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2 years ago

# HIV HEROES

HIV

HIV doesn’t make the news anymore. Now the issue is in your hands. Raffaele also told us that after the people at Publicis in charge of the campaign had quashed the idea, Jason Romeyko, Creative Director of Saatchi & Saatchi Geneva, which in turn is a subsidiary of the Publicis Groupe, had continued to toy with it. And then he asked us whether this wouldn’t make for an interesting campaign for the VANGARDIST. A radical plan The concept was simple and powerful. We would confront the increasing marginalisation of the HIV/AIDS discourse and make people aware of how social prejudices against people with HIV are still pretty rampant in today’s society. Our main focus was to be on the issue of social exclusion that many HIVpositive people who openly deal with their situation continue to face, simply because the disease still triggers all kinds of irrational fears of contracting it, even though this is virtually impossible through ordinary social contact. Our plan: to find three people infected with the virus who should be as different from each other as possible as well as be willing to donate their blood for a good cause. This blood, after being treated in a laboratory to exclude any possible risk of infection, would then be mixed with printer ink to produce an ad that would, in essence, contain the following information: This ad has been printed with HIV infected blood. Pure fate While our Chief Editor’s ears had already pricked up during the description of the idea, when he heard the name Romeyko, a wide grin spread over his face, because—what a nice coincidence—Jason is a personal friend of the VANGARDIST in general and of Julian and Carlos (the founders and editors of this magazine) in particular. At a time when their career ladders weren’t being climbed quite as ambitiously as they are now, these two would regularly visit Jason in Berlin. Probably mostly to party, but also, whenever Jason was sent off around the world, to look after Jason’s cat, Bauer. We should probably mention here that Bauer isn’t just some ordinary cat. He’s a muse, and