Social Studies Education.

ing at the Ackerman Center is introducing

the inaugural James F. Ackerman

Colloquia on Technology and Citizenship

in summer 2007. The event will bring

together experts in social studies, citizenship

education and educational technology

to discuss the Internet and how it has

impacted citizenship participation and the

way civics is taught in the United States.

“This named professorship

will give me a stronger

voice in the field of

social studies education.”

“The Ackerman Center has a wonderful

history of reaching out to the community

and teachers in order to bring awareness

to the importance of citizenship education,”

VanFossen says.

VanFossen has a long-term interest

in changing the way civics education is

taught in this country, a passion so strong

it convinced the former middle and high

school social studies teacher to leave the

classroom and pursue a Ph.D. in order to

make more of an impact in the field.

He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees

at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio,

and his doctoral degrees from The Ohio

State University. Before coming to Purdue

in 1997, he was an assistant professor for

four years at SUNY-Geneseo in New York.

VanFossen’s future plans include continuing

to teach and develop programs

for the Ackerman Center.

“The college is headed in a new, exciting

direction, and I want to continue to

advocate for social studies education, especially

through the integration of technology

in the classroom,” he says. “I believe

that is where the future is headed.”

Written by Kim Medaris

www.education.purdue.edu 13


Peer-reviewed Journals Provide Professional Outlet

A C C O L A D E S A N N O U N C E M E N T S A W A R D S D E V E L O P M E N T S P R O M O T I O N S R E C O G N I T I O N

new educational journal, The Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-based

Learning (IJPBL), edited by Peggy Ertmer, Associate Professor of Educational

Technology, and Alexius Smith Macklin, Associate Professor of Library Science,

was launched March 2006. This quarterly-published, peer-reviewed

journal seeks to challenge, stimulate and provoke additional research in the area of

problem-based learning (PBL). Initially the journal will be available in print but will

move to a web-based format shortly.

IJPBL aims to serve as both a scholarly and mentoring journal as well as a community

of practice. As a scholarly journal it engages researchers and practitioners in

problem-based learning dialogue. The articles in the journal reflect current research,

projects, assessments, and conceptual positions on the use of problem-based learning.

As a mentoring journal, the editorial board members serve as mentors to junior

faculty and graduate students who have submitted manuscripts—essentially PBL in

action. In addition, the journal offers a community of practice by providing practical

application and research. A future goal for the IJPBL website is that it will provide

discussion boards, online support and archives on PBL theory and practice.

Explains Ertmer, “Basically, I want IJPBL to be a strong outlet for PBL scholarship—the

‘go-to’ journal for cutting-edge research as well as for practical suggestions for how to

implement it in the classroom. I hope that the journal can facilitate powerful conversations

between researchers and practitioners about the practice and promise of PBL.”

The IJPBL website will be online in the near future. To view the journal visit

http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/ijpbl/. For more information email PBL@purdue.edu.

ducation and Culture: The Journal of the John Dewey Society, a journal

published twice yearly by Purdue University Press, takes an integrated

view of philosophical, historical and sociological issues in education.

The peer-reviewed, international journal is available as a hard copy and online and

includes essays, studies and book reviews on work inspired by and related to John

Dewey’s philosophical pragmatism and interest in community and democracy.

A.G. Rud, Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Studies and

editor of Education and Culture, has tripled submissions since the journal’s move

to Purdue just one year ago. He uses an online manuscript management system

provided by Berkeley Electronic Press in conjunction with Purdue University Press.

Articles in the current issue include “A Democratic View of ‘No Child Left Behind’” by

Cindy Finnell-Gudwien, “Disney, Dewey, and the Death of Experience in Education

by Jay W. Roberts, and “Design Bearings” by Margaret M. Latta.

“The field of education is broad and complex, and it is necessary to provide a viewpoint

on vital issues of today, such as the effects of poverty, high stakes testing, and

technology upon our P-20 educational system in this country, as well as the effects of

such factors worldwide,” describes Rud. “This peer-reviewed, international journal

does just that. As the editor of one of the two peer-reviewed, international journals in

the College of Education, I hope to provide valuable experience for graduate students

and faculty in research and publication.”

For more information visit http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/eandc/ or email rud@purdue.edu.

14


Retiring After Twenty Years

A C C O L A D E S A N N O U N C E M E N T S A W A R D S D E V E L O P M E N T S P R O M O T I O N S R E C O G N I T I O N

Diane Adams

“She is always cheerful

and upbeat.”

n March 31, 2006 Diane Adams,

Account Clerk in the College

of Education business office,

will close her office door in

Beering Hall for the last time. After 20

years at Purdue, all spent with the College

of Education, she will retire. Initially she

spent two years in Special Education before

moving to the business office. Mike

Kremer, Director of Financial Affairs in

the business office, interviewed her for

both positions. He says “Diane’s positive,

cheereful outlook is what I will miss

most. She never has a bad day. When I

need a lift I go talk to Diane. Her genuine

concern and caring for other people

is wonderful.”

This positive attitude is well known

by her coworkers. “She is always cheerful

and upbeat,” says Amy Maxwell who

is taking Adam’s position. Greg Howell

states, “Diane is responsible for the positive

attitude normally attained in the Ed

business office. She may be retiring, but

she has always (almost) been the new kid

on the block and seems younger. She enjoys

life and makes us happier in kind.”

After retirement Adams plans to spend

her time boating, fishing, caring for

grandchildren, doing volunteer work at

church, and enjoying being at home.

“I was an IU

fan when I came

to Purdue. Mike

Kremer laughingly

told me after

I shared that information, he should

have probably factored that into whether

or not I could work with him on a daily

basis. I am now a complete Purdue fan!”

While we will miss seeing her smiling

face around the office, The College of Education

wishes Diane Adams all the best!

New Faculty & Staff

Tonya Agnew

Communications Director

Sarah Craft

Clerk

Office of Professional

Preparation & Licensure

Stephen David

Assistant Dean for

International Programs

Kara Harris

Assistant Professor

Curriculum & Instruction

Gloria Marlatt

Development Assistant

Amy Maxwell

Account Clerk

Business Office

Sherrelyn Meyer

Academic Counselor

Suzanne Pack-Marrero

Visiting Assistant Professor

Curriculum & Instruction

Marcos Antonio Rivera

Diversity Initiatives Director

David Sears

Assistant Professor

Educational Psychology.

Carrie Wachter

Assistant Professor

Counseling and Development

www.education.purdue.edu 15


he College of Education

lost an extraordinary educator,

colleague, alumna,

and friend on Monday, December

19, 2005. Dr. Susan Nierstheimer,

Assistant Professor in Literacy and Language,

lost her

battle with cancer.

Her shoes

will be difficult

to fill. Throughout

her career she

reached and inspired so many with her

deep love of teaching and her uncanny

ability to connect with her students and

fellow educators.

After receiving her bachelor’s degree

from Illinois State University, Nier-

Susan Nierstheimer

stheimer taught for a number of years in

the elementary public schools. She later

earned a master’s degree from Illinois

State University and went on to earn a

Ph.D. in Literacy and Language from Purdue

University in 1996. After earning her

Ph.D. she taught

“She could find the

bright side of anything.”

literacy education

courses at

Purdue to future

teachers. In 1997

she accepted a

teaching position at Illinois State University

where she taught undergraduate and

graduate students for five years. Then,

in 2002, Dr. Nierstheimer returned to

Purdue’s Department of Curriculum and

Instruction to again teach literacy education

courses.

In the fall of 2003 Nierstheimer

was diagnosed

with a particularly aggressive

form of cancer.

However, she

made the choice to

continue to teach

despite her illness.

Carol Hopkins,

Professor of Curriculum

and Instruction,

mentioned,

“She even thanked her

students for allowing

her to continue to teach.

She was able to put everyone

at ease with her

illness and would crack

jokes at her own expense.”

“She could find

the bright side of anything,”

explained Sarah

Mahurt. Phil Van-

Fossen said, “Personally,

I was moved by her commitment to

teach—even when she was very ill.”

Nierstheimer’s scholarly focus was improving

literacy instruction. She was especially

interested in helping struggling

readers, teacher preparation, and schooluniversity

partnerships that provide mutually

beneficial professional development.

Her literacy methods textbook,

coauthored with Dr. Susan Davis Lenski,

Becoming a Teacher of Reading: A Developmental

Approach (Prentice Hall, 2004)

was written to instill in future teachers

the joy of helping children learn to read.

Lenski explained, “When working with

Susan on our book she had such insight

and knowledge about early readers that I

learned a great deal from her.”

Nierstheimer had a profound effect on

everyone around her—fellow teachers,

college students, university supervisors,

and friends. “It was my privilege to have

worked with and known her,” mentioned

She was creative, strong,

devoted, imaginative,

kind, and gracious.

Jane Fischer, Nierstheimer’s supervisor

for her Block IV class. Susan Gunderson

formed a friendship with Nierstheimer

when they were both graduate students in

the department of Literacy and Language.

A few years later they became colleagues

who worked closely sharing teaching experiences

and classroom ideas. Susan said, “I

particularly enjoyed her positive attitude,

her delightful sense of humor and the way

she never took herself too seriously.”

In reference to Nierstheimer’s class-

16


An Inspirational Light is Extinguished Much Too Early

Drawing by a young student tutored by Nierstheimer

“She showed me

courage and how to

keep fighting for

the things you love,

even when the odds are

stacked against you.”

room approach to teaching,

one of her former students,

Joy Dangora said, “I

have never encountered a

more enthusiastic and energetic

professor.”

Susan Nierstheimer was

extremely committed to

teaching and sharing all

that she could in the time

she had. She was creative,

strong, devoted, imaginative,

kind, and gracious.

When she found

out about her illness, she

knew it would be difficult

to carry on in the classroom. So, she contacted

the Purdue Athletic Department

and as a result, for the past two years tutored

a Purdue Basketball player.

One of the students Nierstheimer tutored

was David Teague, Purdue basketball

player. He says, “Susan had a major

impact on me, not just academically, but

in life as a whole. She taught me how to

be responsible, how to open up to people

who truly care for me,

and how to touch the

lives of others when

they are in times of

need. She was more

than just a ‘tutor’ to

Susan Nierstheimer

(left) and Susan

Gunderson

me, Susan was my friend, someone who

I could call upon at any time, knowing

she would be there for me. She showed

me courage and how to keep fighting for

the things you love, even when the odds

are stacked against you. Never once did

she ever put her own struggles and interior

pain ahead of me or any project that

I had due. I have always, and always will

admire Susan for that. I truly consider her

an angel sent from above, because without

her help and her emotional support,

I wouldn’t be here today. This university

lost more than another mentor, we lost

my friend and I’m certainly going to miss

her dearly.”

Bill McInerney, Professor of Educational

Studies noted, “The disease got her

body but never touched her spirit. She

will be deeply missed.”

It was Susan Nierstheimer’s wish to get books into the hands

of children. The Susan Nierstheimer Memorial Book Fund

has been established to provide children’s books for first grade

students participating in Reading Recovery. If you would like to

contribute, please make checks payable to Purdue Foundation

and mail to the following address:

The Susan Nierstheimer Memorial Book Fund

Purdue Foundation

403 West Wood Street

West Lafayette, IN 47907-2007

www.education.purdue.edu 17


Researchers Hope to Build S cience Literac y

A N A LY Z E E X A M I N E E X P L O R E E X P E R I M E N T I N Q U I R E I N V E S T I G A T E P R O B E S T U D Y

18

hree Purdue College of

Education researchers are

determined to help youngsters

better prepare to learn

science, and they’ve landed a $1.5 million

grant from the U.S. Department of Education

to help them do it.

Their plan is to combine science and literacy,

working with central Indiana public

school kindergarten and Head Start students,

along with their teachers and parents.

Youli Mantzicopoulos, professor of

educational psychology, Helen Patrick,

associate professor of educational psychology,

and Ala Samarapungavan, associate

professor of educational psychology,

began work on the three-year project

in August 2005. “We’re excited to get a

chance to utilize our different strengths

in collaboration and to bring together

our overlapping but different areas of expertise,”

Patrick says.

The researchers will work with teachers

and families to create a developmentally

appropriate, integrated curriculum that is

also standards-based and promotes scientific

literacy.

It will take several avenues:

• The first is in-class inquiry activities

that allow children to explore what the

researchers call “big ideas” in science.

Students will do this by asking questions,

making initial predictions, observing

Karleah Harris instructs students

“The project is an opportunity

to link theory with practice.”

and then recording their findings. They’ll

summarize their results and draw conclusions

from what they learned.

• Another aspect is interactive sciencebook

reading involving children and

adults—in the classroom and at home.

These readings will relate to the students’

science activities.

• The program will also encourage teachers

and parents to discuss science with children

in ways that support their learning.

“By learning science through inquiry,

children get insights into how science is

conducted and where scientific knowledge

comes from,” Samarapungavan

says. “Children

learn that when they do

science, they make educated

guesses about the world

from prior knowledge and experience,

and they can collect data or evidence to

inform and revise their initial ideas.”

Using science notebooks, children

learn the methodological aspects of science,

she notes. “These include planning

research, ways of gathering and recording

data, and looking at cumulative records to

draw conclusions about what happened.”

They also develop communication skills,

she says. “They learn that communicating

what they learned to others is an important

part of science.”

“Getting the grant provides us with a

unique opportunity to study

how young children learn

science and to directly impact

science teaching and

learning through partnerships

with public schools,”

Samarapungavan says.

“Young children’s everyday

interactions with

adults, both teachers and

family members, have a

profound effect on conceptual

development in all areas

of learning,” Mantzicopoulos believes.

“However, science typically receives little

attention at home and school during the

early school years. Also, teachers of K-2

students receive less preparation to teach

science than other subjects, and, as a consequence,

young children are often unprepared

for later science learning.” With

the Purdue-based work, this will hopefully

change.

In this first year, which the researchers

dub their development year, the

professors are working with a randomly

selected teacher sample to develop intervention

materials and procedures and to

pilot new measures.

In the second year, they’ll select intervention

and comparison classrooms and

the pilot classroom and home components

of the intervention. The third year

will test the effectiveness in the intervention

and comparison classrooms.

“The project is an opportunity to link

theory with practice by providing children

with an integrated curriculum that fosters

scientific inquiry and literacy skills,” Mantzicopoulos

says. “It helps teachers and

parents engage children in conversations

about science, and stimulates children’s

motivation to learn science.”

The work is timely, Education Dean

George Hynd says. “There is a critical

need for research that examines how

family income, language and interaction

influence the educational path a child

will take. By encouraging parents to participate

in discussions with their children

about science, we believe students will get

a better start and be more competitive in

today’s world.”

Written by Kathy Mayer


New State-of-the-Art Psychometric L ab Opens

A N A LY Z E E X A M I N E E X P L O R E E X P E R I M E N T I N Q U I R E I N V E S T I G A T E P R O B E S T U D Y

Susan Maller teaching in PUPIL

fficially opened in February

2006, Purdue University Psychometric

Investigation/Instruction

Laboratory (PUPIL)

is a state-of-the-art lab specializing in

psychometric research and offering leadership,

training and consultation. “It’s

a dream come true,” describes Susan

Maller, Professor of

“It is vital for educators

to be skilled and prepared in

measurement and statistics.”

Educational Studies and

PUPIL Co-director.

The establishment of

PUPIL is timely. Countless

children, teachers

and schools are affected

by the US Department of Education’s “No

Child Left Behind” Act. Brian French, Assistant

Professor of Educational Studies

and PUPIL Co-director explains, “With

the implementation of the No Child Left

Behind Act, there is a growing demand for

psychometricians with not only the technical

background and training in testing

but also the skills to communicate these

concepts to a variety of constituents.”

It is vital for educators to be skilled and

prepared in measurement and statistics.

“What do scores mean for children? Are

tests fair and valid?” asks Maller. The answers

can be developed through investigations

and research in the new lab. Better

methods and accurate diagnostics are critical

to measuring students’ knowledge.

PUPIL is affiliated with faculty across

Purdue University. PUPIL includes sixteen

computer workstations with the latest

in psychometric and statistical software,

technical manuals, psychometric

and statistical references, and video conferencing.

In addition to functioning as

a classroom and providing hands-on instruction,

it also serves as a research facility

for students, faculty and practitioners.

In the future, Maller and French plan

to expand the lab’s functions and projects.

“Such projects may include providing

instruction on issues related to standardized

testing, including the proper use

and interpretation of test scores.” French

explains. They also plan to add tutorials,

workshops, and supplements to PUPIL’s

website and hold video conferences with

local schools focused on statewide testing

issues. The hope is that research conducted

through PUPIL will eventually

result in marketable products.

The establishment of PUPIL confirms

Purdue’s College of Education’s commitment

to providing cutting-edge resources

and facilities for students and faculty.

Maller affirms, “This is a wonderful facility

for doing this important work.”

Brian French teaching in PUPIL

For more information visit

http://pupil.education.purdue.edu/

or email pupil@purdue.edu.

www.education.purdue.edu 19


Robert Foerster (BA ´72, MA´76)

A C C O L A D E S A N N O U N C E M E N T S A W A R D S D E V E L O P M E N T S P R O M O T I O N S R E C O G N I T I O N

Robert Foerster helping student Brad Krause

emember those damp, smelly worksheets that were printed in purple? Remember

when simple calculators were the cool, hi-tech tools for school?

Robert Foerster began teaching during those days and now, as he is readying

for retirement after 35 years, students carry jump drives with their assignments,

iPods with music and photos, cell phones with internet access and video. They

are completely connected to each other and the world.

Robert Foerster, BA 1972 Elementary Education and MA 1976 Science Education,

didn’t initially begin college as an education major—he came to Purdue for engineering.

Engineering seemed like

the logical choice since his

strengths were math and sci-

“I attribute my education at

Purdue with propelling me

to where I am today.”

ence. That all changed once

he met Lauralee, who would

later become his wife. She was

an education major and through her connections Foerster began tutoring students in

math and science. He quickly learned that teaching was quite fulfilling and decided to

earn his degree in Elementary Education.

Upon graduation Foerster began his 35 year career with the West

Lafayette Community School Corporation, where he remains today.

He was a sixth grade teacher for sixteen of those years and has been

a principal for the remaining years. Throughout his career he has

strived to utilize technology to its fullest potential and incorporate

technology in the classroom. “I want to enable and empower teachers,”

explains Foerster. He worked to modernize classrooms by installing

phones, computers, networks, and eventually the internet. Even

as early as the mid-eighties the students at his school could check out

introductory hand-held computers.

Selected as one of the ten national finalists out of over 44, 000 applications

for the NASA Teacher in Space program in the mid-eighties,

Foerster participated in basic training as an astronaut. The program’s

goal was to bring education to the forefront. Foerster states, “We

wanted our classrooms to reach out to more of a global awareness.”

To achieve this goal he used his NASA experiences as a launch pad to

illustrate math, science and technology concepts. His efforts gave the

students more than just high test scores. Through the use of technology

Foerster shared the world with them.

Foerster states that his career in education has been a wonderful experience. “I attribute

my education at Purdue with propelling me to where I am today.”

On May 26, 2006 Foerster will leave the school building, knowing that he has inspired

many teachers and students to be creative and inquisitive and to imagine where

technology will go from here.

20


A C C O L A D E S A N N O U N C E M E N T S A W A R D S D E V E L O P M E N T S P R O M O T I O N S R E C O G N I T I O N

Alumni News

1960s

John, W. Richardson (BA ’61) and his

son, Bill Richardson, (AG ’94), opened

Mallow Run Winery in September 2005

near Bargersville, Indiana.

Karen C. Elliott’s (BA ’62) eighteenth

book will be published in May 2006.

1970s

Stan Parker (BA ’76) will be recognized

this spring in Freehold,

New Jersey at the

Freehold High School

Quarter Century Club

for 27 years of teaching.

1990s

Kurt Kurtzhals

(BA ’96) recently had a

book published that he

co-authored and edited

entitled Great Lives,

Vital Lessons.

Jessica L. Crawford (BA ’99) is in her

sixth year of teaching Special Education

at Van Rensselaer Elementary School

in Rensselaer, Indiana. She received her

Master’s Degree in Special Education

from Ball State in the summer of 2005.

Stay connected

To add your news to this page, fill out the form below and mail to:

Purdue University

College of Education—Magazine

Beering Hall, Room 6124

100 N. University St.

West Lafayette, IN 47907-2098

Information may also be emailed to education-info@purdue.edu.

Note “alumni news” in the subject line.

2000s

Kathleen Mane Walker (BA ’00) is

opening a private practice in Hudson,

Massachusets and purchasing a group

practice in Manchester, New Hampshire.

Anthony D. Young (BA ’02) is working

at Sycamore School, the only school

in Indiana specifically dedicated to

the education of gifted and talented

students, in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Jennifer L. Alles

(BA ’05) is a fourth

grade teacher at Pine

Tree Elementary in

Avon, Indiana.

Today’s date:

Degree(s)/Year(s):

Name:

Maiden Name:

Street: City: State: Zip:

Phone:

Email:

Employer:

Title:

Employer City, State:

Spouse’s Name: Purdue Alumnus/a? ® Yes ® No

If yes, Degree(s)/Year(s):

Children’s Names:

News:

® This may be published in the College of Education Magazine. ® This is for alumni records only.

www.education.purdue.edu 21


DeVito C ontinues to Inspire

A D V O C A T E A I D A S S I S T B E N E F I T E N C O U R A G E E N D O R S E H E L P P R O V I D E S U P P O R T

22

Alfred DeVito

piece of paper can be used to

teach scientific principles for an

entire week or more. Alfred De-

Vito, Professor Emeritus of Education,

says “It’s possible. The paper can

be weighed and measured and tested for

absorption and sound. It can be used to

create a cylinder for calculating volume

or torn into pieces and tested for floatation

qualities. The possibilities are endless.”

It is this sense of creativity that has

engaged and inspired so many of DeVito’s

students over the years.

DeVito has been captivating students

since 1956 when he began his teaching

career as an elementary teacher. Subsequently

he spent 1966 to 1988 in education

at Purdue where he received a multitude

of awards for excellence in science

teaching, including being named in the

Purdue University Book of Great Teachers.”

During his tenure and since he has

written dozens of articles, authored and

coauthored numerous books and presented

at many regional, national and international

organizations.

But what he may best be known for is

the connection he has with his students

and colleagues. In order to connect, De-

Vito explains, “You have to be half an actor—a

performer and a teacher. You have

to be creative and humorous.” Superintendent

of Crawfordsville Community

Schools, Kathy Steele, a former DeVito

student and coauthor with DeVito and

Gerald Krockover of Creative Teaching:

A Practical Approach, says, “Dr. DeVito

taught every one of his students how to

be prepared, creative, involved, and caring

through example. Throughout my

life he has persuaded me to take the next

challenge and always provided

the support and encouragement

needed.”

Professor of Science Education,

Gerald Krockover,

who looks to DeVito as his

mentor, mentions that De-

Vito is a “superb role model

who has never looked at

teaching as a job—it is an

opportunity to help.”

Upon DeVito’s retirement in 1988,

Krockover wanted to recognize him and

his accomplishments. DeVito had already

won about every teaching award given at

Purdue so Krockover decided to set up a

scholarship in DeVito’s honor. The Alfred

DeVito Scholar Program awards scholarships

to outstanding first year education

students. The scholars participate in a

course where they are provided the opportunity

to explore the field of education

through school visits and presentations

by professional educators. The students

are also given the chance to engage in research

with a faculty member. The purpose

of the scholarship is to retain high

achieving students in education.

Janet Robinson has been teaching the

course since the fall of 2002 and finds the

experience quite rewarding. At the end

of each course DeVito participates in the

students’ research project presentations.

Robinson says, “It is very generous of Dr.

DeVito to come and participate. The students

always enjoy his visit.”

Amanda Fox, DeVito Scholar 2004-

2005, says, “This scholarship not only

helped financially during my freshman

year, but opened the door to countless

opportunities that few other undergrad

students have the privilege of experiencing.

It’s essential for students—especially

freshmen—to be aware of all the amazing

opportunities and resources Purdue

University and the College of Education

“Building relationships with

professors, faculty, alumni,

and distinguished people like

Dr. DeVito are the key

to a successful and

rewarding college career.”

have to offer. Building relationships with

professors, faculty, alumni, and distinguished

people like Dr. DeVito are the

key to a successful and rewarding college

career.”

In addition to continued involvement

in education at Purdue, DeVito also takes

time to travel to the Montessori School of

Crawfordsville to do science projects with

the children. “The children really look

forward to his visits. Projects range from

experiments with electricity to growing

bean plants to balancing balls on columns

of air. He has a great rapport with the children”

says Margo Campanelli, director of

the Montessori School of Crawfordsville.

DeVito feels that the key to teaching is

creativity, planning and preparation. “It

primarily involves a four letter word—

work,” he says. He has always strived to

improve his methods. And now, eighteen

years after retiring, he continues to engage

and inspire.


Aiding the Success of Current Students

A D V O C A T E A I D A S S I S T B E N E F I T E N C O U R A G E E N D O R S E H E L P P R O V I D E S U P P O R T

s part of the Campaign for Purdue,

the College of Education is

committed to increasing the volume

and value of scholarships

provided to graduate and undergraduate

students.

To date, the College has raised $836,445

toward our campaign goal of $1,679,540

for student scholarships. As we push toward

the conclusion of this historical campaign,

the opportunity for student scholarships

will receive special emphasis.

“By creating student

scholarships alumni

and friends change

the lives of our

students and the lives

they will lead.”

“While our students in the College of

Education are consistently top-quality,

we face increasing competition to attract

the brightest and most capable students,”

says Dr. George Hynd, Dean of the College

of Education. “Our goal is to enroll

academically talented students to pursue

careers in teaching, regardless of family

financial circumstances. By creating

student scholarships alumni and friends

change the lives of our students and the

lives they will lead.”

In addition to providing invaluable financial

support to teachers-in-training,

endowed scholarships can provide a lasting

legacy or tell a story about the donor.

Scholarships may bear the names and

special interests of the donors or may be

named in honor or in memory of family

members, esteemed colleagues, friends,

community leaders, an organization or

other entities or individuals.

For example, scholarships include: The

Dorothy C. Stratton, Helen B. Schleman,

M. Beverly Stone, Barbara I. Cook and

Betty M. Nelson Purdue Deans Fund

honors five women, all former Purdue

University Deans. Marylu McEwen (BS

’68, Science; PhD ’73, Education) created

the scholarship as a tribute to these women

who were her mentors and friends.

The scholarship helps graduate students

in College Student Affairs by providing

funds for dissertation or thesis research.

The Jackson-Reasor Scholarship benefits

undergraduate students in the College

of Education with a preference for

those majoring in elementary education.

Judy Nelson Shertzer (BA ’81, Education)

created this endowment in memory of

her maternal grandparents.

James T. and Gladys G. McDonald

Elementary Science Education Scholarship

was created by Jim (PhD ’02) and

Jamie McDonald to provide the kind of

help for others that Jim’s mother gave him

while he was pursuing his doctorate. The

scholarship helps elementary education

students with a preference for students interested

in teaching science, which reflects

the ten years Jim spent as a fifth-grade science

teacher.

The Frank B. DeBruicker Graduate

Scholarship in Educational Technology

was established by his six children

to honor their father, a lifelong teacher.

Support from sons

Timothy (BS ’70,

Science), Stewart

(BS ’65, Science;

MSIA ’68, Management;

PhD ’73 Management),

Daniel,

Gregory, Terence

and daughter Sara

(BS ’74, Consumer

and Family Science)

created an annual

scholarship for a

Masters- or PhD-level student in Educational

Technology.

The Purdue Education Alumni Association

(PEAA) Scholarship is an endowment-in-progress.

Spearheaded by

the PEAA Board, alumni from the College

are working to build an endowment

that can provide scholarships based on

academic merit for undergraduates in the

College of Education. COE alumni who

would like to contribute to this project are

encouraged to contact Jennifer Jeffries, Director

of Development at 765-496-3545.

University fees for the 2006-07 school year

are $7,096 for Indiana residents. Nonresidents

will pay $ 21,266. The expected

cost of attendance includes $ 1,020 for

books and supplies, $ 7,130 for room and

board, and $1810 for miscellaneous and

travel expenses. It’s easy to understand why

Education students are so very grateful for

the support of generous alumni and friends.

www.education.purdue.edu 23


A D V O C A T E A I D A S S I S T B E N E F I T E N C O U R A G E E N D O R S E H E L P P R O V I D E S U P P O R T

Undergraduate

Alfred E. DeVito

Scholar Program $1,000

Kelly M. Collins

Indianapolis, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Karen M. Hummel

Indianapolis, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Emily K. Kensinger

Fort Wayne, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Brittany L. Lambert

Indianapolis, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Bethany J. Owen

Pittsboro, IN

Social Studies Education

Freshman

Barbara I. Cook

Scholarship $1,000

Ross W. Adang

Pierceton, IN

Social Studies Education

Bodenmiller Art Education

Scholarship $1,000

Jessica L. Bowen

West Lafayette, IN

Art Education

Bonnie Roper-Mohlke

Scholarship $1,000

Amanda M. Kopischke

Highland, IN

Special Education

Freshman

College of Education Scholarship

in Elementary Education $1,000

Amy N. Crooks

Pendleton, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Sabra E. Johns

Michigan City, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Kathleen J. Jordan

Richmond, IN

Elementary Education

Junior

Emily A. Leitch

Kimmell, IN

Elementary Education

Junior

Elyce M. Malek

Dyer, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Katelyn J. Merrell

Kokomo, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Natalie V. Merz

Indianapolis, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Amanda C. Miller

Avon, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Lindsay A. Schaufele

Cedar Lake, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Melissa M. Stewart

Columbus, GA

Elementary Education

Sophomore

Jorie L. Weinger

Northbrook, IL

Elementary Education

Freshman

College of Education Scholarship

in Social Studies Education $1,000

Andrew J. Czarnecki

Elkhart, IN

Social Studies Education

Freshman

Jennifer M. Simmons

Indianapolis, IN

Social Studies Education

Freshman

Decker Family

Scholarship $1,000

Emily R. Proctor

Libertyville, IL

Elementary Education

Freshman

Dr. James & Zella Thomas

Scholarship $1,000

Lindsey R. Grodrian

Centerville, OH

Elementary Education

Senior

Kathy J. Chambery

Scholarship $1,000

Jennifer R. Deedrick

Carmel, IN

Special Education

Freshman

24


A D V O C A T E A I D A S S I S T B E N E F I T E N C O U R A G E E N D O R S E H E L P P R O V I D E S U P P O R T

Kincaid Math/Science Education

Scholarship $500

Eric T. Brumbaugh

Elkhart, IN

Science Education

Sophomore

Leonard Family

Scholarship $1,000

Christina M. Jacobs

South Barrington, IL

Technology Education

Senior

Long Family Scholarship $1,000

Leah D. Hester

Remington, IN

Social Studies Education

Sophomore

Marie Luisa Enriquez Mann

Scholarship $1,000

Ronald A. Pedroza

Merrillville, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Marilyn J. Haring

Scholarship $1,000

Rachel M. Schrink

Brownstown, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Mary Ann Jenkins

Scholarship $1,000

Jocelin P. Powell

Linton, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Miles Family Scholarship $1,000

Lindsay M. Scheessele

Newburgh, IN

Special Education

Junior

Pat Haltom Memorial

Scholarship $1,000

Ashley M. Williams

Carmel, IN

Elementary Education

Senior

Paula B. Shoaf Scholarship $1,000

Letitia E. Liao

Rancho Palos Verdes, CA

Elementary Education

Junior

Katherine M. Lunsford

Zionsville, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Robyn E. Lehman

Scholarship $1,000

Kathryn A. Peterson

Princeton Junction, NJ

Elementary Education

Freshman

Straszheim Scholarship in

Elementary Education $1,000

Kathryn E. Evans

Hammond, IN

Elementary Education

Junior

Lauren J. Richardson

Lafayette, IN

Elementary Education

Freshman

Graduate

Elizabeth Doversberger Graduate

Scholarship in Education $1,000

David Stuebing

Frank B. DeBruicker

Graduate Award in

Educational Technology $1,000

Sung Hee Park

General Wei-chin & Madame

Phoebe Lee Graduate

Scholarship $1,000

Nicole Campanali

Bradley Rice

Mast/Fenner Give a Child a

Dream Graduate Award in

School Counseling $1,000

Megan Hardebeck

Mike Keedy Award in

Mathematics & Education $1,000

Daniel Breidenbach

Wilson Doctoral Science

Education Award $1,000

Bryan Wee

Scholarship Endowments 101

Endowments of $25,000 will generate approximately $1100 in scholarship revenue

each year under the University spending policy.

Endowments of $100,000 will generate approximately $4500 each year to support

graduate fellowships under the University spending policy.

Many scholarships are established through outright contributions that may include

gifts of cash, securities or property. Scholarship contributions may be made in

installments over a 5-year period.

Scholarship funds are added to the University’s permanent endowment which is held

and managed by the University. Income will be used to award scholarships.

Additional information about scholarships is available by contacting Jennifer

Jeffries, Director of Development for the College of Education, at 765-496-3545 or

jcjeffries@purdue.edu.

www.education.purdue.edu 25


A P P R E C I A T I O N A C K N O W L E D G M E N T G R A T I T U D E K U D O S M E R I T R E C O G N I T I O N T H A N K S

With the steady support of alumni and friends we are progressing toward our goal to be one of

the finest Colleges of Education. Individuals who share Purdue’s high ideals for academic excellence

and achievement are having an amazing impact on our students and faculty. Scholarships,

research funding, faculty support, facilities, and programs all benefit from the generosity of our

alumni and friends. The list that follows recognizes gifts made in the 2005 calendar year.

26

Heritage Club

Lifetime, Planned and Major Gifts

James & Lois Ackerman

Janet Ault

Frank Brown

Jack & Ruth Chappell

Robert & Etta Clark

Ken & Kitty Decker

Susie & Ron Dollens

John & Hazel Feldhusen

David & Barbara Francis

Michael & Carolyn Gery

Ken & Connie Gleason

Donna Gollnick

Robert & Barbara Kane

Pose Lamb

Beverly Lang

Michele & Gary Lehman

Janice L. Little

Charles & Maria Mann

James & Jamie McDonald

Marylu K.McEwen

Robert D. Miles

Sidney Marsh Moon

D. Edward Nicholas

Arleen Pogue

Carol Rew

Judith Shertzer

John & Susan Spooner

Jim & Zella Thomas

Lary & Joanne Troutner

Phillip & Dorothy Wankat

Robert & Nancy Wilcox

Jane & Michael Wilson

Dean’s Circle $2,500+

Kay & David Clark

Claude & Rita Culross

Timothy & Cheri DeBruicker

George & Alison Hynd

Margaret & John Kolloff

Norm Nierstheimer

Yvonne Shaheen

Bruce & Carol Shertzer

Phillip & Dorothy Wankat

Dean’s Honor Club

$1,000 - $2,499

Chihae Arafune

Bill & Dottie Asher

Janet Ault

Murray & Diane Blackwelder

James & Sandra Bodenmiller

Mary & Raymond Bonhomme

Penelope & Douglas Britt

Barbara & Fred Butler

Dennis & Donna Cahill

Pamela & Douglas Callantine

Barbara Cook

Robert Dalton

Stewart & Shelby DeBruicker

Barbara & Alfred DeVito

Elizabeth Doversberger

Bessie Duncan

Michael & Molly Eskew

Christopher & Linda Gunn

Charles & Helen Hicks

Edwyna & George Hord

Dorothy & Yong Huang

William & Mary Jenkins

Rich Mitchell & Jeff Kopkey

Susan & Martin Kozak

Joyce & Henry Landau

Beverly Lang

Esther Lee

“Evermore thanks.”

—Shakespeare

James Lehman

Gregg & Robyn Lehman

Edwin & Virginia Leonard

Lyle & Myrna Lloyd

Albert & Carol Long

Debra & Jonathan Meyer

Sidney Marsh Moon

Margaretha Motes

Ruth Ann & Kenneth Newnum

Ernest & Helen Phillips

Patricia Pope

Thomas & Pauline Reale

Thomas & Pamela Robertson

James & Nancy Russell

Sandra & Richard Shoemaker

Diane & Anthony Thomas-Pittari

Joanne & Lary Troutner

Patricia & Peter Vasil

Almar & Carolyn Widiger

Andrea & John Zoller

Dean’s Club $500-$999

Phoebe Bailey

Shirley Benge

Elizabeth & Christopher Boissard

Sheryl & Lawrence Braile

Robert & Karen Brannon

Nancy Bray

Diane & Robert Butler

Lynne & Kent Cerrone

Scott & Niki Dillard

Diane & William Dow

Jennifer French

Thomas & Denise Galovic

Alexandra & Kevin Hall

Lynnette Hinkle

Karen & Gary Hofing

Velma Jones

Wayne & Virginia Kincaid

Sheila & Victor Klinker

Gerald & Sharon Krockover

Candyce & David Krumwiede

Sally McFatridge

Cathy & David McKinnis

Carrie & Ronnie Miller

Douglas Mohlke

Patricia Norton

Jerry & Susan Peters

Chuck Sage

Martha & James Schmidt

Dale & Caryl Schunk

Kathleen & John Steele

Mary Taylor

Judi & Phil Waid

Karen Wesdorp

Education Associate $250 - $499

Craig Bowen

Marshall Buchman

Olive Carland

Mary & James Clamons

Lorraine Davis

Harold & Doris Days

Ruth Ann & Donald Ferris

Robert & Lauralee Foerster

Karen & Pat Gallagher

Sue & Thomas Graham

Susan & David Grider

Rosalind & Richard Hadley

Barbara Hansen

Morris Hansen

Phyllis Herczeg

Patricia & James Himelick

Carol & Edward Hopkins

Jennifer & Randy Jeffries

Trent & Diane Johnson

Pamela & Robert King

Sarah & Gerald Kleedehn

Neil & Emilee Klemme

Richard Kumler

Susan Lenski

Dorothy Long

Carol McGuff

Kendra & Michael Merriman

Janet Miller

Holly & Dennis Mortlock

Russell Nichols

Richard & Patricia Noeth

Earl & Ilah Notestine

Brenda & Paul Olsen

Catrina & Stephen

O’Shaughnessey

Arlen Packard

Louise Pernicano

Sue & Gordon Rains

Maryann Ramsay

Matthew & Kristi Reimer

Cynthia & Raymond Robertson

Walter & Kathleen Schultz

Donna & Allen Segrist

Mark Shertzer

Helen & Leroy Smith

Catherine Strang

Willie & Sarah Trotty

Mary Beth & Tim Unger

Phillip VanFossen

Paulette VanOoteghem

Vicki & Virgil Vaughn

Edward & Jane Wiercioch

Susan & Tad Williams

Steve Zilber

Gloria & Ralph Zimmer

Education Sponsor $100 - $249

Judith & Donald Anderson

Helen Arvidson

Francis & Patricia Aversano

Peggy & James Ballard

Larry Beckley

Marcia & Martin Bedrock

Treva Belanger


A P P R E C I A T I O N A C K N O W L E D G M E N T G R A T I T U D E K U D O S M E R I T R E C O G N I T I O N T H A N K S

Cheryl Bell

Joyce Bentley

Ronald & Bernadette Beyers

Cynthia & Allan Bir

Timothy Bittner

Barbara Bizzarri

John & Susan Bloom

Judith & Louis Bobb

Charles & Nonda Bolyard

Jennifer Borgmann-Morris

Patricia Boyle

Darlene & Richard Brajer

Thomas & Beth Bridge

Terrie & Timothy Brown

Maureen Browne

Barbara & Gregory

Brusnahan-Howell

Lynn Bryan

William & Constance Butler

Maximo & Denise Callao

Carol Callaway

Ann & John Camblin

Laura & Richard Carlson

David Champ

Ann Chezem

Rosemary & Paul Christle-Renaud

Ellsworth & Nancy Christmas

Susan & Bernard Cinkoske

Kathleen Corbin

Marier Cox

Susan Cox

Marlin & Mary Creasy

Joyce & Warren Cundiff

Richard & Barbara Daniel

Brian & Rebecca Dawson

Claudine Deerr

Elsie Delaplane

Lloyd Dennington

Gail & Archie Devore

Susan & Stephen Dibbert

Melvin & Kathryn Dickson

Krista & Eric Dietrich-Osiecki

Grace & Beryl Dillman

Deborah & David

Dillon-O’Brien

Brenda & James Dixey

Christine & Daniel Dunne

Victor & Mary Dupuis

John & Vera Edington

Elizabeth & Thomas Eisele

Patricia Erickson

Peggy & David Ertmer

Nan & James Faflik

Kathleen & Daniel Falconer

Marilyn Ferguson

Twila Figueroa

Patricia & Frederick Finch

Brendan & Jennifer Fleming

Susan & Robert Flemming

Martha & Joseph Fletcher

Lois Foster

Kathryn Francis

David & Martha Frank

Michael & Sandra Frankovich

George Frederick

Carolyn & Douglas Freeman

Melinda & Eric Froedge

Rita & Michael Gaither-Gant

Marilyn Gamblin

Tianguang Gao

Loretta Garling

Jana & Matthew Garrett

Patricia & Floyd Garrott

Linda Gast

Fred Gates

Ruth Gates

Patricia Gehl

Carolyn & Michael Gery

Kathy & Gregory Gesualdo

Christina Gilbert

Joyce & Paul Gilbert

Paul Gilman

Carl Gjeldum

Janice & Richard Good

Margaret & Robert Goodwin

Thomas & Patricia Grabill

Sally & Terry Grenz

Mary & Walter Griffin

Harley & Carol Griffith

Miraca Gross

Daniel Guckien

Sandra & Thomas Halley

Robert & Joyce Hanni

Jan & Stephen Hansen

Candace Harcourt

Marilyn Haring

Debbi Harling

Judith & Chrys Harris

Karen & Richard Harrison

Kay & John Hayes

Stephanie & Scott Hazlett

Maurice Heath

Sara Heitman

Elizabeth & John Helmkamp

Marlene Henderson

Lisa & Troy Hershberger

Mary Hinds

Elizabeth & Lynn Hiser

Charles Hobbs

Lorinda & Jeff Hockema

Jill & Troy Hockemeyer

Alan Holt

Polly Honor

Eileen & Raymond Houin

Esther & Larry Howell

Catherine Hudson

RoseMary & John Hunt

Wanda & John Huston

Dong Geul Hyun

Susan & Stephen Jack

Judith Jackson

Dorothy Jaclack

Stanley & Nancy Jacob

Debrah Jefferson

Chester & Sandra Jernas

Patrick & Elaine Jerrell

Irene Johnson

Susan Kaspar

Kara Keefe-Rohlf

Margaret Kelley

Douglas & Janis Kiff

Janee & Nick Kile

Elaine Kimmerly

Virginia Kingsbury

Louanna Kirkpatrick

Barbara Knarr

Garron Kokai

John & Stephanie Koke

Carol Kornas

Frederick Kosinski

Scott Kubly

Evelyn & Yen-Long Kuo

James & Donna Lambrechts

Dean & Gail Larson

Pamela & John Larson

Mary & Robert Leatherman

Mary & Grenville Lefebvre

Leona & Gregory Leist

Judith Lewandowski

Katherine Lichtenberg

Glenn & Vivian Linnert

Darlene & Gary Lohman

Marcia Long-Taylor

Albertine Lunghi

Sally & Kyle Lutes

Carol & Robert Lutz

Mitzi & Matthew Macaluso

Patricia & Patrick Madison

Michelle Maldonado

Shirley Marshall

Amy Martin-Crowel

Christian & Kendra Mattix

Samuel & Arlene Mayhugh

Sharron & Reece McGee

Donna McGrady

Chris McGrew

Michael McKibbin

Steven McKinley

Ryan McKinney

Graceann & Willard Merkel

Michael Metzger

James & Melanie Metzler

Christine & Andres Meyer

Elizabeth Milburn

Mary Miller

Roseann & John Miller

Thomas Miller

Cletus & Geneve Mitchell

Nancy & Robert Mohlman

Polly Morgan

Jane Moss

Carole & Craig Mueller

Mary & John Mybeck

Robert & Joyce Myers

Nancy Nagy

Christine Neilands

Ted Newell

Evah Belle Newton

Ralph Norman

Teresa Oakes

Alice Obermiller

Victoria & Daniel O’Keefe

Donna & Mark Osborn

Susan Oster

Freddy & Diana Palmer

Albert Parrish

Diana & Stephen Pennell

Kelly & Charles Penquite

Pamela & Thomas Peroutky

James Petty

Amy Phelps

Debra Phillips

Nancy & Mike Piggott

Constance Pinski

Anita & Carl Pirkle

Charlene & Ronald Placey

Erick & Kenya Pruitt

Sandra Purdy

Beth & Jay Purkhiser

Carol & James Ramsey

Peter Riggle

Marcia & Alvin Rohrer

Juan Rosario-Rivera

Mary & Lowell Rose

Judy Rule

Caroline & Michael Runyan

Elaine & Jeff Sanders

Helen Scaglia

Virginia & Stephen Schultz

Paul & Mannee Schuyler

www.education.purdue.edu 27


A P P R E C I A T I O N A C K N O W L E D G M E N T G R A T I T U D E K U D O S M E R I T R E C O G N I T I O N T H A N K S

Education Sponsor continued

Sara & Ronald Schwartz

Nancy & Douglas Seeman

Nancy & Max Servies

Michael Shaffer

Marjorie Sharples

Stanley Shaw

Kent Sheets

Doris & Roy Shelton

Maureen Sheridan

William & Jean Shidler

Marcia & Mark Shirk

Bruce & Jill Sillery

Ronald Sink

Bernie Slaughter

Lois & Curtis Smiley

Rebecca & Jacob Smith

Miriam & Lewis Smith

Leslie & Allen Sockwell

Carol & Carlos Sosa

Lonnie & Carol Steele

Theresa Steill

Wendy Stephenson

James Stewart

Patricia Stites

Stacey & Richard Strehler

Traci & Michael Stump

Betty Suddarth

Susan Suggs

Ruth & Faye Suter

Kathleen Sweeney

David & Deborah Swihart

Amy & Shawn Teague

Susan Thomas

Sandra & Dale Thompson

Carolyn Thompson

Beverly Thompson

Sandra Tilton

Don & Barbara Tolliver

Melinda Utken

Janice & Richard Vetter

Betty Wade

Kay Walker

Marilou & Edwin Warden

Susan & Kenneth Washburn

Ramona Weber

Wendy Weber

Lynn Weber

Carol & D. Lawrence Weingartner

Samuel & Eva Weinstein

Dale Weller

Karen Whisman

Charles Whitlock

Douglas Whitney

Lois Widner

Donald Williams

Elizabeth & Dirk Willms

Nancy & Jeffery Winings

Karen Winning

Sarah & Scott Wisthuff

Judith & Craig Wood

Catherine Wooledge

Eric Worner

Catherine Yeotis

“We cannot always build

the future for our youth,

but we can build our

youth for the future.”

—Franklin D. Roosevelt

Martha & Robert Yonker

Marylou & John Zaloudek

Jean & Jack Zerkel

Marilyn Zielinski

Friend of Education $1 - $99

Kathy & Jay Adams

Kay & John Adams

Paul & Cheryl Adams

Julie Adams

Jeffrey Airey

John Akerly

Sheila & Richard Akers

Kathleen Alberts

Elizabeth Albrecht

Nancy & Thomas Allesee

Joy Alspaugh

Martha & David Altwies

Christine Anders

Tara & Joseph &erson

Deborah & Michael &rus

Crystal & Andre Anthony

Janice & Roy Applegate

Sharlene & Wayne Arita

Janet Armstrong

Ronda & George Arndt

David Arndt

Mary Ashley

Richard Aton

Sandra & William Attick

Kathleen & Jeffrey Auter

Joseph & Barbara Babas

Virginia & John Babel

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28


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30


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“How important it is

for us to recognize and

celebrate our heroes

and she-roes.”

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www.education.purdue.edu 31


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Friend of Education continued

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32


C O M M U N I T Y E N G A G E M E N T G A T H E R I N G H A P P E N I N G I N T E R A C T I O N R E L A T I N G S H A R I N G

standing room only crowd

packed a room in Stewart Center

on February 17, 2006 to hear

a second grade teacher share his

experiences. Why all the interest in this

particular teacher? He is Georgia’s First

Class Teacher o the Year—and he has Tourette

Syndrome.

Brad Cohen, from Marietta, Georgia,

has written a book about his challenges

with Tourette Syndrome and his passion

to become a classroom teacher. Front of

the Class: How Tourette Syndrome Made

Me the Teacher I Never Had, is co-authored

by Lisa Wysocky. Cohen has been

featured in People magazine and is traveling

the country to share his story.

His talk was sponsored by the College

of Education and the Tourette Syndrome

Association of Indiana. Among those

who came to hear Cohen’s speech were

Purdue’s first lady, Patty Jischke; Indiana

state representative and College of Education

outreach liaison Sheila Klinker;

and several children with Tourette’s, accompanied

by their parents and siblings.

Tourette’s Syndrome is a neurological

disorder that becomes evident between

early childhood and adolescence and is

defined by motor and vocal tics lasting

for more than one year.

For Cohen, Tourette’s manifests itself

in vocal and facial tics. Today, he has

learned to deal with them, but as a child,

the disorder made him feel like an outsider

to both children and adults. “People

thought I was possessed by the devil,” he

said. At school “I was the kid always put

in the corner because teachers didn’t want

to deal with me.”

Things started to change for him toward

the end of middle school because of the

understanding relationship he had with

the principal, who allowed him to give

a speech in the school auditorium about

his disorder. In that speech, he talked

about Tourette’s and encouraged

students to talk with him about

it. “After that, I learned the power

of education,” Cohen said. “From

then on, I realized this is what

I needed to do, to be in a classroom.”

Cohen said that as he entered college at

Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., he faced

some difficulties at first but the students

quickly rallied around him.

Cohen said he greatly enjoyed his four

years at college, excelling academically

and socially. But that enthusiasm came

to a screeching halt when he entered the

job market. As he went from school to

school for interviews, at the beginning of

each meeting, he would disclose that he

had Tourette’s. “Administrators couldn’t

look past Tourette’s Syndrome,” he said.

But Cohen refused to give up. He went

on a new round of interviews, determined

to become a teacher. Finally, a principal

from an elementary school in Marietta,

Ga., was impressed enough with his resume

and experiences to give him a job.

Although Cohen still struggles with the

disorder—sometimes being thrown out of

movie theaters and restaurants—he takes

pride in the fact that through education,

he can help cut through the stigma of this

often embarrassing disease and remind

teachers, students and parents that with

enough encouragement, any child can

succeed.

“We all have some kind of disability, but

it’s the ability we should focus on,” Cohen

said. “All the kids in your classroom can be

successful, so don’t give up on them. With

a positive attitude, anyone can succeed.”

Cohen was brought to campus through

the efforts of Michele Lehman, who received

a bachelor’s degree in elementary

education from Purdue in 1974. She

serves on the board of both the Indiana

“With a positive attitude,

anyone can succeed”

and Illinois chapters of the Tourette Syndrome

Association.

The former Lafayette first-grade teacher,

who was recognized last year for her

contributions to Purdue’s Reading Recovery

program, said she heard that Cohen

was going to be speaking in the Chicago

area and started looking into how she

could convince him to talk at Purdue.

“I had heard he was a good speaker, but

after hearing him talk, I think he is just

fantastic,” Lehman said. “I didn’t realize

he would be this inspiring.”

Written by Kim Medaris

www.education.purdue.edu 33


Distinguished Education Alumni Awards

Friday, April 7, 2006

Dean’s Advisory Council meeting

Friday, April 7, 2006

College of Education Honors Convocation & Reception

Sunday, April 9, 2006

Spring Fest Saturday & Sunday, April 8 & 9, 2006

Purdue Literacy Network Project Lecture Series: Francisco Jimènez

Saturday, April 22, 2006

For registration information call 765-494-2973, 800-359-2968

or email Lisa Harker at laharker@purdue.edu

College of Education Commencement

Saturday, May 13, 2006

GERI Super Summer for children Pre-K to grade 4

June 5-9, 2006 and June 12-16, 2006

Visit www.geri.education.purdue.edu and click on “Youth Programs.”

For registration information call (765) 494-7243 or email geri@purdue.edu.

GERI Summer Residential Camps for children in grades 5 to 12

June 25 - July 1, 2006 and July 9 - July 15, 2006 Comet, grades 5-6

June 18 - July 1, 2006 and July 2 - July 15, 2006 Star, grades 7-8

June 18 - July 1, 2006 and July 2 - July 15, 2006 Pulsar, grades 9-12

Visit www.geri.education.purdue.edu and click on “Youth Programs.”

For registration information call (765) 494-7243 or email geri@purdue.edu.

Discover! 2006 Purdue’s Summer Institute for Educators

Monday-Thursday, June 26-29, 2006

For registration information call 765-494-7217, 800-359-2968

or email Susan Umberger at sumberger@purdue.edu

Inaugural Ackerman Colloquium on Technology and Citizenship Education

Monday-Thursday, July 24-27, 2006

Call 765-494-4755 for more information.

Sixth Annual Summer Literacy Institute

Tuesday & Wednesday, July 25 & 26, 2006

For registration information call 765-494-2973, 800-359-2968

or email Lisa Harker at laharker@purdue.edu

Writing Summit

Monday, August 7, 2006

For more information call 765-496-2119 or email plnp@purdue.edu

Mary Risser Distinguished Speaker Series

Friday, September 8, 2006

Friday, November 3, 2006

Friday, December 1, 2006

For registration information call 765-494-2973, 800-359-2968

or email Lisa Harker at laharker@purdue.edu

Purdue University’s Constitution Day Celebration

Friday, September 15, 2006

Call 765-494-4755 for more information.

34


Photo credits - cover: globe by Kurt DeBruyn, Russia by Elena Elisseeva, S. Africa by Ben Murray, Great Wall

by Lambert Parren, windmill by Lidian Neeleman, Poland field by Andrzej Puchta, temple by Rich Bartell;

pg. 2: George Hynd by Dave Umberger; pg. 4: provided by Linda Austin; pg. 5 provided by Jim Lehman; pg.

6: temple by Gunter Fischer; pg. 8: tulips by Erik de Graaf; pg. 9: provided by Ben Murray; pg. 10: St. Basil by

Galina Barskaya; pg. 11: pier by Marta Sadowska; pg. 12: Peterson & Mann provided by Jean Peterson, thumb

by Anne Bergersen; pg. 13: VanFossen & Hynd by John Underwood; pg. 14: books by Andrzej Tokarski; pg.

15: Adams by Tonya Agnew; pg. 16: Nierstheimer provided by Norm Nierstheimer; pg. 17: drawing provided

by Norm Nierstheimer, Nierstheimer & Gunderson provided by Susan Gunderson; pg. 18: Harris provided

by Youli Mantzicopoulos-James; pg. 19: PUPIL by Tonya Agnew; pg. 20: Foerster provided by Rovert

Foerster, graduate by Andres Rodriguez; pg. 22: DeVito provided by Janet Robinson, student by Paulus

Rusyanto; pg. 23: student by jacob Wackerhausen; pg. 29: Cohen provided by Brad Cohen.


ollege of Education

v o l u m e 2 : i s s u e 2 : s p r i n g 2 0 0 6

College of Education

Beering Hall of Liberal Arts and Education

100 North University Street

West Lafayette, IN 47907-2098

Nonprofit Organization

U.S. Postage

PAID

Purdue University

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