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Image:

Clarence Family Day Care Office, Bellerive, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmania Chapter Public Buildings - New & Recycled Award

1+2 architecture


This document has been produced by 1 plus 2 ARCHITECTURE and is Copyright

and may not be reproduced without the written consent of:

1 plus 2 Architecture Pty. Ltd.

31 Melville Street

Hobart Tasmania 7000

Australia

telephone 03 6234 8122

facsimile 03 6234 8211

email mail@1plus2architecture.com

web www.1plus2architecture.com

Contacts: Cath Hall

Fred Ward

Mike Verdouw

1+2 architecture


Image: RAIA Tasmania Chapter Premises, Hobart, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Interior Commendation

CONTENTS

1+2 ARCHITECTURE

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

OUR APPROACH

CASE STUDY

COST CONTROL

RESOURCES

PROJECT TEAM

PROJECTS

APPENDICES

Appendix A Reference Letters

Appendix B Resume

Appendix C Awards

Appendix D Exhibitions and Publications

1+2 architecture


Image: Abbotts Peak Project, Observation Building, Tasmania

1+2 ARCHITECTURE ©

1+2 ARCHITECTURE

1+2 ARCHITECTURE is a multi-award winning practice focusing on the service

and delivery of high quality contemporary architecture. We bring together a

breadth of local, national and international experience in projects ranging

from residential design to commercial, government and institutional projects.

We are a small, young practice, offering a fresh, highly consultative and

personalised service. Our office environment is intimate and facilitates a high

degree of collaboration and discussion. 1+2 believes that a successful

outcome is best achieved by an investment in the quality design services

that we offer.

We understand the importance of listening. The design solutions we deliver

respond directly to the specific needs of your project.

1+2 architecture


Image: 179 Liverpool Street Apartments, Hobart, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmania Chapter Residential Alterations and Additions Award

2006 RAIA Tasmania Chapter Environmental Design Award

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Our practice has a commitment to environmentally sound practices and to the

improvement of the built environment through ecologically sustainable

architecture. In recent years 1+2 has twice received the Environmental Design

Award from the Australian Institute of Architects. The concept of

ecologically sustainable architecture is always central to our design

approach.

Core principles in the application of this would include:

§ Minimising the consumption of energy, water and materials.

§ Ensuring that the environmental cost of all new materials used

is understood and informs their selections.

§ Considering the potential of re-used and recycled structures and

materials.

§ Designing for future re-use of structure and materials.

§ Fully considering the application of sustainable energy sources.

§ Design for water minimisation, waste recycling and onsite waste

management.

1+2 architecture


Image: State Government Public Offices and Art Gallery, Hobart, Tasmania

Jonathan Wherrett ©

1+2 architecture


Clarence Family Day Care Office, Bellerive, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmania Chapter Public Buildings - New & Recycled Award

OUR APPROACH

All projects are complex and can require the resolution of contradictory or

conflicting requirements, brought about by many factors. These can include

complex functional briefs often serving the requirements of multiple user

groups, the constraints of working with existing structures, heritage

constraints, site constraints, town planning and neighbourhood considerations

and the requirement to achieve a great deal from the finite financial

resources available.

1. Consultation

Understanding you and your needs is the foremost prerequisite to achieving

the right design solution for you. This understanding can only be gained

through a thorough consultation process. We will work closely with you in an

efficiently structured and collaborative manner through the briefing process,

to ensure that our understanding of your needs is complete and accurate,

before committing to any design solutions.

The degree of briefing, specific consultation process, and manner of reply

brief feedback will be tailored to the specific requirements of your project.

2. Collaboration

A studio based, collaborative approach to design is at the heart of our

working method. When you engage us to design your building you get the

combined input of the 1 plus 2 team sharing ideas and solutions while cross

checking, reviewing and ultimately maximising the potential quality of our

output. Our approach to collaboration goes far beyond that. You, the client,

know more about what your wants and needs are than anyone else,

therefore, you will be at the core of this collaboration - discussing,

reviewing and actively contributing to the design decisions as they emerge.

This is vital if the final design is going to be the right one for you. We will

work quickly, often manually, to provide simply produced yet informative

sketch options. Often there are many generations of these, which together

with your input are improved and refined until the right solution has evolved.

At 1+2 we have tailored our collaborative methods to extend not only to our

specialist consultant team but to other key players in the procurement

process, particularly approval authorities, with whom we believe an open and

consultative working relationship is the key to maximising success. Our

excellent track record of approvals is evidence of this.

The most important collaboration of all will be with your contractors. It is

often beneficial to begin this relationship early in the process in order to

maximise the potential of what they can offer. This document includes some

reference letters from builders we have worked with in the past as

testimonials to the success of these relationships.

3. Good Design.

We believe that an investment in a high quality design process is the only

way of ensuring that the significant investment you are making in your

building project is the right one. You should be allowing for good quality

design in your budget, appropriate time for design and critical design review

in your programme, and in doing so will be minimising risk and accentuating

the likelihood of a great result.

1+2 architecture


CASE STUDY

A recent and very successful example of our work is the Clarence Family

Day Care Office building, winner of the 2006 Royal Australian Institute of

Architects, Public Buildings Award. Below, is a brief summary of our approach

to this project and how a similar approach may apply to your project.

BRIEFING

As is often the case, this project required the analysis of the client's basic

operational requirements before a brief and spatial requirements schedule

could be formulated. Critically, this process fundamentally changed

preconceptions about what the spatial solution to the project was to become.

Key 'non-building' considerations influenced this process including a reevaluation

of the site curtilage and the potential to acquire additional land

to facilitate the required on-site parking, improve access, and enable single

storey construction which dramatically reduced potential construction costs.

DESIGN

Schematic options were developed and reviewed with the client body through

group meetings and through a process of meeting solely with the client's

representative. We then developed a process best suited to their method of

controlling design decision authority and disseminating information to the end

users.

This was a very low cost development with a fixed budget, yet the brief

required design solutions befitting the civic nature of the project. The

solution was found in lightweight, well engineered construction solutions and

a strict method of prioritising expenditure so as to ensure that money was

being spent where it was most needed.

APPROVALS

Risk of planning dispute was quite high owing to the nature of the project,

the close proximity of neighbours and the potential for overshadowing or

blocked views. The project was approved without dispute following a process

of carefully considered view preservation and siting, followed by a process

of early and open consultation with the approval authority and the

neighbours, where their rights and concerns were considered and where

appropriate, accommodated.

Heritage approval was required and gained without difficulty following

consultation with the Tasmanian Heritage Council.

CONSTRUCTION

High quality contract documentation is essential. It provides certainty when

pricing, minimising ambiguity when building, and provides a level of assurance

that the project will be delivered in accordance with the contract's

requirements and your expectations. This project was documented in detail,

tendered through a public process and awarded within the target budget. It

was completed ahead of schedule, with negligible cost creep.

1+2 provided full construction phase services including acting as contract

administrator.

OCCUPANCY

Like many of our completed projects, the completion of this building has

become a catalyst for improvement in the working life of the users. Post

occupancy feedback has been extremely positive. We encourage you to read

their reference which is appended to this document.

1+2 architecture


Image: Cloudy Bay House, Bruny Island, Tasmania

Jonathan Wherrett ©

1+2 architecture


Image: Garden Room, Tasmania

Julia Verdouw ©

COST CONTROL

The construction environment in Tasmania is tough. Few, if any of our

projects have generous budgets; moreover it is our constant experience that

demanding briefs are to be met through a rigorous and strictly controlled

cost planning process. This is undertaken through close liaison and scheduled

reviews with your cost consultant, but more significantly through careful

analysis of priorities, assessment of development and design options, and

tailored distribution of financial resources.

RESOURCES

We endeavour to maximise the potential of current technologies for all of

the various services. We offer and ensure efficiency and effectiveness of

the task.

Our design and documentation approach involves various methods and

presentations to communicate design ideas and solutions. A strong focus on

detail is integral to the way we design.

Our primary computer aided design platform Bentley Microstation, which is

high-end 2 and 3D software with interface capabilities for drawing exchanges

to other CAD platforms. We are well versed in the disciplines of manual and

CAD drafting and use both as circumstances demand.

In addition to Microstation, we offer Building Information Modelling through

the use of advanced technologies, including Revit Architecture.

Communicative devices at our disposal include computer generated modelling,

Corel and Adobe based digital graphic design expertise, in addition to various

PC based systems for communication, financial management, office

management and so on.

We have a fully networked computer system, feeding off a secure central

server that harbours data and ensures daily backup.

1+2 architecture


Image: Walla Womba Guest House, Bruny Island, Tasmania

1+2 ARCHITECTURE ©

2004 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Colorbond Award

PROJECT TEAM

We source secondary consultants that are fundamentally team players and

see themselves as contributing to the given project holistically rather than

in isolation to the other neighbouring disciplines.

We encourage the investigation of alternative energy systems where

appropriate, and expect our consultants to be familiar with the most recent

technologies and cost effective solutions. These may include alternative

power supply and storage, passive heating and cooling reticulation, water

conservation systems, and the like.

We are happy to suggest secondary consultants for appointment based on

past working relationships and our confidence in their capabilities and

commitment to their disciplines as required.

1+2 architecture


Image: Cloudy Bay House, Bruny Island, Tasmania

Jonathan Wherrett ©

1+2 architecture


Image: Abbott’s Peak Tourism Development, Observation Building, Tasmania

1+2 ARCHITECTURE ©

Image: Wellspring Anglican Church, Tasmania

1+2 ARCHITECTURE ©

PROJECTS

Some of 1+2 ARCHITECTURE's current and recent projects include:

ABBOTT’S PEAK TOURISM DEVELOPMENT

Forestry Tasmania

Visitor Centre, Alpine Observation Building

WELLSPRING ANGLICAN CHURCH

Anglican Church

Redevelopment of existing site and new Auditorium

CORPUS CHRISTI PRIMARY SCHOOL

School Redevelopment

JOHN PAUL 11 PRIMARY SCHOOL

School Redevelopment

STATE GOVERNMENT PUBLIC OFFICES & ART GALLERY

Arts Tasmania

SWANSEA BEACH HOUSE

Multiple family accommodation

CLARENCE FAMILY DAY CARE

Clarence City Council

Compact low budget office building and toy library

on complex urban site

179 LIVERPOOL STREET APARTMENTS/OFFICES

Elmvale Enterprises Pty Ltd

Compact urban living solution in partially

recycled heritage building

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS

New offices for the RAIA, Australian Institute of

Landscape Architects and Planning Institute of Australia

In recycled heritage buildings. Hunter Street

RICHMOND TOURIST FACILITIES

Clarence City Council

Bus terminus and tourist facilities,

master planning and stage 1 construction

CURRENT

CURRENT

CURRENT

CURRENT

RAIA INTERIOR

AWARD 2009

RAIA RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

AWARD 2008

RAIA PUBLIC

BUILDINGS AWARD 2006

RAIA ENVIRONMENTAL

AWARD 2006

RAIA RESIDENTIAL, ALTERATION

AND ADDITIONS AWARD.2006

RAIA INTERIOR DESIGN

COMMENDATION 2006

RAIA PUBLIC BUILDING

HONOURABLE MENTION 2005

In addition, we have vast experience as employed Architects both locally,

nationally and internationally including many roles in a Project or Senior

position including:

LOCALLY;

Elizabeth Street Pier Redevelopment, Hobart Silos, Salamanca Mews

Apartments, Market Place Carpark and TAFE Clarence Campus redevelopment;

NATIONALLY;

Monash University Campus buildings, Melbourne Docklands, Southbank Brisbane

redevelopment and Melbourne Museum;

INTERNATIONALLY;

in USA, Europe and Russia including the redevelopment of Queens Borough

offices (5000m²), a new 8 court Tennis Centre for Columbia University in New

York, the $90M Sanderson Hotel in London, the Maack House ($4M) in

Germany, and the 25 Nevsky Prospekt redevelopment in St Petersburg.

1+2 architecture


Image: Walla Womba Guest House, Bruny Island, Tasmania

Peter Hyatt ©

2004 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Colorbond Award

1+2 architecture


APPENDICES

Appendix A Reference Letters

Appendix B 1+ 2 People

Appendix C Awards

Appendix D Exhibitions and Publications

1+2 architecture


APPENDIX A

Letters of Reference

1+2 architecture


Image: Clarence Family Day Care Office, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmania Chapter Public Buildings New & Recycled Award

1+2 architecture


Image: Swansea House Sketches

1+2 ARCHITECTURE ©

1+2 architecture


Image:

RAIA Tasmania Chapter Office, Hobart, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Interior Commendation

1+2 architecture


Image: Ian & Jeans, Blackmans Bay, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Residential Award

1+2 architecture


Image: 179 Liverpool Street Apartments, Hobart, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmania Chapter Residential Alterations and Additions Award

2006 RAIA Tasmania Chapter Environmental Design Award

1+2 architecture


Image: Walla Womba Guest House, Bruny Island, Tasmania

1+2 ARCHITECTURE ©

2006 RAIA Tasmania Chapter Colorbond Award

1+2 architecture


Image: Ali & Steve’s House, Lindisfarne, Tasmania

1+2 ARCHITECTURE ©

1+2 architecture


Image: Cloudy Bay House, Bruny Island, Tasmania

Jonathan Wherrett ©

1+2 architecture


Image: Richmond Tourist Facilities, Richmond, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2005 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Public Buildings Honourable Mention

1+2 architecture


APPENDIX B

1+2 Resume

1+2 architecture


CATH HALL ARCHITECT RAIA B Arch (Hons), BA Env Des

DOB 23.10.1969

Qualifications

1996 Registered Architect, Board of Architects of Tasmania.

1992 Bachelor of Architecture First Class Honours.

University of Tasmania.

1990 Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design.

University of Tasmania.

Awards

1992 RAIA Tas. Chapter SWT Blythe Student Award

1991 RAIA Tas. Chapter SWT Blythe Student Award,

Joint winner.

Career Summary

2002-Current Director 1+2 Architecture

2003-Current RAIA Representative to the Board of Architects of

Tasmania.

2008 Juror, R.A.I.A. Tasmania Chapter SWT Blythe Student

Award.

2004 Juror R.A..IA. Tasmanian Chapter

John Lee Archer Triennial Award

2002 Board of Architects of Tasmania, Registration Examiner

2000-2001 Principal, Cath Hall Architect.

2000 Tutor, Architecture Design Studio, University of

Tasmania, Launceston

1999 Senior Architect, The Kouzmanoff Partnership,

New York City, USA.

1998 Architect, Jacob Allom Wade, Hobart.

1998 Architect, Heffernan Button Voss , Hobart

1998 Tutor, Architecture Design Studio & Ecology &

Architecture,

University of Tasmania, Hobart

1994 Internship, Denton Corker Marshall , Melbourne

1992 Graduate Architect, Eastman Heffernan Walch & Button

1991 Student Architect, Don Donnithorne Architects,

Christchurch, New Zealand.

1+2 architecture


FRED WARD ARCHITECT RAIA B Arch (Hons), BA Env Des

DOB 16.02.1970

Qualifications

2005 Accredited Building Practitioner (Architect)

2002 Registered Architect, Board of Architects of Tasmania.

1998 Registered Architect, Board of Architects of Victoria.

1992 Bachelor of Architecture Honours, University of Tasmania.

1990 Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design.

University of Tasmania.

Career Summary

2002-Current Director 1+2 Architecture

2008 Juror, R.A.I.A. Tasmania Chapter Henry Hunter

Triennial Award.

2008 Juror, Vitra Fellowship Selection Panel.

2007 Juror, R.A.I.A. Tasmania Chapter Awards

2006-2007 Juror, Design Island Selection Panel

2003-2004 Tutor, Final Year Design Studio, University of Tasmania,

School of Architecture, Launceston

2000 Senior Architect, Jacob Allom Wade, Hobart

1998 Senior Architect, Denton Corker Marshall, London, UK

1996 Architect, Denton Corker Marshall, Melbourne

1992 Graduate Architect, Jacob Allom Wade, Hobart

1990 Student Architect, Eastman Heffernan Walch & Button,

Hobart

1+2 architecture


MIKE VERDOUW B Arch, BA Env. Des.

DOB 15.02.1969

Qualifications

1992 Bachelor of Architecture. University of Tasmania.

1990 Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design.

University of Tasmania.

Awards

1991 RAIA Tas. Chapter SWT Blythe Student Award,

Joint winner.

Career Summary

2002-Current Director 1+2 Architecture

2001 DesignInc. Hobart

2000 Heffernan Button Voss, Hobart

1998 Forward Viney & Partners, Hobart

1997 Denton Corker Marshall, St. Petersburg, Russia

& London, UK.

1994 Denton Corker Marshall, Melbourne

1993 Philp Lighton, Launceston

1991 Eastman Heffernan Walch & Button, Hobart

1+2 architecture


PIERS CHAMBERLEN B Arch (Hons), B Env. Des.

DOB 16.05.1975

Qualifications

2000 Bachelor of Architecture with First Class Honours.

University of Tasmania

1996 Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design.

University of Tasmania

Awards

2000 RAIA Tas. Chapter SWT Blythe Student Award

1994 'Sustainable Environment' Competition - Joint Winner

Career Summary

2004-Current 1+2 Architecture, Hobart

2008 'ABUNDANT” Australian Pavilion Staff

at the 11th International Architecture Exhibition

la Biennale di Venezia - Venice

2003 2003 Cranbrook Conference, Organising Committee

2001 RAIA Tas. Chapter SWT Blythe Student Award Jury

2001-2004 DesignInc, Hobart

2001 Terroir, Hobart (contract work)

1+2 architecture


MARK KUKOLA B Arch, B Env. Des.

DOB 16.09.1970

Qualifications

1996 Bachelor of Architecture. Deakin University

1993 Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design. University of

Tasmania

Awards

1995 Concrete Masonry Association of Australia.

Finalist- Architecture Students Competition

Career Summary

2006-Current 1+2 Architecture, Hobart

2004 Philp Lighton Architects, Hobart

2001 BGA Architects, Bendigo

2000 Green Point Design, Melbourne

1998 Walter Corsi Architect, Melbourne

1+2 architecture


Image: Torquay Dry Cleaners, New Town, Tasmania

Kevin Wiggins ©

2002 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Commercial Buildings Commendation 1+2 architecture


APPENDIX C

Awards

1+2 have continuously received award recognition from the Australian

Institute of Architects since the practice’s inception.

In 2007 we were invited to participate on the AIA Tasmanian Chapter Awards

Jury and consequently did not submit projects for consideration that year.

1+2 architecture


Image: Arts Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania

Jonathan Wherrett ©

2009 AIA Tasmanian Chapter Interior Award

AWARDS

2009 Australian Institute of Architects

Interior - Award

Arts Tasmania

JURY CITATION

“What a lovely surprise, you enter Arts Tasmania's

principal centre through the very portals previous

generations of shoppers have entered – for very

different reasons. Then the sloping picture windows

reflected children gazing through at desired toys; or

sportsmen contemplating fly rods and exotic lures. Now

the visitor is enticed by art – entering a light and airy

space, the roving eye caught by the gallery of art works

and installations. This is clever use of space,

appropriately negotiating the layered heritage fabric of

the site, from the light-infused kitchen and lunch area

to the light installation which illuminates the otherwise

dull end of the building. Work stations are inviting;

indicative of creativity. This is a heritage building once

shaded and utilitarian which has been subtly transformed

into a centre reflective of artistic creativity”

1+2 architecture


Image: Swansea House, Swansea, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2008 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Residential Award

AWARDS

2008 Australian Institute of Architects

Residential - New

Fish for Breakfast

JURY CITATION

“This simple complex of buildings and the spaces they

create successfully captures the shack culture and all it

evokes. The client’s extended family has fond memories

and associations with the site, with the brief requiring

the permutations and extensions of three generations to

be accommodated. 1 + 2 Architecture has designed a

retreat that is sure to nurture and continue this

tradition, with three separate pavilions each for a

different generation that forms a central outdoor social

space.

A simple and understated wall that demarcates the

natural vegetation from the inhabited platform interrupts

the gentle slope of the coastal plain. Two pavilions

reach out over this wall to the sea, a third anchors the

complex at the rear and forms a linear central space.

Pavilion, social space, shelter and a framed view are all

brought together in a wonderfully simple yet effective

and evocative play.

Overall simple forms are deliberately chosen to unify a

complex program. Internally, spaces are unified with

uninterrupted ceilings. Low bay windows, bold cut-outs

that form decks, and glass topped dividing walls create a

wonderful array of subspaces that accommodate the

varied needs of the extended family. The choice of

unadorned timber and painted fibre cement sheeting as

external cladding reinforces the shack references. This

theme is taken into the interior where a limited palette

of white plasterboard walls, plywood fittings that double

as room dividers and timber floors further unify the

spaces. The shack, its reflection of simple lifestyle, of

intimate relationship with context, of economy of form

and material, its blending with the landscape are all

beautifully reinterpreted in this house.”

1+2 architecture


Image: Ian & Jeans, Blackmans Bay, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2008 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Residential Commendation

AWARDS

2008 Australian Institute of Architects

Residential - New (Commendation)

Ian & Jeans

JURY CITATION

“The architects were faced with a long narrow steep

block and an overbearing conglomeration of suburban

houses which hemmed in the site, while a spectacular

view lay below the slope. The solution was simple but

effective: cut out the neighbours and enhance the

experience of the view.

In contrast to the surrounding houses, Ian & Jean’s

presents a plain façade to the street with a colourful

door and a canopy that sails overhead and projects

down, inviting entrance and exploration. On entrance,

stairs and the canopy direct the attention down to a

deck and living area projecting beyond the slope. The

fully glazed end to the living area captures a view of

the sea and distant hills. Opening to the side, the deck

takes in the sweep of Blackmans Bay. The living area

slides back into the hillside forming a deep and enclosed

space, a relief and counterpoint to the expansive setting.

The architects have skilfully managed a context of

contrasts and found a solution that in resolving the

problem of privacy from overlooking neighbours has

accentuated the experience of the magnificent setting.”

1+2 architecture


Image: Clarence Family Day Care Offices, Bellerive, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Public Buildings New and Recycled Award

AWARDS

2006 Royal Australian Institute of Architects

Public Buildings - New and Recycled Award

Clarence Family Cay Care Offices

JURY CITATION

“This building demonstrates that excellent architecture is

not related to the scale of the building or the size of

the budget. The simplicity of form defies the complexity

of the issues, and masks the brilliance of its resolution.

Despite its modest appearance, this is a serious work

that demonstrates how architecture is 'played'. This

project is an example of extravagance of thought and

ideas, not expenditure.

When measured against all the judging criteria, this

building exemplifies a comprehensive thoughtfulness. The

jury marvelled at how the architects respect for others

underpinned all design decisions.

The architects challenged the apparently irreconcilable

constraints of the brief, including the pre-suppositions

of siting, and even the site itself. Through a process of

negotiations with the local authority who owned the site

and the existing building, and community consultation with

the neighbours and others, the architects were pivotal in

finding a creative lateral solution.

The building is deceptively small, and the architects

stated desire to give a civic presence to a domestic

scale building works well - the long façade presented to

the public approach is maximised by its diagonal

alignment. The graphic use of colour and shape is a

multi-layered message to all users - a symbol of

structured form, a sign of welcome and entry, and a

playful game of stacking blocks. Something for everyone,

regardless of access, authority, or age.”

1+2 architecture


Image: Swansea House, Swansea, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2008 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Residential Award

1+2 architecture


Image: 179 Liverpool Street Apartments, Hobart, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Residential Alterations and Additions Award

2006 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Environmental Design Award

AWARDS

2006 Royal Australian Institute of Architects

Residential - Alterations & Additions Award

179 Liverpool Street Apartments

JURY CITATION

“Tucked behind a nineteenth century shophouse façade in

Hobart's CBD, a hint of colour and a bedside lamp are all

that suggests the presence of the micro-scale studio

apartments behind. Working within a tight budget and an

even tighter building footprint, 1+ 2 Architecture have

skilfully manipulated the insertion of six single room

apartments, a retail gallery, car parking and a roof

garden.

The architecture is an exercise in refined but restrained

detailing, maximising both perceptual and physical space

through light, colour and joinery. Two vertical light

shafts provide relief in the centre of the building. In

one, a lightweight steel, glass and timber access stair

rises from a mosaic tile plinth to reveal a generous

communal terrace overlooking Liverpool Street. In the

other, the inclusion of bi-fold windows and a wash of

colour to an otherwise bare concrete surface create an

unexpected warmth and tranquillity to the internal

apartments.

The simplicity of the spatial and planning solution is

complemented by a restrained colour and material

palette. Overall the jury was impressed by the control

exercised by the architects in this challenging project

demonstrating sophistication in spatial, material,

constructional, servicing and financial solutions without

over-indulging in architectural trickery.”

1+2 architecture


Image: 179 Liverpool Street Apartments, Hobart, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Residential Alterations and Additions Award

2006 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Environmental Design Award

AWARDS

2006 Royal Australian Institute of Architects

Environmental Design Award

179 Liverpool Street Apartments

JURY CITATION

“These studio apartments represent a new typology for

urban living. With a dwelling area of approximately 25

square metres, the studios are less than one third of

the average dwelling area per person in Australia. The

environmental benefits of such a reduction in building

footprint are numerous, encompassing resource

consumption, embodied energy, operational energy, land

use, and perhaps most notably in this instance, the

absence of car parking for residential tenancies,

reflecting the needs of an alternative urban dweller

lifestyle.

While the client must be credited with the original vision

for the project, the architects are also to be

congratulated for the way in which they have embraced

this project and for their skill in the architectural

resolution.

The apartments are light and visually spacious for their

footprint while joinery design has been cleverly

integrated to maximise opportunities for storage space.

Furthermore, the physical constraints of the individual

apartments are offset by the provision of a generous

communal roof terrace offering opportunities for social

interaction between the single occupiers of the

apartments.

ESD awards are generally based on the range and

innovation of environmental features within a single

architectural project. The jury were pleased to find that

passive solar design and other environmental features

were integrated in many of this year's projects, including

the Liverpool Street Studio Apartments. However, in this

case the jury has decided to acknowledge a project that

challenges broader entrenched patterns of unsustainable

development which to date have not received enough

attention and which the architectural field is well

positioned to address.”

1+2 architecture


Image: RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Premises, Hobart, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Interior Commendation

AWARDS

2006 Royal Australian Institute of Architects

Interior - Commendation

RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Premises

JURY CITATION

“At last a home for the RAIA! The architects were

engaged to fitout a tight space with numerous

constraints, not the least of which was the daunting

task of satisfying the critical appraisal of their entire

professional cohort! Most would tremble at the thought;

however the architects approached the task with their

usual restrained confidence, and delivered a wonderful

outcome.

The brief inherently required a 'demonstration' project as

it was to be the interface between the RAIA and the

public, the industry, and the profession.

The design is a sensitive response to the heritage

context, illustrating a clear articulation of the often

vexed notion of inserting new into old. The resolution of

the multi-purpose spaces, the minimalist selection of

materials, the sensitivity of the detailing all contribute

to its success.

The RAIA can now loudly sing its song from a stage

worthy of the composer's score.”

1+2 architecture


Image: Richmond Tourist Facilities, Richmond, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2005 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Public Buildings Honourable Mention

AWARDS

2005 Royal Australian Institute of Architects

Public Buildings - Honourable Mention

Richmond Tourist Facilities

JURY CITATION

“This building deserves recognition because it seeks

to contextualise, with an historic setting. Through

means other than imitation of historic forms. It is a

well considered approach, which reworks components

of the familiar without pastiche. It also provides an

innovative plan for an often malighned building type.”

2004 Royal Australian Institute of Architects

Colorbond Award

Walla Womba Guest House

JURY CITATION

This award is given by the Royal Australian Institute of

Architects in recognition of projects demonstrating

innovation and excellence through the use of steel.

2003 Royal Australian Institute of Architects

James Blackburn Triennial Award for Residential

Architecture

Andrew & Jens House

This award is considered a “best of the best” and is awarded

to the outstanding design of the previous three

years.

2002 Royal Australian Institute of Architects

Commercial Building - Commendation

Torquay Dry Cleaners

JURY CITATION

“The jury is impressed by this transformation of a former

service station into a dry cleaning business.

With minimum outlay and a large dose of flair, the clients

have gained a sophisticated and visually arresting shopfront

which turns heads on busy New Town Road.

The jury commends the architects for recognising formal

qualities in an obsolete building and then appreciating how to

convert the architectural potential into a distinctive

commercial presence for a new business”.

1+2 architecture


Image: Andrew and Jen’s, Margate, Tasmania

Kevin Wiggins ©

2003 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter James Blackburn Triennial Award

for Residential Architecture

2002 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Residential Award

2002 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Environmental Design Award

AWARDS

2002 Royal Australian Institute of Architects

The Residential Buildings Award

Andrew & Jens House

JURY CITATION

“The Jury is impressed with all aspects of this autonomous

house which has no connection to town power water or

sewer.

The layout is simple and environmentally efficient. The

building form is essentially familiar, though the entry bridge

with its steeply raking roof, which sets the solar panel at

its optimum pitch, is far from predictable.

This house abounds with examples of beautifully realised

solutions to both usual and unique design problems.

The jury believes that Andrew and Jen's house exemplifies a

commitment by the architect to meeting the client's exacting

brief by designing a building which is able to exceed their

expectations through its architectural refinement and

integrity”.

2002 Royal Australian Institute of Architects

The Environmental Award

Andrew & Jens House

JURY CITATION

“The jury was bound to be impressed with this autonomous

house. Environmental compatibility and energy conservation

are central to its design.

The building has no connection to mains power. Its energy

requirements are met through a combination of efficient

passive solar design and power generation by solar

collector. A composting toilet system is installed, rainwater

in collected for drinking and household use and a large dam

has been built on site for irrigation needs. Grey water is

filtered through subsoil sumps.

The jury considers that Andrew and Jen's house is a

compelling demonstration that adherence to the principles

of ecologically sustainable design can result in a functional

architectural solution that develops its own distinctive

aesthetic”.

1+2 architecture


Image: RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Premises, Hobart, Tasmania

Ray Joyce ©

2006 RAIA Tasmanian Chapter Interior Commendation

1+2 architecture


APPENDIX D

Exhibitions and Publications

1+2 architecture


Cambridge Road Early Learning Centre

Image: Design Island 2009, God is in the Detail

Cambridge Road Early Learning Centre

Peter White ©

1+2 Architecturae’s piece investigates a façade treatment, with a series of 3 free standing

vertical timber panels.

Each is intended to explore concepts in lightweight, sustainable, economical construction, utilizing

domestic methods in a low cost commercial application.

The panels are composed of rough sawn plywood cladding stained in a matrix of colours, inspired

by the colours of the site and its context. Each panel explores a different response

EXHIBITIONS

Our work has been exhibited locally and internationally, including:

2009 DESIGN ISLAND 2009 - Design at the Edge

God is in the Details: Architectural Thresholds

‘The exhibition, God is in the Details, presented work

of 6 Tasmanian architectural practices. Each practice

has recreated at a true scale an architectural detail

from a built or proposed project. In doing so they

address the brief Architectural Thresholds, which

reflects on the Design Island 2009 theme Design at

the Edge.’

Curated by Peta Heffernan & Sarah King

2009 UN_PACKING ARCHITECTURE: BEYOND STYLE + FASHION

The exhibition was located in the Commissariat Store,

Hobart, an 1820’s outbuilding of the Tasmanian Museum

and Art Gallery. It was a collaborative undertaking, with

a curatorial team of Karryn Irwin, Helen Norrie, Dean

Baird, Fred Ward and Mathew Hinds.

The aim of the Exhibition, was to convince the public that

architects play a vital role in realizing the dream of their

clients and to communicate the full extent of the

architects role.

The exhibition presented work of 15 Tasmanian

architectural and design practices.

1+2 architecture


Image: ABUNDANT Model

Forest Interpretation Centre, Tasmania

Peter White ©

This model attempts to describe a conceptual approach used to derive form and meaning in the

architecture of a proposed historic forest practices Interpretation Centre. The building marks the

starting point of an interpretive journey through the surrounding working forest, from its

indigenous foundation through to the present day.

As an interpretive template for new building and landscape form, the growth ring pattern of a

timber section has been traced creating a metaphoric timeline through the proposed structure and

landform. Growth rings as contoured landscape, timeline and structural framework for the

interpretation of a local history.

Image: ON A ROLL ‘Wipeout’

Jan Dallas ©

EXHIBITIONS

2008 ‘ABUNDANT” Australian Pavilion

11th International Architecture Exhibition

la Biennale Exhibition - Venice

‘With Reference to the Biennale theme ‘Out There:

Architecture beyond building’, architects were invited

to submit individual models for display. They were

asked to reflect on their own projects, re-framing

them as new thoughts and investigations. We thought

the models would, in a very concentrated way,

capture the particularities of each practice, their

attitudes to architecture and representation, and

their conceptual priorities.’

‘The submitted works, in their collective, testify to

the vigour and productive energy that characterises

contemporary Architectural production in Australia.’

2008 MODEL MODEL MODEL

2008 ON A ROLL

Abundant Creative Directors

As a precursor to ABUNDANT, the Tasmanian Chapter of

AIA mounted a preview exhibition of architectural models

made by invited architects as part of Design Island

2008.

The Plimsoll Gallery Committee, Tasmanian School of Art,

University of Tasmania, invited artists, designers and

architects to develop works in response to a particular

medium, in this case toilet paper. This is the first of a

series of annual shows where artists respond to a

particular material.

2006 - 2007 THE GREEN HOUSE

National Building Museum, Washington D.C.

Curated by John Vella

Our work represents an organic and collaborative

process through which the ephemeral nature of toilet

paper as both a design medium and a commodity has been

investigated. The form is a derivative of structural

capability and economy. It is intended that the material

be freely distributed for re-use at the completion of the

exhibition.

International exhibition on sustainable residential

architecture featuring 35 houses and apartment

buildings from around the world, including the work of

1+ 2 ARCHITECTURE. The work of the exhibition features

in a book to be published by Princeton Architectural

Press and released at the exhibition.

1+2 architecture


Image: Young Designers 2005

1+2 ARCHITECTURE ©

EXHIBITIONS

2005 YOUNG DESIGNERS 2005

The exhibition was organized by Arts Tasmania to

celebrate young Tasmanian designers.

2004 - 2005 Royal Institute of British Architects:

DiverseCity 2004

Touring exhibition to Auckland, Beijing, Chicago, New

York, Dublin, and London and greater Europe.

The exhibition is designed to celebrate the diversity of

architects in the host locality. It will showcase the range and

quality of designs and completed projects by a selection of

women, minority or under-represented but qualified

professionals who are active in the domain of architecture.

1+2 architecture


Image: Kingston Beach House, Kingston, Tasmania

Jonathan Wherrett ©

1+2 architecture


Hardback Cover Image: Walla Womba Guest House, Bruny Island, Tasmania

Peter Hyatt ©

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Our work has been published locally and internationally, in books and

magazines, including:

CLARENCE FAMILY DAY CARE OFFICES

Gatley, Julia ‘Clarence Family Day Care’ Architecture Australia, May/June 2006

The Phaidon Atlas of 21st Century World Architecture, London, Phaidon

Press Inc 2008, pp.48

RICHMOND TOURIST FACILITIES

Gatley, Julia ‘Comfort Stop’ Architecture Australia, March/April 2005 VOL 94

NO 2, pp.70-73

Slavid, Ruth Micro Architecture, London, Laurence King Publishing 2007,

pp.22-25

ANDREW & JENS HOUSE

Lee, Lydia ‘Off the Grid - Sustain-a-Mania’ Dwell - At Home in the Modern

World, September 2003 pp.50-52

Dillon, Julie ‘Elegant Autonomy’ Houses Issue 31 2002 pp.16-20

WALLA WOMBA GUEST HOUSE

Stang, Alana & Hawthorn, Christopher The Green House - New Directions in

Sustainable Architecture, New York, Princeton Architectural Press 2005,

pp.130-133

Franklin, Catherine ‘Off the Grid - Tait Modern’ Dwell - At Home in the

Modern World, April/May 2005 pp.72-74

Hyatt, Peter Out of Town - The Country House, Australia, The Images

Publishing Group Pty Ltd 2006 pp.192-199

Cullen, Jenny 'Home Among the Gumtrees' Tasmania Life, Dec06/Jan07

pp.36-43

Ryker, Lori Off the Grid Homes, Case Studies for Sustainable Living, Utah,

Gibbs Smith Publisher 2007, pp.34-45

Ecological House, UK, Fusion Publishing and teNeues Publishing Group 2008,

pp.18-23

Duran, Sergi Costa Green Homes - New Ideas for Sustainable Living, New

York, Collins Design & Loft Publications 2007, pp.114-119

1+2 architecture


SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

179 LIVERPOOL STREET APARTMENTS

Abell, Judith 'Tiny Footprints' Houses, Issue 53 2006, pp.34-40

Heather, Louise ‘Big Things in Small Packages’ Contemporary Home Design

Vol. 6 Number 2, 2007, pp.82-86

SWANSEA HOUSE

Norrie, Helen, ‘Swansea Shack' Australian Architectural Review, Issue 108,

2008, pp.112-119

Burton Taylor, Jane, 'Mix and Match' Habitus, Issue 04 July-September 2009,

pp132-139

CLOUDY BAY HOUSE

Hall, Peter 21st Century Beach Houses, The Images Publishing Group Pty Ltd

2010 pp.56-59

LIVINGSTON STREET HOUSING

Abel, Judith, ‘Shared Space' Houses, Issue 73, pp.78-85

Norrie, Helen, ‘Inspired Infill' Sanctuary, Issue 10, pp.78-85

1+2 architecture


Image: State Government Public Offices and Art Gallery, Hobart, Tasmania

Jonathan Wherrett ©

1+2 architecture

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