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OCTOBER 2009

Excited About

Education

Program Profiles

Our Largest and Most Complete

Directory of Academic and

Training Programs Ever

Acing Your Audition


www.stage-directions.com

Table Of Contents October 2009

30

Marshall Bissett

76

Features

12 Light on the Subject

All about the ETCP and the certification exams. By Richard Cadena

16 Sound Design

John Shivers puts in some overtime designing sound for 9 to 5. By

Bryan Reesman

20 Investing in Creative Infrastructure

SD learns more about the programs the Mellon Foundation expects

to see with its recent $2M infusion. By Jacob Coakley

24 Master of Many Trades

Tony Walton talks history and the future of design on Broadway. By

Bryan Reesman

28 The Abuses of Musical Theatre

At Northwestern State in Louisiana, an install that can stand up to

the demands of modern musical theatre. By David Koteles

30 Honor Among Rogues

At Rogue Artists Ensemble everyone brings ideas—and better be

prepared to let them go.

By Marshall Bissett

Special Section: Education

34 Go State

Two publicly funded schools with great programs for everyone. By

Lisa Mulcahy

38 Navigating Theatre Program Auditions

Gatekeepers speak out on do’s and don’ts for your audition. By

Kevin M. Mitchell

42 Education Directory

Stage Directions’ annual directory of educational opportunities.

Departments

4 Editor’s Note

Wherein our hero goes on an audition, volunteers at a Fringe festival,

and wonders as Charles Dickens enlightens him to the error of his

ways. By Jacob Coakley

5 Letters

Kudos, and a letter to get the correct kudos mentioned.

7 In the Greenroom

Tom Hanks donates endowment to Solano College, LaMama puts

a show on eBay, About Face Theatre in Chicago erases debt and

more.

10 Tools of the Trade

Gear at home in your toolbox or in your school’s.

76 Answer Box

Stephanie Weisman and David Ford from the Marsh talk about the

community behind solo shows. By Jacob Coakley

Columns

40 TD Talk

TD’s deserve tenure, too. Here’s how they can earn it, and a guide to

judging them correctly. By Dave McGinnis

41 Off the Shelf

How-to books on technical theatre and fundraising. By Stephen

Peithman

TheatreFace.com

Excited About

Education

Program Profiles

Our Largest and Most Complete

Directory of Academic and

Training Programs Ever

Acing Your Audition

ON OUR COVER: The production of Kyogen:

Laughter for all Time, a collection of three short

comedies of the classical “kyogen” theatre of

Japan at the Kennedy Theatre, University of

Hawaii at Manoa

PHOTOGRAPHY BY: Andrew Shimabuku


Dan Hernandez

Editor’s Note

Great Expectations

. . . Or, what I dismissed.

To my memory, I’ve only turned down a part

once. It was at Playwrights Horizons, when

I was studying acting there. They needed

actors to help out some of their playwrights in

a staged reading. With the best of synergy, they

held auditions—playwrights, directors, actors,

all learning together how to work through the

process. I went, read, and was offered the part of the disaffected,

surly teenage son. I forget everything about the play,

except I didn’t think it was very good (it was a first reading,

what did I want?) and even more than the script, I remember

being absolutely unimpressed by the actors I read with. Yeah,

who knew, an actor who thinks he’s better than everyone

else? Stop the presses! I remember I was appalled that one

actor didn’t know how to pronounce Austria-Hungary. So I

turned down the part. I gave some excuse about not being

able to fit rehearsals around my work schedule. It was close

enough to the truth to work, but still just an excuse. I have

no idea what happened to that play, but I do know what happened

to other artists I dismissed.

I used to volunteer a lot at the San Francisco Fringe

Festival. This was when I was working with computers for a

few years and volunteering was my only connection to practicing

theatre. So I saw a bunch of troupes and performers,

several of whom I dismissed as absolutely talent-less after

seeing their acts. But I remembered their names, and saw

them year after year at the fest. They kept at it. Do I need to

tell you that they’re winning awards now, and performing to

acclaim across the country?

Charles Dickens finally told me what I was doing wrong.

I was reading Great Expectations, where, in case you don’t

know, the main character is blessed/cursed with “great expectations”

and begins to feel above it all. He starts looking down

his nose on his roommate. Late in the book, after having been

knocked around a bit, he realizes his error: “I often wondered

how I had conceived that old idea of his inaptitude, until I

was one day enlightened by the reflection, that perhaps the

inaptitude had never been in him at all, but had been in me.”

So, at a certain point a few years ago, I decided to put

ego aside, and just focus on craft. Do the work, and let go of

results. Or, as I heard someone say today: “Left foot, right foot.

Breathe.” Or, as Dori says in Finding Nemo “Just keep swimming,

just keep swimming.”

The work is hard enough. The art is fragile enough. Success

is elusive enough. We don’t need to put up artificial barriers

between us and the work. So, at the start of another fall season,

another new school year, that is my goal: To not close

myself off to opportunity thanks to my preconceived notions

about what I’m “better than.” Or who isn’t worth it. I’m going

to do the work, and help others do the work.

Jacob Coakley

jcoakley@stage-directions.com

4 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Letters

Kudos!

I

have been a fan of Stage Directions from its beginnings! I missed the

old "Theatre Crafts" magazine format which was hands-on useable

in my theatre arts classes. Stage Directions appeals to a variety of

technical skill levels. I learn and my students learn from the articles

because you include things which we can grasp within the realms

of our limited resources and then you give us a look at how much

more is available. I like the advertisements because they also give me

direction. But, making the digital copy which I can download is even

more exciting. If I could I would give you a Tony! Now I can share an

issue with the whole class at the same time. I tried it for the first time

today - Yeah!

Thank you for this wonderful gift.

Cynthia R. King

Director of Theatre Arts

Notre Dame Regional High School

Cape Girardeau, MO

[Thanks, Cynthia! Glad you like the book. Any reader can go green and

change their subscription to the digital edition at www.stage-directions.

com/subscribe. —Jacob]

. . . And Correct Kudos

I read with interest your “Sound Policy,” article by Lisa Mulcahy

in the September 2009 issue about two of New York’s fine sound

shops. I’ve had the pleasure of dealing with both Masque and Sound

Associates many times over the past 30 years, and the depth of knowledge,

the ingenuity, the attention to detail, and the support that their

staffs provide always help ease the stress of doing production on a

new show.

I did notice some inaccuracies in the article that should be corrected:

Sound Associates was started in 1946 by Richard Fitzgerald’s

father, Tommy Fitzgerald, not in 1979.

Scott Lehrer won the 2008 Tony Award for Sound Design of a

Musical for South Pacific, not Masque Sound.

Your article also leaves the reader with a mistaken impression

of the extent of Masque Sound’s role in the Lincoln Center Theater

production of South Pacific. All of the work in the theatre to realize

Scott’s design concept was performed by Scott and his team of

Leon Rothenberg (Associate Sound Designer) and Bridget O’Connor

(Assistant Sound Designer), and by the IATSE Local 1 production crew

of South Pacific consisting of Gary Simon, Julia Rubin and myself. This

was the team that assembled the sound system in the shop, handled

its installation in the Vivian Beaumont Theater, programmed all of the

sound effects, performed all of the measurement and calculation of

the 322 different delays, configured and programmed the DSPs with

those delays, and programmed the 175 delay changes required to

run the show.

While Masque’s contributions to South Pacific should not be minimized,

neither should they be overstated.

Marc Salzberg

Production Soundman

South Pacific

[Thank you for the correct date of Masque’s founding and especially

for the correct credits for the South Pacific award. Printing the name of

the company as winner and neglecting the names on the crew was a

terrible lapse on my part. In our effort to write about Masque sound, we

did not intend to minimize the efforts and skills of all the talented people

involved. —Jacob]

www.stage-directions.com • April 2009 0


SD CELEBRATING

OPERATIONS

General Manager William Vanyo

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Publisher Terry Lowe

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Editor Jacob Coakley

jcoakley@stage-directions.com

Audio Editor Jason Pritchard

jpritchard@stage-directions.com

Lighting & Staging Editor Richard Cadena

rcadena@plsn.com

New York Editor Bryan Reesman

bryan@stage-directions.com

Editorial Assistant Victoria Laabs

vl@plsn.com

Contributing Writers Marshall Bissett, Richard Cadena,

David Koteles, Dave McGinnis,

Kevin M. Mitchell, Lisa Mulcahy,

Stephen Peithman, Bryan Reesman

Consulting Editor Stephen Peithman

ART

Art Director Garret Petrov

Production

Production Manager Linda Evans

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Apollo Design; Becky Kaufman, Period Corsets; Keith Kevan, KKO Network; Todd

Koeppl, Chicago Spotlight Inc.; Kimberly Messer, Lillenas Drama Resources;

John Meyer, Meyer Sound; John Muszynski, Theater Director Maine South High

School; Scott C. Parker, Johnny Carson School of Theatre and Film; Ron Ranson,

Theatre Arts Video Library; David Rosenberg, I. Weiss & Sons Inc.; Karen Rugerio,

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6 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


In the Greenroom

Tom Hanks Funds Endowment at Solano College

Tom Hanks will support the Solano College Theatre

with the Tom Hanks/Rita Wilson Endowment Fund.

The endowment is a living legacy from the two-time

Academy Award winner and honors the students as well

as his long friendship with SCT Artistic Director George

AEA Finds in Favor of Piven

In a statement on their Web site a spokesperson for

Actors' Equity announced that “the decision in the matter

of the Arbitration between Speed the Plow Company,

L.P. and Jeremy Piven & Actors' Equity Association is

in favor of Mr. Piven and AEA. The Arbitrator's decision

acknowledges that Mr. Piven did not breach his

individual employment contract nor did he breach the

Equity-League collective bargaining contract.”

Producers of the show filed a suit against Piven after

he withdrew from their Broadway production of David

Mamet’s Speed-the-Plow citing mercury poisoning. A

February meeting of a grievance committee comprising

members from the association and the Broadway

League resulted in a split decision and no penalty for

Piven. The producers then filed for arbitration.

LaMama ETC Puts Special

Performance on eBay

In a novel fundraising attempt, LaMama ETC auctioned

off a private performance on October 2 of a new musical,

Days and Nights: Two Chekhovian Interludes. In addition to

the private performance, the highest bidder and guests will

participate in a champagne reception with the cast and creators

of Days and Nights following the performance.

The eBay auction was the inspiration of Days and Nights

creator and director Brian Ahn. Days and Nights: Two

Chekhovian Interludes is a NY premiere production comprised

of two new musical adaptations of short stories by

Anton Chekhov: "The Doctor" and "The Joke." The shows

were created and performed by an international company of

Korean, Taiwanese and American theatre makers.

Maguire. It will provide scholarships to Theatre Arts students

at Solano Community College. Maguire met Hanks

at Great Lakes Shakespeare Festival in Cleveland 32

years ago and the two have maintained a close friendship

ever since.

Center Theatre Group Receives

$1 Million from Mellon Foundation

Center Theatre Group was recently awarded a three-year,

$1 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that

will support the expansion of CTG’s New Play Production

Program. The expansion will focus on the commissioning,

development, and production of non-text-based work, which

is often underrepresented in the programming for large

regional theatres such as CTG. The grant will also place an

emphasis on supporting works from Los Angeles-based artists.

For a full description of the grant, and how CTG will use

the funds, turn to page 20.

Open Stage Theatre Closes

To Review Alternatives

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review is reporting that Open

Stage Theatre will cease operations—hopefully only

temporarily. They will be spending the next six months

making strategic plans to ensure the organization has

a future. As part of this planning mode the theatre will

give up the its leased theatre space, which it sometimes

rented out to other companies.

"Our six seasons on Smallman Street were very good

for us," board president Jim Keller, told the Tribune-

Review, "but the economy is extremely challenging now,

and we were forced to make some very difficult decisions."

Open Stage’s artistic director, and only full-time

employee, David M. Maslow, announced his resignation

in tandem with the news. The Tribune-Review reports

that Maslow cited long-term debt and theatre maintenance

in a tough economy as reasons for the closure.

theatre buzz

Chicago’s About Face Theatre Erases Debt

Artistic Director Bonnie Metzgar and the About Face Board

of Directors announced the success of their “Face the Future

Campaign.” The campaign earned more than $200,000 for the

company, erased debt and raised funds for artistic programming

and the foundation of a new cash reserve. The success of the campaign

has enabled the company to launch the upcoming season,

including the all-new Chicago XYZ Festival.

In addition to new artistic programming, Metzgar

announced a national search to replace Managing Director

Rick Dildine, who is leaving to join Shakespeare St. Louis.

Metzgar also announced the addition of Stevie Ball, community

leader and former Director of Development for the

Epilepsy Foundation and longtime head of Chicago House,

as Development consultant and interim member of the staff.

Ball replaces longtime About Face Director of Development

Mollie Spear, who has recently joined the staff of Kansas

City Repertory, now helmed by former About Face Artistic

Director Eric Rosen.

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 7


theatre buzz

Actors’ Unions Squabble Stops

Live Stream of Show

The Pittsburgh Irish and Classical Theatre had planned

on live-streaming a performance of their current show

The History Boys over the Internet on August 15. In a

press release from August 4 they announced that the

live performance and live stream had been green-lit

by the play’s authors and the unions representing participating

theatre practitioners involved in the show.

But, on Wednesday, August 12 Stephanie Riso, operations

director at PICT sent out an e-mail stating that the

live-streaming had been canceled due to objections

from Actors’ Equity and AFTRA (American Federation of

Television and Radio Artists).

The play was to be streamed on PICT’s “live and in

person live and live and online” (LIPLO) web portal. The

software was developed by PICT co-founder and operations

director Stephanie Riso in conjunction with Alex

Geis of 21 Productions and had been run with success

during a cabaret series in 2007-2008.

Joyce Theatre Stagehands Ask

Local One IATSE to Represent Them

On August 14, Local One of the International Alliance

of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) requested voluntary

recognition from the Joyce Theatre Foundation as

the collective bargaining representative of the stagehands

employed at the Joyce Theatre in New York City. A

statement from IATSE stated that a “vast majority” of the

stagehands employed by the Joyce had signed authorization

cards selecting Local One to bargain collectively

on its behalf.

IATSE offered to the Joyce that it select a neutral,

third party to review the signed authorization cards in

order to promote “constructive and harmonious relations

between the Joyce Theatre and Local One,” as well

as avoid the expenses associated with National Labor

Relations Board election procedures.

When IATSE had not received a reply from the Joyce

by September 14, they filed a petition with the NLRB for

a supervised election of the Joyce Theater stagehands to

certify Local One as their collective bargaining agent.

When reached for comment, representatives for the

Joyce said they did not wish to make a statement at this

time.

industry news

8 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Writers’ Theatre Names Stuart Carden

Associate Artistic Director

Writers’ Theatre in Chicago has

appointed Stuart Carden associate artistic

director.

“I'm thrilled to be back home in the

thriving Chicago theatre community as

Writers' Theatre's new associate artistic

director,” said Carden.

Carden joins Writers’ Theatre as associate

artistic director after two seasons

Stuart Carden

at City Theatre Company in Pittsburgh

where he was associate artistic director. As a new play specialist,

Stuart has helped to develop more than 30 plays, 12 of which he

directed in their world premiere productions. Notable regional,

U.S., and world premieres include works by Martin Crimp, David

Henry Hwang, Tristine Skyler, Jeffrey Hatcher, Shishir Kurup,

Richard Dresser and Yussef El Guindi.

Amanda Farrar New Executive

Director of Barrel of Monkeys

Amanda Farrar is the

new executive director

of Barrel of Monkeys theatre

company in Chicago.

An arts administrator for

almost a decade, Farrar

received her Master of

Arts Management from

Columbia College Chicago.

For the past two years she

has been Remy Bumppo’s

Amanda Farrar

director of development,

and before that was development and communications

associate at housing options, a nonprofit providing

homes to adults with mental illness.

Pedro Brenner

changing roles

Jordan Roth Succeeds Rocco Landesman as President of Jujamcyn Theaters

Producer Jordan Roth has succeeded Rocco Landesman

as President of Jujamcyn Theaters, the owner and operator

of five major Broadway theatres. Roth, 33, takes over

leadership of the organization which Landesman presided

over from 1987 until his recent confirmation as Chairman

of the National Endowment for the Arts on August 7. Roth

is also acquiring a 50% ownership interest in the privately

held company.


Tools of the Trade

ADB Lighting Domino XT Console

ADB Lighting

Technologies has

launched the latest

in its line-up

of memory lighting

control desks,

the Domino series of lighting control desks, headed by the new

Domino XT. The Domino is designed to provide a flexible and

intuitive solution for both professionals and novices to use, and

is offered at a competitive price point. The four-strong series is

available as Domino 24, 48, 48XT and 96XT versions. The series is

designed for the large mid-range controller market. A major feature

of the Domino is a dedicated crossfade playback fader pair,

along with a large number of physical submasters to execute

playback, chasers, memories and more. The Domino/XT versions

also feature a moving light interface with crucial control parameters

including effects, fans, palettes, presets and filters, which

are all controllable via a single finger touch.

www.adblighting.com

Apollo Apprentice Kits

Apollo is now shipping

the Apprentice Gel

Kit and the Gobo Tool

Kit to help introduce

and train on color selection

and gobo use for

general stage lighting

applications.

The products and

instructional DVD included in each kit are designed to simplify

and explain the basics of gel and gobo usage. With suggested

retail prices of $275 and $225, respectively, Apollo’s Apprentice

Gel Kit and Gobo Tool Kit provide extra value when compared to

buying the products separately.

www.apollodesign.net

Chauvet COLORdash Block

Chauvet’s COLORdash Block is a

compact wash fixture designed to

provide a high-power output with

four separate clusters of LEDs to

produce an infinite array of colors. It

comes with seven operating modes

and full color mixing with or without

DMX control. It can be used as a wash

light or programmers can take control

of each pod individually and create

direct view effects. The COLORdash

block features built-in automated programs or can be customized

to create the right show for any application. Customized

programs can be transferred to up to 10 fixtures at a time via

master/slave or DMX. The rectangular shaped light contains 28

compact 1W LEDs packed in its four pods. Each pod contains

seven LEDs—two red, two green, two blue and one white—

that provide an output of 1,690 @ 2m, with a beam angle of 17

degrees (field angle is 32 degrees).

Thanks to its white LEDs, this unit offers a virtually limitless

range of colors, including pastels and true white.

www.chauvetlighting.com

IAStage Truss-Mounted Wire Tension Grid Systems

IAstage, in conjunction

with TOMCAT USA,

has introduced a Truss-

Mounted Wire Tension

Grid system. This system is

a modified near-standard

lighting grid consisting of

“Sky” truss and SkyDeck

panels. A standard lighting

grid is transformed

into a working platform that provides safe and easy access

to lighting and sound equipment as well as a floor for riggers,

lighting and audio techs to work from, complete with

handrails and safety gates. SkyDeck panels are modular and

easily adaptable to fit any type of truss system, and can even

be reconfigured within a single venue. Focusing a show can

be more efficient and trouble free since the electrician can

simply walk across the whole rig.

www.iastage.com/truss_mounted_tension_wire_grid

Martin MAC 250 Beam

The MAC 250 Beam is a new member

of Martin Professional’s 250-watt series,

and converts the MAC 250 Wash fixture

into a beam fixture that generates variably

sized pencil beams as well as wash

effects via a motorized frost filter. The

MAC 250 Beam is designed to output a

tight beam for a powerful mid-air effect.

The output is optimized via a glass cold

light reflector. A large diameter micro

Fresnel lens produces a distinctive wide beam designed to look

like the same fat beam look as from 300 watt fixtures. A 3000-hour

lamp life translates into a lower cost of ownership and a choice of

lamp options provides added flexibility. The MAC 250 Beam’s CMY

color mixing system is designed to produce a broad spectrum of

colors with smooth cross fades in between colors for spectacular

mid air effects. A gobo wheel with 6 static gobos/apertures plus

open allows for wider or tighter beam effects as well as multiple

beams or cone looks. A motorized frost filter can be employed for

soft beam or wash type effects. A high resolution dimming system

provides smooth dimming and fast strobe effects.

www.martin.com

SRI ProPlus Rescue Assist System

The SRI ProPlus Rescue Assist System from Sapsis Rigging can

be used in the event of a fall to alleviate suspension trauma or to

climb back to the anchor point. In the event of a fall, the Rescue

Assist System pouch releases into rescue mode by automatically

ejecting a high point strength, 16-foot synthetic rescue ladder,

allowing the worker to climb back to the anchor point or stand

on the ladder to relieve pressure, increase blood flow and ensure

enough time for emergency response. It must be used in conjunction

with a full body harness and a complete fall prevention/

rescue program.

www.sapsis-rigging.com

10 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Light on the Subject By Richard Cadena

|

There Will Be a Quiz

All about the ETCP and the certification exams

For many of us in the industry,

the last test we took

was just before we tossed

our graduation caps high in the

air and walked away from academia.

And as we walked away,

we did so thinking we would

never have to take another test

again as long as we lived. That

might be the single happiest

thought in a student’s life. So

why would anyone in the professional

world want to take a

test to become an ETCP certified

rigger or entertainment electrician?

It’s About Safety

You’ve seen the logos, you’ve

heard the designations, you

might even know someone who has passed the ETCP test.

But you might still wonder what the ETCP certification is or

why it’s important.

“Hundreds of deaths occur each

year due to electrocution and electric

shock was the fourth leading

cause of fatal industrial accidents

in 2006.”

In a word: Safety.

In 2000, there were 7,700 nonfatal work-related electrical

injuries according to the National Institute for

Occupational Safety and Health. Hundreds of deaths occur

each year due to electrocution, and electric shock was the

fourth leading cause of fatal industrial accidents in 2006.

Perhaps the most surprising and telling statistic is that

over half of these fatal electrical accidents occur with less

than 600 volts.

But the entertainment industry record for rigging accidents

far surpasses that of electrical accidents. In the last

couple of years we have seen cranes collapse, structures

collapse, scaffolds collapse, and other accidents account

for both fatal and non-fatal accidents. One actor fell

through an open trap door just before a show and a tech

fell to his death when he stepped through a false ceiling.

These are but a few of the many accidents that occur annually

in our industry.

The Entertainment Technician Certification Program

(ETCP) was developed in 2006 by the Entertainment

Services & Technology Association (ESTA) with a number

Classes, work experience and practice will help all prepping for the certification exams.

of other related industry organizations including IATSE,

Live Nation, and the United States Institute of Theatre

Technology (USITT). It’s a voluntary certification awarded

to people who can demonstrate that they have experience

in their field as well as certain abilities, skills and knowledge.

The idea is to promote education and safety in the

industry.

To sit for the exam you have to have industry experience,

training and/or formal education. The requirements

for eligibility are based on a point system; you need 30

points altogether and you get 1 point for every 100 hours

of electrical work experience that you have. So if you work

full time and half of your time is spent dealing with electrical

issues like generators, power distribution, dimming,

etc., then you can accumulate 10 points per year (20 hours

per week for 50 weeks is 1000 hours or 10 points) for electrical

work experience. In three years you would be eligible

to take the exam.

If you have a journeyman electrician’s license that

counts as 7 points and a master electrician’s license counts

as 10 points out of the 30 that are required. College education

from an accredited school counts towards anywhere

from 2 to 8 points, depending on the type of degree and

the field of study. For example, an undergraduate degree

in theatre tech counts as 7 points and a graduate degree

counts as 1 point.

The application process requires that you document

your work experience so that the ETCP can verify your work

history. Education points require an official transcript and

there is a fee of $600 in the U.S. or Canada and $650 outside

of the U.S. and Canada. You can get a $100 discount if you’re

a member of the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television

Producers (AMPTP), CITT, ESTA, the International Alliance

of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE), the International

Association of Assembly Managers (IAAM), InfoComm, the

Broadway League, TEA or USITT.

12 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Light on the Subject

What’s On the Test?

The most common question about the ETCP certification

exam that I get in the classes I teach is, “Is this going

to be on the test?” The best answer to that question can

be found in the ETCP Candidate Handbook. It spells out

how many questions are on the test (150), what subjects

are covered (electrical skills, regulations, codes, life

safety and entertainment electrical systems planning),

and how many questions are on the test that pertain to

a particular subject. The handbook can be downloaded

for free at etcp.esta.org/candidateinfo/electricalexams/

ElectricalCandidateHandbook.htm.

Another question that is often raised about the ETCP

certification exam is, “How can I best prepare to take the

test?” There are several courses you can take to better

prepare yourself and to make you more aware of your

personal areas of weakness. You can find a listing of

upcoming training opportunities on the ESTA Foundation

website at www.estafoundation.org/seminars/resources/

elecseminars.php. On the ETCP website there is a list of

ETCP Recognized Trainers who are available for training

seminars.

Another very good option for preparing for the test is

to take a practice exam. The practice exam is very much

like the real thing except it has only 50 questions instead

of 150. It costs $35 to take it and you have 30 days to

work on it. As you answer each question you have the

option of checking the answer or you can wait until you

“Being certified is one way to distinguish

yourself from the crowd.

If you are certified then a prospective

employer knows that, at the

very minimum, you have some

useful skills and knowledge of your

trade.”

have completed the entire test to check your work. These

practice examinations are available at www.esta.org/

etcppracticeexams.

If you’re like many people, then you might be a bit

apprehensive about taking a test, especially if you’ve been

working in the field for any length of time. After all, how

would it look if you failed the test?

You’re not alone in this regard. It’s perfectly normal to

be a bit fearful about taking a test. After all, it’s not trivial.

But there are two kinds of fear; there’s fear that causes

panic and immobility and there’s fear that promotes focus

and heightens your senses. So it’s normal to have butterflies

in your stomach before taking a test. Just focus your

nervous energy on being well prepared to take the exam.

14 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Professionals are the students in one of Richard Cadena’s electrical seminars.

Why Test?

Some people question why they would want or need to be

certified. Why would anyone need to demonstrate their skills?

After all, isn’t doing a good job year after year enough?

Being certified is one way to distinguish yourself from the

crowd. If you are certified then a prospective employer knows

that, at the very minimum, you have some useful skills and

knowledge of your trade. You are much more likely to be hired

over another equally qualified but uncertified candidate.

Perhaps more importantly, insurance companies know

that a qualified worker is generally a safer worker than an

unqualified worker, and a certification program is a good

indicator of qualifications. That’s why many venues and some

companies are starting to require certification

for lead techs and the demand

for certified techs is growing.

Early in the program, some people

thought that by becoming certified

you would take on more liability. In

fact, becoming certified will more than

likely reduce your liability because you

have demonstrated your knowledge

of your craft. However, whether you

are certified or not is no guarantee

that you won’t be hauled into court

in the event of an accident. If that

happens, the litigates will go after the

deepest pockets, which in most cases means the venue or the

company you work for. They’re not interested in the kind of

money you and I make.

There are many good reasons to become certified in

your field but the decision is yours alone. If you decide not

to become certified there’s a good chance that it will make

no difference. So if you want to make a difference, become

certified.

Richard Cadena is an ETCP Certified Trainer and teaches

Electricity for Entertainment seminars throughout the year,

including some this November in Orlando. For a current schedule,

visit www.plsnbookshelf.com.

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 15


Sound Design

|

By Bryan Reesman

Miking 9 to 5, A Good Way To Make A Living

John Shivers puts in some overtime designing sound for this Broadway tuner

Those old enough to know the source material of

the Broadway musical 9 to 5 recall the hilarious

1980 film of the same name about three frustrated

office works (one of whom was played by Dolly

Parton) who take revenge on their “sexist, egotistical,

lying, hypocritical bigot” boss by holding him hostage

in his own house and running his office to make

changes for the better. Composer Parton and original

co-screenwriter/story creator Patricia Resnick brought

September 6, but plans are currently in the works for a

touring production. Stage Directions spoke with sound

designer John Shivers about his approach to this largescale

show and working with long-time associate David

Patridge and live mixer Dan Tramontozzi.

Stage Directions: How did you get involved in the

project? How much did you work with Dolly Parton?

John Shivers: I was contacted by General Manager

A musical number from 9 to 5

Marc Kudisch, as the evil boss, torments Stephanie J. Block

the movie to the stage with a plethora of new songs

(the title tune—which Parton also wrote—is the only

one from the original film) and a new male supporting

character.

9 to 5, which opened on Broadway with Megan

Hilty, Allison Janney and Stephanie J. Block in the lead

roles, is a genuine crowd pleaser with loads of set and

costume changes and a big, beefy sound. It closed on

Nina Lannan's office, who was inquiring about my interest

and availability. I was, of course, very interested and

subsequently met with Director Joe Mantello and Musical

Director/Vocal Arranger Stephen Oremus, who I had

never worked with, to discuss details of the design. Dolly,

although around for pretty much the entire process,

left us to do what we do but was extremely supportive

throughout.

This is a big musical that

embraces amplification and

certainly does not mask it

at any point. What was your

approach in creating the

sound design for 9 to 5?

You are correct, the show is

quite amplified and that fact

is made even more evident

by the nature of the acoustical

properties of the Marquis

Theatre. There is almost no

reverberation inherent in the

room, and because of that I

found the venue very unforgiving

and particularly challenging

in that every sonic

16 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


“The theatre is a bit like a recording

studio where everything must

be represented in the mix.”

— John Shivers

element needed to be present in the sound system. The

vocals don't naturally project from the stage, and with

the minimal natural reflections and reverberation there

was virtually nothing to help blend the elements into a

cohesive and pleasing sound.

All photograpy by Joan Marcus

Left to right: Megan Hilty, Allison Janney and Stephanie J. Block in 9 to 5

Having said all that, there is something I like about this

sort of environment. In fact, I much prefer it to one where

the room acoustics are so wet and spectrally imbalanced

that it is difficult, if not impossible, to maintain vocal intelligibility

and a satisfying level of detail from the orchestra.

The theatre is a bit like a recording studio where

everything must be represented in the mix. So we, with

a great deal of effort, started putting the pieces together

to generate a pleasing and cohesive sonic experience for

the audience. Through the proper use of equalization,

compression, reverbs and a solid and dynamic mix I think

we achieve a pretty satisfying sound. To add some "liveness"

to the room we utilized our surround system to help

create a sense of spatial dimension.

How was surround sound used specifically in the

show?

The surround system was used very minimally. We

used it for the opening alarms and, as mentioned before,

to attempt to add some liveness to the venue.

I noticed that many of the musicians in the pit are

seated in separate chambers to avoid bleed-through.

Is this becoming more common in shows, and does it

presumably make your life easier in terms of sonically


Sound Design

The cast of 9 to 5

balancing the orchestra?

Well, it is really only the drummer,

Sean McDaniel—who by the way

is an excellent musician and really

knows how to tune his kit—and Dave

Mancuso the percussionist, who are

completely isolated. The rest of the

orchestra is sectioned off by the use

of baffles. The purpose is twofold: one,

it gives us extra control over the quality

of the sound; and two, it gives the

musicians some protection against

high SPL from their fellow musicians.

Of course, the isolation does present

challenges in terms of the orchestra

playing together tightly, but this is

pretty well solved with some attention

given to their monitoring system.

What types of mics and transmitters

did you use on this show and why?

Were the leads all double miked?

Did you use any foot mics?

We use DPA 4061s and some MKE-

1s and Sennheiser 5012 transmitters

and 3532 receiver units. Some of the

principles are double miked for insurance.

No foot mics.

Who was the trickiest person to

mike in the cast?

I don't really think there was any

particular challenge is this respect.

We were pretty lucky in that the wig

design and minimal wearing of hats

allowed us to achieve good and mostly

unobtrusive mic positions.

You have worked a long time with

associate sound designer David

Patridge. How were he and live

mixer Dan Tramontozzi instrumental

in the sound design for 9 to 5?

David has been my associate on a

number of projects over the last several

years. He has a very thorough technical

knowledge base, and we have a

very similar sense of audio aesthetic.

He anticipates our needs and takes

care of many of the details, allowing

me more time to focus on the overall

design. Dan is an excellent mixer

and an excellent musician. He has an

uncanny ability to execute even the

most challenging cues with finesse.

I never had to worry about him not

being able to handle even the most

complicated mixing requests.

18 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


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Feature

|

By Jacob Coakley

Left

Investing in Creative Infrastructure

SD learns more about the programs the Mellon Foundation

expects to see with its recent $2M infusion

The Andrew W. Mellon foundation recently granted $2 million

($1M each) to the Arena Stage in Washington D.C. and

the Center Theatre Group in L.A. to look at the ways that

new plays are developed and study alternatives in an effort to

discover systems of creating more work in a sustainable way.

Arena Stage will use the funds to create the American Voices

New Play Institute program. David Dower, associate artistic director

at the Arena described the initiative in a blog post as an attempt

“to create a space for the new works sector to study, develop, and

npdp.arenastage.org/2009/08/raising-the-stakes-the-institutegets-rolling.html).

It will include four distinct programs: Playwright

Residencies, New Works Producing Fellowships, an Audience

Enrichment seminar and a series of regular convenings to inform

the theatre community about their findings, including what programs

and techniques are working best.

As Dower freely admits, the first three of these programs will

be directly adopted from the theatres where they originated. The

Playwrights Residencies are based on programs already in place

Center Theatre Group will be working with Phil Soltanoff of the Mad Dog Theatre Company (a moment

from their More or Less/Infinty shown here) as part of their support of devised works.

to right: Musician’s Arwen Lawrence de Castellanos, Jorge Liceaga and JoAnne Winter rehearse a song

at a California Shakespeare Theater workshop for Steinbeck's The Pastures of Heaven by Octavio Solis, an NEA

New Play Development Project selection for a Distinguished Development Project grant.

disseminate effective ideas for strengthening the infrastructure

nationwide.” They look at it as a lab to study and disseminate best

practices for play development across the country.

In L.A., Center Theatre Group will be using the money to create

their own New Play Production Program. The program will

fund the commissioning, development and production of nontext-based

work, but it also has an element of developing and

strengthening infrastructure.

“We’ve already been trying to find ways to develop this type of

work,” Diane Rodriguez, director of new play development at CTG,

told me. “Now it’s just an effort to codify—what are the models

that we’re doing that we could develop these artists as well as

develop models for the field in general.”

I thought $2 million going to develop new structures of play

development was worth a closer look, so I sat down with Dower

and Rodriguez to talk more about their programs.

www.stage-directions.com/mellonmoney

ONLINE BONUS

For a fuller explanation of each

program, and more quotes from

David Dower and Diane Rodriguez,

go to www.stage-directions.com/

mellonmoney

American Voices New Play Institute

As part of their support of the NEA’s

New Play Development Program, Arena

Stage maintains a blog meant to inform

those interested about the status of the

projects in the program as well as invite

more interaction. It was on this blog that

Dower posted a lengthy description of

what the Institute will look like (http://

at several large theatres and aim to give writers the financial,

material and artistic support and freedom they need to create

new works. The Producing Fellowships are based on a program

at Foundry Theater and will focus on “developing a crop of

young producers prepared specifically to handle new work.” The

Audience Enrichment Seminar comes direct from Steppenwolf

in Chicago, and will offer 100 audience members unsurpassed

insight into how a play is produced.

The new element Arena will be adding is the regular convenings,

in order to spread the word about what’s working and

ensure new ideas are being heard.

“There’s no place to evaluate and disseminate what the

ingredients of effectiveness for developing new work are,” says

Dower. “The convenings are meant to identify promising new

ideas, but also challenges and opportunities that are arising.”

Convenings will be recorded and notes made public through

the Institute’s Web site. The Institute will also commission and

publish “white papers” on trends and challenges in the field,

describing how they’re being met by theatres across the country.

Dower takes the idea of studying and developing infrastructure

seriously and will keep the focus of the Institute on these

experiments. Programs that have proven to be successful in the

Institute will need to be adopted by the Arena or other theatres,

but will not continue to be supported by the Institute.

The program faced a little bit of a backlash over the fact

20 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


PHIL SOLTANOFF

A moment from i/o, a Mad Dog Theatre production.

that when the plan was first presented

the first cohort of fellows was already

set and the playwrights residencies

were limited to established playwrights.

It has since been clarified that people

wishing to participate in next round

of producing fellowships should apply

to the Allen Lee Hughes Fellowship

Program, but the writers residencies

will still only be offered to established

playwrights that Arena currently has a

relationship with.

“In order to get it going, the choice

that we’ve made, we’re going to work

with people who understand us enough

that we could build this thing by doing

it,” says Dower. “And then after this

first round when we know what it is,

that’ll be the time to cast a wider net for

people we may not already know but

might be perfect contributors.”

Non-Text Based Initiatives

Center Theatre Group’s $1 million will

also go to studying and disseminating

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 21


Feature

A moment during one of Foundry Theatre’s three workshops for Provenance of Beauty (originally Detour/South Bronx) by

Claudia Rankine. Production manager Dave Ogle is looking out the window at the historic "Teatro Puerto Rico,"

converted into an evangelical church.

new models, only their study will focus on devised works.

After three years (the length of the Mellon grant) CTG

is required by the conditions of the grant to release a paper

summarizing different processes and models, examining what

worked and what didn’t, so that theatres across the country can

learn. Additionally, the Center Theatre Group will use it’s semiannual

New Play Production Newsletter

to update everyone about the troupes,

their processes and how it’s proceeding,

so the field has a chance to learn along

with CTG.

To find these new models, CTG will

fund seven different projects that follow

three different paths: commissions,

completion funds and an “innovation

fund” designed to support “maverick”

approaches to theatre. Within the commissions

branch there are three ways

they’ll try: CTG will create an ensemble

themselves to make the work; look for

collaborators to work on a text that

already exists and deconstruct it, giving

it a new spin with the creators; lastly, the

straight commission, which means “We

support them in the development of the

work at their site, in their home base. And

we come to them,” says Rodriguez.

Like Arena, CTG is not accepting

applications to join this process, instead

choosing artists to collaborate with based on relationships already

in place.

“It’s going to be people that we know or work that we’ve seen,”

said Rodriguez, stressing that they wanted to work with these

people in new ways.

Rodriguez used the example of CTG’s

relationship with Phil Soltanoff (artistic

director of Mad Dog Theatre company,

already announced as one of the artists

participating in the program) to give more

details about what CTG’s “deeper investment”

would look like.

“We’re going to have a workshop of

20 people that we select that are interesting

performers, and maybe a designer’s

thrown in there,” says Rodriguez. “And Phil

works with those 20 people for a workshop.

And then we see if those people, if a smaller

group of that same group is interested in

proceeding with the project. And then we

form a smaller group. And that group stays

with us for quite a while, a year—at least a

year—creating the piece. Now that’s very

different than us hiring actors and they

come in with a piece already done.

Part of CTG’s process will be figuring

out how to cover the creators through

equity, how to work with the company

administratively, and also finding artists in

L.A. who are willing to commit to a yearlong

project.

“It takes a kind of artist who wants to

make work,” comments Rodriguez. “It’s the

difference between the words playwriting

and playmaking.”


YOUR #1 RESOURCE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION


Feature

|

By Bryan Reesman

Heather Wolensky

Walton directed and designed

on a production of Shaw’s The

Devil’s Disciple at Asolo Rep in

Florida after mounting it at the

Irish Rep in New York City.

Tony Walton

Master of

Many Trades

Tony Walton talks history and the

future of design on Broadway

Few people on Broadway possess the experience that Tony

Walton does. And that’s no overstatement. The scenic and

costume designer is a seeming whirlwind of energy and

creative talent who has dove into numerous disciplines (including

lighting and video projections) and kept himself in a game that

all too often burns people out. With more than five decades of

theatre and film credits under his belt, the man has become a part

of Broadway history.

His resume speaks for itself. Walton has worked with composer

and playwright Stephen Sondheim, actress and singer Julie

Andrews (to whom he was married for several years in the ‘60s)

and veteran lighting and video designer Richard Pilbrow, among

others. During a 75-minute chat with Stage Directions, Walton was

eloquent, insightful, funny and gracious. Luckily for us, the man

loves what he does, and he loves sharing his experience with

others.

Stage Directions: You and Richard Pilbrow have worked very

well together for 50 years. Why is that, and what is your

chemistry like?

Tony Walton: After 50 years of professional collaboration of

all sorts, Richard is still my closest and best colleague and friend.

Our theatrical tastes are very similar, and we are lucky enough to

share a sense of humor that has yet to desert us, even in the most

stressful of situations.

www.stage-directions.com/tonywalton

ONLINE BONUS

For more from Tony, including

working with Sondheim, go to

www.stage-directions.com/tony

walton

You said that it is not as fun to work on

Broadway shows anymore. Why?

Originally Broadway producers were,

I suppose you could say, “fabulous imbeciles” who just did what

they wanted to do, what they loved. The businessman/lawyer/

agent type producer is much more geared to doing something

that they think will make money. If you want to do that you should

be in any other business other than the theatre. It doesn’t make a

lot of sense. The odds of making money in the theatre are probably

lower than any other business at all. So things over the last

few years have begun to be gauged by audience response and

the kind of thing that used to be Hollywood’s province. Although

you can make a popular piece of work that way or you can find out

how the most number of people are going to want something to

be, that isn’t the way to make a fine piece of art. It became kind of

depressing, so I finally thought, if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.

You have done costume design and scenic design throughout

your career...

In a European convention it is much more usual if you’re

designing a show that you’re designing a show, and that means

everything, sometimes even the lighting as well. That used to

be more of a tradition in America, but once all the unions got

involved it all split asunder. I do both when it seems manageable,

but in the Broadway structure that’s very hard to do now because

you usually get your go-ahead so late in the game, and it’s very

hard to focus furiously on both things simultaneously. If I’m in a

protected situation like Lincoln Center or in regional theatre then I

will do both. I even started out doing lighting as well, but I rapidly

learned that I was a madman.

How does working in both disciplines help you understand

“Theatre is much more ‘two boards and a

passion,’ not necessarily fabulous special effects.”

—Tony Walton

24 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


them?

If you’re working on both you essentially

don’t think of them as two disciplines.

You think of them as the look of the show.

I don’t know whether this is fair or not, but

it tends to work out that the set designer

starts and establishes the visual language

of the show, and then the costume designer,

like it or not, has to follow in whatever

vein the set designer established and pick

up on the palate that already exists. I’ve

maybe twice done only costumes on a

show, and it can be a little bit inhibiting

or frustrating because you know you

only have the palette of the original set

designer to create your own work from.

You can’t start from scratch or you have

to stick with black-and-white. Sometimes

that’s not a bad idea, but on the 1992

revival of Guys and Dolls they used every

conceivable color in the spectrum for the

settings, and William Ivey Long, who did

the costumes, said I’d left nothing for him

except black-and-white. I said, “No, you

can’t do that! You’ve got to join in and

make it even more colorful!” He did and

got the Drama Desk Award.

You’ve worked on some shows on which

you have just done scenic design. Does

it feel weird when you’re not doing costume

design?

No, I actually love it. Any time I’m working

on a show and thinking about design

but not having to do it, I’m the happiest

person in the world because pulling it

off is the hardest. Getting it through all

the processes from getting the image on

the page to the thing on the stage, just

to get what your dream was delivered as

creatively as you had hoped it might be, is

the biggest challenge of all. No matter how

lucky you are with all the people who are

putting it on, it’s never easy to do, to keep

the creative life in it, cooking all the way to

the final project. That’s fascinating.

At one point I started to be rather dictatorial

about how my costumes should

be made, and I would have to say that

the resulting costumes were probably the

least interesting ones I ever did. If you’re

lucky enough to have gifted and creative

people in the workshop, whether it’s a scenic

shop or a costume shop or whatever,

the more you can keep them feeling as if

they’re contributing creatively to the final

work, the more life that tends to remain in

it. Sometimes you almost have to pretend

ignorance in order to encourage creative

input from all around.

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 25


Feature

Another moment from Walton’s production of The Devil’s Disciple at Asolo Rep

How was your recent experience directing The Devil’s Disciple

in Florida?

It has been a tremendous pleasure for me to re-visit The Devil’s

Disciple at the Asolo Repertory Theatre. The rewards of working

on Shaw are inexhaustible, and while my Irish Rep troupe seemed

to me to be as perfect as I could have wished, it has been revelatory

to work with a Rep company in which some members may

not be obvious casting for their roles but are such consummate

actors that they are bringing delightfully fresh and surprising

Heather Wolensky

colors to the play. I have been loving every minute of it, especially

since the repertory system results in the director having odd days

between rehearsals which, in my case, have been invaluable for

checking up on progress on the set and costumes.

You’ve worked on Broadway for such a long time. What

changes have you seen on Broadway during the last 50 years?

For better or for worse, where do you think it’s going?

I’m going to leave aside things that have gotten overblown,

but many of the changes came about as a result of our access

to technology and to the incredible speed at which technology

was delivering new equipment and new instruments. So the

brand new lighting equipment of last season has already been

superseded and more marvelous things have occurred. One of

the great things about working with Richard Pilbrow is that he’s

always right on the edge of being completely alert to the next

electronic or technological discovery. Quite often his associates or

assistants or apprentices are flabbergasted to see that he’s already

way ahead, where they should be the ones on the cusp.

That is in many ways a thrilling thing, but it’s also something to

be very carefully watched because it makes it possible for us to get

closer to the kind of realism or quick cutting that you can achieve

in movies. That’s not necessarily innately theatrical. Theatre is

much more “two boards and a passion,” not necessarily fabulous

special effects. And the more that fabulous special effects became

admired and copied and the source for the reason for doing

shows, the less theatrical to my mind

many shows became. The closer we

get back to the interaction between the

actor and the audience, the better it is.

The more things you throw into the mix

that can interfere with that exchange of

energy, the less pure it is to me. I felt for

quite a long time that we were moving

into a sub-movie phase where we could

never be as good as the movies but be

a pale, faltering imitation. It gave writers

and directors the ability to achieve

effects that had not been visible in the

theatre before, so it was exciting.

But it hurt my heart. It cut into the

core of theatricality, which is making

the audience imagine what you’re dealing

with and what you’re telling them,

and bringing the audience’s imagination

into the mix as the crucial, driving

force of the entertainment or event. And

we’re losing that. We were getting into a

sort of “wow!” effect. And I’m not saying

that any of this stuff isn’t brilliant, but

an example would be the brilliance of

Cirque Du Soleil’s O production, where

so much happens underwater. All you

can be is astonished. You don’t have any

fun. You don’t have a visceral response

that gets you involved in any individual

people. It’s fun to be astonished too, but

it’s not the same thing. Astonishment

you can get from the movies or from

walking out into the street, whereas the

26 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


life changing interaction between people

and what goes on in their lives and how

that relates to ours is something that the

theatre has a special purchase on.

What do you think of something like

[title of show]?

I actually didn’t see it. But that’s another

slight problem in that it’s essentially

a show based on irony, and as so many

recent musicals have been, poking fun at

the idea of putting on a show. It’s a very

pleasant thing for critics because they see

so much stuff that anything that comes

with an ironic view to it is very welcomed,

but anything that is essentially sincere, or

God help us even sentimental, is fair game

for a cynical guy who sees much too much

theatre. They don’t want to have to be

made to feel anything. It’s a tough thing.

It’s a shame that the things that do seem

to reach out to get an audience’s involvement

are the things the critics find harder

to accept. That’s a shame. It’s totally understandable,

but it’s a shame.

What advice would you give to a young

scenic designer coming up?

When I was starting out I only got

negative advice. “Don’t do it! You’ll never

make any money.” And so on and so forth.

Richard Pilbrow said, “Do you remember

when we started out? Everybody said to

us, ‘Why would you do this? You’ll never

make a penny at it!’ And we’ve achieved

that beyond our wildest expectations.” I

used to say that, but now I say you have

to decide whether there’s anything else

that you feel you could profitably do,

and if there is do it. And if there isn’t, go

ahead and you’ll have the time of your life.

Because although you may not make a

living, you can occasionally make a killing.

It’s not a business to go into if you’re looking

to get a well-paid lifestyle. But it’s an

extraordinary business, because at its best

the work is about itself and not about all

the peripheral, moneymaking nonsense.

That’s the thing that I was trying to

explain that changed most for me. Over

the last 10 or 15 years, from the time

when we had the crazed producers as

opposed to the business folks today, back

in those years all the work used to be

about the work, and now it’s changed

to be about the financial success of the

work, as opposed to the achievement of

it. As we know from Sondheim, that’s not

necessarily what amounts to a great production.


Feature

|

By David Koteles

The Abuses

of Musical

Theatre

At Northwestern State in Louisiana,

an install that can stand up to the

demands of modern musical theatre

Near the quiet banks of the Cane River Lake, in

Natchitoches, La., a part of the world where stately,

old southern houses with inviting porches are shaded

by pecan trees, sits the campus of Northwestern State

University (NSU). Everyone knows football, marching bands,

and beauty pageants are all taken very seriously in Louisiana.

What many people don’t know, however, is that the performing

arts are also revered here, and NSU has an excellent

undergraduate theatre program. Now that program is

mounting professional-level shows using a brand new audio

system with cutting-edge technology, which is generously

funded by a munificent arts grant from the Louisiana Board

of Regents.

“Due to the nature of modern theatre,

all of the equipment we use

must have a great deal of flexibility.”

—Shawn Parr

NSU is a member of the National Association of Schools of

Theater (NAST), and offers a full curriculum in theatre. NSU

offers a Bachelor of Science in Theatre Arts, with typically 100

undergrads majoring in theatre each year. While all students

take their turn doing tech, 15 to 20 of them choose theatre

design and technology as their field of concentration. Now,

those tech students will have a state-of-the-art sound infrastructure

to learn their craft on.

Historic Building, New Gear

Named after the noted Louisiana statesman and former

university president, the Albert Asa Fredericks Auditorium at

NSU is a fine example of masterwork WPA architecture. A solid

box of red bricks, not unlike what you’d expect the third, and

wisest, little pig to build fending off the Big Bad Wolf. However,

the gentle lines of the depression-era architecture, and its

simple adornment of three ivory-white high-relief statues give

A scene from Kiss Me, Kate at Northwestern State

Left to right: Undergraduate student Nicholas Frederick and Shawn Parr, sound design faculty member.

the building an appealing expression. The statues, representing

the three muses, stand above a trio of extended doors

and give the entrance an enhanced sense of importance and

scholarship. With 1,400 seats and a balcony, this elegant yet

practical 1938 auditorium is the main stage for the School of

Creative and Performing Arts at NSU, and the chief venue for

its theatre, dance, and music departments.

While the 71-year-old theatre was blessed with pretty good

acoustics, a decent sound system was nevertheless needed.

When it came time to replace the old equipment, the new system,

according to sound director and adjunct professor Shawn

Parr, “had to be up to snuff for the abuses of musical theatre.”

Every school year, the theater hosts three musical productions,

numerous theatrical productions, dance concerts, a hugely

popular Christmas spectacular, various student events, and

they even tried their hand at dinner theatre recently.

28 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


For musicals—like Company, pictured here—Northwestern

State uses Sennheiser mics run through an

Aviom digital snake to FOH.

“Due to the nature of

modern theatre, all of the

equipment we use must

have a great deal of flexibility,”

says Parr. “For example,

our last summer season

musical was produced

as a dinner theatre show,

with the audience placed on

stage at tables in a circular

pattern and the actors in the

center. Our front-of-house

mixing position was in the

orchestra pit, and with this

system we were able to get

audio flowing back and forth

between the two as well as

to our booth location.”

So versatility and durability

were key factors in

choosing a different system.

After considering his options, Parr chose an EAW KF730

line array for the main speaker cluster with some DSP controls

that allowed for push-button presets for small, easy events

that wouldn’t require a staff to be on-hand. Parr went with

EAW because it provided a very even, wide dispersion pattern

that he found “ideal” for theatre. Signal processing is handled

by a Rane RPM 26z while Crown amps provide power. For

mics they chose a 20-channel Sennheiser Evolution G2 series,

which Parr thinks provides “the best thing for the buck right

now.”

The system is controlled with a Soundcraft MH2 analog

board. “Honestly, it was a bit cheaper, which kind of helped

out in the end,” says Parr. “But the primary reason was it

would be a good stepping stone for students” learning to mix

for the first time.

Ironically, that old-school analog console sits in the middle

of a digital signal chain heavy with Aviom components. The

mics are all routed at the stage into Aviom mic input boxes

and that digital signal—in the form of A-Net, Aviom’s highspeed

digital audio transmission protocol—runs over Cat6

cable to an Aviom 6416o output mdule

where it is converted back to analog

and routed to the console. The addition

of an Aviom MH10 Merger hub (similar

to an Ethernet switch, the MH10 allows

parallel connections while distributing

signals bidirectionally) and additional

input and output modules allows for

the tranmsmission of clean digital audio

virtually anywhere in the theatre including

the stage, orchestra pit and regular

front-of-house mix position. To accommodate

different staging requirements,

additional racks of input and output modules enables Parr

and his students to easily create a digital snake wherever

necessary.

While he could have taken the more traditional route of

using a copper wire snake, Parr instead chose a digital snake.

“The Aviom Pro64 digital snake was a solution with many

benefits,” says Parr. “It is readily available, relatively inexpensive,

and so small that running it through public spaces and

scenery is much easier and safer than with a traditional snake.

We never have to worry about an audience member tripping

over cable.”

Because a university is primarily a learning environment,

Parr required a system that was simple to set up and easy

to configure and operate so that students could get a solid

introduction to working with a digital snake.

“Since audio distribution and digital snake systems are

starting to be used in many theatre venues now, it is a hot

topic in the industry,” says Parr. “By training our students on

a digital snake now our students will be very valuable to the

industry when they graduate.”

Northwestern State’s production of Something’s Afoot

Sharing and Showing

Along with its main production space, the University has

two additional theatrical spaces, a smaller thrust space that

they use for straight plays or smaller musicals, but right now

Parr is still ecstatic about where he’s at in the mainstage.

“No more snakes out the booth window and up the stairs!”

explained Parr. “No more cables on the floor! It’s pretty

great.”

Associate Professor Scott Burrell, the artistic director and

coordinator of theatre at NSU’s School of the Creative and

Performing Arts, is also happy with the new system. Burrell

seemed pleased with the quality of the equipment, saying

the boost it will give their productions, as well as the knowledge

and sound design understanding it will offer his theatre

design and technology students, would make a huge impact

on the program. He was also extremely pleased to share it

with the residents of Natchitoches at their recent holiday

event. “For us to be a premiere venue in our area, it’s great to

have. It’s invaluable, really, to be able to share it—and show

it off—to our community.”

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 29


Feature

|

By Marshall Bissett

Honor Among Rogues

At Rogue Artists Ensemble everyone brings ideas—and

better be prepared to let them go

The Rogue Artists

Ensemble, as their

name suggests, do

not play by the rules. Many

theatre companies will find

a script, rehearse for six

weeks, bring in technical

crew at the last minute

and open whether they

are ready or not. Take that

process, extend it by about

three years, get the input

of 15 designers and you

will get a feel for how the

Rogues create what they

call “Hyper Theatre.”

A production concept

and many of the group’s

trademark visual effects

precede the script by as

much as a year. In a tradition

that owes a lot to

Brecht, Peter Brook and

Kabuki theatre, the story

is carried forward using as

many stage techniques as

the design team considers

appropriate. While masks

and puppets have been

around as long as theatre

itself, in the Rogue’s “Hyper

Theatre” they’re combined

with an injection of modern

technology to create enormous

production value.

Their current production—Gogol

Project—is

based on three of acclaimed

19th-century Russian writer

Nikolai Gogol’s short

stories, adapted by playwright

and NPR radio host

Kitty Felde. The script is

an amalgam of Diary of a

Madman, The Overcoat and

The Nose.

Process

If you are wondering

how 15 designers can

agree on anything, Artistic

Director Sean Cawelti says

he has never had too much

Puppet designers Elizabeth Luce and Brian White with “The Very Old Clerk” puppet

“We make it clear from the outset

that everything can and will

change and that we welcome

input in every area—nothing is

sacrosanct.” —Sean Cawelti

Rogue Artistic Director Sean Cawelti (left) and actors with rehearsal puppets

All Photography by Marshall Bissett

of a problem with it.

“Each member creates

a small sacred list of ideas

and the group allows these

to bubble up to the surface,”

explains Cawelti. “It

works very well—I very

rarely have to adjudicate.”

Collaboration is at the

heart of Rogue Theatre

thinking.

“We did not start the

company just to put actors

on stage,” says Cawelti.

“We are designers, storytellers

and artists that

want to create work that

will engage an audience.

The core group met at UC

Irvine between 2000-2003

and pushed the limits of

what typical student production

could do. We have

production meetings at

least once a month and

constant cyber meetings

for about two years before

we open a show. We bump

into each other and ideas

happen.”

For this production the

group brought their “show

bible” of artwork and visual

research to the author Kitty

Felde who blended three

Gogol short stories into

one. In the Rogue world,

this script became one of

many changeable elements

that serve the theatrical

experience. Knowing how

this approach could induce

hysteria in playwrights,

Cawelti says, “We make it

clear from the outset that

everything can and will

change and that we welcome

input in every area—

nothing is sacrosanct.”

Cawelti and Assistant

Director Tyler Stamets

refer to the company as an

ensemble and the antith-

30 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


esis of an actors showcase. They virtually

erase the lines that separate

backstage and onstage. Members can

be actors, lighting and sound techs,

projection experts, set designers or

puppet makers.

“I started as an actor and now they

are letting me work with puppets—

it’s not as easy as it looks,” company

member Nina Silver adds. And independent

spirits are not only welcome

but required.

“While people come and go, we try

to keep one person from each craft

within the ensemble at all times,”

says Stamets. With all the emphasis

on multiple functions it’s not surprising

that most of the group hold day

jobs within the production industry.

If this sounds too Utopian to work,

the results speak for themselves. Last

season the Company scored critical

(three LA Drama Critics Circle Awards)

and box office success with The

Tragical Comedy or Comical Tragedy

of Mr. Punch establishing themselves

as a model for how theatre can work

outside a script-driven hierarchical

structure.

Location

As a nomadic group, they are

thrilled to be back at the Bootleg

Theatre located in historic

Filipinotown near downtown Los

Angeles. For a 99-seat Equity theatre

the space has an impressive

rig of ETC Source 4 fixtures, an ETC

Insight console and Meyer full-range

cabinets with a Yamaha digital console.

The original brick warehouse

walls are especially appealing to the

design team who will extend this

element with “flats that play tricks”

into a full street scene. The extreme

stage depth gives the set a forced

perspective. Cawelti says, “We have

a long history of going into small L.A.

theatres and retrofitting them for our

shows—many of them remain that

way after we leave.”

Rehearsals are interconnecting

cells. While Cawelti works with the

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 31


Feature

“We will soon be at

the point where we

start integrating with

each other and fighting

for space on the grid.”

—John Nobori

Brian White with a medium-sized puppet

actors using brown paper bag rehearsal puppets, Stamets

and set designer Katie Polebaum huddle over a scale

model of the set. Mock-up puppets ranging in size from

tiny dogs to larger than life characters are in a constant

state of modification. The tools of choice are the Apple

MacBooks and rolls of gaffers tape.

In the control room of the Bootleg Theatre the talk is

of show control and MIDI interfaces. QLab Show Control

software is at the heart of this complex show. Sound

Designer John Nobori and Lighting Designer Haylee

Freeman create complex cue stacks for projection, lighting

and audio on a newly acquired Mac.

A month before opening night Nobori is

experimenting with “point sourcing” placing

of microphones within and near the

larger puppets. For a church scene he is

trying floor mics fed through the reverb on

the Yamaha DM1000 console to create the

feeling of a cathedral. For other effects he

will use Pro Tools. He jokes, “We will soon

be at the point where we start integrating

with each other and fighting for space on

the grid.” Freeman still favors traditional

consoles like the ETC Insight over software based laptop

devices. However, the cues she creates will be triggered

by QLab’s MIDI generator.

Brian White has created video effects for previous

Rogue shows and, drawing from his background as

an illustrator, is also credited with puppet design. He

explains, ”The video content is created in Adobe After

Effects with a little bit of Flash, and for this show we use

some stop motion animation. We are overlaying video

over video for the first time. We have created an animated

clock face and a number of environmental effects.”

White worked with veteran puppet

builder Elizabeth Luce to create

puppets that are durable, lightweight

and visually stunning. From

analog sketches the puppet team,

which included Wes Crain and Lena

Garcia, crafted the arcane Gogol

characters from foam, thin wood

and paper mache.

“It was very, very labor intensive

and time-consuming, but I am very

happy with the results” says White.

“The tricky part is making them

actor friendly” adds Crain. “There is

a lot of onsite adjustment.”

Musical Director Ego Plum (born

Ernesto Guerrero) created musical

themes and songs for the piece.

His non-conformist approach and

broad musical influences from jazz,

through New Wave to the Beatles

has made him the perfect rogue collaborator—which

is good, because

Cawelti is always thinking about the

future.

32 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


The Baker puppet with actor Audrey Moore. The animated clock

with its multiple video overlays is in the background.

“Sometime our production

requirements are stringent but not

always,” says Cawelti. “We are also

developing small shows ‘Rogue

Nanos’ and the idea is that we

could set them up anywhere. Right

now we are in development for

three larger projects. It is also quite

possible that we could tour our

productions—the projects could

definitely have a life outside of Los

Angeles. I would love to take our

work to universities.”

If this dream comes true, be sure

to check out the Rogue Ensemble

at a theatre, warehouse or simply a

space near you.


Special Section: Education

Go

State

Karis Lo

Two publicly funded schools with

great programs for everyone

By Lisa Mulcahy

Private college theatre programs can be

terrific for many reasons. But that’s no

reason to dismiss state schools—they

offer the same important resources (prestige,

excellent faculty, and valuable work experience

for students) often at a fraction of the cost. Some of

the best and most unique training can be had at both wellknown

state universities, plus those you may never have

heard of. Here are two to prove just that point.

A Discipline of Diversity

The University of Hawaii at Manoa in Honolulu is lauded

for many attributes—affordable tuition in a picturesque

campus setting among them. For theatre students, however,

U. Hawaii’s greatest attraction may just be its highly

respected berth as the premier university in the U.S. for

“The emphasis shifts from Japan

to China to southeast Asia, incorporating

different training methods

from these diverse geographical

areas.” — W. Dennis Carroll

Asian theatre study. U. Hawaii’s training program concentrates

on a highly nuanced study of Kabuki, South-East

Asian genre and Chinese operatic performance styles, with

a strong additional emphasis on the history and culture of

these complex disciplines.

“The Asian theatre training we offer is systematic in

the bringing of master teachers to our students,” says W.

Dennis Carroll, chair of the department of theatre and

dance. “It’s a rotating program, meaning that the emphasis

shifts from Japan to China to southeast Asia, incorporating

different training methods from these diverse geographical

areas.”

Degrees offered include a BA in theatre and MFAs in

directing, design, playwrighting, Asian performance and

University of Hawaii also teaches Western-style theatre, like this production of Macbeth, from 2008.

youth theatre, in addition to Ph.D.s in Western Theatre and

Asian Theatre.

“Our training has a broad humanistic element,” Carroll

explains. “As a whole, it reflects the pictures and paradigms

of the human experience. The key to our program, in terms of

curriculum, is a full semester sequence, incorporating world

theatre courses and dramatic theory. Ideally, we like students

to take these courses in order. It’s pretty unusual, in that we’re

not always or solely dealing with Western theatre—although

our students read key plays in all genres—but mostly, the

focus in on Asian theatre elements.” U. Hawaii’s esteemed

theatre faculty has boasted a long-time affiliation with Asian

theatre professor and noted interpreter Elizabeth Wichmann-

Walczak, in addition to respected teachers including Julie

Iezzi, Patricia N.H. Leong and Kirstin A, Pauka.

U. Hawaii’s stage facilities are well-known for their

aesthetic beauty, as well as their versatility in terms of

usage. The Kennedy Theatre, the school’s 600-seat mainstage

space, was designed by famed architect I.M. Pei

and opened in 1963, named in honor of President John

F. Kennedy. The Kennedy’s dimensions were intended

to accommodate both traditional western blocking

and set design configurations as well as Asian theatre

staging methodology. Additionally, the 150-seat Earle

Ernst Lab space offers students the perfect setting for

working on smaller scale department and independent

productions.

The program’s graduates have made strong impressions

in working theatre.

“Our students have become playmakers and performers

in major cities all over the world, and many teach at

noted universities,” Carroll reports. “Many of our students

produce wonderful shows, both at the university

and beyond—a stunning production of Sarah Kane’s

4.48 PSYCHOSIS, which was presented at a Honolulu

venue recently, comes to mind as a highlight of what

our students have accomplished.”

34 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Peter Smith Photography

Peter Smith Photography

Left to Right: Paul Koch as Terry, Seon Britton as Roscoe and Josh Berkowitz as Cheese in the

UM Department of Theatre & Drama's production of Seth Moore's Jonesin'.

Top to bottom - Correy Dorris as Aafaa and Joseph Moses as

Cripple in the UM Department of Theatre & Drama's production

of Wole Soyinka's Madmen and Specialists

Art Meets Academics

The University of Michigan’s reputation as one of the

county’s most prestigious and scholarly colleges is wellcemented—and

its theatre department is particularly

steeped in excellence. With two campuses in Ann Arbor

and Flint, Michigan’s theatre concentration utilizes class

study in performance, production design, playwrighting,

directing and more, blending this curriculum with traditional

compulsory and elected liberal arts courses. “The

mission and philosophy of our department is to nurture

our students in an environment of open artistic expression

and academic excellence in expectation of professional

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 35


Special Section: Education

Andrew Shimabuku; February 2005

“We strengthen their

individual creative

growth while

celebrating

imaginative

collaboration.”

—Gregory Poggi

A production of Luck and Loss done in the Indonesian Randai style at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

development,” says department chair Gregory Poggi.

The program’s successful grads are numerous; alumni

include James Earl Jones, Christine Lahti, and the late

Gilda Radner. In additional to distinguished faculty members

such as Lauren Friesen, Caroline

Gillespie and William Irwin, students

have been taught by a truly extraordinary

group of theatre professionals,

including director Mark Lamos

and actor Jeff Daniels—Daniels has

even offered work opportunities in

the past to undergrads, grads and

faculty at his professional company,

the Purple Rose.

“We strengthen their individual creative growth while

celebrating imaginative collaboration,” Poggi stresses.

Those pursuing BFAs in acting, directing and design,

Interarts (Performance Art) with the School of Art &

Design, plus bachelor’s degrees have the luxury of

working in the elaborate Walgreen Drama Center, featuring

the 200-seat Arthur Miller Theatre and numerous

rehearsal and design studios, plus a well-stocked

theatre and drama library (Ann Arbor); and spacious

and flexible mainstage and black box spaces with stateof-the-art

computerized tech (Flint). “The department

offers a distinctive and rigorous educational experience,”

Poggi states.

Michigan theatre undergrads, grads and alumni

are all actively encouraged to train away from school

at performance camps, work during their downtime

at local regional theatres, and develop work on their

own. Needless to say, this spawns many incredible

artistic accomplishments. “A recent and significant

highlight was a mainstage production of Seth Moore’s

Jonesin’, winner of a 2008 Hopwod Award for undergraduate

drama, which premiered in our Arthur Miller

Theatre—Miller himself won a Hopwood when he

was an undergraduate at Michigan in the 1930s,” says

Poggi. “With Jonesin’ it was very gratifying to see an

emerging young playwright have his work produced

in the theatre named after one of our grads and one of

America’s greatest playwrights. As one member of the

Kennedy Center/American College Theatre Festival put

it, ‘The full force of this production, with its direction,

lighting, sound and performances, really made for an

exciting evening!’”

Equally exciting? The future potential of many more

students Michigan has, and will, inspire.

36 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


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Special Section: Education

A moment from The Trial at

DePaul University. Their audition

process features more

than just a monologue.

Navigating Top Theatre

Programs Auditions

The “keepers of the gate” speak out on do’s and don’ts

By Kevin M. Mitchell

It’s for the smallest of audiences, involves no set or props, and

takes less time than microwaving popcorn. Yet it’s an audition

that can launch your journey as an actor to professional heights

so many dream of but never reach.

Jason Beck is familiar with the process for DePaul University’s

theatre school. While today he is director of admissions for the

Chicago-based program, he’s also a graduate of the program, and

laughs when asked to recount his own audition in 1993. Having

grown up in Oklahoma City, he had little experience outside

“No accents—I want to hear

what their voice is like.”

—Charlie Richter

his high school. “I didn’t feel like I was prepared.” The audition

process then and now is a three-part process: The first part is the

monologues, next there is some class work and then some light

scene work. Beck felt comfortable with the monologue, as he had

some coaching from his drama teacher. “But I didn’t even know

what a conservatory was at the time so with the other parts I felt

out of my element.”

DePaul offers 15 degree programs and three graduate programs.

“It’s a four-year total immersion program.” Around 330

students participate in 40 productions a year.

St. Louis-based Webster University has a four-year professional

training program for actors that is unique because it’s the only one

in the country that is partnered with both a major opera company

(St. Louis Opera) and major repertory (St. Louis Repertory). Peter

Sargent, dean, says the program has about 140 students, split

between performance (acting/musical theatre), and production.

There’s six full-length productions, plus an opera and three dance

concerts. Sargent has had a long and prosperous career with both

the school and here’s one way to measure it: “I’ve sat through over

60,000 two-and-a-half minute audition monologues,” he says.

The Monologue

At Webster, applicants perform two monologues up to two

minutes long. The preference is something written after 1945,

and is dialect-free. “They can do something from Shakespeare,

but we don’t require it because high school kids aren't usually

prepared to take on that work,” Sargent says. “I think the issue

is making a character choice that the person is comfortable

with, and be able to tell a story with it.” But he cautions about

being too contemporary: As so many great contemporary

writers use … ahem, “contemporary” language, he’s seen a

desire to impress by some choosing these “colorful” snippets.

“I’ve had others on the committee turn to me and say, ‘if I hear

another ‘[expletive deleted],’ I’ll go nuts!’” he laughs. “Don’t

get me wrong, some of the work of David Mamet and Sam

Shepard can be quite lyrical, but you don’t want to push it for

an audition.”

At Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Penn., auditions/

interviews in theatre and dance are held on campus from

September through February. Charlie Richter is director of

theatre, a founding faculty member of the department, and is

resident stage director. “We’re a B.A. program but more sophisticated,”

he says, noting that they they’ve been named fourth

best school in the nation in the Princeton Review. Muhlenberg

does six major productions a year, and 16 to 20 studentdirected

projects.

The liberal arts college requires a good academic record

38 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


A production of Caw at Muhlenberg College

to get in, at least a B plus. There’s no audition into the theatre

program, though they hold auditions for scholarships and for

those who don’t quite meet the academic requirements. “I can

be like the football coach,” he smiles.

Muhlenberg also requires two age-appropriate monologues,

up to a total of five minutes. “No accents—I want to

hear what their voice is like.” He advises choosing monologues

that allows them to make “active choices—pieces that show

they can act. Too often monologues are remembrances of the

past, and overly narrative rather than active.” Part of the audition

is what they choose themselves, which is why Muhlenberg

does not give recommendations. “I want to see what you

choose. It’s going to tell me what your level of sophistication

is.” Bad choices include getting “silly things off the Internet”

(yes, he’s seen it) or Christopher Durang pieces which are “too

hard and I’ve seen too many of them.”

They can choose a Shakespearean piece. “I would avoid

comic pieces from As You Like It. It’s never funny and almost

always painful to watch. Midsummer Night's Dream excerpts

are overdone. I would advise considering Isabella and Angelo

monologues from Measure for Measure. They are good and not

done to death.”

At DePaul, it’s just one contemporary monologue. Beck

advices the applicant to be familiar with the entire play the

monologue is from. “We may choose to work with them a bit

on the piece,” he says. His view is there is a limit to the wellwritten

pieces for this age. “I tell applicants we haven’t seen

them do that piece. And good material is good material for a

reason.”

After the monologue, there’s a class session for about an

hour that involves warm ups, movement and vocal exercises,

and other basics taken right out of their first year at DePaul.

The entire process is also meant for the applicant to audition

DePaul, too. “We want them to see if we’re a good fit for

them.”

At Webster, those interested in pursuing musical theatre also

sing 16 bars of two songs. “The big tendency is to choose songs

from the current hit on Broadway,” says Sargent. “Sometimes

they forget there was some pretty good music written in older

shows.” Also, today’s Broadway hits tend to be rock songs. While

it’s still great music, it doesn’t always show off what the voice

can do as well as older material in 16 bars. “Everyone likes to do

things from Rent, but it’s all belting. It punishes the vocal cords.”

He adds that hearing a Lerner and Loewe or Rodgers/Hart

song is not as common as one might think, and is an excellent

choice—as well as a welcome break for the judges.

A still from Cabaret at Webster University in St. Louis, which is partnered with a

professional opera and repertory theatre.

Coaching – and the “Small Stuff”

Sargent notes a burgeoning cottage industry of audition

coaches making a living preparing kids to get into

programs.

“Some do excellent work, some don’t,” says Sargent.

Some acting coaches think they know the formula of getting

into a particular school, but it’s not like coaching someone

to get a high score on the SAT. “We’re interested in what

the person brings to the audition, rather than the slickness

of the audition.”

Richter notes that sometimes he’s seen kids who have all

this additional training at special workshops, come from Arts

Magnet schools, and work with a professional coach, which

is “fine when they are good. But I want to say to some of

these kids, with all that training, and you’re still bad? Maybe

someone should have told you you’re lacking talent!”

All advise to pay attention to the details.

Beck at DePaul specifies to wear clothes you can comfortably

move in. Even if for the monologue it’s better for the

applicant to wear a shirt and tie, they encourage them to

bring a change of clothes and get comfortable for the rest of

the process. Richter recommends dressing simply and comfortably.

Women shouldn’t dress overly suggestively, and

no one should dress in a manner that contrasts too radically

with the material they are performing.

“Some advise wearing something a little funky so you are

easily remembered,” Beck says.

Sargent feels applicants should dress appropriately, in

near business-attire. “I say an audition is an important date.

Don’t go in with jeans. Look presentable. Some guys like to

wear ties and dress pants. Women should think skirts and

heels.”

Other “small” things that make a difference: State the

name of the piece clearly. “Sometimes applicants are nervous

and mutter it, and we spend most of the monologue

trying to figure out what it’s from!” says Sargent.

Headshots are necessary, though they need not be professional

ones. And remember the importance of the resume –

experience and shows need to be done in reverse chronological

order, starting with the most recent show or training.

Beck encourages asking questions. If you’re the least

bit confused in preparing or executing your audition, the

staff at any good theatre program is going to want to help.

Finally remember that those auditioning you are rooting for

you: “When we see someone do really good work, it’s exciting

to us,” he says.

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 39


TD Talk

|

By Dave McGinnis

Off the Beaten Tenure Track

Why yes, I have plenty of time to build

absolutely everything and still meet

everyone else’s requirements for tenure.

In most university academic disciplines, the tenure process

presents little in the way of confusion where preparation is

concerned. Develop as a professional. Teach well. Serve the

university community. For almost every tenure-track assistant

professor on a campus, these requirements mean the same

things, but do they for our humble hero, the TD?

Many institutions still live in what I refer to as the Age of the

Doctorate. This not only refers to their complete ignorance of

what MFA means, but also to their lack of knowledge regarding

what they hired the TD to do in the first place.

Have no fear, comrades. I’m with Stage Directions, and I’m

here to help. This month’s column is not only for the TDs of the

academic world, but also for the administrators who hold their

tenures—and futures—in the balance while having no idea how

to gauge a TD’s work.

Teaching as a TD

First, where teaching is concerned, TDs may instruct one or

two courses here and there that meet in a classroom, utilize

standard academic techniques/technologies and function in the

“classic” academic sense. But not usually. A theatre tech course

involves learning on your feet by doing the work.

When one unfamiliar with tech theatre enters the TD’s class

at its best, it will resemble bedlam or—to the eye of one adept

in administration—hell. People will run in all directions; they

may work in pairs or teams, but there’s every chance that no

two teams will be doing the same thing. If this is the case, the

students are learning and the TD’s doing it right. Let it be. It’s the

TD who runs a classically structured class whom I don’t trust.

Service as a TD

Tenure-track contracts normally require that all faculty—

including the TD—perform some form of service to the university.

Under normal circumstances (i.e. accounting or English faculty),

this involves service on committees, in the Faculty Senate

or on some form of university-sponsored service project, like

feeding the starving peoples of insert-third-world-country-here.

Can the TD take part in these? Of course…provided the

committee will all turn their schedules upside down to accommodate

him/her. Otherwise, things could get difficult. One may

ask why. For the answer, read on.

Professional Development as a TD

The TD spends the bulk of his/her mornings teaching courses

so that afternoons—most often from one to five—remain free

to oversee the shop.

During these afternoons, the TD oversees all construction

for all projects, all electrical work, all audio work, safety issues,

cleanliness, personnel (both student and professional) and literally

anything else that moves or happens within the theatre, the

shop or the loading dock. Does the TD receive a course release

to do this work? Sure…a one-class release probably, and I submit

here in writing that that one-class release does not equal

the work necessary to mount a single production, much less

the usual two to four. Either way, this work merits professional

development credit in and of itself. Some institutions do count

it, and my applause goes out to them.

Professional development, however, normally involves presenting

at conferences, publishing articles and monographs

and/or (hopefully) working on external performance projects. If

this is the case, the TD can simply find summer work or—better

yet—work with the summer theatre at

their university to fulfill this requirement.

If, however, a given institution accepts

only “academic” development (meaning

all forms BUT performance work), the TD

faces two options: start writing articles

or start writing a resume, because if one

fails to receive tenure, then one packs

one’s bags.

Sadly, very few administrators

understand what goes into the job, not

through malice, but because they got

Ph.D.s in accounting or what-have-you,

resulting in TDs who don’t make tenure

and lose their jobs. For the sake of my

comrades the world over, then, I have

decided to provide administrators with

all the necessary questions regarding

whether or not their TD deserves tenure:

Does the TD’s department think s/he

does a good job? Yes? Tenure.

Does the TD’s dean think that s/he

does a good job? Yes? Promotion.

Done.

40 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


By Stephen Peithman

Off the Shelf

Best Foot Forward

How-to books on technical theatre and fundraising

There’s always room for improvement, and this month’s new

books focus on ways to maximize effectiveness in technical

theatre, fundraising and donor relations.

Sound and Music for the Theatre, by Deena Kaye and James

LeBrecht, traces the process of sound design from initial concept

through closing night. Now in its third edition, the book discusses

how to develop a sound design that supports the play, including

how to organize sound design elements, how the designer functions

in a rehearsal, and how to set up and train an operator to run

sound equipment for the actual production. Especially helpful is

the section on researching sources for music and effects. This latest

edition also offers new information on sound reinforcement,

computer-assisted playback systems, and using technology to

build and execute shows. [$34.95, Focal Press]

Richard Cadena’s Electricity for the Entertainment Electrician

& Technician discusses basic electrical concepts, safety rules,

fault conditions, protective devices, cables and connectors, test

equipment, loads, power sources, current legislation and safety

guidelines. As an ETCP (Entertainment Technician Certification

Program) trainer and seasoned professional, Cadena does an

excellent job, providing free additional information (including

animations) via the book’s own Web site. [$44.95, Focal Press]

The Back Stage Guide to Stage Management, by Thomas

A. Kelly, is now in its third edition. Subtitled “Traditional and

New Methods for Running a Show from First Rehearsal to Last

Performance,” the book covers the organizing all rehearsals and

performances; maintaining the working script, cue sheets and

daily records; supervising the technical aspects of the show; running

shows outdoors and at other non-theatrical venues; and

dealing with performers and crew members on all levels. This new

edition updates the text to include new developments and innovations

in the industry, and adds a new chapter on opera stage

management, complete with an in-depth look at the challenges

this type of production presents. Throughout, Kelly provides

sample documents, diagrams, and charts—plus 19 appendices,

including complete a job description, sample production schedule,

production meeting notes, rehearsal schedules and scene

breakdowns, sample cue sheet, cue lights, performance report

and schedule, site survey for outdoor event, costume breakdown

and cue sheet, among others. [$19.95, Back Stage Books]

As its title suggests, Stagecraft Fundamentals: A Guide and

Reference for Theatrical Productions covers virtually every aspect

of theatre production. The history of stagecraft, safety precautions,

lighting, costumes, scenery, career planning tips and more

are included with photos and illustrations (most in color) that

display both step-by-step procedures and the finished product.

Other topics include, paint, safety, tools and supplies, texturing,

rigging and equipment, lighting, costumes, makeup, sound, special

effects, and stage management. Designed both as a textbook

and reference manual, Rita Kogler Carver’s outstanding one-stop

guide also includes links to additional resources on its own website.

[$54.95, Focal Press]

Fundraising and donor relations are part of the everyday world

of most theatre companies, and one of the most popular of activities

is the auction. For those planning to hold an auction—or for

those who’d like to improve the one they already have—there is

The Big Book of Benefit Auctions, by Jay R. Fiske. In this step-bystep

handbook on planning and running a successful auction,

the author discusses how to define the purpose of the event,

organize the steering committee, procure auction items, setting

financial and attendance goals, publicize the auction, prepare the

catalog, and run the actual event—including set-up, food and

cashiering (check out) services. In addition to the basic how-to

information, Fiske explains those decisions and activities that are

essential for a well-run and efficient event, as well as strategies

for maximizing revenue, plus common pitfalls and how to avoid

them. The book is inclusive, encyclopedic and well written, with

many examples of forms and procedures to help maximize a successful

outcome. [$49.95, Wiley]

Donors are customers, partners in philanthropy and members

of the organizational family. That’s why they deserve the best care

that a theatre company can give them—not just to keep them

coming back and giving more, but because of their generous spirits

and commitment to our cause. In Effective Donor Relations,

Janet L. Hedrick provides a concise and readable guide to creating

and implementing each aspect of an effective donor relation

plan, with recommended solutions to frequently encountered

dilemmas, plus sample documents, checklists and other tools to

help shape a program that keeps donors happy and receptive.

[$50, Wiley]

Central to A Philanthropic Covenant with Black America

are eight essays from several prominent African-American

grant makers, scholars, activists and clergy that examine

critical elements of modern philanthropy and how they affect

black communities. Edited by Rodney M. Jackson, the book

is intended to inform individuals, grantors, organizations and

fundraisers about the role, responsibilities and potential of

African-Americans and African-American philanthropy, in particular,

to affect positive change in their own communities.

[$24.95, Wiley]

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 41


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

Alabama

Alabama State University

Theatre Arts Dept.

915 S. Jackson St.

Montgomery, AL 36101

P: 334-229-6929

F: 334-229-6933

W: www.alasu.edu

Auburn University,

Auburn

Dept. Of Theatre

211 Telfair B. Peet

Theatre

Auburn, AL 36849-5422

P: 334-844-4748

F: 334-844-4743

W: media.cla.auburn.

edu/theatre/index.cfm

Auburn University,

Montgomery

Communication And

Dramatic Arts

P O Box 244023

Montgomery, AL

36124-4023

P: 334-244-3379

F: 334-244-3740

W: www.aum.edu/

Academics/Schools/

Liberal_Arts/Departments_and_Programs/

Huntingdon College

- Theatre Studies

Program

1500 E. Fairview Ave.

Cloverdale/box 367

Montgomery, AL 36106

P: 334-833-4497

W: www.huntingdon.

edu

University Of Alabama

Theatre/Dance Dept.

Box 870239

115 Rowand-johnson

Hall

Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-

0239

P: 205-348-5283

W: www.as.ua.edu/

theatre

University Of Montevallo

Div Of Theatre

6210 University Of

Montevallo

Montevallo, AL 35115

P: 205-665-6200

W: www.montevallo.

edu/thea

University Of North

Alabama

Department Of Music

And Theatre

Una Box 5168

1 Harrison Plaza

Florence, AL 35632

P: 256-765-4597

F: 256-765-4995

W: www.una.edu/

theatre

University Of South

Alabama

Dept. Of Dramatic Arts

Pac Rm.1052

Mobile, AL 36688

P: 251-460-6305

W: www.southalabama.

edu/drama

Alaska

Accademia Dell ‘arte

P.O.Box 251505

Little Rock, AK 72225-

1505

P: +39 501-227-5063

W: www.dell-arte.org

Arkansas Repertory

Theatre

601 Main St.

P.O.Box 110

Little Rock, AK 72201

P: 501-378-0445

W: www.therep.org

University Of Alaska,

Anchorage

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

3211 Providence Dr.

Anchorage, AK 99508

P: 907-786-1792

F: 907-786-1799

W: theatre.uaa.alaska.

edu

University Of Alaska,

Fairbanks

Theatre UAF

302 Great Hall

Fairbanks, AK 99775

P: 907-474-6590

W: www.uaf.edu/

theatre

Arizona

Arizona State University

Herberger School Of

Theatre And Film

232 Dixie Gammage

Hall

P.O.Box 872102

Tempe, AZ 85287-2102

P: 480-965-5337

F: 480-965-5351

W: theatrefilm.asu.edu

Northern Arizona

University

Dept. Of Theatre

Box 6040

Bldg. 37/rm. 120

Flagstaff, AZ 86011

P: 928-523-3781

W: www.cal.nau.edu/

theatre

University Of Arizona

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

P.O.Box 210003 1025

N. Olive

Drama Bldg., Rm.239

Tucson, AZ 85721-0003

P: 520-621-7008

F: 520-621-2412

W: web.cfa.arizona.

edu/theatre

Arkansas

Lyon College

Theatre Dept.

P.O.Box 2317

2300 Highland Rd.

Batesville, AR 72503

P: 870-307-7332

W: www.lyon.edu

Southern Arkansas

University, Magnolia

Dept. Of Theatre &

Mass Communication

100 E. University

Magnolia, AR 71754-

9203

P: 870-235-4000

W: www.saumag.edu/

academics/liberal_

and_performing_arts

University Of Arkansas

J. William Fulbright College

Of Arts & Sciences

619 Kimpel Hall

Fayetteville, AR 72701

P: 479-575-2953

F: 479-575-7602

W: www.uark.

edu/~drama

University Of Arkansas

At Little Rock

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

2801 S. University Ave.

Cpa 130

Little Rock, AR 72204

P: 501-569-3291

F: 501-569-8355

W: ualr.edu/theatre

University Of Central

Arkansas

Mass Communication

And Theatre

Dept.

201 Donaghey Ave.

Harrin Hall 224

Conway, AR 72035

P: 501-450-3162

F: 501-450-5555

W: www.uca.edu/

cfac/mct/theatre

California

Allan Hancock

College

800 S. College Dr.

Bldg. F

Santa Maria, CA

93454

P: 805-922-6966

W: www.hancockcol

lege.edu

American Academy

Of Dramatic Arts,

CA

1336 N. La Brea Ave.

Los Angeles, CA

90028

P: 323-464-2777

F: 323-464-1250

W: www.aada.org

American Conservatory

Theater

(ACT)

415 Geary St.

San Francisco, CA

94102

P: 415-439-2228

W: www.actactortraining.org

American Musical &

Dramatic Academy,

CA

6305 Yucca St.

Los Angeles, CA 90028

P: 866-374-5300

F: 323-469-3350

W: www.amda.edu

Cal Poly Pomona

Theatre Dept.

3801 W. Temple Ave.

Bldg 25

Pomona, CA 91768

P: 909-869-3900

F: 909-869-3184

W: www.class.

csupomona.edu/th/

theatre.html

Cal State University,

San Bernardino

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

5500 University Pkwy.

San Bernardino, CA

92407-2318

P: 909-537-5876

F: 909-537-7016

W: theatre.csusb.edu

Calarts California

Institute Of The Arts

24700 Mcbean Pkwy.

Valencia, CA 91355-

2397

P: 661-253-7808

F: 661-255-0462

W: www.calarts.edu/

theater

California State Polytechnic

University,

Pomona

Theatre Dept., Csu

Pomona

3801 W. Temple Ave.

Bldg. 25

Pomona, CA 91768

P: 909-869-3900

F: 909-869-3184

W: www.class.

csupomona.edu/th

California State University,

Bakersfield

Music Bldg. 102

9001 Stockdale Hwy.

Bakersfield, CA 93311-

1022

P: 661-654-2782

W: www.csub.edu

California State University,

Dominguez

Hills

Dept. Of Theatre,

Dominguez Hills

1000 E. Victoria St.

Carson, CA 90747

P: 310-243-3696

W: www.csudh.edu

California State University,

East Bay

Theatre And Dance

Dept.

25800 Carlos Bee Blvd.

220 Robinson Hall

CSUEB

Hayward, CA 94542

P: 510-885-3118

F: 510-885-4748

W: class.csueastbay.

edu/theatre

California State University,

Fresno

Theatre Arts Dept.

5201 N. Maple Ave.

M/s Sa46

Fresno, CA 93740-8027

P: 559-278-3987

F: 559-278-7215

W: www.csufresno.edu/

Theatre

California State University,

Fullerton

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

P.O.Box 6850

Fullerton, CA 92834-

6850

P: 714-278-3628

F: 714-449-7041

W: www.fullerton.

edu/arts

California State University,

Long Beach

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

1250 Bellflower Blvd.

Long Beach, CA 90840-

2701

P: 562-985-4042

F: 562-985-2263

W: www.csulb.edu/

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 45


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

depts/theatre

California State University,

Northridge

Theater Dept.

18111 Nordhoff St.

Northridge, CA 91330

P: 818-677-1200

W: www.csun.edu/

theatre

California State University,

Sacramento

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

6000 J St. - Shasta Hall

Sacramento, CA 95819-

6069

P: 916-278-6368

F: 916-278-5681

W: www.csus.edu/dram

California State University,

Stanislaus

Dept. Of Theatre

One University Circle

Turlock, CA 95382

P: 209-667-3451

F: 209-664-3782

W: web.csustan.edu/

Theatre

Columbia College

Hollywood

18618 Oxnard St.

Tarzana, CA 91356-

1411

P: 800-785-0585

F: 818-345-9053

W: columbiacollege.

edu

De Anza College

Creative Arts Division

21250 Stevens Creek

Blvd.

Cupertino, CA 95014

P: 408-864-5678

W: www.deanza.edu/

dance/

Dell’arte

131 H St.

P.O.Box 816

Blue Lake, CA 95525

P: 707-668-5663

F: 707-668-5665

W: www.dellarte.com/

Foothill College - Fine

Arts And Communication

Dept. Of Theatre

Technology

12345 El Monte Rd.

Los Altos Hills, CA

94022

P: 650-949-7777

W: www.foothill.fhda.

edu

Glendale Community

College - Theatre Art

Departmen

1500 N. Verdugo Rd.

Glendale, CA 91208

P: 818-240-1000

F: 818-549-9436

W: www.glendale.edu/

theatre

Humboldt State

University

Dept. Theatre, Film &

Dance

Theatre Arts Bldg. -

Rm.20

1 Harpst St.

Arcata, CA 95521-8299

P: 707-826-3566

F: 707-826-5494

W: www.humboldt.

edu/~theatre

Idyllwild Arts Academy

52500 Temecula Rd.

P.O.Box 38

Idyllwild, CA 92549

P: 951-659-2171

W: www.idyllwildarts.

org

Institute For Readers

Theatre

P.O.Box 421262

San Diego, CA 92142

P: 858-277-4274

F: 858-277-4222

W: www.readersthe

atreinstitute.com

Joe Blasco Cosmetics,

West

1670 Hillhurst Ave.

Hollywood, CA 90027

P: 323-467-4949

F: 323-664-1834

W: www.joeblasco.com

Los Angeles City College

Theatre Academy

855 N. Vermont Ave.

Los Angeles, CA 90029

P: 323-953-4000

F: 323-953-4013

W: theatreacademy.

lacitycollege.edu

Loyola Marymount

University

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

1 Lmu Dr.

Los Angeles, CA 90045

P: 310-338-2700

W: www.lmu.edu

Monterey Peninsula

College

Drama Dept.

980 Fremont St.

Monterey, CA 93940

P: 831-646-4000

F: 831-646-4277

W: www.mpc.edu

Occidental College

Dept. Of Theater

1600 Campus Rd

Los Angeles, CA 90041-

3314

P: 323-259-2500

F: 323-259-2958

W: www.oxy.edu

PCPA / Pacific Conservatory

Of Performing

Arts

Allan Hancock College

Pcpa Theaterfest

800 S. College Dr.

Santa Maria, CA 93454-

6399

P: 805-928-7731

F: 805-928-7506

W: www.pcpa.org

Pomona College

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

300 E. Bonita Ave.

Claremont, CA 91711

P: 909-621-8186

F: 909-621-8780

W: www.theatre.

pomona.edu

Saddleback College -

Fine Arts Division

28000 Marguerite

Pkwy.

Mission Viejo, CA 92692

P: 949-582-4500

W: www.saddleback.

edu/ap/fa/Drama.

HTML

Saint Mary’s College

Dept. Of English And

Drama

P.O.Box 4730

1928 Saint Mary’s Rd.

Moraga, CA 94575

P: 925-631-4000

W: www.stmarys-ca.

edu

San Diego State

University

Dept. Of Theatre

College Of Professional

Studie

5500 Campanile Dr.

San Diego, CA 92182-

7601

P: 619-594-5091

F: 619-594-7431

W: theatre.sdsu.edu

San Francisco State

University

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

1600 Holloway Ave.

San Francisco, CA

94132

P: 415-338-7758

W: www.sfsu.edu/~tha

San Jose State University

Dept. Of Television,

Radio, Film And Theatre

Hugh Gillis Hall Rm. 100

San Jose State University

San Jose, CA 95192

P: 408-924-4530

F: 408-924-4574

W: www.tvradiofilmtheatre.com

Santa Ana College

Theatre Arts Dept.

1530 W. 17th St.

Santa Ana, CA 92706

P: 714-564-6000

F: 714-564-5665

W: www.sac.edu

Santa Clara University

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

500 El Camino Real

Santa Clara, CA 95053

P: 408-554-4989

F: 408-554-5199

W: www.scu.edu/

theatre

Santa Monica College

1900 Pico Blvd.

Santa Monica, CA

90405

P: 310-434-4319

W: www.smc.edu/

theatre/

Sonoma State University

Performing Arts At

Sonoma State University

Theatre And Dance

Dept.

1801 E. Cotati Ave.

Rohnert Park, CA 94928

P: 707-664-2235

W: www.sonoma.edu/

performingarts

South Coast Repertory

655 Town Center Dr.

P.O.Box 2197

Costa Mesa, CA 92628-

2197

P: 714-708-5500

F: 714-708-5576

W: www.scr.org

Southwestern College

900 Otay Lakes Rd.

Chula Vista, CA 91910

P: 619-421-6700

W: www.swccd.edu

Stanford University

Dept. Of Drama, Mc:

5010

Memorial Hall, Rm.144

551 Serra Mall

Stanford, CA 94305

P: 650-723-2576

F: 650-723-0843

W: www.stanford.edu/

dept/drama

Theatre Arts Productions/

Spotlight

Theatre

1622 19th St.

Bakersfield, CA 93301

P: 661-634-0692

W: www.spotlightthe

atreandcafe.com

University Of California,

Berkeley

Dept. Of Theater, Dance

& Performance Studies

101 Dwinelle Annex

Berkeley, CA 94720

P: 510-642-1677

W: theater.berkeley.edu

University Of California,

Davis

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

222 Wright Hall

One Shields Ave.

Davis, CA 95616

P: 530-752-0888

F: 530-752-8818

W: theatredance.

ucdavis.edu

University Of California,

Irvine

Dept. Of Drama

Irvine, CA 92697-2775

P: 949-824-6614

F: 949-824-3475

W: drama.arts.uci.edu

University Of California,

Los Angeles

School Of Theater, Film

And Television

102 E. Melnitz Hall

Box 951622

Los Angeles, CA 90095

P: 310-825-5761

W: www.tft.ucla.edu

University Of California,

Riverside

900 University Ave.

Riverside, CA 92521-

0324

P: 951-827-7193

F: 951-827-1255

W: www.theatre.ucr.

edu

University Of California,

San Diego

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

9500 Gilman Dr.,

Mc0344

La Jolla, CA 92093

P: 858-534-3791

W: theatre.ucsd.edu

University Of California,

Santa Barbara

Theater & Dance

Mail Code 7060

552 University Rd.

Santa Barbara, CA

93106-7060

P: 805-893-3241

F: 805-893-7029

W: www.ucsb.edu/

University Of California,

Santa Cruz

Theater Arts Dept.

J-106 Theater Arts

Center

Santa Cruz, CA 95064

P: 831-459-4075

F: 831-459-5359

W: theater.ucsc.edu

University Of La Verne

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

1950 3rd St.

La Verne, CA 91750

P: 909-593-3511

W: www.ulv.edu/

theatre

University Of San

Diego

USD MFA Program

P.O.Box 122171

San Diego, CA 92112-

2171

P: 619-260-4524

W: www.globemfa.org

University Of Southern

California

School Of Theatre

1029 Childs Way

Los Angeles, CA 90089

P: 213-821-2744

F: 213-740-8888

W: theatre.usc.edu

University Of The

Pacific, Stockton

3601 Pacific Ave.

Drama Bldg.

Stockton, CA 95211

P: 209-946-2011

W: www.pacific.edu

US Performing Arts

Camps

100 Meadowcreek Dr.,

Ste. 102

Corte Madera, CA

94925

P: 888-497-3553

W: www.usperformin

garts.com

Westmore Academy

Of Cosmetic Arts

3407 W. Olive Ave.

Burbank, CA 91506

P: 877-978-6673

W: www.westmo

reacademy.com

Will Geer Theatricum

Botanicum

1419 N. Topanga Canyon

Blvd.

Topanga, CA 90290

P: 310-455-2322

W: www.theatricum.

com

Will Geer Theatricum

Botanicum1419 N.

Topanga Canyon Blvd.

Topanga, CA 90290

P: 310-455-2322

F: 310-455-3724

W: www.theatricum.

com

Colorado

Denver Center For The

Performing Arts

National Theatre Conservatory

(NTC)

101 13th St.

Denver, CO 80204

P: 303-893-4000

W: www.denvercenter.

org

Metropolitan State

College Of Denver

The Dept. Of Communication

Arts &

Sciences

Campus Box 34

P.O.Box 173362

Denver, CO 80217

P: 303-556-3033

F: 303-556-3409

W: www.mscd.edu

Naropa University

Performing Arts Ctr.

2130 Arapahoe Ave.

Boulder, CO 80302

P: 303-444-0202

F: 303-444-0410

W: www.naropa.edu

Perry Mansfield Performing

Arts School

& Camp

40755 Routt County

Rd. 36

Steamboat Springs, CO

80487

P: 970-879-7125

F: 970-879-5823

W: www.perry-mans

field.org

46 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

Pikes Peak Community

College

Dept. Of Performing

Arts

5675 S. Academy Blvd.

Colorado Springs, CO

80906

P: 800-456-6847

W: www.ppcc.cccoes.

edu

Rocky Mountain

Theatre For Kids

5311 Western Ave.

Ste. D

Boulder, CO 80301

P: 303-245-8150

F: 303-245-0152

W: www.theaterforkids.

net

University Of Colorado

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

261 Ucb

Boulder, CO 80309-

0261

P: 303-492-7355

F: 303-492-7722

W: www.colorado.edu/

TheatreDance/

University Of Colorado

At Denver

The College Of Arts &

Media

Campus Box 162

P.O.Box 173364

Denver, CO 80217-3364

P: 303-556-2279

F: 303-556-2335

W: cam.cudenver.edu/

tfvp/index.html

University Of Denver

Dept. Of Theatre

2199 S. University Blvd.

Denver, CO 80208

P: 303-871-2518

F: 303-871-2505

W: www.du.edu/thea

University Of Northern

Colorado

School Of Theatre Arts

& Dance

Guggenheim Hall,

Rm. 204

Campus Box 30

Greeley, CO 80639

P: 970-351-2515

F: 970-351-2699

W: arts.unco.edu

Connecticut

Central Connecticut

State University

Ccsu Dept. Of Theatre

Maloney Hall

1615 Stanley St.

New Britain, CT 06053

P: 860-832-3150

W: www.theatre.ccsu.

edu

Connecticut College

Dept. Of Theater

270 Mohegan Ave.

Box 5512

New London, CT 06320

P: 860-447-1911

W: www.conncoll.edu

Fairfield University

Dept. Of Visual &

Performing Arts

1073 N. Benson Rd.

Fairfield, CT 06824

P: 203-254-4000

W: www.fairfield.edu

Hartt School

University Of Hartford

200 Bloomfield Ave.

West Hartford, CT

06117-1599

P: 860-768-4454

W: harttweb.hartford.

edu/

O’Neill National Theater

InstituteEugene

O’theater Center

305 Great Neck Rd.

Waterford, CT 06385

P: 860-443-7139

F: 860-444-1212

W: www.theoneill.

org/nti

Southern Connecticut

State University

Theatre Dept.

501 Crescent St.

New Haven, CT 06515

P: 203-392-6100

F: 203-392-6105

W: www.southernct.

edu/theatre

St. Thomas More

School

45 Cottage Rd.

Oakdale, CT 06370

P: 860-823-3861

F: 860-823-3863

W: www.stmct.org

Trinity College

Dept. Of Theater &

Dance

300 Summit St.

Hartford, CT 06106

P: 860-297-2000

F: 860-297-5380

W: www.trincoll.edu/

Academics/Study/The

aterAndDance

University Of Connecticut

Dept. Of Dramatic Arts

802 Bolton Rd., Unit

1127

Storrs, CT 06269

P: 860-486-4025

F: 860-486-3110

W: www.drama.uconn.

edu

University Of Hartford

The Hartt School, University

Of Hartford

200 Bloomfield Ave.

West Hartford, CT

06117-1599

P: 860-768-4454

F: 860-768-4441

W: harttweb.hartford.

edu

Wesleyan University

Theater Dept.

275 Washington

Terrace

Middletown, CT 06459

P: 860-685-2950

W: www.wesleyan.edu/

theater

Western Connecticut

State University

Theatre Dept.

181 White St.

Danbury, CT 06810

P: 203-837-8258

W: www.wcsu.edu/

theatrearts

Yale University

School Of Drama

P.O.Box 208325

New Haven, CT 06520

P: 203-432-1507

F: 203-432-9668

W: drama.yale.edu

Delaware

University Of Delaware

Dept. Of Theatre

413 Academy St.

Newark, DE 19716

P: 302-831-2201

F: 302-831-3673

W: www.udel.edu/

theatre

Florida

Asolo Repertory

Theatre

FSU/Asolo Conservatory

5555 N. Tamiami Trail

Sarasota, FL 34243

P: 941-351-9010

W: www.asolo.org

Eckerd College

4200 54th Ave. South

Theatre Dept.

St. Petersburg, FL

33711

P: 800-456-9009

F: 727-864-7890

W: www.eckerd.edu/

academics/theatre

Florida Atlantic University,

Boca Raton

College Of Arts And

Letters

Dept. Of Theatre

777 Glades Rd.

Boca Raton, FL 33431

P: 561-297-3000

F: 561-297-2180

W: www.fau.edu

Florida Gulf Coast

University

10501 Fgcu Blvd. S.

Fort Meyers, FL 33965-

6565

P: 239-590-1000

W: www.fgcu.edu

Florida International

University

Herbert And Nicole

Wertheim Performing

Arts Center

University Park Campus

11200 Sw 8th St.

Miami, FL 33199

P: 305-348-2895

F: 305-348-1803

W: www.fiu.

edu/~thedan/

Florida School Of The

Arts

St. Johns River Community

College

5001 St. Johns Ave.

Palatka, FL 32177

P: 386-312-4300

F: 386-312-4306

W: www.floarts.org

Florida Southern

College

Dept. Of Theatre

111 Lake Hollingsworth

Dr.

Lakeland, FL 33801-

5698

P: 863-680-4209

W: www.flsouthern.edu

Florida State University

School Of Theatre

239 Fine Arts Bldg.

Tallahassee, FL 32306

P: 850-644-7257

F: 850-644-7408

W: theatre.fsu.edu

Florida Studio Theatre

1241 N. Palm Ave.

Sarasota, FL 34236

P: 941-366-9000

W: www.floridastu

diotheatre.org

Full Sail

3300 University Blvd.

Winter Park, FL 32792

P: 800-226-7625

W: www.fullsail.com

Jacksonville University

Dept. Of Theatre

2800 University Blvd.

North

Jacksonville, FL 32211

P: 904-256-8000

W: www.ju.edu

Lovewell Institute

1000 Corporate Dr.,

Ste. 340

Fort Lauderdale, FL

33334

P: 954-270-6452

F: 954-270-6452

W: www.lovewell.org

Miami Dade College

300 N.e. 2nd Ave.

Miami, FL 33132-2204

P: 305-237-8888

W: www.mdc.edu

New World School Of

The Arts

Theater Division

300 Ne 2nd Ave.

Miami, FL 33132-2297

P: 305-237-3135

F: 305-237-3794

W: www.mdc.edu/nwsa

Orlando Shakespeare

Theater

812 E. Rollins St.

Orlando, FL 32803

P: 407-447-1700

W: www.orlandoshakes.org

Palm Beach Atlantic

University

Theatre Arts Dept.

901 S. Flagler Dr.

West Palm Beach, FL

33401

P: 561-803-2000

W: www.pba.edu/

undergraduate/

communication-media/

theatre/index.cfm

Rollins College

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

1000 Holt Ave. - 2735

Winter Park, FL 32789-

4499

P: 407-646-2501

F: 407-646-2257

W: www.rollins.edu/

theatre

University Of Central

Florida

4000 Central Florida

Blvd.

P.O.Box 162372

Orlando, FL 32816

P: 407-823-2000

W: www.cas.ucf.edu/

theatre

University Of Florida

College Of Fine Arts

School Of Theatre &

Dance

P.O.Box 115900

Gainesville, FL 32611

P: 352-273-0500

F: 352-392-5114

W: www.arts.ufl.edu

University Of Miami

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

P.O.Box 248273

Coral Gables, FL 33124-

4820

P: 305-284-4474

F: 305-284-5702

W: www.as.miami.edu/

theatrearts

University Of South

Florida

School Of Theatre &

Dance

4202 E. Fowler Ave.

Tar 230

Tampa, FL 33620

P: 813-974-2701

W: theatreanddance.

arts.usf.edu

University Of Tampa

401 W. Kennedy Blvd.

Tampa, FL 33606-1490

P: 813-253-3333

W: www.ut.edu

University Of West

Florida

Dept. Of Theatre

11000 University Pkwy.

Bldg. 82

Pensacola, FL 32514

P: 850-474-2146

F: 850-857-6176

W: uwf.edu/theatre

Georgia

Agnes Scott College

Dept. Of Theatre

141 E. College Ave.

Decatur, GA 30030

P: 404-471-6000

F: 404-638-5369

W: www.agnesscott.

edu/academics/p_theatre.asp

Armstrong Atlantic

State University

Dept. Of Art, Music &

Theatre

11935 Abercorn St.

Savanah, GA 31419-

1997

P: 912-344-2503

W: www.finearts.

armstrong.edu

Berry College

Theatre Dept.

2277 Martha Berry

Hwy. Nw

Mount Berry, GA 30149

P: 706-232-5374

W: www.berry.edu/

academics/majors/

art.asp

Brenau University

Dept. Of Performing

Arts

500 Washington St. S.e.

Gainesville, GA 30501

P: 770-534-6264

W: www.brenau.edu/

sfah/theatre/

Columbus State

University

Dept. Of Theatre

901 Front Ave.

Columbus, GA 31907

P: 706-507-8400

W: theatre.colstate.

edu/index.asp

Emory University

Theater Studies

1602 Fishburne Dr.

Rich Memorial Bldg.

230

Atlanta, GA 30322

P: 404-727-6463

F: 404-727-6253

W: www.theater.emory.

edu

Gainesville Theatre

Alliance

P.O.Box 1358

Gainesville, GA 30503

P: 678-717-3624

F: 678-717-3675

W: www.gainesvillethe

atrealliance.org

Georgia Southern

University

Communication Arts

Dept.

P.O.Box 8144

Statesboro, GA 30460-

8144

P: 912-478-4636

F: 912-681-0822

W: class.georgiasouth

ern.edu/commarts/

index.html

48 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Georgia Southwestern

State University

Fine Arts Dept.

800 Wheatley St.

Americus, GA 31709

P: 229-931-2204

W: www.gsw.

edu/~finearts/dramat

ic_arts.html

Kennesaw State

University

Dept. Of Theatre &

Performance

1000 Chastain Rd. #3103

Kennesaw, GA 30144

P: 770-499-3123

W: www.kennesaw.edu/

theatre

Lagrange College

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

601 Broad St.

Lagrange, GA 30240

P: 706-880-8000

W: www.lagrange.edu

Piedmont College

165 Central Ave.

Demorest, GA 30535

P: 706-778-3000

F: 706-776-6635

W: www.piedmont.edu/

SCAD

The University For

Creative Careers

P.O.Box 3146

Savannah, GA 31402

P: 800-869-7223

W: www.scad.edu/

performing-arts

Shorter College

315 Shorter Ave.

Rome, GA 30165

P: 800-868-6980

W: www.shorter.edu

University Of Georgia

University Of Georgia

Fine Arts Bldg.

Athens, GA 30602-3154

P: 706-542-2836

F: 706-542-2080

W: www.drama.uga.edu

University Of West

Georgia

Theatre Arts

1601 Maple St.

Carrollton, GA 30118

P: 678-839-5000

F: 678-839-4926

W: www.westga.

edu/~theatre

Valdosta State University

Dept. Of Communications

College Of The

Arts

1500 N. Patterson St.

Valdosta, GA 31698-

0120

P: 229-333-5800

W: www.valdosta.edu

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 49


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

Hawaii

University Of Hawaii

At Manoa

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

1770 E-w Rd.

115 Kennedy Theatre

Honolulu, HI 96822

P: 808-956-7677

F: 808-956-4234

W: www.hawaii.edu/

theatre

Idaho

Boise State University

Morrison Center For

The Performing Arts

Academic Wing

1910 University Dr.

Boise, ID 83725-1565

P: 208-426-3957

F: 208-426-1771

W: theatre.boisestate.

edu

University Of Idaho

Dept. Of Theatre & Film

442008/1028 W. 6th St.

Shoup Hall, 2nd Fl.

Moscow, ID 83844-

2008

P: 208-885-6465

F: 208-885-2558

W: www.uitheatre.com

Illinois

Act One Studios

Act One Studios Conservatory

640 N. Lasalle

Ste. 535

Chicago, IL 60654

P: 312-787-9384

F: 312-787-3234

W: www.actone.com/

ActOneHomePage/

ConservatoryPage/ta

bid/537/Default.aspx

Augustana College

In Il

Theatre Dept.

639 38th St.

Rock Island, IL 61201-

2296

P: 800-798-8100

W: www.augustana.

edu/academics/theatre/department/

Bradley University

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

1501 W. Bradley Ave.

Peoria, IL 61625

P: 309-677-2660

F: 209-677-3505

W: theatre.bradley.edu

Chicago Academy For

The Arts

1010 W. Chicago Ave.

Chicago, IL 60622

P: 312-421-0202

F: 312-421-3816

W: www.chicagoartsa

cademy.org

Chicago State University

Theatre Dept., Breakey

Theatre

Douglas Hall Rm. 102

9501 S. King Dr.

Chicago, IL 60628

P: 773-995-2000

F: 773-821-2413

W: www.csu.edu/

speech/theatre/index.

htm

Columbia College

Theater Dept.

600 S. Michigan Ave.

Chicago, IL 60605

P: 312-344-6100

F: 312-408-1827

W: www2.colum.edu/

undergraduate/theater/index.php

DePaul University

2135 N. Kenmore Ave.

Chicago, IL 60614

P: 773-325-7999

F: 773-325-7920

W: theatreschool.

depaul.edu/schoolmain.php

Elmhurst College

190 Prospect Ave.

Elmhurst, IL 60126-

3296

P: 630-617-3500

W: public.elmhurst.

edu/communication/1279847.html

Eureka College

Theatre Arts & Drama

300 E. College Ave.

Eureka, IL 61530

P: 309-467-6350

W: www.eureka.edu

Illinois State University

College Of Fine Arts

School Of Theatre

Campus Box 5700

Normal, IL 61790-5700

P: 309-438-8783

F: 309-438-5806

W: www.cfa.ilstu.edu/

theatre

Illinois Wesleyan

University

School Of Theatre Arts

1312 Park St. Bloomington

Bloomington, IL 61701

P: 309-556-1000

F: 309-556-3411

W: www2.iwu.edu/

theatre/index.shtml

Independence Community

College

30 N. Lasalle St.

Ste. 2400

Chicago, IL 60602

P: 800-621-7440

W: www.indycc.edu/

academics/programs.

htm

Loyola University,

Chicago

Dept. Of Fine And

Performing Arts

6525 N. Sheridan Rd.

Mundelein Center, Ste.

1200

Chicago, IL 60626

P: 773-508-7510

F: 773-508-7515

W: www.luc.edu/

theatre/index.shtml

Millikin University

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

1184 W. Main St.

Decatur, IL 62522

P: 18003737733

W: www.millikin.edu/

theatre

National High School

Institute At Northwestern

University

617 Noyes St.

Evanston, IL 60208

P: 847-491-3026

F: 847-467-1057

W: www.northwestern.

edu/nhsi

Northern Illinois

University

School Of Theatre &

Dance

Norther Illinois Univ.

Dekalb, IL 60115

P: 815-753-1334

F: 815-753-8415

W: www.niu.edu/

theatre

Northwestern University

Dept. Of Theatre

2240 Campus Dr.

Evanston, IL 60208

P: 847-491-7023

F: 847-467-1464

W: www.communication.northwestern.edu/

theatre/

Rockford College

Performing Arts Dept.

Clark Arts Center

5050 E. State St.

Rockford, IL 61108

P: 815-226-4000

F: 815-394-5167

W: www.rockford.edu/

academics/depart

ments/pa/index.asp

Roosevelt Univ,

Chicago College Of

Performing Arts

The Theatre Conservatory

430 S. Michigan Ave.

Chicago, IL 60605

P: 312-341-3500

W: ccpa.roosevelt.edu

School Of The Art

Institute Of Chicago

Performance Dept.

37 S. Wabash Ave.

Chicago, IL 60603

P: 312-629-6100

W: www.artic.edu/saic

Second City Training

Centers

1616 N. Wells St.

Chicago, IL 60614

P: 312-337-3992

W: www.secondcity.

com

Southern Illinoins

University, East St.

Louis

Siue East St. Louis Center

For The Performing

Arts

601 James R. Thompson

Blvd.

East St. Louis, IL 62201

P: 618-482-6912

W: www.siue.edu/eslc/

performing_arts.shtml

Southern Illinois University,

Carbondale

Dept. Of Theater

Carbondale, IL 62901-

6608

P: 618-453-2121

W: www.siu.

edu/~mcleod

Steppenwolf Theatre

Company

1650 N. Halsted St.

Chicago, IL 60614

P: 312-335-1650

W: www.steppenwolf.

org

University Of Illinois

At Chicago

Dept. Of Performing

Arts

Epasw Bldg.

1040 W. Harrison St.

Mc-255

Chicago, IL 60607

P: 312-996-2977

F: 312-996-0954

W: www.uic.edu/depts/

adpa

University Of Illinois

At Springfield

Theatre Program

One University Plaza,

Ms Uhb 3010

Springfield, IL 62703

P: 217-206-6613

W: www.uis.edu/

theatre

University Of Illinois

Urbana-champaign

4-122 Krannert Center

For The Performing Arts

500 S. Goodwin Ave.

Urbana, IL 61801

P: 217-333-2371

W: www.theatre.uiuc.

edu

Western Illinois

University

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

1 University Circle

Browne Hall 101

Macomb, IL 61455

P: 309-298-1543

F: 309-298-2695

W: www.wiu.edu/

theatre

Indiana

Ball State University

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance Ball State Univers

Ball State University

2000 W. University Ave.

Muncie, IN 47306

P: 765-285-8740

F: 765-285-4030

W: www.bsu.edu/

theatre

Butler University

Jordan College Of Fine

Arts

Theatre Dept.

4600 Sunset Ave.

Indianapolis, IN 46208

P: 800-368-6852

F: 317-940-9866

W: www.butler.edu/

theatre

Franklin College

Theatre Dept.

101 Branigin Blvd.

Franklin, IN 46131

P: 800-852-0232

W: www.franklincol

lege.edu/common/

learning/majorsminors/

theater.cfm?aud=pro

Hanover College

Dept. Of Theatre

P.O.Box 108

Hanover, IN 47243

P: 812-866-7000

W: www.hanover.edu/

academics/programs/

theatre/

Indiana State University

Indiana State University

Theater Dept.

200 N. 7th. St.

Terre Haute, IN 47809-

9989

P: 800-468-6478

W: web.indstate.edu

Indiana University

College Of Arts And

Sciences

Dept. Of Theatre &

Drama

275 N. Jordan

Bloomington, IN 47405-

1101

P: 812-855-4535

W: www.indiana.

edu/~thtr/

Purdue University

Purdue Theatre

Pao Hall Of Visual And

Performing Arts

552 W. Wood St.

West Lafayette, IN

47907

P: 765-494-3074

F: 765-496-1766

W: www.purdue.edu/

theatre

University Of Evansville

Dept. Of Theatre

1800 Lincoln Ave.

Evansville, IN 47722

P: 800-423-8633

F: 812-471-6995

W: theatre.evansville.

edu

University Of Indianapolis

1400 E. Hanna Ave.

Indianapolis, IN 46227

P: 800-232-8634

W: theatre.uindy.edu

University Of Notre

Dame

Film, Television, And

Theatre

Debartolo Cntr. For

Perf. Arts

Rm. 230

Notre Dame, IN 46556

P: 574-631-7054

W: www.nd.edu/~ftt/

University Of Southern

Indiana - Theatre

Dept.

8600 University Blvd.

Evansville, IN 47712-

3596

P: 812-464-8600

W: www.usi.edu

Valparaiso University

Department Of Theatre

Center For The Arts

1709 Chapel Dr

Valparaiso, IN 46383

P: 219-464-5213

W: www.valpo.edu/

theatre/index.php

Vincennes University

Performing Arts, Theatre

Dept.

1002 N. First St.

Vincennes, IN 47591

P: 812-888-8888

W: www.vinu.edu

Wabash College

Theater Dept.

P.o.box 352

Crawfordsville, IN

47933

P: 765-361-6100

W: www.wabash.edu/

academics/theater

Iowa

Clarke College

Dept. Of Drama

1550 Clarke Dr.

Dubuque, IA 52001

P: 888-825-2753

W: www.clarke.edu

Coe College

Theatre Arts Dept.

1220 1st Ave. Ne

Cedar Rapids, IA 52402

P: 319-399-8689

F: 319-399-8557

W: www.public.coe.

edu/departments/

theatre

Cornell College

Dept. Of Theatre And

Communications

Studies

600 First St. West

Mt. Vernon, IA 52314

P: 319-895-4334

W: cornellcollege.edu/

theatre

Donna Reed Foundation

For The Performing

Arts

1305 Broadway

Denison, IA 51442

P: 712-263-3334

F: 712-263-8026

W: www.donnareed.

org

50 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

Dordt College

Theatre Arts Dept.

498 4th Ave. Ne

Sioux Center, IA 51250

P: 800-343-6738

W: www.dordt.edu/

arts/theatre

Drake University

Theatre Arts Dept.

2507 University Ave.

Des Moines, IA 50311-

4505

P: 180044

W: www.drake.edu

Graceland University

Lamoni Campus

1 University Place

Lamoni, IA 50140

P: 641-784-5000

W: www.graceland.edu/show.

cfm?durki=518

Grinnell College

733 Broad St.

Grinnell, IA 50112-

1690

P: 641-269-4000

F: 641-269-4420

W: www.grinnell.edu/

academic/theatre

Iowa State University

Isu Theatre

2226 Pearson

Ames, IA 50011-2204

P: 515-294-2624

F: 515-294-2652

W: www.theatre.

iastate.edu

Players Workshop

1431 Grove St.

52601, IA 52601

P: 319-753-6623

W: www.playerswork

shop.org

University Of Iowa

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

The University Of Iowa

107 Theatre Bldg.

Iowa City, IA 52242-

1795

P: 319-335-2700

F: 319-335-3568

W: www.uiowa.

edu/~theatre

University Of Northern

Iowa

Theatre Dept.

1227 W. 27th St.

Cedar Falls, IA 50614

P: 319-273-2311

W: www.uni.edu

Waldorf College

Theatre Dept.

106 S. 6th St.

Forest City, IA 50436

P: 800-292-1903

W: www.waldorf.edu/

finearts/theatre/the

atre/index.htm


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

Kansas

Baker University

P.O.Box 65

Baldwin City, KS 66006

P: 785-594-6451

F: 785-594-3570

W: www.bakeru.edu

Bethany College

Theatre Dept.

335 E. Swensson St.

Lindsborg, KS 67456-

1895

P: 785-227-3311

F: 785-227-2004

W: www.bethanylb.edu

Empoira State University

1200 Commercial St.

201 King Hall

Campus Box 4033

Emporia, KS 66801

P: 620-341-5256

W: www.emporia.edu/

theatre

Kansas State University

College Of Speech

Communication, Theatre,

And Danc

129 Nichols Hall

Manhattan, KS 66506-

2304

P: 687-252-4436

F: 371-152-4436

W: www.ksu.edu/sctd

Kansas Wesleyan

University

100 E. Clafin Ave.

Salina, KS 67401-6196

P: 785-827-5541

F: 785-827-0297

W: www.kwu.edu/

University Of Kansas

Dept. Of Theatre & Film

1530 Naismith Dr.,

Rm. 356

Murphy Hall

Lawrence, KS 66045-

3102

P: 785-864-3511

W: www.ku.edu/~kuthf

Wichita State University

School Of Performing

Arts

1845 Fairmount St.

Wichita, KS 67260

P: 316-978-3456

W: www.wichita.edu

Kentucky

Bellarmine University

Arts Administration

Program

2001 Newburg Rd.

Louisville, KY 40205-

0671

P: 502-452-8131

W: cas.bellarmine.edu/

theatre/

Berea College

English, Theatre, And

Speech Comm. Dept.

Draper 201b

Cpo 1893

Berea, KY 40404

P: 859-985-3756

F: 859-985-3906

W: www.berea.edu/

etsc

Centre College

600 W. Walnut St.

Danville, KY 40422

P: 859-238-5200

F: 859-887-4527

W: www.centre.edu

Eastern Kentucky

University

Theatre Dept.

521 Lancaster Ave.

306 Campbell

Richmond, KY 40475

P: 859-622-1000

F: 859-622-5904

W: www.theatre.eku.

edu

Georgetown College

Dept. Of Theatre &

Performance Studies

400 E. College St.

Georgetown, KY 40324

P: 502-863-8000

W: www.georgetown

college.edu/Depart

ments/tpa/

Murray State University

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

106 Fine Arts Bldg.

Murray, KY 42071

P: 270-809-4421

F: 270-809-4422

W: www.murraystate.

edu/chfa/theatre

Northern Kentucky

University

Dept.of Theatre &

Dance

Fine Arts-205, Nunn Dr.

Highland Heights, KY

41099-1007

P: 859-572-6362

F: 859-572-6057

W: www.nku.

edu/~theatre

Spalding University

School Of Communication

851 S. 4th St.

Louisville, KY 40203

P: 800-896-8941

F: 502-585-7158

W: www.spalding.

edu/mfa

University Of Kentucky

Dept. Of Theatre

114 Fine Arts Bldg.

Lexington, KY 40506

P: 859-257-3297

W: www.uky.edu/

finearts/theatre

University Of Louisville

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

501 S. Preston St.

Louisville, KY 40292

P: 502-852-7682

W: www.louisville.

edu/a-s/ta

52 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

Western Kentucky

University

Theatre & Dance

1906 College Heights

Blvd., #71086

Bowling Green, KY

42101

P: 270-745-5845

F: 270-745-5879

W: www.wku.edu

Louisiana

Centenary College Of

Louisiana

Theatre Dept.

2911 Centenary Blvd.

Shreveport, LA 71104

P: 800-234-4448

W: www.centenary.

edu/theatre

Dillard University

2601 Gentilly Blvd.

New Orleans, LA 70122

P: 504-283-8822

W: www.dillard.edu/

Grambling State

University

Dept. Of Speech &

Theatre

403 Main St. Carver

Hall 114

Grambling, LA 71245

P: 800-569-4714

W: www.gram.edu/

Louisiana State

University

LSU Dept. Of Theatre

217 Music & Dramatic

Arts Bld.

Baton Rouge, LA 70803

P: 417-261-0727

F: 413-361-0727

W: www.theatre.lsu.

edu

Louisiana Tech University

School Of Performing

Arts

P.O.Box 8608

Ruston, LA 71272

P: 318-257-2711

F: 318-257-4571

W: performingarts.

latech.edu

Loyola University,

New Orleans

Communications/music

Complex

Rm. 109

6363 St. Charles Ave.

New Orleans, LA 70118

P: 504-865-3037

W: mfa.loyno.edu/

theatrearts

Mcneese State University

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

4205 Ryan St.

Lake Charles, LA 70609-

0420

P: 337-475-5000

W: www.mcneese.edu

Tulane University

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

215 Mcwilliams Hall

New Orleans, LA 70118

P: 504-314-7760

F: 504-314-7761

W: www.tulane.

edu/~theatre

University Of Louisiana

At Lafayette

Theatre And Dance

Dept.

P.O.Box 43690

Lafayette, LA 70504

P: 337-482-6357

W: arts.louisiana.edu/

degree/pfar

University Of New

Orleans

Film, Theatre And Communication

Arts

2000 Lakeshore Dr.

Pac, Rm.307

New Orleans, LA 70148

P: 504-280-6317

F: 504-280-6318

W: ftca.uno.edu

Maine

Bates College

Theater Dept.

2 Andrews Rd.

Lewiston, ME 04240-

6028

P: 207-786-6255

F: 207-786-6123

W: www.bates.edu/

THEA.xml

Bowdoin College

Dept. Of Theater &

Dance

9100 College Station

Brunswick, ME 04011-

8491

P: 207-725-3663

W: academic.bowdoin.

edu/theaterdance/

International Film &

Video Workshops

Maine Media Workshops

70 Camden St.

Rockport, ME 04856

P: 207-236-8581

F: 207-236-2558

W: www.theworkshops.

com

University Of Maine

School Of Performing

Arts

5788 Class Of 1944 Hall

Orono, ME 04469-5788

P: 207-581-4700

W: www.umaine.edu/

spa

University Of Southern

Maine

Usm Dept. Of Theatre

P.O.Box 9300

Russell Hall

Gorham, ME 04104

P: 207-780-4141

W: www.usm.maine.

edu/theater

Maryland

Community College

Baltimore County,

Catonsville

Theatre Dept.

800 S. Rolling Rd.

Baltimore, MD 21228-

5317

P: 410-455-6991

W: www.ccbcmd.edu

Community College

Of Baltimore County,

Essex

Cockpit In Court Summer

Theatre

320 York Rd.

Baltimore, MD 21204

P: 410-887-6100

W: www.bcpl.lib.md.us

Goucher College

Theatre Dept.

1021 Dulaney Valley Rd.

Baltimore, MD 21204-

2794

P: 410-337-6000

W: www.goucher.edu/

x6418.xml

Round House Theatre

4545 East-west Hwy.

Bethesda, MD 20814

P: 240-644-1099

F: 240-644-1090

W: www.round-house.

org

Rudolf Steiner

Institute

P.O.Box 5373

Baltimore, MD 21209

P: 800-774-5191

F: 410-358-0058

W: www.steinerinstitute.org

Towson State University

- Theatre Arts

Dept

8000 York Rd.

Towson, MD 21252

P: 410-704-2792

F: 410-830-3914

W: www.towson.edu/

theatre

University Of

Maryland, Baltimore

County

Dept. Of Theatre

1000 Hilltop Cir

Baltimore, MD 21250

P: 410-455-2917

W: www.umbc.edu/

theatre


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

University Of Maryland,

College Park

Dept. Of Theatre

College Park, MD

20742-1610

P: 301-405-6676

F: 301-314-9599

W: www.theatre.umd.

edu

Massachusetts

American Repertory

Theatre--A.R.T.

Loeb Drama Center,

Harvard University

64 Brattle St.

Cambridge, MA 02138

P: 617-495-2668

W: www.fas.harvard.

edu/~art

Amherst College

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

P.O.Box 5000

Amherst, MA 01002

P: 413-542-2411

F: 413-542-7917

W: www.amherst.

edu/~theater/

Berkshire Theatre

Festival

P.O.Box 797

Stockbridge, MA 01262

P: 413-298-5536

W: www.berkshirethe

atre.org

Boston College

Theatre Dept.

140 Commonwealth

Ave.

Chestnut Hill, MA

02467

P: 617-552-0823

F: 617-552-0798

W: www.bc.edu/

schools/cas/theatre

Boston College, Newton

Campus

Theatre Dept.

885 Centre St.

Newton Centre, MA

02459

P: 617-552-0823

F: 617-552-0798

W: www.bc.edu/

schools/cas/theatre

Boston Conservatory

Theater Division

8 The Fenway

Boston, MA 02215

P: 617-536-6340

F: 617-912-9101

W: www.bostonconser

vatory.edu

Boston University

College Of Fine Arts,

Theatre Dept.

855 Commonwealth

Ave.

Boston, MA 02215

P: 617-353-3350

F: 617-353-6555

W: www.bu.edu/cfa/

theatre

Brandeis University

Spingold Theater

Center

415 South St.

Waltham, MA 02453-

2728

P: 781-736-3340

F: 781-736-3408

W: www.brandeis.edu/

theater

College Of The Holy

Cross

Theatre Dept.

1 College St.

Worcester, MA 01610

P: 508-793-3490

F: 508-793-3030

W: www.holycross.edu/

departments/theatre/

website/index.html

Emerson College

Dept. Of Performing

Arts

120 Boylston St.

Boston, MA 02116-4624

P: 617-824-8600

W: www.emerson.edu

Harvard

Summer School

51 Brattle St.

Cambridge, MA 02138-

3722

P: 617-495-4024

W: www.harvard.edu

Mount Holyoke

College

Alice Withington Rooke

Theatre

50 College St.

South Hadley, MA

01075-6409

P: 413-538-2118

F: 413-538-2838

W: www.mtholyoke.

edu/acad/theat/

Northeastern University

Dept. Of Theatre

Rm. 180 Ryder Hall

360 Huntington Ave.

Boston, MA 02115

P: 617-373-2244

F: 617-373-4149

W: www.dac.neu.edu/

theatre

Salem State College

Theatre Dept.

352 Lafayette St.

Salem, MA 01970

P: 978-542-6000

W: www.salemstate.

edu

Shakespeare &

Company

70 Kemble St.

Lenox, MA 01240

P: 413-637-1199

F: 413-637-4274

W: www.shakespeare.

org

Smith College

Smith College

North Hampton, MA

01063

P: 413-584-2700

W: www.smith.edu/

54 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


theatre

Springfield College

263 Alden St.

Visual & Performing

Arts Dept.

Springfield, MA 01109-

3797

P: 413-748-3000

W: www.spfldcol.edu

Suffolk University

8 Ashburton Place

Boston, MA 02108-

2770

P: 617-573-8000

F: 617-573-8513

W: www.suffolk.edu/

Tufts University

Dept. Of Drama And

Dance

Aidekman Arts Center

40 Talbot Ave.

Medford, MA 02155

P: 617-627-3524

W: ase.tufts.edu/

drama-dance

University Of Massachusetts

Amherst

Dept. Of Theater

151 Presidents Dr.

112 Fine Arts Ctr.

Amherst, MA 01003-

9331

P: 413-545-3490

F: 413-577-0025

W: www.umass.edu/

theater

Walnut Hill School

Theater Dept.

12 Highland St. Natick

Natick, MA 01760

P: 508-653-4312

F: 508-655-3726

W: www.walnuthillarts.org/theater/

index.html

Wellesley College

Theatre

Alumnae Hall, Wellesley

College

106 Central St.

Wellesley, MA 02481

P: 781-283-2029

F: 781-283-3625

W: www.wellesley.

edu/Theatre

Michigan

Alma College

Theatre & Dance

Program

614 W. Superior St.

Alma, MI 48801

P: 989-463-7242

W: www.alma.edu/

departments/theatredance

Eastern Michigan

University

Dept. Of Comm. &

Theatre Arts

124 Quirk Bldg.

Ypsilanti, MI 48197

P: 734-487-3130

W: www.emich.edu/

cta

Henry Ford Community

College

Theatre Dept., Associate

In Arts

5101 Evergreen Rd.

Mackenzie Fine Arts

Center

Dearborn, MI 48128

P: 313-845-9600

W: www.henryford.

cc.mi.us

Hope College

Hope College Dept. Of

Theatre

141 E. 12th St.

Holland, MI 49423

P: 616-395-7600

F: 616-395-7180

W: www.hope.edu/

academic/theatre

Interlochen Arts

Academy

Interlochen Center For

The Arts

P.O.Box 199

Interlochen, MI 49643-

0199

P: 231-276-7200

F: 231-276-7444

W: www.interlochen.

org

Kalamazoo College

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

1200 Academy St.

Kalamazoo, MI 49006-

3295

P: 269-337-7000

W: www.kzoo.edu

Lake Michigan College

Dept. Of Theatre

2755 E. Napier Ave.

Benton Harbor, MI

49022

P: 269-927-8100

W: www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Lansing Community

College

5100 - Humanities &

Performing Arts Dept.

P.O.Box 40010

Lansing, MI 48901-

7210

P: 800-644-4522

W: www.lcc.edu/

home/future_students/

Michigan State

University

Dept. Of Theatre

149 Auditorium Rd.

East Lansing, MI 48824

P: 517-355-6690

F: 517-355-1698

W: www.theatre.msu.

edu

Northern Michigan

University

Forest Roberts Theatre

1401 Presque Isle Ave.

Marquette, MI 49855

P: 906-227-2061

F: 906-227-2071

W: www.nmu.edu/

caps/

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 55


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

Oakland University

2200 N. Squirrel Rd.

Rochester, MI 48309-

4401

P: 248-370-2100

F: 248-370-2041

W: www4.oakland.edu/

Olivet College

Dept. Of Performing

Arts

320 S. Main St.

Olivet, MI 49076

P: 800-456-7189

W: www.olivetcollege.edu/academics/

visual_arts.php

University Of Michigan

School Of Music, Theatre

& Dance

E.v. Moore Bldg.

1100 Baits Dr.

Ann Arbor, MI 48109-

2085

P: 734-764-0583

F: 734-763-5097

W: www.music.umich.

edu/departments/

theatre

University Of Michigan,

Flint

Theatre Dept.

303 E. Kearsley St.

Flint, MI 48502-2186

P: 810-762-3300

W: www.umflint.edu

Wayne State University

Dept. Of Theatre

4841 Cass Ave.

Ste. 3225

Detroit, MI 48202

P: 313-577-3508

F: 313-577-0935

W: theatre.wayne.edu

Western Michigan

University

Dept. Of Theatre

1903 W. Michigan Ave.,

Kalamazoo, MI 49008-

5360

P: 269-387-3220

F: 269-387-3222

W: www.wmich.edu/

theatre

Minnesota

Bethel University

Dept. Of Theatre - Dept.

Chair

3900 Bethel Dr.

St. Paul, MN 55112-

6999

P: 651-638-6400

W: cas.bethel.edu/

dept/theatre/

Central Lakes College

Theatre Dept.

501 W. College Dr.

Brainerd, MN 56401

P: 218-855-8037

F: 218-828-2710

W: www.clcmn.edu/

academicprograms/

new/theatre/theatre.

htm

Gustavus Adolphus

College

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

800 W. College Ave.

Saint Peter, MN 56082

P: 507-933-8000

W: gustavus.edu/aca

demics/theatre-dance/

Minnesota State

Mankato

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

201 Performing Arts

Ctr.

Mankato, MN 56001

P: 507-389-2118

F: 507-389-2922

W: www.msutheatre.

com

Minnesota State University,

Moorhead

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

1104 7th Ave. South

Moorhead, MN 56563

P: 218-477-2126

F: 218-477-4612

W: www.mnstate.edu/

theatre

Southwest Minnesota

State University

Dept. Of Fine Arts

1501 State St., Fa 207

Marshall, MN 56258

P: 18006420684

F: 507-537-7014

W: www.southwestmsu.edu/thtr

St. Mary’s University

Of Minnesota

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

700 Terrace Heights

Winona, MN 55987-

1399

P: 800-635-5987

W: www.smumn.edu/

Index.aspx

St. Cloud State University

Theatre, Film Studies

& Dance

720 4th Ave. S

212 Performing Arts

Ctr.

St. Cloud, MN 56301-

4498

P: 320-308-3229

F: 320-308-2902

W: www.stcloudstate.

edu/theatrefilmdance

St. Olaf College

Theatre Dept.

1520 St. Olaf Ave.

Theatre Bldg.

Northfield, MN 55057

P: 507-646-3240

F: 507-646-3949

W: www.stolaf.edu/

depts/theatre

University Of Minnesota,

Duluth

1049 University Dr.

Duluth, MN 55812

P: 218-726-8000

F: 218-726-6798

W: www.d.umn.edu

University Of Minnesota,

Twin Cities

240 Williamson Hall

231 Pillsbury Dr. S.e.

Minneapolis, MN

55455-0213

P: 612-625-2008

W: www.tc.umn.edu

Winona State University

Theatre & Dance Dept.

P.O.Box 5838,

Winona, MN 55987

P: 800-342-5978

F: 507-457-5481

W: www.winona.edu

Mississippi

Bologna Performing

Arts Center

Bpac Dsu Box 3213

1003 W. Sunflower Rd.

Cleveland, MS 38733

P: 662-846-4625

F: 662-846-4627

W: www.bolognapac.

com

Delta State University

Hwy. 8 West

Cleveland, MS 38733

P: 662-846-3000

W: www.deltastate.edu

Mississippi University

For Women

Muw Dept. Of Music

And Theatre

1100 College St.

Muw-70

Columbus, MS 39701

P: 662-329-7260

F: 662-241-7815

W: www.muw.edu/

theatre

11901 Wornall Rd.

Kansas City, MO 64145

P: 816-501-2400

W: www.avila.edu

Culver-Stockton

College

Division Of Fine Arts

Theatre Dept.

One College Hill

Canton, MO 63435

P: 573-288-6000

W: www.culver.edu/

academics/divisions/

finearts/theatre/

Lindenwood University

Theatre Dept.

209 S. Kings Hwy.

St. Charles, MO 63301

P: 636-949-4949

W: www.lindenwood.

edu/academics/arts/

Missouri Southern

State University

Theatre Dept.

Taylor Performing Arts

Center

3950 E. Newman Rd.

Joplin, MO 64801-1595

P: 417-625-9393

W: www.mssu.edu/

theatre/theatre1.htm

Missouri State University

Theatre And Dance

Dept.

901 S. National Ave.

Springfield, MO 65897

P: 417-836-4400

F: 417-836-4234

W: www.theatreand

dance.missouristate.

edu

Missouri Valley College

The Theatre Dept.

500 E. College

Marshall, MO 65340

P: 660-831-4000

W: www.moval.edu/

TMD/index.asp

University Of Mississippi

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

P. O. Box 1848

University, MS 38677-

1848

P: 662-915-7177

F: 662-915-5053

W: www.olemiss.edu/

depts/liberal_arts/

University Of Southern

Mississippi

The College Of Arts

And Letters

118 College Dr., #5052

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-

0001

P: 601-266-1000

W: www.usm.edu/

theatre

Missouri

Avila University

Theatre Dept.

Northwest Missouri

State University

Dept. Of Theatre

800 University Dr.

Maryville, MO 64468

P: 660-562-1212

W: www.nwmissouri.

edu/dept/ctl

Repertory Theatre Of

St. Louis

130 Edgar Rd.,

P.O.Box 191730

St. Louis, MO 63119

P: 314-968-7340

W: www.repstl.org

Saint Louis University

Dept. Of Fine And

Performing Arts

221 N. Grand Blvd.

St. Louis, MO 63103

P: 314-977-2500

W: www.slu.edu/

x14264.xml

56 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

Southeast Missouri

State University

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

College Of Liberal Arts

One University Plaza,

Ms 7850,

Cape Girardeau, MO

63701

P: 573-651-2149

W: www.semo.edu/

theatreanddance

St. Louis University

Dept. Of Fine And

Performing Arts

221 N. Grand Blvd.

St. Louis, MO 63103

P: 314-977-3030

F: 314-977-2999

W: www.slu.edu/index.

xml

Stages St. Louis

444 Chesterfield Center

Chesterfield, MO 63017

P: 314-821-2407

W: www.stagesstlouis.

org

Stephens College

1200 E. Broadway

Columbia, MO 65215

P: 573-442-2211

F: 573-876-7216

W: www.stephens.edu

University Of Central

Missouri

Dept. Of Theatre

P.O.Box 800

Warrensburg, MO

64093

P: 877-729-8266

F: 660-543-8006

W: www.ucmo.edu/

x26474.xml

University Of Missouri,

Columbia

Dept. Of Theatre

129 Fine Arts Center

Columbia, MO 65211

P: 573-882-2021

F: 573-884-4034

W: theatre.missouri.edu

University Of Missouri,

Kansas City

(UMKC)

Dept. Of Theatre

Kansas City, MO 64110

P: 816-235-6222

W: www.umkc.edu/

theatre

Washington University

In St. Louis

Performing Arts Dept.

One Brookings Dr.

P.O.Box 1108

St. Louis, MO 63130

P: 314-935-5858

F: 314-935-4955

W: padarts.wustl.edu

Webster University

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

470 E. Lockwood Ave.

St Louis, MO 63119-

3194

P: 314-968-6991

F: 314-963-6102

W: www.webster.edu/

depts/finearts/theatre

William Woods University

Arts & Science Division

One University Ave.

Fulton, MO 65251

P: 800-995-3159

W: www.williamwoods.

edu

Montana

Carroll College

Performing Arts Dept.

1601 N. Benton Ave.

Helena, MT 59625

P: 406-447-4300

F: 406-447-4533

W: www.carroll.edu

Montana State University

Dept. Of Media &

Theatre Arts

Msu - Bozeman

P.O.Box 173350

Bozeman, MT 59717

P: 406-994-2484

F: 406-994-6214

W: mta.montana.edu

University Of Montana

Dept. Of Drama And

Dance

Performing Arts Ctr.

Rm.196

Missoula, MT 59812

P: 406-243-4481

F: 406-243-5726

W: www.sfa.umt.edu/

drama

Nebraska

Creighton University

Dept. Of Fine And

Performing Arts

Lied Education Center

For The

2500 California Plaza

Omaha, NE 68178-0303

P: 402-280-2509

W: www2.creighton.

edu/ccas/index.php

Metropolitan Community

College

P.O.Box 3777

Omaha, NE 68103-0777

P: 402-457-2400

W: www.mccneb.edu/

theatre/

Nebraska Wesleyan

University

Communication &

Theatre Arts

5000 St. Paul Ave.

Lincoln, NE 68504

P: 402-465-2395

W: www.nebrwesleyan.

edu/depts/commta

University Of Nebraska

Lincoln

Johnny Carson School

Of Theatre & Film

215 Temple Bldg.

12 Th & R St.

Lincoln, NE 68588

P: 402-472-2072

W: www.unl.edu/

theatrearts

Nevada

University Of Nevada,

Las Vegas

Dept. Of Theatre

4505 Maryland Pkwy.

Box 455036

Las Vegas, NV 89154

P: 702-895-3666

F: 702-895-0833

W: theatre.unlv.edu

University Of Nevada,

Reno

University Of Nevada

Mail Stop 0228

Reno, NV 89557

P: 775-784-6839

F: 775-784-1175

W: www.unr.edu/cla/

spth

New Hampshire

Dartmouth College

Rm.s 110 And 111

Hopkins Center

Hb 6204

Hanover, NH 03755

P: 603-646-3104

F: 603-646-1757

W: www.dartmouth.

edu/~theater

Keene State College

Theatre And Dance

Dept.

229 Main St.

Keene, NH 03435-2407

P: 603-358-2162

W: academics.keene.

edu/tad

New England College

Theatre Dept.

98 Bridge St.

Henniker, NH 03242

P: 603-428-2454

W: www.nec.edu

Plymouth State

University

Dept. Of Music, Theatre

And Dance

Msc 37

17 High St.

Plymouth, NH 03264-

1595

P: 603-535-2334

W: www.plymouth.

edu/mtd/theatre/index.html

University Of New

Hampshire

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

30 Academic Way

Paul Creative Arts Ctr.

Durham, NH 03824

P: 603-862-2919

F: 603-862-0298

W: www.unh.edu/

theatre-dance

New Jersey

College Of New Jersey

Theatre & Drama

P.O.Box 7718

2000 Pennington Rd.

Ewing, NJ 08628

P: 609-771-2278

W: www.tcnj.

edu/~arts/

Drew University

Theatre Dept.

36 Madison Ave.

Madison, NJ 07940

P: 973-408-3059

F: 973-408-3704

W: www.depts.drew.

edu/thea

Fairleigh Dickinson

University

Dept. Of Visual And

Perf. Arts

285 Madison Ave.

Madison, NJ 07940-

1099

P: 973-443-8635

W: www.fduarts.org

Kean University

Dept. Of Theatre

1000 Morris Ave.

Union, NJ 07083

P: 908-737-5326

W: www.kean.edu

Montclair State

University

College Of The Arts

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

Life Hall, Ste. 126

Montclair, NJ 07043

P: 973-655-4217

F: 973-655-7717

W: www.montclair.

edu/arts/dept/theatredance/index.html

Princeton University

185 Nassau St.

Princeton, NJ 08542

P: 609-258-3733

W: www.princeton.

edu/%7Evisarts/the.

html

Rowan University

College Of Fine And

Performing Arts

Theatre Dept.

201 Mullica Hill Rd.

Glassboro, NJ 08027-

1701

P: 856-256-4000

W: www.rowan.edu/

colleges/fpa

Rutgers University Of

NJ, Camden

Dept. Of Fine Arts/

Theater Dept.

314 Linden St.

Camden, NJ 08102-

1403

P: 856-225-6176

F: 856-225-6330

W: finearts.camden.

rutgers.edu/theater

Seton Hall University

Seton Hall University

400 S. Orange Ave.

South Orange, NJ

07079

P: 973-761-9000

W: artsci.shu.edu/communication/theatreperf.htm

Shakespeare Theatre

of New Jersey

36 Madison Ave

Madison, NJ 07940

P: 973-408-3278

W: www.njshakespeare.

org

William Paterson

University Of New

Jersey

Communication Dept.

300 Pompton Rd.

Wayne, NJ 07470

P: 877-978-3923

W: www.wpunj.edu

New Mexico

College Of Santa

Fe - Performing Arts

Department

Greer Garson Theater

Center

1600 St. Michael’s Dr.

Santa Fe, NM 87505

P: 505-473-6439

F: 505-473-6127

W: www.csf.edu

58 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

Eastern New Mexico

University

1500 S. Ave. K

Portales, NM 88130

P: 575-562-1011

W: www.enmu.edu

University Of New

Mexico

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

One University Of New

Mexico

Msc04 2570

Albuquerque, NM

87131-0001

P: 505-277-4332

F: 505-277-8921

W: www.unm.

edu/~theatre

New York

Actors Center

520 Eighth Ave.

Ste. 315

New York, NY 10018

P: 212-447-6309

F: 212-447-9688

W: www.theactorscen

ter.org

Adelphi University

Dept. Of Performing

Arts

1 South Ave.

P.O.Box 701

Garden City, NY 11530-

0701

P: 516-877-4930

F: 516-877-4926

W: www.adelphi.edu

Alfred University

Division Of Performing

Arts

1 Saxon Dr.

Alfred, NY 14802

P: 607-871-2562

F: 607-871-2339

W: www.alfred.edu

American Academy Of

Dramatic Arts, NY

120 Madison Ave.

New York, NY 10016

P: 800-463-8990

F: 212-696-1284

W: www.aada.org

American Mime

Theatre

61 4th Ave.

2nd Fl.

New York, NY 10003-

5204

P: 212-777-1710

W: www.american

mime.org

American Musical &

Dramatic Academy,

NY

211 W. 61st St.

New York, NY 10023

P: 800-367-7908

F: 212-247-0488

W: www.amda.edu

Atlantic Acting School

76 Ninth Ave.

Ste. 537

New York, NY 10011

P: 212-691-5919

F: 212-691-6280

W: www.atlantictheater.org

Bard College

Drama Dance Dept.

P.O.Box 5000

Annandale-on-hudsn,

NY 12504-5000

P: 845-758-7957

W: www.bard.edu/

Barnard College

Dept. Of Theatre

5th Fl., Milbank Hall

3009 Broadway

New York, NY 10027

P: 212-854-2080

W: www.barnard.edu/

theatre

Brooklyn College

Dept. Of Theater

2900 Bedford Ave.

Brooklyn, NY 11210-

2889

P: 718-951-5666

F: 718-951-4606

W: depthome.brooklyn.

cuny.edu/theater

Camp Broadway

336 W. 37th St.

Ste. 460

New York, NY 10018

P: 212-575-2929

F: 212-575-3125

W: www.campbroadway.com

Cazenovia College

22 Sullivan St.

Cazenovia, NY 13035

P: 800-654-3210

W: www.cazenovia.

edu/

Chautauqua Institution

Chautauqua Schools Of

Fine & Performing Arts

1 Ames Ave.

P.O.Box 28

Chautauqua, NY 14722

P: 180-0836

W: www.ciweb.org

Circle In The Square

Theatre School

1633 Broadway At

50th St.

New York, NY 10019

P: 212-307-0388

F: 212-307-0257

W: www.circlesquare.

org

City At Peace

104 W. 27th St.

12th Fl.

New York, NY 10001

P: 212-924-2300

F: 212-924-2167

W: www.cpnational.org

City University Of NY-

Graduate Center

Ph.d. Program In

Theatre

365 5th Ave.

New York, NY 10016

P: 212-817-8870

F: 212-817-1538

W: web.gc.cuny.edu/

theatre

City University Of

New York

The City College Of

New York

Theatre Dept.

160 Convent Ave.

New York, NY 10031

P: 212-650-7000

W: www.ccny.cuny.

edu/humanities/

Colgate University

Dana Arts Center,

Theater Dept.

13 Oak Dr.

Hamilton, NY 13346

P: 315-228-1000

F: 315-228-7002

W: www.colgate.edu

Columbia University

Theatre Arts Division

601 Dodge Hall, Mail

Code 1808

2960 Broadway

New York, NY 10027

P: 212-854-3408

W: www.columbia.edu/

cu/arts

Cornell University

Dept. Of Theatre, Film

& Dance

430 College Ave.

Ithaca, NY 14850

P: 607-254-2700

W: www.arts.cornell.

edu/theatrearts

Five Towns College

Theatre Arts Program

305 N. Service Rd.

Dix Hills, NY 11746-

5871

P: 631-424-7000

W: www.ftc.edu

Fordham University

Theatre Program

College At Lincoln

Center

113 W. 60th St.

New York, NY 10023

P: 212-636-6710

F: 212-636-6788

W: www.fordham.edu/

theatre

Gateway Playhouse

215 South Country Rd.

Bellport, NY 11713

P: 631-286-1133

W: www.gatewayplayhouse.com

60 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

Hamilton College

Dept. Of Theatre

198 College Hill Rd.

Clinton, NY 13323

P: 315-859-4057

W: www.hamilton.

edu/academics/department.

html?dept=Theatre

Hangar Theatre

P.O.Box 205

Ithaca, NY 14851

P: 607-273-8588

F: 607-273-4516

W: www.hangartheatre.org

Hartwick College

One Hartwick Dr.

Oneonta, NY 13820

P: 607-431-4000

F: 607-431-4207

W: www.hartwick.edu

HB Studio

120 Bank St.

New York, NY 10014

P: 212-675-2370

W: www.hbstudio.org

Hofstra University

Dept. Of Drama And

Dance

112 Hofstra Univ.

102 Emily Lowe Hall

Hempstead, NY 11549-

1000

P: 516-463-6600

W: www.hofstra.edu

Hunter College

Dept. Of Theatre

695 Park Ave.

New York, NY 10065

P: 212-772-5148

F: 212-650-3584

W: www.hunter.cuny.

edu/theatre

International Symposium

For Directors, La

Mama

LaMama Etc

74a E. 4th St.

New York, NY

10003

P: 212-254-

7710

W: www.

lamama.org

Ithaca College

201 Muller

Center

Ithaca, NY

14850

P: 607-274-

3345

W: www.ithaca.

edu/theatre

Julliard

School, Drama

Division

60 Lincoln Ctr.

Plaza

New York, NY

10023

P: 2127995000251

F: 212-875-8437

W: www.juilliard.edu

Lee Strasberg Theatre

Institute

115 Lee Strasberg

New York, NY 10003

P: 212-553-5500

W: www.strasberg.com

Linklater Center For

Voice And Language,

Llc

P.O.Box 504

New York, NY 10025

P: 212-340-4762

W: www.thelinklatercenter.com

Long Island University

School Of Visual &

Performing Arts

C.w. Post Campus

720 Northern Blvd.

Brookville, NY 11548-

1326

P: 516-299-2395

W: www.liu.edu/~svpa

Make Up Designory

School/ Mudshop

375 W. Broadway Ste.

202

New York, NY 10012

P: 212-925-9250

F: 212-925-9254

W: www.mud.edu

Manhattanville College

2900 Purchase Street

Purchase, NY 10577

P: 914-694-2200

W: www.manhattanville.edu

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 61


education DIRECTORY

Marymount Manhattan

College

Theatre Arts Program

221 E. 71st St.

New York, NY 10021

P: 212-517-0400

W: marymount.mmm.

edu

Michael Chekhov Acting

Studio

138 W. 15th St., 1st Fl.

New York, NY 10011

P: 646-385-2876

W: www.michaelchekhovactingstudio.com/

Nazareth College

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

4245 East Ave.

Rochester, NY 14618

P: 585-389-2525

F: 585-586-2452

W: www.naz.edu/dept/

theater_arts

Neighborhood

Playhouse School Of

Theatre

New York, NY 10022

P: 212-688-3770

F: 212-906-9051

W: www.the-neiplay.

org

New Actors Workshop

259 W. 30th St.

2nd Fl.

New York, NY 10001

P: 212-947-1310

F: 212-947-9729

W: www.newactor

sworkshop.com

New School For

Drama

151 Bank St.

New York, NY 10014

P: 212-229-5859

F: 212-242-5018

W: www.newschool.

edu

New School University

The New School For

Drama

55 W. 13th

New York, NY 10014

P: 212-229-8923

W: www.newschool.

edu

New York City College

Of Technology/CUNY

Entertainment Technology

Dept.

300 Jay St.

Brooklyn, NY 11201

P: 718-260-5000

F: 718-260-5591

W: www.citytech.cuny.

edu

New York Conservatory

For Dramatic Arts

School Of Film +

Television

39 W. 19th St.

New York, NY 10011

P: 212-645-0030

F: 212-645-0039

W: www.sft.edu

New York Conservatory

For The Arts

120 Schildknecht Rd.,

Hurley, NY 12443

P: 845-339-4340

W: www.nyca.org

New York Film Academy

100 E. 17th St.

New York, NY 10003

P: 212-674-4300

F: 212-477-1414

W: www.nyfa.com

New York State Theatre

Institution

37 First St.

Troy, NY 12180

P: 518-274-3200

F: 518-274-3815

W: www.nysti.org/

index.htm

New York University

Steinhardt School Of

Culture, Education, And

Human Development

Dept. Of Music And

Performing Arts Professions

35 W. 4th St., Ste. 777

New York, NY 10012

P: 212-998-5424

W: steinhardt.nyu.edu/

music

New York University

Tisch School of the Arts

Office of Student Affairs

721 Broadway, 8th Flr.

New York, NY 10003

P: 212-998-1900

F: 212-995-4060

W: www.nyu.edu/info/

tisch/staging

Niagara University

Niagara University

Theatre

P.O.Box 1913

Niagara University, NY

14109

P: 716-286-8482

W: www.niagara.edu/

theatre

NYS Theatre Institute

37 First St.

Troy, NY 12180

P: 518-274-3200

F: 518-274-3815

W: www.nysti.org

Pace University

Dept. Of Performing

Arts

1 Pace Plaza

New York, NY 10038

P: 212-346-1200

W: www.pace.edu

Purchase College

The Performing Arts

Ctr.

735 Anderson Hill Rd.

Purchase, NY 10577

P: 914-251-6000

W: www.purchase.edu

Queens College

Dept. Of Drama, Theatre

And Dance

Rathaus Hall 213

65-30 Kissena Blvd.

Flushing, NY 11367

P: 718-997-3075

F: 718-997-3095

W: qcpages.qc.edu/

dramadance/

EMPAC — Experimental

Media and

Performing Arts

Center

110 8th St.

Troy, NY 12180

P: 518-276.4135

W: empac.rpi.edu

Sarah Lawrence

College

Theatre Program

One Mead Way

Bronxville, NY 10708

P: 914-337-0700

W: www.slc.edu

Siena College

Theatre Program

515 Loudon Rd.

Siena Hall 321

Loudonville, NY 12211-

1462

P: 518-783-2325

F: 518-782-6548

W: www.siena.edu/

level3col.aspx?menu_

id=530&id=952

SITI Company

520 8th Ave., Ste. 310

New York, NY 10018

P: 212-868-0860

F: 212-868-0837

W: www.siti.org

Skidmore College

815 N. Broadway

Saratoga Springs, NY

12866

P: 518-580-5430

F: 518-580-5444

W: www.skidmore.edu/

academics/theater

St. Bonaventure

University

Drawer AU

St. Bonaventure, NY

14778

P: 716-375-7685

W: www.sbu.edu

Stella Adler Studio Of

Acting

31 W. 27th St.

3rd Fl.

New York, NY 10001

P: 212-689-0087

62 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


W: www.stellaadler.

com

SUNY, Buffalo State

Theater Dept.

1300 Elmwood Ave.

203 Rockwell Hall

Buffalo, NY 14222

P: 716-878-6416

F: 716-878-6402

W: www.buffalostate.

edu

SUNY, College At

Brockport

Dept. Of Theatre

350 New Campus Dr.

Brockport, NY 14420

P: 585-395-2796

W: www.brockport.

edu/theatre

SUNY, Fredonia

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

Rockefeller Arts Ctr.,

#212

280 Central Ave.

Fredonia, NY 14063

P: 716-673-3111

F: 716-673-3621

W: www.fredonia.edu

SUNY, Genesee Community

College

Theatre Arts Dept.

One College Rd.

Batavia, NY 14020

P: 585-343-0055

F: 585-343-4541

W: www.genesee.edu/

academics/programs/

Arts/Theatre/

SUNY, Oswego

Theatre Dept.

105 Tyler Hall

Oswego, NY 13126

P: 315-312-2140

F: 315-312-3394

W: www.oswego.edu/

theatre

SUNY, Stony Brook

State University Of

New York

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

Staller Ctr. For The Arts

Stony Brook, NY 11794

P: 631-632-7300

W: ws.cc.sunysb.edu/

theatrearts

SUNY, University At

Albany

Theatre Dept.

1400 Washington Ave.

Albany, NY 12222

P: 518-442-3300

F: 518-442-4206

W: www.albany.edu/

theatre/

SUNY, University At

Binghamton

Dept. Of Theater

P.O.Box 6000

Binghamton, NY

13902-6000

P: 607-777-2000

W: theatre.binghamton.edu/New/index.

htm

SUNY, University At

Buffalo

Theatre And Dance

810 Clemens Hall,

North Campus

Buffalo, NY 14260

P: 716-645-2711

F: 716-645-3888

W: www.cas.buffalo.edu/depts/the

atredance

SUNY, University At

New Paltz

School Of Fine & Performing

Arts

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

1 Hawk Dr.

New Paltz, NY 12561

P: 845-257-3200

W: www.newpaltz.edu/

theatre

SUNY, University At

Potsdam

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

44 Pierrepont Ave.

Potsdam, NY 13676

P: 315-267-2000

W: www.potsdam.edu/

SUNY, University At

Purchase

Conservatory Of Theatre

Arts & Film

735 Anderson Hill Rd.

Purchase, NY 10577

P: 914-251-6000

W: www.purchase.

edu/Departments/

AcademicPrograms/

Arts/TAF/

Syracuse University

College Of Visual And

Performing Arts

Dept. Of Drama

202 Crouse College

Syracuse, NY 13244

P: 315-443-2769

F: 315-443-4410

W: vpa.syr.edu

TVI Actors Studio

165 W. 46th St.

Ste. 509

New York, NY 10036

P: 212-302-1900

F: 212-302-1926

W: www.tvistudios.com

University Of Buffalo

Theatre & Dance

College Of Arts And

Sciences

810 Clemens Hall,

North Campus

Buffalo, NY 14260-5030

P: 716-645-2711

F: 716-645-3888

W: www.cas.buffalo.

edu

University/Resident

Theatre Association

1560 Broadway, Ste.

712

New York, NY 10036

P: 212-221-1130

F: 212-869-2752

W: www.urta.com

Vassar College - Theatre

Dept.

124 Raymond Ave.

Box 735

Poughkeepsie, NY

12604

P: 845-437-7000

W: drama.vassar.edu/

Wagner College

Theatre Dept.

One Campus Rd.

Staten Island, NY 10301

P: 718-390-3223

W: www.wagner.edu

North

Carolina

Appalachian State

University

ASU Dept. Of Theatre

& Dance

Chapell Wilson Hall

P.O.Box 32123

Boone, NC 28608

P: 828-262-3028

F: 828-265-8694

W: www.theatre.app

state.edu

Campbell University

The Theatre Dept.

P.O.Box 567

Buies Creek, NC 27506

P: 800-334-4111

F: 910-893-1200

W: www.campbell.edu

Catawba College

Theatre Arts Dept.

2300 W. Innes St.

Salisbury, NC 28144

P: 704-637-4409

F: 704-637-4222

W: www.catawba.edu/

academic/theatrearts

Central Piedmont

Community College

Arts And Comm Dept.

P.O.Box 35009

Charlotte, NC 28235

P: 704-330-2722

F: 704-330-6438

W: www.cpcc.cc.nc.us

Davidson College

Theatre Dept.

Box 7141

Davidson, NC 28035-

7141

P: 704-894-2361

W: www3.davidson.

edu/cms/x3738.xml

Duke University

Duke Dept. Of Theater

Studies

206 Bivins Bldg.

Box 90680

Durham, NC 27708-0680

P: 919-660-3343

F: 919-684-8906

W: www.duke.edu/web/

drama

Elon University

Campus Box 2800

Elon, NC 27244

P: 336-278-5600

W: www.elon.edu/

perarts

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 63


education DIRECTORY

Greensboro College

Theatre Dept.

815 W. Market St.

Greensboro, NC 27401

P: 800-346-8226

F: 336-271-6634

W: www.greensboro

college.edu/academics/departments/theatre/index.cfm

Guilford College

Theatre Studies Dept.

5800 W. Friendly Ave.

Greensboro, NC 27410

P: 336-316-2000

W: www.guilford.edu/

academics/departments/theatre/

High Point University

833 Montlieu Ave.

High Point, NC 27262

P: 800-345-6993

W: theatre.highpoint.

edu

Lees-McRae College

191 Main St.

P.O.Box 128

Banner Elk, NC 28604

P: 828-898-5241

F: 828-898-8814

W: www.lmc.edu/sites/

academics/Divisions/

PerformingArts/

Lenoir-Rhyne College

Dept. Of Theatre

7th Ave. & 8th St. Ne

Hickory, NC 28601

P: 828-328-1741

F: 828-328-7163

W: www.lrc.edu/

theatre

Livingstone College

Division Of Liberal Arts

Theatre Arts Dept.

701 W. Monroe St.

Salisbury, NC 28144

P: 800-835-3435

W: www.livingstone.

edu/academics/liberal

arts.html

Mars Hill College

Theatre Arts Dept.

P.O.Box 370

100 Athletic St.

Mars Hill, NC 28754

P: 866-642-4968

F: 828-689-1473

W: www.mhc.edu/

theatre/index.asp

North Carolina Agricultural

&technical

State UN

1601 E. Market St.

Greensboro, NC 27411

P: 336-344-7852

F: 336-334-4741

W: www.ncat.edu

North Carolina Central

University

Nccu Dept. Of Theater

115 Farrison-newton

Communications Bldg.

1801 Fayetteville St.

Durham, NC 27707

P: 919-530-6798

F: 919-530-6790

W: www.nccu.edu/

academics/liberalarts/

index.cfm

University Of North

Carolina School Of

The Arts

Drama Dept.

1533 S. Main St.

Winston-salem, NC

27127-2188

P: 336-770-3399

F: 336-770-3369

W: www.uncsa.edu

University Of North

Carolina At Asheville

Drama Dept.

1 University Heights

Asheville, NC 28806

P: 828-251-6610

F: 828-232-2416

W: www.unca.edu/

drama

University Of North

Carolina At Chapel

Hill

Dept. Of Dramatic Art

Cb# 3230

Center For Dramatic Art

Chapel Hill, NC 27599-

3230

P: 919-962-1132

F: 919-962-5791

W: drama.unc.edu/

info.htm

University Of North

Carolina At Greensboro

The Dept. Of Theatre

P.O.Box 26170

Greensboro, NC 27402-

6170

P: 336-334-4032

W: www.uncg.edu/the/

University Of North

Carolina At Wilmington

Dept. Of Theatre

601 S. College Rd.

Wilmington, NC 28403

P: 910-962-3000

W: www.uncw.edu/thr

Wake Forest University

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

P.O.Box 7264 Reynolda

Station

Winston-Salem, NC

27109

P: 336-758-5294

F: 336-758-5668

W: www.wfu.edu/

theatre

North Dakota

North Dakota State

University

Division Of Fine Arts,

Theatre Dept.

P.O.Box 5691

Fargo, ND 58105-5691

P: 701-231-9564

W: www.ndsu.edu/

finearts/theatre

University Of North

Dakota

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

Chandler Hall

P.O.Box 8136 University

Station

Grand Forks, ND 58202-

8136

P: 701-777-3446

F: 701-777-3522

W: www.und.edu

Ohio

Antioch College

Dept. Of Theatre

795 Livermore St.

Yellow Spings, OH

45387

P: 937-769-1000

W: antioch-college.edu

Baldwin-Wallace

College

Dept. Of Communication

And Theatre

Kleist Center For Art

And Dram

275 Eastland Rd.

Berea, OH 44017-2088

P: 440-826-2900

W: www.bw.edu/aca

demics/theatre

Bowling Green State

University

Dept. Of Theatre And

Film

338 South Hall

Bowling Green, OH

43403-0001

P: 419-372-2222

F: 419-372-7186

W: www.bgsu.edu/de

partments/theatrefilm

Case Western Reserve

University

Dept. Of Theater Arts

10900 Euclid Ave.

Cleveland, OH 44106

P: 216-368-4868

W: www.case.edu/

artsci/thtr

Clark State Community

College

Clark State Performing

Arts Center

300 S. Fountain Ave.

Springfield, OH 45506

P: 937-328-3841

F: 937-328-8084

W: pac.clarkstate.edu/

home.php

Cleveland State

University

Theater Arts Bldg.

2121 Euclid Ave.

1833 E. 23rd St.

Cleveland, OH 44115

P: 216-687-2113

W: csuohio.edu/theater

Denison University

Dept. Of Theater Arts

P.O.Box 740

Granville, OH 43023

P: 740-587-6276

F: 740-587-5755

W: www.denison.edu/

academics/depart

ments/theatre

Hiram College

Theatre Arts Dept.

P.O.Box 67

Hiram, OH 44234

P: 330-569-3211

W: www.hiram.edu

Kent State University

School Of Theatre &

Dance

B141 Music & Speech

Ctr.

Kent, OH 44242-0001

P: 330-672-0108

F: 330-672-2889

W: www.theatre.kent.

edu

Miami University

Dept. Of Theatre

501 E. High St.

Oxford, OH 45056

P: 513-529-1809

W: www.muohio.edu/

theatre

Oberlin College

Theater & Dance

Program

30 N. Professor St.

Oberlin, OH 44074

P: 440-775-8152

W: www.oberlin.edu/

thedance

Ohio Northern University

525 S. Main St.

Pac 106

Ada, OH 45810

P: 419-772-2000

W: www.onu.edu

Ohio State University

Dept. Of Theatre

1089 Drake Center

1849 Cannon Dr.

Columbus, OH 43210

P: 614-292-5821

F: 614-292-3222

W: theatre.osu.edu

Ohio University

School of Theater

Kantner Hall 307

Athens, OH

45701

P: 740-593-4818

W: www.ohio.edu/

theater

Ohio Wesleyan University

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

61 S. Sandusky St.

Delaware, OH 43015

P: 740-368-2000

F: 740-368-3858

W: www.owu.edu/

64 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Otterbein College

One Otterbein College

Westerville, OH 43081

P: 614-890-3000

W: www.otterbein.

edu

University Of Akron

School Of Theatre

& Arts

Guzzetta Hall, Rm. 394

The University Of

Akron

Akron, OH 44325

P: 330-972-7890

F: 330-972-7892

W: www.uakron.edu/

dtaa

University Of Cincinnati

Mary Emery Hal

P.O.Box 210003

Cincinnati, OH 45221-

0003

P: 513-556-6638

W: www.ccm.uc.edu

University Of

Findlay

Theatre Program

100d N. Main St.

Findlay, OH 45840

P: 800-548-0932

F: 419-434-4822

W: www.findlay.edu/

academics/colleges/

cola/academicpro-

grams/undergradu-

ate/thea/default.htm

University Of Toledo

Dept. Of Theatre And

Film

2801 W. Bancroft St.

Ctr. For Performing

Arts, Rm.1002, Mail

Stop 611

Toledo, OH 43606

P: 419-530-2202

F: 419-530-8439

W: theatrefilm.utoledo.edu

Wilmington College

1870 Quaker Way, Box

1211

Wilmington, OH

45177

P: 800-341-9318

W: www.wilmington.

edu/

Wittenberg University

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

Post Office Box 720

Springfield, OH 45501

P: 800-677-7558

F: 937-327-7029

W: www4.wittenberg.

edu/academics/thdn/

Wright State University

T148 Creative Arts Ctr.

3640 Colonel Glenn

Hwy.

Dayton, OH 45435-

0001

P: 937-775-3072

F: 937-775-3787

W: www.wright.edu/

tdmp

Youngstown State

University

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

One University Plaza

Youngstown, OH

44555

P: 330-941-3000

W: www.fpa.ysu.edu/

theater/index.html

Oklahoma

Northeastern State

University

Dept. Of Performing

Arts

600 N. Grand Ave.

Tahlequah, OK 74464

P: 918-456-5511

W: www.nsuok.edu

Oklahoma City

University

Dept. Of Theatre

2501 N. Blackwelder

Oklahoma City, OK

73106

P: 405-208-5000

F: 405-521-5447

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 65


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

W: www.okcu.edu/

theater

Oklahoma State University,

Stillwater

Dept. Of Theatre

121 Seretean Center

Stillwater, OK 74078

P: 405-744-6094

F: 405-744-6509

W: theatre.okstate.edu

Oral Roberts University

Communication &

Drama

7777 South Lewis

Tulsa, OK 74171

P: 918-495-6161

F: 918-495-6222

W: www.oru.edu/sec

ondary/undergrad.php

University Of Oklahoma

Weitzenhoffer School

Of Musical Theatre

Carpenter Hall

800 Asp Ave., Rm. 203

Norman, OK 73019

P: 405-325-0538

F: 405-325-7663

W: www.ou.edu/

finearts/musicaltheatre

University Of Oklahoma

Weitzenhoffer Family

College Of Fine Arts

Carpenter Hall, Rm. 104

Norman, OK 73019-

3021

P: 405-325-7370

F: 405-325-1667

W: finearts.ou.edu

University Of Tulsa

Henry Kendall College

Of Arts & Sciences

800 S. Tucker Ave.

Chapman Hall 111

Tulsa, OK 74104-3189

P: 918-631-2244

F: 918-631-3721

W: www.cas.utulsa.edu

Oregon

Oregon State University

Theatre Arts Program

University Theatres

141 Withycombe Hall

Corvallis, OR 97331

P: 541-737-2853

F: 541-737-5399

W: oregonstate.edu/

dept/theatre

Portland Actors Conservatory

1436 Sw Montgomery

St.

Portland, OR 97201-

2557

P: 503-274-1717

F: 503-274-0511

W: actorsconservatory.

com

Reed College

Theatre Dept.

3203 Se Woodstock

Blvd.

Portland, OR 97202-

8199

P: 503-771-1112

F: 503-777-7769

W: academic.reed.edu/

theatre

Southern Oregon

University

Theatre Arts Dept.

1250 Siskiyou Blvd.

Ashland, OR 97520

P: 541-552-6689

W: www.sou.edu/

theatre

University Of Oregon

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

216 Villiard Hall

1231 University Of

Oregon

Eugene, OR 97403

P: 541-346-4171

W: theatre.uoregon.

edu

University Of Portland

Performing And Fine

Arts Dept.

Buckley Center 235

5000 N. Willamette

Blvd.

Portland, OR 97203-

5798

P: 503-943-8000

W: www.up.edu

Willamette University

Dept. Of Theatre

900 State St.

Salem, OR 97301

P: 503-370-6300

W: www.willamette.

edu

Pennsylvania

Albright College

13th And Bern

Box 15234

Reading, PA 19612

P: 610-921-7660

F: 610-921-7294

W: www.alb.edu

Arcadia University

Theatre Arts Program

450 S. Easton Rd.

Glenside, PA 19038

P: 877-272-2342

W: www.arcadia.edu/

academic/default.

aspx?id=3704

Art Institute Of Pittsburgh

420 Boulevard Of The

Allies

Pittsburgh, PA 15219

P: 18002752470

F: 412-263-6667

W: www.aip.aii.edu

Bloomsburg Theatre

Ensemble At Alvina

Krause Theatre

226 Center St.

Bloomsburg, PA 17815

P: 570-784-8181

W: www.bte.org

Bucknell University

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

701 Moore Ave.

Lewisburg, PA 17837

P: 570-577-2000

F: 717-524-3760

W: www.bucknell.edu/

departments/theater.

dance

California University

Of Pennsylvania

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

250 University Ave.

California, PA 15419

P: 724-938-4000

F: 724-938-1587

W: www.cup.edu/

liberalarts/theatre/

index.jsp

Carnegie Mellon

University

School Of Drama

Purnell Ctr. For The Arts

#218

5000 Forbes Ave.

Pittsburgh, PA 15213

P: 412-268-1581

F: 412-621-0281

W: www.cmu.edu/cfa/

drama

Chatham University

Chatham University

Theatre

Eddy Theatre

Woodland Rd.

Pittsburgh, PA 15232

P: 412-365-1100

W: www.chatham.edu/

departments/writing/undergraduate/

theatre/

66 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

DeSales University

DeSales University

2755 Station Ave.

Center Valley, PA 18034

P: 610-282-1100

W: www.desales.edu

Dickinson College

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

P.O.Box 1773

Carlisle, PA 17013

P: 717-245-1239

W: www.dickinson.

edu/departments/

drama

Drexel University -

College Of Media Arts

33rd And Market St.s

Philadelphia, PA 19104

P: 215-895-2451

W: www.drexel.edu/

westphal

Franklin & Marshall

College

TDF Dept., Theatre

Dept.

P.O.Box 3003

Lancaster, PA 17604-

3003

P: 717-291-3911

W: tdf.fandm.edu

School Of Theatre

103 Arts Bldg.

University Park, PA

16802

P: 814-865-7586

F: 814-865-5754

W: www.theatre.psu.

edu

Point Park University

Dept. Of Theatre

201 Wood St.

Pittsburgh, PA 15222

P: 412-391-4100

W: www.pointpark.edu

Seton Hill University

Theatre Program

One Seton Hill Dr.

Greensburg, PA 15601

P: 724-834-2200

F: 724-834-1294

W: www.setonhill.edu

Swarthmore College

Dept. Of Theater

500 College Ave.

Swarthmore, PA 19081

P: 610-328-8149

F: 610-957-6179

W: www.swarthmore.

edu/Humanities/the

ater/content/Home.

php

York, PA 17403-3651

P: 717-846-7788

W: www.ycp.edu/

academics/2444.htm

Rhode Island

Brown University

Dept. Of Theatre,

Speech And Dance

Lyman Hall

Box 1897

Providence, RI 02912

P: 401-863-3283

F: 401-863-7529

W: www.brown.edu/

Departments/Theatre_

Speech_Dance/

Providence College

Theatre Dept.

549 River Ave.

Providence, RI 02918-

0001

P: 401-865-1000

F: 401-865-2761

W: www.providence.

edu/Theatre/Theatre.

htm

Roger Williams University

Performing Arts Center

One Old Ferry Rd.

Bristol, RI 02809

P: 401-254-3626

F: 401-254-3634

W: departments.rwu.

edu/theatre

University Of Rhode

Island

Fine Arts Center

105 Upper College Rd.

Kingston, RI 02881

P: 401-874-5843

F: 401-874-5618

W: www.uri.edu/artsci/

the

South

Carolina

Centre Stage-South

Carolina

501 River St.

Greenville, SC 29601

P: 877-377-1339

W: www.centrestage.

org

Indiana University Of

Pennsylvania

Dept. Of Theater And

Dance

Waller Hall, Rm. 104

401 S. Eleventh St.

Indiana, PA 15705

P: 724-357-2965

F: 724-357-7899

W: www.arts.iup.edu/

theater

King’s College

Theatre Work Shop

133 N. River St.

Wilkes-barre, PA 18711

P: 570-208-5900

W: www.kings.edu

Temple University

Tomlinson Theater

011-05

1301 W. Norris St.

Philadelphia, PA 19122

P: 215-204-8414

F: 215-204-8566

W: www.temple.edu/

theater

University Of Pittsburgh

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

1617 Cathedral Of

Learning

Pittsburgh, PA 15260

P: 412-624-6568

W: www.play.pitt.edu

Lafayette College

Lafayette College

301a Pardee Hall

Easton, PA 18042

P: 610-330-5000

F: 610-330-5606

W: www.lafayette.edu

University of the Arts

College of Performing

Arts

320 S. Broad Street

Philadelphia, PA 19102

P: 800-616-ARTS

W: www.uarts.edu

Lehigh University

Maginnes Hall

420 E. Packer Ave.

Bethlehem, PA 18015

P: 610-758-3640

W: cas.lehigh.edu/casweb/Content/default.

aspx?pageid=567

Villanova University

Theatre Dept.

800 Lancaster Ave.

Villanova, PA 19085

P: 610-519-6000

F: 610-519-6800

W: www.villanova.edu/

artsci/theatre

Muhlenberg College

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

2400 Chew St.

Allentown, PA 18104-

5586

P: 484-664-3335

F: 484-664-3623

W: www.muhlenberg.

edu

Pennsylvania State

University

Wilkes University

Visual & Performing

Arts Dept.

84 W. South St.

Wilkes-Barre, PA 18766

P: 570-408-4420

W: www.wilkes.edu/

vpa

York College Of Pennsylvania

The Theatre Dept.

441 Country Club Rd.

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 67


education DIRECTORY

College Of Charleston

Theatre Dept.

School Of The Arts

66 George St.

Charleston, SC 29424

P: 843-953-6306

F: 843-953-8210

W: www.cofc.edu/

theatre

Converse College

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

580 E. Main St.

Spartanburg, SC 29302

P: 864-596-9000

W: www.converse.edu

East Carolina University

School Of Theatre &

Dance

1001 E. 5th St.

Greenville, SC 27858-

4353

P: 252-328-6390

F: 252-328-4890

W: www.theatre-dance.

ecu.edu/

Lander University

320 Stanley Ave.

Greenwood, SC 29649-

2099

P: 864-388-8000

W: www.lander.edu/

mass

Presbyterian College

Dept. Of Art, Theatre,

And Dance

503 S. Broad St.

Clinton, SC 29325

P: 864-833-2820

F: 864-833-8600

W: www.presby.edu/

University Of South

Carolina

Longstreet Theatre

Main Office, Rm. 402

Columbia, SC 29208

P: 803-777-4288

F: 803-777-6669

W: www.cas.sc.edu/

thea

University Of South

Carolina, Aiken

471 University Pkwy.

Aiken, SC

P: 803-648-6851

W: www.usca.edu

Winthrop University

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

701 Oakland Ave.

Rock Hill, SC 29733

P: 803-323-2287

F: 803-323-2560

W: www.winthrop.edu

South Dakota

Augustana College

In SD

Dept. Of Theatre

2001 S. Summit Ave.

Sioux Falls, SD 57197

P: 605-274-5213

W: www.augie.edu/

dept/coth/theatre/

main.html

University Of South

Dakota

Dept. Of Theatre

414 E. Clark St.

Vermillion, SD 57069

P: 605-677-5418

F: 605-677-5988

W: www.usd.edu/cfa/

Theatre

Tennessee

Austin Peay State

University

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

P.O.Box 4475

Clarksville, TN 37044

P: 931-221-6767

W: www.apsu.edu/

theatre_dance

Belmont University

Theatre Dept.

1900 Belmont Blvd.

Nashville, TN 37212-

3757

P: 615-460-6012

W: www.belmont.edu/

theatre

Chattanooga State

Technical Community

College

4501 Amnicola Hwy.

Office: Hum 236

Chattanooga, TN

37406-1097

P: 423-697-4404

F: 423-697-3146

W: www.chattanoogastate.edu/Theatre/

default.asp

Cumberland University

Art, Dance And Theatre

Dept.

One Cumberland

Square

Lebanon, TN 37087-

3408

P: 800-467-0562

F: 615-444-2569

W: www.cumberland.

edu/undergrad/sma/

art_dance_theatre.html

Lambuth University

School Of Arts And

Communication

705 Lambuth Blvd.

Jackson, TN 38301

P: 800-526-2884

W: www.lambuth.edu

Milligan College

P.O.Box 500

Milligan College, TN

37682

P: 423-461-8700

W: www.milligan.edu/

Rhodes College

Dept. Of Theatre

2000 N. Parkway

Memphis, TN 38112-

1690

P: 901-843-3000

W: www.rhodes.edu/

academics/7561.asp

Sewanee: The University

Of The South

Theatre Arts Dept.

735 University Ave.

Sewanee, TN 37383

P: 931-598-1000

W: www.sewanee.edu

University Of Memphis

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

144 Theatre Communication

Bldg.

Memphis, TN 38152-

3150

P: 901-678-5643

W: www.memphis.edu/

theatre

University Of Tennessee

At Chattanooga

Dept. Of Theatre &

Speech

615 Mccallie Ave.

Chattanooga, TN 37403

P: 423-425-4374

W: www.utc.edu/

Academic/TheatreAnd

Speech/

University Of Tennessee

At Knoxville

Dept. Of Theatre

206 Mcclung Tower

Knoxville, TN 37996

P: 865-974-5161

F: 865-974-4867

W: www.clarence

browntheatre.com

University Of Tennessee

At Martin

Theatre Arts Dept.

102 Fine Arts Bldg.

Martin, TN 38238

P: 731-881-7400

W: www.utm.edu/

departments/chfa/

finearts

Vanderbilt University

Dept. Of Theatre

Vu Station B #350001

2301 Vanderbilt Place

Nashville, TN 37235-

0001

P: 615-322-2404

W: sitemason.vander

bilt.edu/theatre

Texas

Abilene Christian

University

Theatre Dept.

Acu Box 27843

Abilene, TX 79699-7843

P: 325-674-2303

F: 325-674-6887

W: www.acu.edu/

academics/cas/theatre/

index.html

Alamo Community

College, San Antonio

Theatre & Speech Communication

Dept.

1300 San Pedro Ave.

San Antonio, TX 78212-

4299

P: 210-733-2715

F: 210-785-6484

W: www.accd.edu

Amarillo College

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

& Dance

22nd & S. Jackson

P.O.Box 447 - Mb 305

Amarillo, TX 79178

P: 806-371-5359

F: 806-371-5370

W: sites.actx.

edu/~theatre/

Angelina College

Fine Arts Div - Theatre

Dept.

P.O.Box 1768 - Hwy. 59

South

Lufkin, TX 75902

P: 936-633-5233

F: 409-639-4299

W: www.angelina.

cc.tx.us

Angelo State University

Cdj Dept., Drama Dept.

Asu Station # 10895

San Angelo, TX 76909

P: 325-942-2031

W: www.angelo.edu/

dept/cdj

Austin College

Theatre Dept.

900 N. Grand Ave.

Sherman, TX 75090-

4440

P: 903-813-2000

F: 903-813-2565

W: www.austincollege.

edu

Austin Community

College

Rio Grande Campus

Drama Dept.

1212 Rio Grande

Austin, TX 78701

P: 512-223-3000

W: www.austincc.edu/

drama

Baylor University

Baylor Theatre

One Bear Place #97262

Waco, TX 76798

P: 254-710-2407

F: 254-710-1444

W: www.baylor.edu/

theatre

Brazosport College

Dept. Of Drama

500 College Dr.

Lake Jackson, TX 77566

P: 979-230-3000

W: www.brazosport.

edu

Brookhaven College

Dept. Of Theatre

3939 Valley View Lane

Farmers Branch, TX

75244-4997

P: 972-860-4244

W: www.brookhavencollege.edu/instruction/bcsa/drama/

Cisco Junior College

Dept. Of Drama

101 College Heights

Cisco, TX 76437

P: 254-442-5019

F: 254-442-5100

W: www.cjctheatre.

com

Clarendon College,

Claradon Campus

Performing/visual/

communications Arts

Theatre Arts Dept.

1122 College Dr.,

P.O.Box 968

Clarendon, TX 79226

P: 806-874-3571

W: www.theatre-arts.

net

Coastal Bend College

Dept. Of Drama

3800 Charco Rd.

Beeville, TX 78102

P: 361-354-2322

W: www.coastalbend.

edu/Acdem/visual/

College Of The

Mainland

Arena Theatre

1200 Amburn Rd.

Texas City, TX 77591

P: 409-938-1211

W: www.com.edu/

campus-life/theatre.

cfm

Collin County Community

College

The Theatre Dept.

2800 E. Spring Creek

Pkwy.

Plano, TX 75074

P: 972-881-5100

F: 972-881-5103

W: www.collintheatrecenter.com/home.

htm

Del Mar Community

College

Del Mar Drama Dept.

101 Baldwin Blvd.

Corpus Christi, TX

78404

P: 361-698-1200

F: 361-886-1511

W: www.delmar.edu/

drama

Eastfield College

Dept. Of Theatre

3737 Motley Dr.

Mesquite, TX 75150

P: 972-860-7002

W: www.dcccd.edu

Hardin-Simmons

University

Theatre Dept.

2200 Hickory, Box

14864

Abilene, TX 79698

P: 325-670-1404

W: www.hsutx.edu/

academics/theatre/

index.html

Howard College

Dept. Of Theater/drama

1001 Birdwell Lane

Big Spring, TX 79720

P: 432-264-5000

W: www.howardcol

lege.edu/

68 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Howard Payne

University

Dept. Of Communication

And Theatre

1000 Fisk St.

Brownwood, TX

76801

P: 325-649-8020

W: www.hputx.edu

KD Studio: Actors

Conservatory

Kd Studio Acting

School

2600 Stemmons Frwy,

Ste. 117

Dallas, TX 75207

P: 214-638-0484

F: 214-630-5140

W: www.kdstudio.

com

Kingwood College

Dept. Of Drama

20000 Kingwood Dr.

The Woodlands, TX

77339

P: 281-312-1600

W: kingwood.lonestar.

edu/

Lamar State College

- Port Arthur

1500 Procter St..

Port Arthur, TX 77640

P: 800-477-5872

W: www.pa.lamar.edu

Lee College

Drama Dept.

P.O.Box 818

Baytown, TX 77522-

0818

P: 281-427-5611

F: 713-425-6520

W: www.lee.edu

Lon Morris College

800 College Ave.

Lon Morris College

Jacksonville, TX 75766

P: 800-259-5753

F: 903-589-4000

W: www.lonmor

ris.edu/dynpage.

php?pageid=108

Lubbock Christian

University

Dept. Of Communications/fine

Arts

5601 19th St.

Lubbock, TX 79407

P: 800-933-7601

F: 806-720-7255

W: www.lcu.edu

McMurry University

Dept. Of Theatre

14th & Sayles Blvd.

Mcmurry Station

Box 278

Abilene, TX 79697

P: 325-793-4700

W: www.mcm.edu/

newsite/web/

Midwestern State

University

Dept. Of Theatre

3410 Taft Blvd.

Wichita Falls, TX

76308-2099

P: 940-397-4670

F: 940-397-4909

W: finearts.mwsu.

edu/theatre/

Navarro College

Dept. Of Theatre/

Drama

3200 W. 7th Ave.

Corsicana, TX 75110

P: 903-875-7632

F: 903-874-4636

W: www.navarrocol

lege.edu/

North Central Texas

College

Dept. Of Fine Arts

1525 W. California

Gainesville, TX 76240-

4699

P: 940-668-7731

F: 940-668-3317

W: www.nctc.edu/

finearts.html

North Harris

Montgomery Comm.

college

5000 Research Forest

Dr.

The Woodlands, TX

77384

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 69


education DIRECTORY

P: 832-813-6500

W: www.nhmccd.edu

North Lake College

Dept. Of Theatre

5001 N. Macarthur

Blvd.

Irving, TX 75038-3899

P: 972-273-3000

W: www.northlakecol

lege.edu/academics/

vparts/index.html

Our Lady Of The Lake

University

Dept. Of English,

Drama And Communication

Arts

411 Sw 24th St.

San Antonio, TX 78207

P: 210-434-6711

F: 210-431-4036

W: www.ollusa.edu

Palo Alto College

Dept. Of Drama

1400 W. Villaret

San Antonio, TX 78224

P: 210-486-3000

W: www.accd.edu/pac/

htm/Current/academics/depts/arts_speech/

default.htm

Paris Junior College

Dept. Of Speech/

theatre

2400 Clarksville St.

Paris, TX 75460

P: 903-785-7661

W: www.parisjc.edu

Prairie View A&M

University

College Of Arts And

Sciences

P.O.Box 519

Prairie View, TX 77446-

0519

P: 936-261-3311

F: 936-261-3188

W: www.pvamu.edu/

pages/329.asp

Richland College

Theatre Dept.

12800 Abrams Rd.

Dallas, TX 75243-2199

P: 972-238-6100

W: www.rlc.dcccd.edu/

human/theatre/

Sam Houston State

University

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

Box 2297

Huntsville, TX 77341

P: 936-294-1329

F: 936-294-3898

W: www.shsu.

edu/~drm_www

Schreiner University

Dept. Of Theatre

2100 Memorial Blvd.

Kerrville, TX 78028

P: 830-896-5411

F: 830-896-3232

W: www.schreiner.edu

South Plains College

Dept. Of Fine Arts

Theatre Arts Program

1401 S. College Ave.

Levelland, TX 79336

P: 806-894-9611

F: 806-894-5274

W: www.southplain

scollege.edu/finearts/

theatre

South Texas Community

College

3201 West Pecan

Mcallen, TX 78501

P: 800-742-7822

W: www.southtexas

college.edu/speechdrama/

Southern Methodist

University

Meadows School Of

The Arts

Division Of Theatre

P.O.Box 750356

Dallas, TX 75275

P: 214-768-2558

F: 214-768-1136

W: www.smu.edu/

meadows/theatre

Southwestern Adventist

College

100 W. Hillcrest

P.O.Box 567

Keene, TX 76059

P: 800-433-2240

W: www.swau.edu

Southwestern University

Theatre Dept.

1001 E. University Ave.

Georgetown, TX 78626

P: 512-863-6511

W: www.southwestern.

edu

St. Edward’s University

Mary Moody Northen

Theatre

3001 S. Congress Ave.

Austin, TX 78704

P: 512-448-8400

W: www.stedwards.edu

St. Mary’s University

Dept. Of Music/drama/

art

One Camion Santa

Maria

San Antonio, TX 78228-

8580

P: 210-436-3011

W: www.stmarytx.edu/

acad/drama/

St. Stephen’s Episcopal

School

Theatre Focus

2900 Bunny Run Rd.

Austin, TX 78746

P: 512-327-1213

W: www.sstx.org

Stephen F. Austin

State University

College Of Fine Arts

P.O.Box 13022, Sfa

Station

Nacogdoches, TX

75962

P: 936-468-4003

W: www.finearts.sfasu.

edu

Sul Ross State University

Theatre Program

P.O.Box C-114

Alpine, TX 79832

P: 432-837-8011

F: 432-837-8376

W: www.sulross.edu/

pages/3627.asp

Tarleton State University

Dept. Of Fine Arts And

Communications

Box T-0320

Tarleton Station, TX

76402

P: 254-968-9245

W: www.tarleton.

edu/~theater/

Texarkana College

Humanities Division/

drama Dept.

2500 N. Robinson Rd.

Texarkana, TX 75501

P: 903-832-5565

F: 903-832-5030

W: www.texarkanacol

lege.edu

Texas A&M University

The Dept. Of Performance

Studies

304 Academic Bldg.

4240 Tamu

College Station, TX

77843-4240

P: 979-845-3355

F: 979-862-2666

W: performanc

estudies.tamu.edu

Texas Lutheran University

Dept. Of Dramatic

Media

1000 W. Court St.

Seguin, TX 78155

P: 830-372-8000

F: 830-372-8096

W: www.tlu.edu

Texas Southern

University - Fine Arts

Dept.

3100 Cleburne St.

Houston, TX 77004

P: 713-313-7011

W: www.tsu.edu/

academics/arts

Texas State University,

San Marcos

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

430 Moon St.

San Marcos, TX 78666

P: 512-245-2147

F: 512-245-8440

W: www.theatreand

dance.txstate.edu

Texas Tech University

605 Indiana Ave.

Box 42191

Lubbock, TX 79409-

2191

P: 800-692-6877

W: www.ttu.edu/ideal

Texas Woman’s University

Dept. Of Drama

P.O.Box 425708

Denton, TX 76204-4254

P: 940-898-2086

W: www.twu.edu/soa/

Trinity University

Dept. Of Speech &

Drama

One Trinity Pl

San Antonio, TX 78212-

7200

P: 210-999-8511

F: 210-999-8512

W: www.trinity.edu/

departments/speech_

and_drama

University Of Dallas

Drama Dept.

1845 E. Northgate Dr.

Irving, TX 75062

P: 972-721-5061

F: 972-721-5302

W: www.udallas.edu/

drama

University Of Houston

School Of Theatre &

Dance

4800 Calhoun Rd.

Houston, TX 77204

P: 713-743-3003

F: 713-743-2648

W: www.class.uh.edu/

theatre

University Of North

Texas

Dept. Of Dance &

Theatre

P.O.Box 310607

Denton, TX 76203

P: 940-565-2211

F: 940-565-4453

W: www.danceandthe

atre.unt.edu

University Of St.

Thomas

Drama Dept.

3800 Montrose Blvd.

Houston, TX 77006

P: 713-522-7911

W: www.stthom.edu/

drama

University Of Texas At

Arlington

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

Box 19103

Arlington, TX 76019-

0103

P: 817-272-5722

W: www.uta.edu/

theatre

University Of Texas At

Austin

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

1 University Station

D3900

Austin, TX 78712-0362

P: 512-471-5793

F: 512-471-0824

W: www.finearts.

utexas.edu/tad

University Of Texas At

Dallas

School Of Arts &

Humanities, Jo31

800 West Campbell Rd.

Richardson, TX 75080-

3021

P: 972-883-2980

W: ah.utdallas.edu/

undergraduate/theater.

html

University Of Texas At

El Paso

Dept. Of Theatre, Dance

And Film

Fox Fine Arts Bldg.

371d

500 W. University Ave.

El Paso, TX 79968-0549

P: 915-747-5146

F: 915-747-5438

W: www.utep.edu/

theatre

University Of Texas,

Pan American

Utpa Theatre-television-film

1201 W. University Dr.

Edinburg, TX 78539

P: 866441

W: www.utpa.edu/

dept/comm/theatre

University Of The

Incarnate Word

Theatre Arts Dept.

4301 Broadway

San Antonio, TX 78209

P: 210-829-6000

W: www.uiw.edu/

home/about/index.htm

Victoria College

Humanities And Fine

Arts Dept.

2200 E. Red River

Victoria, TX 77901

P: 361-573-3291

W: www.victoriacol

lege.edu

Weatherford College

Fine Arts/speech Dept.

225 College Park Dr.

Weatherford, TX 76086

P: 800-287-5471

F: 817-594-0627

W: www.wc.edu/

West Texas A&m

University

Dept. Of Art, Communication

And Theatre

2501 Fourth Ave.

Canyon, TX 79016

P: 806-651-0000

W: www.wtamu.edu

Western Texas College

Fine Arts Dept.

6200 College Ave.

Snyder, TX 79549

P: 325-573-8511

F: 325-573-8511

W: www.wtc.edu.

Utah

Brigham Young

University

Dept. Of Theatre &

Media Arts

D-581 Harris Fine Art

Center

Provo, UT 84602

P: 801-422-6645

F: 801-422-0654

W: tma.byu.edu

College Of Eastern

Utah

Theatre Dept.

451 E. 400 North

Price, UT 84501

P: 435-613-5000

W: www.ceu.edu

Dixie State College

Of Utah

Theatre Dept.

225 S. 700 E. St.

St. George, UT 84770

P: 435-652-7500

W: www.dixie.edu/aca/

finearts.html

Southern Utah University

Theatre Arts & Dance

Dept.

351 W. University Blvd.

Cedar City, UT 84720

P: 435-586-7700

W: www.suu.edu/

pva/ta

University Of Utah

Dept. Of Theatre

240 S. 1500 E

Rm.206

Salt Lake City, UT

84112-0170

P: 801-581-6448

W: www.theatre.utah.

edu

Utah Shakespearean

Festival

351 W. Center St.

Cedar City, UT 84720

P: 435-586-7878

F: 435-865-8003

W: www.bard.org

Utah State University

Utah State Theatre

Dept.

4025 Old Main Hill

Logan, UT 84322-4025

P: 435-797-3046

F: 435-797-0086

W: www.usu.edu/

theatre

Vermont

Bennington College

Dept. Of Drama

One College Dr.

Bennington, VT 05201

P: 802-442-5401

W: www.bennington.

edu

Dialect Accent Specialists

P.O.Box 44

Lyndonville, VT 05851

P: 800-753-1016

F: 802-626-8676

W: www.dialectac

centspecialists.com

Dorset Theatre

Festival

P.O.Box 510

Dorset, VT 05251

P: 802-867-5777

W: www.dorsettheatref

70 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


estival.org

Green Mountain

College

Visual & Performing Arts

Dept.

One Brennan Circle

Poultney, VT 05764

P: 800-776-6675

F: 802-287-8099

W: www.greenmtn.edu

Middlebury College

Dept. Of Theatre

Center For The Arts

Middlebury, VT 05753

P: 802-443-5601

F: 802-443-2137

W: www.middlebury.

edu/academics/ump/

majors/theatre/

Saint Michael’s College

Dept. Of Theatre

One Winooski Park

Colchester, VT 05439

P: 802-654-2000

W: www.smcvt.edu

University Of Vermont

Dept. Of Theatre

226 Waterman

Burlington, VT 05405

P: 802-656-3131

W: www.uvm.edu/

theatre

Virginia

College Of William

And Mary

Dept. Of Theatre,

Speech And Dance

P.O.Box 8795

Williamsburg, VA 23187-

8795

P: 757-221-2660

F: 757-221-2507

W: www.wm.edu/

theatre

Emory & Henry College

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

P.O.Box 947

Emory, VA 24327

P: 276-944-6667

F: 276-944-6259

W: theatre.ehc.edu/

new/mainintro.htm

Ferrum College

Theatre And Drama

Dept.

P.O.Box 1000

Ferrym, VA 24088

P: 540-365-2121

W: www.ferrum.edu

George Mason

University

Dept. Of Theatre

4400 University Dr.

Fairfax, VA 22030

P: 703-993-1000

W: www.gmu.edu

Hampton University

Dept. Of Fine And

Performing Arts

Theatre Dept.

Hampton, VA 23668

P: 757-727-5402

F: 757-727-5047

W: www.hamptonu.

edu/academics/

schools/libarts/fparts/

Hollins University

P. O. Box 9602

Roanoke, VA 24020

P: 540-362-6259

W: www.hollins.edu/

undergrad/theatre/

theatre.htm

James Madison University

School Of Theatre And

Dance

Theatre Ii, Msc 5601

Harrisonburg, VA 22807

P: 540-568-6342

W: www.jmu.edu/

theatre

Longwood University

Dept. Of Theatre

201 High St.

Farmville, VA 23909

P: 434-395-2643

W: www.longwood.

edu/theatre

Mary Baldwin College

Theatre Dept.

318 Prospect St.

Staunton, VA 24401

P: 540-887-7019

F: 540-887-7139

W: www.mbc.edu/

Old Dominion University

Theatre Dept.

Norfolk, VA 23529

P: 757-683-3000

F: 757-683-4700

W: www.odu.edu/al/

comm

Radford University

Dept. Of The Theatre And

Cinema

Martin Hall 209

Box 6903

Radford, VA 24142

P: 800-890-4265

F: 540-831-6313

W: theatre.asp.radford.

edu

Regent University

School Of Communication

And The Arts

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

1000 Regent University

Dr.

Virginia Beach, VA 23464

P: 888-777-7729

F: 757-226-4279

W: www.regent.edu/

theatre


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

Roanoke College

221 College Lane

Salem, VA 24153

P: 540-375-2500

W: web.roanoke.edu/

Shenandoah University

Theatre Division

1460 University Dr.

Winchester, VA 22601

P: 540-665-4500

W: www.su.edu

Sweet Briar College

Theatre Arts Dept.

115 Quad Swbr

Amherst, VA 24521

P: 434-381-6100

W: www.theatre.sbc.

edu/

University Of Mary

Washington

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

1301 College Ave.

Fredericksburg, VA

22401

P: 540-654-1243

W: www.umw.edu/cas/

theatre

University Of Richmond

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

Modlin Ctr. For The Arts

28 Westhampton Way

Richmond, VA 23173

P: 804-289-8592

F: 804-287-1841

W: theatre.richmond.

edu

University Of Virginia

Dept. Of Drama

P. O. Box 400128

Charlottesville, VA

22904-4128

P: 332-453-0303

F: 144-553-0303

W: www.virginia.edu/

drama/masters.htm

Virginia Commonwealth

University

W.e. Singleton Ctr. For

The Performing Arts

922 Park Ave.

P.O.Box 842524

Richmond, VA 23284-

2524

P: 804-828-1514

W: www.pubinfo.vcu.

edu/artweb/theatre/

Virginia Tech

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

203 Performing Arts

Bldg.

Blacksburg, VA 24061

P: 540-231-5335

W: www.theatre.vt.edu

Wolf Trap Foundation

For The Performing

Arts

1645 Trap Rd.

Vienna, VA 22182

P: 703-255-1900

W: www.wolf-trap.org

Washington

Central Washington

University

Theatre Arts Dept.

400 E. University Way

Ellenburg, WA 98926

P: 509-963-1760

F: 509-963-2301

W: www.cwu.

edu/~theatre

Columbia Gorge

School Of Theatre

1381 Snowden Rd.

White Salmon, WA

98672-8233

P: 800-405-3450

F: 509-493-1501

W: www.cgst.com

Cornish College Of

The Arts

Theater Dept.

Main Campus Center

1000 Lenora St., 6th Fl.

Seattle, WA 98121

P: 800726

F: 206-726-5050

W: www.cornish.edu/

THEATER/

Eastern Washington

University

526 5th St.

Cheney, WA 99004

P: 509-359-6200

W: www.ewu.edu

Lower Columbia

Community College,

Longview Campus

Columbia Theatre

1544 12th Ave.

Ste. B.

Longview, WA 98632

P: 360-578-8499

W: lowercolumbia.edu/

community/art-andentertainment/theatre/

Seattle Children’s

Theatre

201 Thomas St.

Seattle, WA 98109

P: 206-443-0807

F: 206-443-0442

W: www.sct.org

Seattle University

901 12th Ave., P.O.Box

222000

Seattle, WA 98122-1090

P: 206-296-5300

W: www.seattleu.edu/

artsci/finearts/events/

theatre.html

Skagit Valley College,

Mount Vernon

Campus

Theatre Arts Dept.

2405 E. College Way

Mount Vernon, WA

98273

P: 360-416-7600

W: www.skagit.edu

University Of Washington

School Of Drama

Box 353950

Seattle, WA 98195

P: 206-543-5140

F: 206-543-8512

W: depts.washington.

edu/uwdrama

Washington State

University

Theatre Arts Program

Daggy Hall 320

P.O.Box 642432

Pullman, WA 99164-

2432

P: 509-335-7447

F: 509-335-4255

W: www.libarts.wsu.

edu/theatre

Western Washington

University

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

516 High St.

Bellingham, WA 98225-

9108

P: 360-650-3876

F: 360-650-7648

W: www.wwu.edu/

depts/theatre

Whitworth College

Theatre Dept.

300 W. Hawthorne Rd.,

Ms 0305

Spokane, WA 99251

P: 509-777-3707

F: 509-777-4592

W: www.whitworth.

edu

Washington

D.C.

Actors’ Center

1810 16th St. Nw

2nd Fl.

Washington, D.C. 20009

P: 703-413-3270

W: www.actorscenter.

org

American University

Dept. Of Performing

Arts

4400 Massachusetts

Ave.

Washington, D.C.

20016-8012

P: 202-885-2446

W: www.american.

edu/cas/

Catholic University Of

America

620 Michigan Ave. Ne

Washington, D.C. 20064

P: 202-319-5358

F: 202-319-5359

W: drama.cua.edu

Gallaudet University

Theatre Arts Dept.,

Elstad Annex

800 Florida Ave. Ne

Washington, D.C. 20002

P: 202-651-5501

F: 202-651-5272

W: depts.gallaudet.

edu/theatre

George Washington

University, The

Columbian College Of

Arts & Sciences

800 22st St. Nw Phillips

Hall

Theatre Dept.

Washington, D.C. 20052

P: 202-994-6130

F: 202-994-0854

W: www.gwu.

edu/~ccas/

Howard University

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

2455 6th St., Nw

Washington, D.C. 20059

P: 202-806-7050

F: 202-806-9193

W: www.howard.edu/

CollegeFineArts/Theatre/index.html

John F. Kennedy

Center For The Performing

Arts

2700 F St., Nw

Washington, D.C. 20566

P: 800-444-1324

W: www.kennedycenter.org

National Conservatory

Of Dramatic Arts

1556 Wisconsin Ave.

NW

Washington, D.C. 20007

P: 202-333-2202

F: 202-333-1753

W: www.theconserva

tory.org

Shakespeare Theatre

Company

450 7th St. Nw

Washington, D.C.

20004-2207

P: 877-487-8849

W: www.shake

spearetheatre.org

Shakespeare Theatre

Company

Sidney Harman Hall

610 F St. Nw

Washington, D.C. 20003

P: 877-487-8849

W: www.shakespearetheatre.org

Studio Theatre

1501 14th St., Nw

Washington, D.C. 20005

P: 202-232-7267

F: 202-588-5262

W: www.studiotheatre.

org

West Virginia

Davis & Elkins College

100 Campus Dr.

Elkins, WV 26241

P: 304-637-1360

F: 304-637-1287

W: www.davisandel

kins.edu

Fairmont State College

- School Of Fine

Arts

1201 Locust Ave.

Rm. 304 Wallman Hall

Fairmont, WV 26554

P: 304-367-4219

W: www.fairmontstate.

edu/

Marshall University

Dept. Of Theatre

One John Marshall Dr.

Huntington, WV 25755

P: 304-696-7184

F: 304-696-6582

W: www.marshall.edu/

cofa/theatre

West Virginia University

College Of Creative Arts

Division Of Theatre &

Dance

P.O.Box 6111

Morgantown, WV

26506-6111

P: 304-293-4841

F: 304-293-6896

W: theatre.wvu.edu

West Virginia Wesleyan

College

Theatre Dept.

59 College Ave.

Buckhannon, WV 26201

P: 304-473-8000

W: www.wvwc.edu

Wisconsin

Cardinal Stritch

University

Dept. Of Theatre

6801 N. Yates Rd.

Milwaukee, WI 53217

P: 414-410-4000

W: www.stritch.edu

Carroll University

Theatre Arts Dept.

100 N. East Ave.

Waukesha, WI 53186

P: 262-547-1211

W: www.cc.edu/pro

grams/theaterarts

Lawrence University

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

P.O.Box 599

Appleton, WI 54912

P: 920-832-7000

W: www.lawrence.edu/

dept/theatre

Marquette University

Diederich College Of

Communication

Dept. Of Performing

Arts, Johnston Hall,

111

1131 W. Wisconsin Ave.

Milwaukee, WI 53233

P: 414-288-7133

F: 414-288-5227

W: www.marquette.

edu/comm/departments/performingarts.

html

University Of Wisconsin,

Eau Claire

Music And Theatre Arts

Dept.

156 Haas Fine Arts

121 Water St.

Eau Claire, WI 54702-

4004

P: 228-214-4737

F: 395-014-4737

W: www.uwec.edu/

mus-the

University Of Wisconsin,

Green Bay

Dept. Of Theatre And

Dance

2420 Nicolet Dr.,

Th-331

Green Bay, WI 54311-

7001

P: 920-465-2944

W: www.uwgb.edu/

performarts

University Of Wisconsin,

La Crosse

Dept. Of Theatre Arts

154 Center For The

Arts

1725 State St.

La Crosse, WI 54601

P: 608-785-8000

W: www.uwlax.edu/

THEATRE

University Of Wisconsin,

Madison

Bolz Center For Arts

Administration

975 University Ave.

Madison, WI 53706

P: 608-263-4161

F: 608-265-2739

W: www.bolzcenter.

org

University Of Wisconsin,

Milwaukee

Peck School Of The

Arts

Theatre Dept.

2200 E. Kenwood Blvd.,

P.O.Box 413

Milwaukee, WI 53201

P: 414-229-4947

F: 414-229-2728

W: www.uwm.edu/

psoa/theatre

University Of Wisconsin,

River Falls

Dept.of Speech Comm.

& Theatre Arts

410 S. 3rd St.

River Falls, WI 54022-

5001

P: 715-425-3911

W: www.uwrf.edu

University Of Wisconsin,

Stevens Point

Dept. Of Theatre &

Dance

161 Noel Fine Arts

Center

1800 Portage St.

Stevens Point, WI

54481

P: 715-346-4429

F: 715-346-4794

W: www.uwsp.edu/

theatre-dance/

University Of Wisconsin,

Whitewater

Theatre & Dance Dept.

800 W. Main St.

Whitewater, WI 53190-

1790

P: 262-472-1234

W: www.uww.edu/

arts.html

Viterbo University

Fine Arts, Theatre

Dept.

900 Viterbo Dr.

La Crosse, WI 54601

P: 608-796-3100

W: www.viterbo.edu/

theatre.aspx?id=6440

72 October 2009 • www.stage-directions.com


Education DIRECTORY

education DIRECTORY

Wyoming

Casper College

Theatre & Dance Dept.

125 College Dr.

Casper, WY 82601

P: 800-442-2963

F: 307-268-3020

W: www.caspercollege.

edu

University Of

Wyoming

Theatre And Dance

Dept.

Dept. 3951

1000 E. University Ave.

Laramie, WY 82071-

3951

P: 307-766-2198

F: 307-766-2197

W: www.uwyo.edu/

th&d

Western Wyoming

Community College

Theatre Program

2500 College Dr.

Rock Springs, WY

82901

P: 307-382-1600

F: 307-382-1887

W: www.wwcc.wy.edu/

academics/theatre/

England

British American

Drama Academy

(BADA)

14 Gloucester Gate

London, England NW1

4HG

P: 011442074870730

F: 011442074870731

W: www.badaonline.

com

Bristol Old Vic Theatre

School

1-2 Downside Rd.

Bristol BS8 2XF

P: +44 44 (0)117 973

3535

F: 4401179239371

W: www.oldvic.ac.uk

London Academy Of

Music & Dramatic Art

Drama School

155 Talgarth Rd.

London, England W14

9DA

P: 442088340500

F: 442088340501

W: www.lamda.org.uk

Monash University

The Centre For Drama

& Theatre Studies

School Of English,

Communications And

Performance Studies

Vic 3800

P: +61 +61 3 9905 9135

W: www.arts.monash.

edu.au/drama-theatre/

about/index.php

Performers College

Southend Rd.

Corringham, Essex

SS17 8JT

P: 01375672053

W: www.performerscol

lege.co.uk

Rose Bruford College

Lamorbey Park

Burt Oak Lane

Sidcup, Kent DA159DF

P: 02083082600

F: 02083080542

W: www.bruford.ac.uk

University Of London

Central School Of

Speech And Drama

Embassy Theatre

Eton Ave., Swiss Cottage

London NW3 3HY

P: +44 44 0 20 7722

8183

W: www.cssd.ac.uk

Canada

Alberta

Banff Centre

Theatre Arts Dept.

Box 1020

Banff, Alberta T1L 1H5

P: 403-762-6100

F: 403-762-6444

W: www.banffcentre.

ca/theatre

Theatre Alberta

3rd Fl. Percy Page

Centre

11759 Groat Rd.

Edmonton, Alberta

T5M 3K6

P: 18884228160

F: 780-422-2663

W: www.theatrealberta.com

University Of Calgary

Dept. Of Drama

2500 University Dr. Nw

Ch D209

Calgary, Alberta T2N

1N4

P: 403-220-5421

F: 403-284-0713

W: www.finearts.

ucalgary.ca/drama

British

Columbia

Canada’s National

Voice Intensive

The Dept. Of Theatre,

Film And Creative W

6354 Crescent Rd.

Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2

P: 604-822-3880

F: 604-822-5985

W: www.theatre.ubc.ca

School For The Contemporary

Arts

Simon Fraser University

8888 University Dr.

Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6

P: 604-291-3363

F: 604-291-5907

W: www.sfu.ca/sca

Simon Fraser University

School For The Contemporary

Arts

Theatre Program

8888 University Dr.

Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6

P: 778-782-3111

W: www.sfu.ca/

Ontario

Theatre Ontario

215 Spadina Ave.

Ste. 210

Toronto, ON M5T 2C7

P: 416-408-4556

F: 416-408-3402

W: www.theatreontario.org

University Of Ottawa

Dept. Of Theatre

135 Seraphin-Marion

Rm. 207

Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5

P: 613-562-5761

W: www.uottawa.ca/

academic/arts/theatre/

eng/index.html

University Of

Windsor

School Of Dramatic Art

401 Sunset Ave.

Windsor, ON N9B 3P4

P: 519-253-3000

F: 519-971-3629

W: www.uwindsor.ca/

drama

York University

Dept. Of Theatre,

Faculty Of Fine Arts

4700 Keele St.

Toronto, ON M3J 1P3

P: 416-736-5135

F: 416-736-5447

W: www.yorku.ca/

finearts

Quebec

Concordia University

Dept. Of Theatre

7141 Sherbrooke St.

West

Montreal, QB QC H4B

1R6

P: 514-848-2424

F: 514-848-4525

W: theatre.concordia.

ca

www.stage-directions.com • October 2009 73


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