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The Sunflower_ On the Possibilities and - Wiesenthal, Simon copy

The Sunflower_ On the Possibilities and - Wiesenthal, Simon copy

The Sunflower_ On the Possibilities and - Wiesenthal, Simon

  • Page 4 and 5: CONTENTS Preface BOOK ONE The Sun
  • Page 6 and 7: Edward H. Flannery Eva Fleischner M
  • Page 8 and 9: Cardinal Franz König Harold S. Kus
  • Page 10 and 11: Matthieu Ricard Joshua Rubenstein S
  • Page 12 and 13: PREFACE When the first American edi
  • Page 14 and 15: Holocaust, repeat many of its horro
  • Page 17 and 18: What was it Arthur said last night?
  • Page 19 and 20: they splintered into small groups,
  • Page 21 and 22: If so, why were some murderers and
  • Page 23 and 24: order in which God has a definite p
  • Page 25 and 26: always led to dire punishment. If a
  • Page 27 and 28: Our gaze roamed the crowds on the p
  • Page 29 and 30: last look at the forest of sunflowe
  • Page 31 and 32: We turned left. I knew the way well
  • Page 33 and 34: designed as a prison gate. They had
  • Page 35 and 36: The other soldiers didn't seem to s
  • Page 37 and 38: work with Derdacki—a design for a
  • Page 39 and 40: I obeyed. His almost bloodless hand
  • Page 41 and 42: “I heard from one of the sisters
  • Page 43 and 44: All the atrocities and tortures tha
  • Page 45 and 46: closed the door behind me I heard m
  • Page 47 and 48: spirits. Oh, the jokes we used to p
  • Page 49 and 50: see symbols in everything. It was a
  • Page 51 and 52: He took a deep breath. Then a sip o
  • Page 53 and 54:

    “As we approached I could see the

  • Page 55 and 56:

    forget—least of all the child. It

  • Page 57 and 58:

    constantly warned Eli's parents to

  • Page 59 and 60:

    monotone. Sick people when they are

  • Page 61 and 62:

    “Our rest period did not last lon

  • Page 63 and 64:

    “In that moment I saw the burning

  • Page 65 and 66:

    the fact that he spoke to me was a

  • Page 67 and 68:

    “I was beginning to think you had

  • Page 69 and 70:

    At the end of Grodezka Street we tu

  • Page 71 and 72:

    Luckily the commandant was nowhere

  • Page 73 and 74:

    was better to keep my mouth shut ab

  • Page 75 and 76:

    career when the war broke out. Duri

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    He now had me where he wanted me: I

  • Page 79 and 80:

    His father brought him to me in his

  • Page 81 and 82:

    though the Poles were now themselve

  • Page 83 and 84:

    to prove they were earning their sp

  • Page 85 and 86:

    swallowed it ravenously. Soldiers s

  • Page 87 and 88:

    failed. Then one day the extra labo

  • Page 89 and 90:

    whole stock of drugs consisted of i

  • Page 91 and 92:

    “Bolek,” I insisted, “you who

  • Page 93 and 94:

    “Maybe. But had he come to the ri

  • Page 95 and 96:

    At that time the world was seeking

  • Page 97 and 98:

    confronted the mother I did not kno

  • Page 99 and 100:

    move to my sister's, but I don't wa

  • Page 101 and 102:

    She could not tell me enough. I had

  • Page 103 and 104:

    Germans to find out who was guilty.

  • Page 105 and 106:

    My picture of Karl was almost compl

  • Page 107:

    And later when I met his mother I a

  • Page 110 and 111:

    tool of war. Over 10,000 individual

  • Page 112 and 113:

    I explicitly and emphatically rejec

  • Page 114 and 115:

    JEAN AMÉRY My high regard for your

  • Page 116 and 117:

    part in the extermination, he knew

  • Page 118 and 119:

    SMAIL BALI Now that nearly thirty y

  • Page 120 and 121:

    shape the views of the masses. One

  • Page 122 and 123:

    epresentative of German Nazism, or

  • Page 124 and 125:

    Even if Wiesenthal believed that he

  • Page 126 and 127:

    except when the state declares an a

  • Page 128 and 129:

    forgiveness is forbidden. Judaism t

  • Page 130 and 131:

    ROBERT MCAFEE BROWN Warsaw, 1979. W

  • Page 132 and 133:

    after twenty-seven years in jail, p

  • Page 134 and 135:

    HARRY JAMES CARGAS I am afraid not

  • Page 136 and 137:

    ROBERT COLES We are told at the end

  • Page 138 and 139:

    inconceivable to us. Still, with ca

  • Page 140 and 141:

    THE DALAI LAMA I believe one should

  • Page 142 and 143:

    EUGENE J. FISHER Simon Wiesenthal's

  • Page 144 and 145:

    Secondly, I believe it is the heigh

  • Page 146 and 147:

    a prayer or two that the efforts in

  • Page 148 and 149:

    Simon's sleep was not to remain so

  • Page 150 and 151:

    unanimity on such issues is rarely,

  • Page 152 and 153:

    course; it has invariably led to an

  • Page 154 and 155:

    elates to the concept of atonement,

  • Page 156 and 157:

    MATTHEW FOX Simon Wiesenthal is a t

  • Page 158 and 159:

    the dying but guilt-ridden soldier.

  • Page 160 and 161:

    allows these sins to take root and

  • Page 162 and 163:

    all-to-hell type, the Nazi beast. D

  • Page 164 and 165:

    increments in his humanity add up,

  • Page 166 and 167:

    the community that gives him that r

  • Page 168 and 169:

    Did the Germans actually feed into

  • Page 170 and 171:

    even saw one, and whatever atrociti

  • Page 172 and 173:

    HANS HABE On reading The Sunflower

  • Page 174 and 175:

    the question of punishment. If Karl

  • Page 176 and 177:

    murderer or not, for Providence rel

  • Page 178 and 179:

    those Jews who tried to isolate Ger

  • Page 180 and 181:

    ARTHUR HERTZBERG This personal hist

  • Page 182 and 183:

    had carried out the murders. On the

  • Page 184 and 185:

    ABRAHAM JOSHUA HESCHEL Over fifty y

  • Page 186 and 187:

    SUSANNAH HESCHEL I would have done

  • Page 188 and 189:

    JOSÉ HOBDAY The question, “What

  • Page 190 and 191:

    CHRISTOPHER HOLLIS The Sunflower, w

  • Page 192 and 193:

    these are explanations. They are no

  • Page 194 and 195:

    confessing to an unknown Jew? The J

  • Page 196 and 197:

    had also reached the same point, th

  • Page 198 and 199:

    Archbishop of Vienna Reading about

  • Page 200 and 201:

    HAROLD S. KUSHNER I am not sure the

  • Page 202 and 203:

    while he's living it up with his ne

  • Page 204 and 205:

    Although many have hailed the since

  • Page 206 and 207:

    the sinner to eternal damnation bef

  • Page 208 and 209:

    in absolving your man, and you woul

  • Page 210 and 211:

    level: from within themselves, they

  • Page 212 and 213:

    forgiveness. Citizens of Germany, A

  • Page 214 and 215:

    deathbed moment of crystal clarity.

  • Page 216 and 217:

    outsiders, cynicism and atheism hav

  • Page 218 and 219:

    e sure, the conviction that we gain

  • Page 220 and 221:

    ERICH H. LOEWY Anyone who has never

  • Page 222 and 223:

    Of course, Wiesenthal could not for

  • Page 224 and 225:

    HERBERT MARCUSE I think I would hav

  • Page 226 and 227:

    “What would I have done?” becom

  • Page 228 and 229:

    the cheapening of grace. A second f

  • Page 230 and 231:

    CYNTHIA OZICK

  • Page 232 and 233:

    2. THE SOURCES OF PITY Pity is not

  • Page 234 and 235:

    But that is a misunderstanding. Ven

  • Page 236 and 237:

    4. MORAL TENDERNESS, MORAL RESPONSI

  • Page 238 and 239:

    greatest moral philosopher of the a

  • Page 240 and 241:

    more complex process, especially in

  • Page 242 and 243:

    interventionist possibilities can n

  • Page 244 and 245:

    DENNIS PRAGER I am a religious Jew

  • Page 246 and 247:

    murderer, not his punishment (let a

  • Page 248 and 249:

    has been taken to mean “pray for

  • Page 250 and 251:

    Pulling away from the Khmer Rouge l

  • Page 252 and 253:

    TERENCE PRITTIE Men who are dying e

  • Page 254 and 255:

    MATTHIEU RICARD For a Buddhist, for

  • Page 256 and 257:

    JOSHUA RUBENSTEIN As we near the cl

  • Page 258 and 259:

    We know today, if Simon did not at

  • Page 260 and 261:

    SIDNEY SHACHNOW Having spent most o

  • Page 262 and 263:

    from communism. I was prepared to g

  • Page 264 and 265:

    extraordinary happened, something I

  • Page 266 and 267:

    human beings. And yet, those eyes a

  • Page 268 and 269:

    themselves into a collective and un

  • Page 270 and 271:

    mission. But if that young man had

  • Page 272 and 273:

    he have the right to ask for forgiv

  • Page 274 and 275:

    treat the man as a monster who had

  • Page 276 and 277:

    nasty lie. As a child survivor of t

  • Page 278 and 279:

    give up prosecuting those who have

  • Page 280 and 281:

    seems to be denying to the Jews the

  • Page 282 and 283:

    Forgiveness is not a simple, discre

  • Page 284 and 285:

    JOSEPH TELUSHKIN Was this young Naz

  • Page 286 and 287:

    that if a murderer accepts his puni

  • Page 288 and 289:

    specifically human activity which c

  • Page 290 and 291:

    What would I have done? Our preside

  • Page 292 and 293:

    left the Jewish people still strugg

  • Page 294 and 295:

    HARRY WU Reading Simon Wiesenthal's

  • Page 296 and 297:

    out of the barracks and braced ours

  • Page 298 and 299:

    CONTRIBUTORS SVEN ALKALAJ is the am

  • Page 300 and 301:

    volumes); The Moral Life of Childre

  • Page 302 and 303:

    ecipient of the Herzl Prize, his wo

  • Page 304 and 305:

    He has taught at the Jewish Theolog

  • Page 306 and 307:

    at the Catholic Theological Union i

  • Page 308 and 309:

    died in 1981. MANÈS SPERBER, Frenc

  • Page 310 and 311:

    A NOTE ABOUT THE AUTHOR SIMON WIESE

  • Page 312 and 313:

    Other SCHOCKEN BOOKS of Related Int

  • Page 314 and 315:

    Available at your local bookstore,

  • Page 316 and 317:

    Library of Congress Cataloging-in-P

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