Liat Margolis, Robert Wright, Ted Kesik - Green Roofs for Healthy ...

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Liat Margolis, Robert Wright, Ted Kesik - Green Roofs for Healthy ...

GREEN ROOFS FOR HEALTHY CITIES

Understanding Design Performance Parameters for

Green Roof and Solar PV and Air Conditioning System Integration

Centre for Landscape Research (CLR)

Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design

University of Toronto

Liat Margolis, Robert Wright, Ted Kesik

Contacts:

Prof. Liat Margolis; liat.margolis@daniels.utoronto.ca

Prof. Robert Wright; r.wright@daniels.utoronto.ca


CO-BENEFITS OF PHOTOVOLTAICS AND

GREENROOFS


AS THE CITY OF TORONTO MOVES FORWARD WITH ITS GREEN ROOF BYLAW AND OTHER

PROACTIVE ENERGY PROGRAMS, SEVERAL CATEGORIES OF TECHNICAL QUESTIONS AND

CHALLENGES ARISE RELATIVE TO THE PAIRING OF GREEN ROOFS AND PV PANELS. THOSE

QUESTION THE POTENTIAL OF:

1. INCREASED ENERGY EFFICIENCY; THROUGH AN OPTIMAL COMBINATORY DESIGN THAT WOULD

ALSO MEET ROOF MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS;


6”, 12”, 24”, 48”

4”, 6”


AS THE CITY OF TORONTO MOVES FORWARD WITH ITS GREEN ROOF BYLAW AND OTHER

PROACTIVE GREEN ROOF PLANNING, SEVERAL CATEGORIES OF TECHNICAL QUESTIONS AND

CHALLENGES ARISE RELATIVE TO THE PAIRING OF GREEN ROOFS AND PV PANELS. THOSE

QUESTION THE POTENTIAL OF:

1. INCREASED ENERGY EFFICIENCY; THROUGH AN OPTIMAL COMBINATORY DESIGN THAT WOULD

ALSO MEET ROOF MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS;

2. INCREASE IN OPERATING EFFICIENCY OF AIR CONDITIONING UNITS; THROUGH THE INTAKE OF

COOLER AIR GENERATED BY A GREEN OR COOL ROOF;

3. GREEN ROOF SYSTEMS; AS A BALLAST FOR NON-PENETRATING RACKING STRUCTURES IN

ORDER TO MITIGATE CHALLENGES WITH THE ROOF’S STRUCTURAL CAPACITY;

4. STORMWATER; IMPROVEMENT OF QUALITY AND REDUCTION OF QUANTITY

5. BIODIVERSITY; DIVERSITY AND APPROPRIATENESS OF PLANT MATERIALS

6. COOL ROOF TECHNOLOGY AND SOLAR PV; CO-BENEFITS BETWEEN THE TWO

7. GREEN ROOFS AND CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION; TOLERANCE TO EXTREME WEATHER

(DROUGHT, RAIN, WIND, HEAT)


STUDY APPROACH

TWO TESTING FACILITIES LINKED IN REAL-TIME VIA THE INTERNET:

1. Tremco Roof (50,000 sq.ft):

Compares 3 surfaces (extensive greenroof, blacktop, white) underneath solar panel

racking systems that are suspended at specific heights and distances.

2. U of T Roof: (2000 sq.ft) “Calibration Laboratory”:

Testing a broader range of green roof and green wall systems.


INSTRUMENTATION & REAL-TIME PERFORMANCE DATA

how data acquisition of remote monitoring of time sensitive or real time performance data

can potentially become an industry‐municipal standard

BASE LINE CLIMATE

intense summer weather and intermittent precipitation that are being evidenced through climate change

STANDARDIZATION

existing networks, meta-data, data-sharing


CMP11-L - KIPP & ZONEN Thermopile Pyranometer


THERMODYNAMICS

PLANT SURVIVABILITY

STORMWATER INTERCEPTION


City postpones green rooftop requirement

ANNA MEHLER PAPERNY

From Friday's Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011 10:26PM EST

Last updated Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011 10:27PM EST

The city is delaying a requirement for new industrial developments to sport leafy

green tops with an aim to find environmentally friendly alternatives to rooftop

gardens. The logic is that it’s unreasonable to require owners of such huge, flattopped

structures to cultivate capital-intensive, sky-level gardens, especially

when they could pursue other options (solar panels, for example) that don’t take

as much time or money.

More related to this story

Green roofs sprouting new adherents

Green roofs sprouting new followers

But at the same time, critics argue, these massive structures are among the

city’s worst heat-sink offenders – the ones that suck up the most solar rays and

the ones that could benefit the most from being buried under dirt and plants. It’s

one of many minor repudiations of former mayor David Miller’s interventionist

agenda of enjoining private actors to take environmentally friendly steps they

would otherwise be likely to skip. Mayor Rob Ford’s administration has also

targeted rebates for low-flow toilets, the five-cent bag tax, and has cut staff from

several of the city’s environment-related departments.


But at the same time, critics argue, these massive structures are among the city’s worst heat-sink offenders

– the ones that suck up the most solar rays and the ones that could benefit the most from being buried

under dirt and plants.

It’s one of many minor repudiations of former mayor David Miller’s interventionist agenda of enjoining

private actors to take environmentally friendly steps they would otherwise be likely to skip. Mayor Rob

Ford’s administration has also targeted rebates for low-flow toilets, the five-cent bag tax, and has cut staff

from several of the city’s environment-related departments.

In this case, a year’s grace period before new industrial buildings and larger residential and commercial

developments must set up plant-based green roofs has been extended to two. And city staff are looking to

extend owners’ options – something they say wasn’t possible before amendments to provincial regulations

opened the door to solar-panelled roofs, or white ones treated to reflect, rather than absorb, light and heat.

“Now we have the authority to introduce alternatives,” chief city planner Gary Wright said. Industrial

buildings are the most affected by the green-roof requirement, he said, simply because of their size.

“We think there will be some requirement for a roof that has environmental benefits. And it could be a

reflective roof or a cool roof, whatever those technologies are.”

It’s good news for companies like Sanofi Pasteur. The Toronto branch of the pharmaceutical giant has a

property on Steeles Avenue. And trying to plant and maintain a massive green roof would have been next to

impossible, facilities management director Norm Medeiros said. They would like to rent out their roof to a

private company that would install solar panels and sell the energy back to the province.

“For us, [a green roof] means higher maintenance costs, higher capital costs on the installation and the

possibility of infestation in those roofs if not maintained,” he said. “We’re a pharmaceutical company. So we

really don’t want infestation in our roofs. … Any time there’s a roof leak, it means it’s possibly entering our

production facilities.

“There’s lots of options other than the so-called vegetative green roof.”

However, while planting a green roof the size of a football field may sound preposterous and overly

resource-intensive, their proponents note that bigger buildings stand to gain the most.

Large industrial areas of the city are what Mr. Wright calls “heat islands.” Their vast expanses of asphalt

suck up large quantities of the sun’s energy.

And having plants on the roof does more than just cool down a building: They act as an extra layer of

protection that can extend the life of asphalt that would otherwise be open to the wear and tear of elements,

said Colin Viebrock, who has designed green roofs across Toronto.


RESEARCH PARTNERS

In-kind contributions:

Arise Solar Technologies

Bioroof Systems

Greenscreen

IRC Building Sciences Group

Siplast

Tremco

University of Toronto

Grant funding:

City of Toronto

RCI Foundation

Ontario Centres of Excellence

Green Roof for Healthy Cities

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