Group Mentoring Program - Allies Canada

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Group Mentoring Program - Allies Canada

Group Mentoring

Mentor Resource Kit

Group Mentoring

Mentor Resource Kit


This Mentor’s Resource Kit - Group contains integrated materials created by:

Sage Mentors Inc. and JVS Toronto

©2007, 2009 Sage Mentors Inc. www.sagementors.com

Sage Mentors Inc. grants JVS Toronto a non-exclusive use of materials for participants of the JVS

Toronto mentoring programs. Sage Mentors Inc. and JVS Toronto maintain the rights to their

materials. These workbooks can not be re-sold or given to another organization without the written

permission of Sage Mentors Inc. and JVS Toronto. Sage Mentors grants the materials may be updated

and tailored for specific audiences from time to time.

These materials may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites other than those owned by JVS

Toronto or posted to a listserve (such as: Google, Facebook, Linked-in, Plaxo, Yahoo,

and all others) without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may

print, download, or email for their own individual use.

Printed in Canada.

2


Table of Contents

Program Overview.......................................................................................................4

Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 5

Building the Mentoring Relationship ........................................................................................... 6

Being a Mentor............................................................................................................................ 7

Frequently Asked Questions....................................................................................................... 8

Definitions ................................................................................................................................... 9

Group Mentoring Tips & Techniques.........................................................................10

Building Relationships with the Group...................................................................................... 11

How Mentors Make a Difference .............................................................................................. 12

Tips for Facilitating Groups....................................................................................................... 13

Cross-Cultural Awareness ........................................................................................................ 14

Tips for Listening so that People Feel Listened to.................................................................... 15

Feedback Technique and What to do with Feedback .............................................................. 16

Coaching Technique for Managing Conflict.............................................................................. 17

Beginning and Ending Meetings Technique: Check-in and Check-out .................................... 18

Check List for Preparing for the First Meeting .......................................................................... 19

Mentor Orientation.....................................................................................................20

Mentoring Objectives and Expected Outcomes ....................................................................... 21

Cycle of the Mentoring Relationship......................................................................................... 22

Worksheet: Getting to Know Each Other.................................................................................. 23

Mentors and Mentees Roles and Responsibilities.................................................................... 24

The 5-Meeting and Activities Guideline .................................................................................... 25

Meeting 1: Establish the Mentoring Group ................................................................26

Meeting Agenda........................................................................................................................ 27

Setting the Stage for Being an Effective Member of a Mentoring Group ................................. 28

Confidentiality and Accountability Agreement .......................................................................... 29

Worksheet Summary of Mentee Career Highlights and Job Targets....................................... 30

Getting to Know my Mentor ...................................................................................................... 33

Meeting 2: Job Search Tools.....................................................................................34

Meeting Agenda........................................................................................................................ 35

Meeting 3: Interviewing, Networking & Job Search Strategies ..................................36

Meeting Agenda........................................................................................................................ 37

Meeting 4: Issues Exploration & Workplace Culture..................................................38

Meeting Agenda........................................................................................................................ 39

Meeting 5: Integrating into the New Job ....................................................................40

Meeting Agenda........................................................................................................................ 41

Appendix: Job Search Tips........................................................................................42

Job Search Strategy ................................................................................................................. 43

Research Tips........................................................................................................................... 44

Internet Job Search Sites ......................................................................................................... 45

Top Ten Interview Tips ............................................................................................................. 46

Top Ten Job Search Tips ......................................................................................................... 47

Telephone and Voice Mail Etiquette......................................................................................... 48

How to Build and Maintain a Network....................................................................................... 49

Useful Tips for Successful Networking ..................................................................................... 50

Email Etiquette.......................................................................................................................... 51

Cover Letters and Answering Advertisements ......................................................................... 52

Top Ten Résumé Tips .............................................................................................................. 53

Ten Tips for the First 6-Months of the New Job ....................................................................... 54

3


Program Overview

“I learned so much about myself

and my abilities to build the

confidence of another person. The

gratitude and appreciation I

received from my mentee made me

feel like I really made a difference

to the life of a new Canadian”

Mentor

The role of the Mentor is important to the overall success of the individual being mentored and the

success of the program. In considering the value you bring to your role in facilitating the integration

of internationally educated professionals into the Canadian workplace, this resource kit has been

prepared to support you.

How this manual is organized

Introduction

This section introduces the goals and objectives of the group mentorship program and general

information about mentoring.

Group Mentoring Tips and Techniques

This section provides mentoring and coaching tips and techniques to support the mentoring

relationship. Use what you need, when you need it for the matter at hand.

Mentor Orientation to the Mentoring Program

This section contains some of the mentor materials used during the orientation workshops.

Meeting Guides

This section contains one-page guides for each of the five meetings, and an agenda for mentors to

use as a means of tailoring each meeting to the unique needs of the mentees in the group. The

mentee resource material matches the pages in this section.

Meeting 1: Establishing the Mentoring Group

Meeting 2: Job Search Tools

Meeting 3: Interviewing, Networking & Job Search Strategies

Meeting 4: Issues Exploration & Workplace Culture

Meeting 5: Integrating into the New Job

Appendix: Job Search Tips

The appendix contains summary tips for many aspects of the job search process.

4


Introduction

Group mentoring is a unique form of support, where people looking for work (mentees) can

connect with a professional working in their field (mentor) over a period of five group meetings.

Group mentoring provides job seekers with a quick and effective way to enhance their networks

and makes excellent use of our volunteer mentor resources.

This mentoring kit was originally developed in partnership between JVS Toronto and the Iranian-

Canadian Network (IC Network) for the Iranian Community Network for Mentoring, Group

Mentoring Program.

JVS Toronto is a non-profit, non-sectarian community organization that partners with the

government and business sectors to help people succeed at school, work and life. We have over

10 years experience in the successful delivery of innovative group, one on one, online and

corporate one-day mentoring programs.

The Iranian-Canadian Network (IC Network) is a network of Iranian-Canadian business owners,

professionals and community members. This Network was initiated by members of the Iranian

Community Advisory Council of Family Service Association of Metro Toronto (FSA) to take

initiative in addressing the issue of unemployment, under-employment and self-employment in the

Iranian community living in Canada.

The original production of this kit was made possible through a grant from the Ontario Trillium

Foundation. The Ontario Trillium Foundation provides funding to thousands of charitable and notfor-profit

organizations throughout Ontario. Today, they are one of Canada’s leading charitable

grant-making foundations.

The kit was modified in 2012 in partnership with JVS Toronto, Toronto Region Immigrant

Employment Council (TRIEC) and the five professional immigrant networks listed below with

funding from ALLIES.

• Association of Filipino Canadian Accountants (AFCA)

• Association of Romanian Engineers in Canada (AREC)

• Canadian Network of Iraqi Engineers and Architects (CNIEA)

• Canadian Hispanic Congress (CHC)

• Indo-Canadian Chamber of Commerce

Group Mentoring Objectives

Through group mentoring, mentees can:

• Learn about Canadian workplace culture and industry trends

• Identify educational and technical skills required to meet market demands

• Receive guidance through the licensing and accreditation process

• Acquire support through the job search process

• Establish professional networks

• Improve professional terminology

• Build confidence in a new culture

5


Building the Mentoring Relationship

Welcome to Mentoring

The Group Mentoring Program has been created to facilitate the effective

transfer of knowledge, values, and workplace behaviours to improve access

to employment for internationally educated professionals.

The impact for all members of the group is their meaningful integration into

the Canadian workplace. Your role as mentor is important for providing the

context of the Canadian workplace environment, facilitating participation,

providing information on how to effectively job search in your field, and

building effective networks.

The tools, tips and techniques provided in this guide are designed to assist

you with your role. These resources are not intended to be comprehensive

and we encourage you to make contact with your coordinator for additional

resources when you need them.

The material is organized to follow the natural flow of developing trust in

mentoring relationships and in support of the five group mentoring meetings.

Tools and techniques are provided for developing effective mentoring

relationships and an active job search.

6


Being a Mentor

Mentors are people who have a combination of knowledge and

business experience to bring wisdom as guides to the learning

process. They are not necessarily senior executives but they

have clearly established themselves in their current roles and

likely have a reputation for developing others. They have welldeveloped

interpersonal skills and are continuous learners.

And, most of all, they are comfortable enough with themselves

and their role to set their needs aside and focus on the needs

of the mentees.

Mentors regularly report they believe they learn as much as the

mentee. Mentees say the mentor behaviours they most admire

are:

♦ Making an effort to understand the background of the

mentee

♦ Being consistent and dependable

♦ Helping the mentees think things through

♦ Finding ways to add to the mentees’ thoughts, not give

them their thoughts

♦ Not assuming their way is the only way

♦ Asking for a frank discussion and providing feedback

♦ Providing the mentees with ideas, options and alternate

ways for better decision making

♦ Being able to laugh at themselves

“I found it very gratifying to help

someone as bright as my mentee

and he is thrilled that he found a

job so quickly. It paid off for

both of us!”

Mentor

7


Frequently Asked Questions

What is the definition of mentoring?

A learning relationship between individuals based on the

mentees’ goals. This developmental relationship is focused on

overall growth.

Do I have to find my mentees a job?

No. Mentees conduct their own job search. As mentors, you

guide your mentees on how to job search in your profession and

or industry. You may guide them in the direction of job openings,

and provide a sounding board for their presentation and

integration into the workplace.

What are the program goals?

To successfully integrate internationally educated professionals

into the workplace.

Why is it a group program?

People often learn more from the experiences of others and

benefit from the different perspectives present in a group

process. This is also a great opportunity for mentees to develop

and nurture their own network with each other.

How will I know I am doing a good job?

Open communication is the key to any good relationship.

Throughout the mentoring relationship you will be speaking with

your mentees about whether or not you are fulfilling the goals

you set out at the beginning. You will also be asked to provide

feedback on your progress and experience throughout the

mentoring relationship.

How long will I mentor for?

This program is designed for five group meetings of two hours

each meeting.

“I just wanted to report a

success story. My mentee has

been offered a job, starting

Monday, through a contact I

had. He will be working in his

field and seems to be delighted. I

feel very pleased and lucky to

have been able to make the

connection for him. Talk about

the hidden job market!!”

Mentor

8


Definitions

Mentoring

Mentoring is a learning relationship between individuals based

on the mentee’s goals. This developmental relationship is

focused on the overall growth of the mentee.

For this program, mentoring will incorporate many processes

and techniques to assist with the development of the mentee.

This “blended” model is focused on assisting the mentee in

applying and supporting the job search process and effective

integration into the Canadian workplace. This will include

mentors, a group of mentees, support from the Mentoring

Coach and job search assistance from job search programs

provided by JVS Toronto and other community agencies.

Mentor

The mentor has the knowledge and life experience as one who

“has been there before” and can therefore ask insightful

questions, assist with the exploration of options, and determine

the real needs of the mentees in relation to the marketplace.

The mentor has the qualities, experience or knowledge needed

by the mentee for effective learning.

Mentee

The mentee receives assistance of a mentor in a learning

relationship. The mentee invests time and effort to learn from

the relationship – develop skills, achieve insight, and the

perspective needed that is important for a successful job

search and integration into the Canadian workplace.

Mentee Group

Mentees working together as a group with common goals are

also peer-mentors to each other. Mentees in a group have a

responsibility to support the learning of each member of the

group. A mentee group offers the opportunity for broad-based

feedback in support of an effective job search.

“For me, the mentoring aspect

helped me to explore my

network, improve my

communication skills, and know

more about Canadian work

environment culture. Most

importantly, my mentor makes

me feel that I am not alone on the

job-hunting journey. There is

always someone there willing to

help and give advice. Even right

now. We became friends, shared

work experience, and life

experience. Actually I just had

coffee with him this morning, my

mentor, a great friend”

Mentee

9


Overview

This section provides mentoring tips and

techniques to assist the mentor to be effective

in their role. Additional resources may be

available through your coordinator.

Group Mentoring Tips &

Techniques

Contents

Building Relationships with the Group .....................................................11

How Mentors Make a Difference ............................................................................................. 12

Tips for Facilitating Groups ..................................................................................................... 13

Cross-Cultural Awareness........................................................................................................ 14

Tips for Listening so that People Feel Listened to ................................................................... 15

Feedback Technique................................................................................................................. 16

What to do with Feedback........................................................................................................ 16

Coaching Technique for Managing Conflict............................................................................ 17

Beginning and Ending Meetings Technique: Check-in and Check-out ................................... 18

Check List for Preparing for the First Meeting ........................................................................ 19

“The program is crucial for the

newcomers. I found it very rewarding to

learn that some of my suggestions were

very helpful for my mentee and proved

to be an eye opener – it is well worth it

for both of us”

Mentor

10


Building Relationships with the Group

The first priority is to build relationships with all members of the

group. Mentors have the ability to create and maintain

relationships. This ability will be a significant part of your

success. There are a few key tips that will help build strong

relationships:

♦ As the mentor, you set the tone and climate for all the

meetings

♦ Always have an agenda for the meeting, and wrap-up with

inviting mentees to prepare for the next meeting

♦ The best time to offer suggestions is when they are

requested

♦ You are providing perspective and alternatives – mentees

make their own decisions with the information they gather

from you and others

♦ Ask questions and stimulate discussions – you are not

there to provide an “answer”

♦ Show you understand the mentees’ challenges and issues

♦ Provide a structure, balance formality with informality and

maintain relationship boundaries that you agree to as part

of the Accountability and Confidentiality Agreement process

(page 29)

♦ Be forthright and say what you mean

♦ Listen

♦ Enjoy your relationships

“I found the experience

rewarding – being able to help

someone who is new to the

country and trying to make their

home in Canada.”

Mentor

11


How Mentors Make a Difference

The mentoring relationship is focused on supporting

internationally trained professionals and newcomers to Canada

in their job search and integrating effectively into the workplace.

Mentees benefit most from mentors in:

♦ Understanding Canadian workplace culture

♦ Identifying the skills required by market demands

♦ Identifying the credentials desired by specific industries

♦ Being guided through the licensing process/certification

process where needed

♦ Assuring professional terminology from the mentee’s

originating country translates to current market terms

♦ Selecting technical skills up-grading programs/re-training

programs and resources

♦ Locating publications and workshops on recent

developments in the mentee’s field

♦ Acquiring/accessing support through the job search process

♦ Establishing professional networks

♦ Determining the best method to market ones-self into

specific industries – what works for one will not necessarily

work for another

♦ Building long-term networks for ongoing professional growth

♦ Supporting and encouraging efforts to become

professionally established

“She was a very motivated

mentee, who was very job ready.

She was always open to my

suggestions and a pleasure to

mentor.”

Mentor

12


Tips For Facilitating Groups

The primary goal for the mentor is to assure everyone in the

group benefits from the experiences of all participants. Create

an open and welcoming environment.

♦ Create a discussion; you do not need to have the answers

♦ Challenge people to think about the topic at hand

♦ Encourage the sharing of thoughts, experiences and ideas

♦ Help everyone feel valued for their input

♦ Redirect judgments when they occur. A judgment sounds

like: “You should….”; “It shouldn’t be like that…”; “If I were

you, I would…”

♦ Ask open-ended questions and follow-up questions. “Would

you describe your experience with…?”

♦ Bring a topic to closure with: “What will you do differently as

a result of…?”; “What is the next step for you…?”’ “Shall we

have an up-date on this topic the next time we meet?”

Guide

Encourage

Support

Be patient

Be flexible

Give feedback

Be silent and

intervene when

needed

Discuss

problems as

they arise

Summarize

♦ Close with asking for feedback on the group process: “What

worked, what did not work, what can be done differently to

make the next session more effective?”

13


Cross-Cultural Awareness

As more and more newcomers arrive in Canada and begin their

new lives, one of their priorities is to secure employment. The

significance of understanding and being aware of cultural

nuances becomes paramount for both the newcomer, and

everyone with whom they interact. The importance of

understanding cultural dynamics in communication and day-today

interactions with others cannot be overstated.

Intercultural understanding is challenging due to the differences

in verbal and non-verbal communication. Some of the factors that come into play include

misunderstandings, misinterpretations, false assumptions, and discomfort with being around some

culture-specific behaviours or habits, and, lack of knowledge in how to address these concerns in

an effective and sensitive manner.

Two common differences between western business culture and that of other countries, is with

teamwork and the concept of time. Unlike western culture, many other cultures are collectivist. This

means that individualism is not valued, but working together as a group is. This can be used as a

positive way to explain the concept of teamwork to internationally educated professionals. The

concept of time differs in cultures worldwide. For example, meeting times may be a guideline in

one culture rather than a commitment.

Overcoming cultural differences involves awareness, knowledge, and skills.

Awareness:

Being aware that your mentee(s) acting or speaking contrary to your expectations may be due to

their own cultural norms of behaviour and language interpretation.

Knowledge:

Applying your understanding of cultural differences to effectively resolve both obvious and not so

obvious culture-bound situations your mentee(s) may be experiencing.

Skills:

Bringing together your awareness that differences exist and your knowledge that a newcomer may

be acting in a culture-specific way, paves the way for effective communication, positive regard and

non-judgmental listening.

As we become more culturally aware, we will all respond to each other across all relationship

systems (work, service, community life) with respect and empathy to people of all cultures, classes,

races, religions and ethnic backgrounds in a manner that values the worth of each other.

In mentoring, you and your mentees are embarking on a voyage of discovery – not only will your

mentees become more intimate with the nuances of Canadian work-culture, but you will also learn

about the richness of others.

14


Tips for Listening so that People Feel

Listened to

In networking, the workplace, interviewing, and your mentoring

relationships, you will participate best by practicing effective

listening skills. The following tips support effective listening.









Maintain eye contact with the speaker, lean forward, nod

and smile

Avoid talking or interrupting, except to reinforce the

speaker with such comments as: “I see”, “yes”, or “that’s

true”

Use your eyes as well as your ears. Look at the speaker’s

body language, facial expressions and vocal cues to help

you understand the spoken message

Focus completely on the speaker

Concentrate on the content, both factual and emotional

Think about what is being said and what is left unsaid

Be patient. We can listen about four times faster than we

can speak

Clarify what you heard by summarizing, paraphrasing or

asking questions

“It is always a pleasure to help

out on the settlement of new

immigrants, especially

professionals that seek a place in

the Canadian marketplace. My

work with mentees has given me

insights on the challenges they

face and I have been glad to

provide the information/guidance

and help when needed. We remain

great friends with past mentees.”

Mentor

15


Feedback Technique

Providing feedback that result in change is a sign of effective

mentoring. Sometimes feedback needs to be positive;

sometimes feedback needs to be constructive.

♦ Plan your comments

o Let the mentee know what they have done well

o State clearly the problem area

♦ Pick your time and place with thought – usually a private

place to assure as much dignity and respect as possible

♦ Give the mentee a “heads-up” that you want to have a talk

so they are prepared to listen

♦ Listen. Your mentee may have something relevant to say

♦ Be sure to use “yes, and….” as this acknowledges their

experience; “yes, but….” negates their experience

♦ Conclude with your mentee agreeing on a change

Feedback done poorly is damaging, done well, is powerful

What to do with Feedback

♦ Mentors may need to coach mentees in how to learn from

feedback

♦ You may say to your mentee:

“What do you typically do when someone gives you

feedback?”

♦ Talk about how feedback belongs to behaviour and is

delivered to be helpful. You may say:

“It is not about who you are, it is about the behaviour that

needs to change”

Mentoring has helped me in

boosting my morale and

confidence. There are mock

interviews as well as more

information provided by the

mentor for the successful job

search.”

Mentee

or say:

“Feedback is for learning and is to help you be successful”

16


Coaching Technique for Managing

Conflict

This technique is provided as a guideline for exploring issues

that have generated conflict in the group, be it internal or

between members of the group, or in the mentor/mentee

relationship.

Step 1: Assess the emotions of the situation

♦ What emotions were triggered in me (frustration,

questioning, surprise, fear)?

♦ What emotions do I believe were being experienced by

the other person?

Step 2: Think about the circumstances

♦ What interests or values or needs are at stake for each

of us?

♦ What assumptions or expectations do we have about

each other?

♦ What approaches or style would be best for resolving

the situation?

Step 3: Invite the other person to discuss and develop a

resolution

♦ Set a positive, “open” tone by acknowledging the

intention to understand and resolve the situation

♦ Acknowledge and validate the other person – “thank you

for working with me on this; I can see that it is important

to you...”

Step 4: Explore the problem or issue

♦ Take turns exploring each other’s thoughts and feelings

about the issue

♦ Listen and ask questions

♦ Identify what is at the heart of the matter

♦ Summarize and agree on what you understand

Step 5: Explore options and identify a mutually agreeable

solution

♦ Be open and explore – generate several options

♦ Explore how to make the options work

“My mentee and I continue to

talk. He has landed on his feet

and has good prospects for his

employment being a lateral

move. I do think the program has

played a significant role in this.”

Mentor

17


Beginning and Ending Meetings

Technique: Check-in and Check-out

Check-in:

Take 15 minutes total time at the beginning of the meeting to

gain the focus of participants for the session.

This important technique acknowledges the current experience

of the participants, provides a gage to the mentor of what is top

of mind, and serves as a bridge for moving people from all the

activities of their day, to focus on the topics of the mentoring

group.

First Meeting:

Invite each participant to introduce themselves – their

background and where they are in their job search; what they

see that is working for them and where they are challenged.

Incorporate any “hot-topic” into the agenda for the meeting. A

hot-topic is any experience or issue that is at the top of mind of

a participant such as: a mentee is scheduled to have a

telephone interview and would like some tips on how to handle

it well.

Second and subsequent meetings:

Invite each participant to introduce themselves and ask:

“What is on your mind today?”

Check-out:

15 minutes total time at the end of the meeting to come to

closure with everyone.

Ask “what are you taking away from today’s meeting that you

will use or apply in the next week?”

Mentoring has helped me get a

deeper understanding of the

engineering profession in

Canada. My mentor also gave me

specific industry job hunting tools

and broadened my network.”

Mentee

18


Checklist for Preparing for the First

Meeting

Prepare to discuss your background and the backgrounds

of each member of the group

Review the goals of the program

Share your personal goals for the mentoring relationship

Identify what you (mentor) would like to learn

Discuss expectations – review what will and won’t be

discussed in the group

Agree on the amount of time you plan to spend together,

where you will meet, who will organize refreshments

Clarify roles and responsibilities

Discuss confidentiality

Discuss and agree on the areas that are not open for

discussion - this sets the boundaries for the relationships

Set time, date, and place for the meetings

Discuss how you will manage any conflicts that may arise

during the relationship

“I now understand the Canadian

workplace culture and life style; I

have begun to establish and

develop my networks and make

new friends; I have identified the

possible opportunities for my

career growth”

Mentee

19


Overview

Mentor and Mentee Orientation sessions can be

conducted together or separately. The content

provided here may be used in both circumstances and

can easily be adjusted to suit the needs of the

audience. Orientation workshop facilitators may

review the content of the materials provided and may

add supplementary resources.

Mentor Orientation

Mentor Orientation Session

Mentoring Objectives and Expected Outcomes ....................................................................... 21

Cycle of the Mentoring Relationship ....................................................................................... 22

Worksheet: Getting to Know Each Other................................................................................. 23

Mentors and Mentees Roles and Responsibilities.................................................................... 24

The 5-Meeting and Activities Guideline .................................................................................. 25

20


Mentoring Objectives

Through group mentoring, mentees can:








Learn about Canadian workplace culture and industry

trends

Identify educational and technical skills required to meet

market demands

Receive guidance through the licensing and accreditation

process

Acquire support through the job search process

Establish professional networks

Improve professional terminology

Build confidence in a new culture

Expected Outcomes

♦ Mentees will be better informed and equipped to obtain

suitable employment in or related to their fields of expertise.

They will obtain the sector-specific information and

knowledge necessary to assist them in establishing their

careers in Canada

♦ Through exposure to their mentor’s personal and

professional experiences, mentees will gain valuable

information on how to pursue their goal of being employed in

an appropriate field

♦ The mentees will gain the confidence and motivation

required to actively pursue their employment goals

♦ Mentees will begin to build and maintain their network within

the group

♦ Through an informal support and networking group, mentees

will be encouraged to explore various avenues that may

facilitate their gainful employment

Mentoring helped to give me a

better understanding of my

profession in Canada (the

requirements etc.), the approach I

need to take to make my jobsearch

more effective within my

profession, and important

information about the Canadian

workplace culture. The insights

which my mentor was able to

provide were invaluable.”

Mentee

21


Cycle of the Mentoring Relationship

The following diagram illustrates how the mentoring relationship changes over time. The mentors

and mentees spend time getting to know each other and begin the process of developing the early

social relationship that builds trust. Once trust exists, more complex issues and concerns are

brought forward for exploration, discussion and feedback. True learning and change take place

when trust exists. The relationship moves to closure when significant progress on goals has been

achieved. A new relationship may begin, or new goals established in the same relationship.

22


Worksheet: Getting to Know Each Other

Mentors often find spending time with other mentors to be a worthwhile way to learn from each

other and build their own network. The following exercise is provided to assist members of the

group to begin establishing a relationship with each other. Mentors may also wish to re-use this

exercise to get to know their mentoring group on the first meeting.

In small groups, have each individual present their background using the following

questions as a guideline (allow 5 minutes per person):

What are some of the highlights of my personal life that would be useful to share, as it is part of

who I am?

What are some of the highlights from my work and education history that would be useful to share

as these set the foundation for the work I do?

What are some of the highlights of my experiences in the Canadian work environment that would

be useful to explore in preparation for mentoring internationally educated professionals (for

example: understanding the nuances of the hiring process; how to promote ideas to team-mates;

how to be an effective member of a team)?

How have mentors/guides or role models made a difference to me in my career in the past?

What are some of the hopes I have for this mentoring program?

23


Mentors and Mentees Roles and Responsibilities

Mentors

Listen: Be a sounding board. Listen actively,

patiently and empathetically.

Confidential: Hold confidential all information

and private details of your group.

Build trust: Trust is the cornerstone of a

mentoring relationship. Only in an atmosphere

of trust will mentees communicate their true

goals, fears and ideas.

Share experiences, both positive and

negative: Mentees learn as much from your

difficulties and setbacks, as from your

successes.

Give constructive feedback: Share your

observations, not what you thought of it.

Offer perspective and challenge mentees to

make decisions: This is not the same as

telling a mentee what to do. While you may

wish to protect a mentee from making critical

errors, you still want her/him to grow into an

independent problem-solver. Effective mentors

ask questions that lead their mentee to make

workable decisions.

Facilitate: Encourage everyone to surface their

issues, concerns and questions, share their

experiences – what has worked and what has

not worked. People who participate in a group

mentoring process indicate they get as much

value from their fellow participants as they do

from the mentor.

Encourage participation: Assure all members

of the group are engaging and benefiting from

the experience.

Mentees

Professional conduct: Treat all members of

the group with respect.

Confidential: Hold confidential all information

and private details of the group.

Mentees are asked to not release the names

of other mentees/mentors or personal

information without explicit consent.

Take the mentoring relationship seriously:

Take the time to learn the hidden rules of the

workplace. In mentoring there is freedom and

opportunity to explore how things work and

why they work the way they do. Mentees are

encouraged to take advantage of the

opportunity.

Keep to the agreed meeting schedule.

Follow the established team norms or rules

of engagement.

Encourage yourself and others to

contribute: Contribute to the group by asking

questions, gaining clarity of the issues,

providing input.

Do not expect your mentor to “get a job for

you”: Mentors provide insight, background,

resources, tips and techniques to assist

mentees with being successful in attaining and

integrating into a new job, not find a job.

Be open: Learn from the issues and concerns

of group members. Share experiences –

successes, challenges, difficulties, and

failures.

Access resources: Identify where additional

resources are needed.

24


The 5 Meeting and Activities Guideline

The following is a general overview of key topics to be discussed in the five

meetings. In taking the needs of the group into account, adjust the meeting topics

to meet those needs.

Establish the Mentoring Group

• Introductions: get to know everyone

• Establish how members of the group would like to work

together, and determine the rules of conduct

• Gain commitment and ask all participants to sign the

Confidentiality and Accountability Agreement

• Review mentee career highlights and job targets (skills

and required education and credentials)

• Establish topics and goals of the participants

• Review of Working in Canada assignment

Overview of Profession and Job Search Tools

• Overview of profession

• Identify and share job search resources (associations,

current job fairs, recruiters, useful web-sites)

• Conduct a peer-to-peer review of resumes

• Discuss education and credentials and how these are

transferable to your industry/sector

• Review cover letters and how to answer ads

• Discuss the interview process

• Discuss how to build and maintain a network

Interviewing, Networking & Job Search Strategies

• Explore questions from the group

• Discuss job search strategies that work for different lines

of work and industries

• Discuss using the Internet for job postings and

applications

• Practice interview question, discuss what employers are

looking for in the answers

Issues Exploration and Workplace Culture

• Continue interview practice questions and provide

feedback

• Review job search progress

• Discuss salary expectations and options

• Discuss workplace culture – how to build relationships

Integrating into the New Job

• Continue interview practice and provide feedback

• Review job search progress

• Discuss workplace culture – building a successful career

• Discuss how the members of the group will continue

networking with each other post-mentoring program

25


Overview

This section provides several discussion

processes to assist with establishing the group

and building relationships.

Meeting 1: Establish the

Mentoring Group

What to cover

Set the tone and climate for the meetings

Introductions and Check-in (see group

mentoring technique Check-in and Checkout

page 18)

Establish how members of the group would

like to work together; what will be the rules

of conduct for the group? (page 28 for

discussion questions)

Gain commitment and ask all participants to

sign the Confidentiality and Accountability

Agreement (page 29)

Complete review of Mentee Career

Highlights and Job Targets (page 30)

Establish topics and goals of the

participants (page 30)

Mentees share what input and feedback

they would like from their mentor (page 30)

Check-out (see group mentoring technique

Check-in and Check-out page 18)

Check Working in Canada assignment

given at orientation session

What to prepare for meeting #2

♦ Ask mentees to bring a copy of their resume

and sample applications

♦ Mentors bring sample interview questions

and interview scoring system if used in your

company

Questions to stimulate

discussion

♦ Check-in: (after the introduction, ask each

mentee to take a moment and describe)

How has your day unfolded or what is on

your mind right now?

♦ As a mentoring group, we need to

establish our group norms and how we will

work together (Confidentiality and

Accountability Agreement, page 29). Ask:

can you describe what is important for you

to assure it will be a good mentoring

experience for you?

♦ Using the Worksheet Summary of Mentee

Career Highlights and Job Targets Page

30), ask: please take a few minutes to

review your career history and identify your

target job and industries for the group.

♦ Ask: in what areas would you like input or

feedback from me as your mentor, or other

mentees, throughout our mentoring

relationship? (page 30)

♦ Check-out: what are you taking away from

today’s meeting that you will use or apply

in the next week?

26


Meeting Agenda

Date Time:

Use this agenda to keep track of your notes and mentees’ topics of interest

Location:

Attendees confirmed:

Key Topics:

Notes:

Issues Addressed:

Next Meeting:

27


Setting the Stage for Being an Effective Member of a Mentoring

Group

Participating in group-mentoring can be rewarding and challenging at the same time. To make the best of the group

experience, take some time in the first meeting to establish how you wish to work together and how you will contribute

to each other’s learning.

Mentors facilitate group discussion on each question as a means of setting the stage for effective

group functioning.

28


Confidentiality and Accountability Agreement

We, the undersigned agree on the following terms of reference as those with which we will guide

our mentoring relationship, today and beyond. We have discussed how we will manage our

relationships and the ways by which we will respect each other in our group and individually.

In the spirit of partnership, we agree to collaborate on supporting each other’s learning and job

search within this mentorship relationship.

This will be completed by all parties in a timely manner and will form the framework for our future

meetings for the duration of this professional mentoring relationship and program.

We agree to:

1. Meet regularly as follows:__________________________________________________

2. Respect the rules of engagement that we have established for our group

3. Provide feedback to each other to assist with each other’s progress

4. Maintain confidentiality

5. Be respectful of each other

6. Other__________________________________________________________________

Signatures

Date

29


Worksheet Summary of Mentee Career Highlights and Job

Targets

Mentors facilitate the process for all mentees in the group to share their goals by inviting

participants to:

1. Introduce themselves. Mentors and mentees are provided space to make notes of each

other’s experience and work target. These notes will help with on-going mutual support and

to establish their network

2. Describe their expertise and work history

3. Identify their target job and preferred industries (most related to their job target)

4. Describe what they would like to get as feedback from the group and mentor (for example:

feedback on personal presentation and handling interview questions, ideas on companies to

target)

5. Describe what they have to offer others in the group (for example, practice interview

questions, approaches to the job search strategy)

Name:

Expertise and work history:

Email:

Phone:

Target job and preferred industries:

I would like feedback from the group and mentor on:

I offer to others in my group:

Name:

Expertise and work history:

Email:

Phone:

Target job and preferred industries:

I would like feedback from the group and mentor on:

I offer to others in my group:

30


Name:

Expertise and work history:

Email:

Phone:

Target job and preferred industries:

I would like feedback from the group and mentor on:

I offer to others in my group:

Name:

Expertise and work history:

Email:

Phone:

Target job and preferred industries:

I would like feedback from the group and mentor on:

I offer to others in my group:

Name:

Expertise and work history:

Email:

Phone:

Target job and preferred industries:

I would like feedback from the group and mentor on:

I offer to others in my group:

Name:

Expertise and work history:

Email:

Phone:

Target job and preferred industries:

I would like feedback from the group and mentor on:

I offer to others in my group:

31


Name:

Expertise and work history:

Email:

Phone:

Target job and preferred industries:

I would like feedback from the group and mentor on:

I offer to others in my group:

Name:

Expertise and work history:

Email:

Phone:

Target job and preferred industries:

I would like feedback from the group and mentor on:

I offer to others in my group:

Name:

Expertise and work history:

Email:

Phone:

Target job and preferred industries:

I would like feedback from the group and mentor on:

I offer to others in my group:

Name:

Expertise and work history:

Email:

Phone:

Target job and preferred industries:

I would like feedback from the group and mentor on:

I offer to others in my group:

32


Getting to Know my Mentor

It is important for mentees to learn about the experiences and

background of their mentor. Mentors may wish to invite mentees

to ask the questions listed.

Mentors please prepare to answer these questions from the

Mentees.












What do you love most about what you do?

What work situations have you enjoyed the most? Why?

How have you changed jobs or managed a job search in

your past?

What work relationships have benefited you? Why were

they helpful?

What barriers have you experienced in the workplace?

How did you overcome them?

What has been your greatest learning experience in your

career? Why?

How do professionals in your field approach employers?

When job searching, who is the ideal contact for me: the

head of the firm or a department head?

What about volunteer work or co-op placements?

Which skills are the most important for professionals

within our industry?

What is the demand/market like right now for…?

“…Mentors are a guide to our

professional development and not

job givers. If that is made very

clear, they will be able to help a

lot. They help us work on the

right path to achieve our goals. It

may be a slow process, but at

least you are on the right path…”

Mentee

33


Overview

The focus for Meeting 2 is for the mentor to give

mentees an understanding of their profession in

Canada and help identify how their skills are

transferable to their target markets and how to

access those markets using job search tools.

Meeting 2: Overview of

Profession and Job

Search Tools

What to cover

Provide an over of the profession in Canada

Conduct a peer-to-peer review of resumes

Review cover letters and how to answer ads

Discuss the interview process

Identify and share resources for each

mentee’s job target: identify industries, types

of companies, name of organizations

Discuss the best way to approach the

company:

• Network

• Through associations

• Postings/Internet applications

Where a mentee is considering examining

education equivalencies, new training, new

credentials, and up-grading expertise,

discuss how to research employers to

determine the education/credentials that are

most valued by the market

Refer to JVS Toronto for up-to-date job

search workshops and resources

What to prepare for meeting #3

Ask mentees to (and mentors may bring their

own samples):

♦ Bring resumes and sample applications

♦ Bring sample difficult interview questions for

practice

♦ Bring information researched on retraining/up-grading

options

♦ Be prepared to talk about progress

♦ Bring questions and experiences to explore

Questions to stimulate

discussion

♦ Check-in: (Ask each mentee to take a

moment and describe) How has your day

unfolded? Or, what is on your mind right

now?

♦ Ask: What job search strategy have you

been using and how successful has the

approach been to date?

♦ Ask: Having explored resumes, what input

can you provide related to the job target –

identify industry; name of company; person

you may know at the company?

♦ Ask mentees to: describe their experiences

with the examining of credentials for retraining/up-grading

or equivalencies

♦ Ask: Are you having success with cover

letters and answering ads?

♦ Explore the experiences of mentees

regarding the interview process: what

questions have they found most difficult?

♦ Check-out: what are you taking away from

today’s meeting that you will use or apply

in the next week?

34


Meeting Agenda

Date Time:

Use this agenda to keep track of your notes and mentees’ topics of interest

Location:

Attendees confirmed:

Key Topics:

Notes:

Issues Addressed:

Next Meeting:

35


Overview

The Meeting 3 focus is for the mentor to

continue supporting the job search process.

What to cover

Meeting 3: Interviewing,

Networking & Job Search

Strategies

Explore questions from the group

Discuss job search strategies and

techniques that work for different lines of

work and industries

o Word of mouth

o Volunteering with an association

o Networking

o Applying on-line

o Answering a job posting

o Cold calling; job fairs, recruiters

Discuss using the Internet for job postings

and applications

Practice interview questions; discuss what

employers are looking for in the answers

Networking in Canada; discover what

networking was in their originating country

and contrast with Canada

Refer to coordinator for additional up-to-date

job search workshops and resources

What to prepare for meeting #4

Ask mentees to:

♦ Bring samples of difficult interview questions

for practice

♦ Be prepared to talk about their progress

since the last meeting

♦ Bring questions and experiences to explore

Questions to stimulate

discussion

♦ Check-in: (Ask the mentee to take a

moment and describe) how has your day

unfolded? Or, what is on your mind right

now?

♦ Ask: what has been your experience in

using the Internet and other resources for

your job search?

♦ Ask: what questions have you been getting

in your interviews? What skills and

personal capabilities do you believe the

interviewer is assessing in your answers?

♦ Ask: what steps have you taken since

arriving in Canada to build your networks?

♦ Ask: what job search techniques are you

using presently that seem to be working for

you/not working for you?

♦ Check-out: what are you taking away from

today’s meeting that you will use or apply

in the next week?

36


Meeting Agenda

Date Time:

Use this agenda to keep track of your notes and mentees’ topics of interest

Location:

Attendees confirmed:

Key Topics:

Notes:

Issues Addressed:

Next Meeting:

37


Overview

The Meeting 4 focus is on continued interview

practice and discussions on workplace culture,

as a step to integrating effectively in the

workplace.

Meeting 4: Issues

Exploration & Workplace

Culture

What to cover

Continue interview practice questions and

provide feedback

Discuss what employers look for in interviews

– the balance between technical skills and

the “fit” with the team/organization

Review job search progress

Discuss salary expectations and options

Discuss workplace culture – how to build

relationships; workplace attitudes and

behaviour in different types of meetings; how

to get involved in committees

Questions to stimulate

discussion

♦ Check-in: (Ask the mentee to take a

moment and describe) how has your day

unfolded? Or, what is on your mind right

now?

♦ Ask: what interview questions do you find a

challenge to answer?

♦ Ask: what is important for you to know

about the Canadian workplace culture?

♦ Check-out: what are you taking away from

today’s meeting that you will use or apply

in the next week?

What to prepare for meeting #5

Ask mentees to:

♦ Bring difficult interview questions for

practice

♦ Be prepared to talk about their progress

♦ Bring questions and experiences to

explore

38


Meeting Agenda

Date Time:

Use this agenda to keep track of your notes and mentees’ topics of interest

Location:

Attendees confirmed:

Key Topics:

Notes:

Issues Addressed:

Next Meeting:

39


Overview

In this final meeting, mentors need to review

progress, cover issues not previously addressed

and discuss ongoing career building

Meeting 5: Integrating

into the New Job

What to cover

Continue to discuss interview and practice

questions

Review job search progress – what is

working and not working effectively for

mentees

Discuss workplace integration – how things

get done, building relationships on the job;

managing the transition

Discuss the importance of how the telephone

is answered, and how to use email to

communicate effectively

Discuss how members of the mentoring

group might continue to support each other

and form part of their new professional

network

Discuss getting involved with professional

associations and selecting committees for

volunteering as a means of building networks

Thank You!

Ending a mentoring relationship can be both

difficult and exhilarating! Difficult in that you are

ending the bond that has been created with all

the members of the group. Exhilarating, as you

have helped others to learn and achieved

progress on their goals.

Questions to stimulate

discussion

♦ Check-in: (Ask the mentee to take a

moment and describe) how has your day

unfolded? Or, what is on your mind right

now?

♦ Ask: what questions do you have that have

not been addressed yet in our mentoring

group?

♦ Discuss: your skills get you the interview;

your personality is what helps keep your

job and influence you career success

♦ Ask: what has helped you the most in our

time together in this mentoring group?

♦ Check-out: what are you taking away from

today’s meeting that you will use or apply

in the next week? Or, what are you taking

away from our time together over the five

meetings that you will continue to do?

Take the time to review the mentees’ individual

goals and the progress made.

40


Meeting Agenda

Date Time:

Use this agenda to keep track of your notes and mentees’ topics of interest

Location:

Attendees confirmed:

Key Topics:

Notes:

Issues Addressed:

Next Meeting:

41


Appendix: Job Search

Tips

Appendix Contents

Job Search Strategy .................................................................................................................. 43

Research Tips ........................................................................................................................... 44

Internet Job Search Sites........................................................................................................... 45

Top Ten Interview Tips ............................................................................................................ 46

Top Ten Job Search Tips.......................................................................................................... 47

Telephone and Voice Mail Etiquette........................................................................................ 48

How to Build and Maintain a Network .................................................................................... 49

Useful Tips for Successful Networking ................................................................................... 50

Email Etiquette ......................................................................................................................... 51

Cover Letters and Answering Advertisements......................................................................... 52

Top Ten Résumé Tips .............................................................................................................. 53

Ten Tips For the First 6-Months of the New Job ..................................................................... 54

“The mentorship program helped me to

develop a network within my profession. It also

helped me to gain knowledge about the

Canadian workplace culture and Canadian

sensitivities which were very helpful in my

interviews and network meetings.”

Mentee

42


Job Search Strategy

An effective job search requires all the components of a strategy:

♦ Information about me

o Strengths

o Expertise

o Qualifications

o What I am looking for in a new role and new company

♦ Information about the market

o Industry trends

o Key organizations in the industry I wish to be in

o Types of work in my field

o What employers are looking for today

o Who is the right person to contact in the organization I wish to work for

♦ How to approach the market I wish to be in

o Using techniques such as:

Building networks and conducting information interviews

Participating in associations, attending trade shows, conferences

Attending job fairs

Employment agencies, recruiters and Job Finding Clubs

Using the Internet for employment sites, and company web-sites

Answering advertisements and job postings

Volunteering

♦ Creating the supporting materials to approach my target organizations and specific jobs

o Resumes

o Portfolio of qualifications

o Cover letters, ad-answer letters, introduction letters

o Preparation notes for making telephone calls: cold-calls; follow-up calls; referral calls

o References list

♦ Creating an action calendar to “work the strategy”

o Identify the number of industries to investigate and time to completion

o Identify the number of companies to contact, when and how the contact will be made,

and time-frame for follow-up

Working the strategy

♦ Treat the job search as a full-time job and manage time and resources accordingly – read in the

evening; make appointments to see people during the work day; write letters in the evening;

volunteer during the day

♦ “Test” the viability of a job target – speak with a minimum of 10 people directly in the field to gain

their perspective on the possibility of achieving the desired position within a specific time line

♦ Have multiple job targets: Plan A; Plan B; Plan C

43


Research Tips

What is my market?

The hidden job market

♦ 20% of available jobs are advertised

♦ 80% of jobs are not advertised

Research the target industry

♦ Are they growing or declining

♦ How are they changing due to market trends

♦ What occupations do they have and hire

♦ What associations are they affiliated with

♦ What publications target their issues and needs

Research target companies in the industry

♦ What companies offer work in your field

♦ Where are they located

♦ What kind of employees are they looking for

♦ What kind of products or services do they offer

♦ What makes these particular companies special

♦ How many employees do they have

♦ Are they growing or declining

♦ Will they hire me

♦ What do I have to offer them

♦ Who is the right person to contact

What is the market looking for?

Three Major skill sets

1. Fundamental Skills

2. Personal Management Skills

3. Team-work skills

o Team

o Communication

o Information management

o Problem solving

o Adaptability

o Positive attitude

Sources of information

• Toronto Reference Library

(789 Yonge Street, north of

Bloor)

• Business Directories:

o Scotts Directories

o Who’s Hiring Who

o The Blue Book of

Canadian Business

o The Canadian Trade

Index

o The Trade Name

Directory

o Dun and Bradstreet

o The Canadian Key

Business Directory

o The Directory of

Directors

o Directory of

Associations in Canada

o Directory of Trade &

Professional

Associations

o The Financial Post Top

100

o The Globe and Mail

Top 1000

Trade Publications

Business Press

The Internet: to identify specific

job titles and responsibilities,

see:

www.workingincanada.gc.ca

44


Internet Job Search Sites

1. Bilingual Jobs not just French/English but all sorts of languages www.Bilingual-Jobs.com

2. Canada Jobs Wide range of industry, corporate and technical jobs www.canadajobs.com

3. Canada labour market information www.workinfonet.ca

4. Canadian Career free listings and links www.canadiancareers.com

5. Career Edge National youth internship program; private sector organizations

providing work and experience to youth

www.careeredge.org

6. Career Key Canadian career resources and industry links www.careerkey.com

7. Careers Without

Borders

Free registration. Browse jobs with leading NGO's, non-profit

organizations and foundations, private institutions, universities,

United Nations and government agencies.

www.careerswithoutborders.ca

8. Charity Village Excellent not-for-profit listings in Canada, some international www.charityvillage.com

9. Christian Jobs Must sign “statement of faith” to access www.christianjobs.com

10. Contract Computer

Job Board

Search computer professional jobs in USA and Canada

www.computerwork.com

11. Cool Jobs Canada Canadian Tourism/Hospitality job site www.cooljobscanada.com

12. Dice High Tech USA, Canadian and International postings www.dice.com

13. Eluta Searches the job/career pages of company websites using key

words and location cues

14. Government Jobs

(Provincial)

15. Government Jobs

(Federal)

16. Human Resources

Development

Government of Ontario job opportunities

Federal Government Jobs open to the public

National job bank

17. Interbiznet The electronic recruiting source; contains information and links on

electronic recruitment

www.eluta.com

www.gojobs.gov.on.ca

www.jobs-emplois.gc.ca

www.hrsdc.gc.ca

www.interbiznet.com

18. JobBus Canadian job site with links, resources, etc. www.jobbus.com

19. JobSearch Covers Southern Ontario www.jobsearch.ca

20. JobShark Canadian site includes e-mail notification of available jobs – some

international offices

www.jobshark.com

21. Mandy Jobs in television and film production www.mandy.com

22. Medhunters Health care recruitment www.medhunters.com

23. Medzilla Jobs in chemistry, biotech, medicine, pharmacy and science www.medzilla.com

24. Monster Board Links, jobs, the works. Bilingual. Has links to USA site. www.monster.ca

25. NetJobs Canadian and US postings for employers and employees www.netjobs.com

26. Position Watch Information technology jobs - international www.positionwatch.com

27. Working Canadian jobsite that is connected to the National Post, HR

Reporter and local papers

www.working.com

28. Workopolis Canadian links to local newspapers/ job sites www.workopolis.com

29. Workwire Résumé builder and employer search engine by the Canadian www.workwire.com

Council for Rehabilitation and Work, HRDC, and the Centre for

Education and Training at the Peel Board of Education

Social Networking Sites

Facebook Personal networking, preferred use by family and friends. Fun and light-hearted. www.facebook.com

Linked-In

Professional Networking. Excellent means at getting in touch with past colleagues, or

finding contacts you wish to target. Very professional and mature client base.

www.linkedin.com

45


Ten Interview Tips

1. Be friendly and confident

2. Plan ahead using the 4-Rs of Preparation





Research – learn what you can about the company

Rehearse – practice

Relax – get a good night sleep

Review – review your resume, their requirements list,

and your accomplishments

3. Tell your best accomplishment stories


Prepare 6-8 stories of your achievements, based on

the competencies required in the job position

4. Practice interview questions


Practice answering tough questions

5. Create a great first impression


Dress in a tailored suit, conservative separates or

business suit; be attentive to “scent-sensitivity” this

includes body odor, perfume, hair products; attend to

fresh and clean clothing, groomed hands, hair, and

polished shoes

6. Maintain eye contact throughout interview with natural

movement from one interviewer to the next

7. Listen and adapt


Be sensitive to the style of the interviewer(s). If need

be, rephrase questions to make sure you understood

what was asked

8. Prepare questions to ask interviewer


Ask thoughtful questions such as: “can you please

describe the management style of the organization?”

“Can you please describe the top three priorities for

the position in the first 6 months?”

9. Have a strong close or wrap-up for the interview


Show your enthusiasm for the position and state your

interest in continuing to the next steps

10. Follow-up


Write a thank you note that highlights the top three

priorities for the job and how your strengths match the

priorities

46


Top Ten Job Search Tips

1. Use all available methods/avenues of job-hunting


Internal postings, newspapers, Internet job sites,

targeted cold-calling, placement agencies, association

job postings, networking

2. Have a professional resume and cover letter, and a

separate list of your references

3. Keep your references up to date



Provide your references with your résumé, cover letter

and a copy of the job posting, and inform them when

they may be called, and who may call

Discuss the interview, what questions were asked,

what projects you talked about, so as to prepare them

to answer similar questions on your behalf

4. Have a strategy


Determine the job you want and target your search

and all marketing materials to reflect your objective

5. Tap into your network


It is NOT the job of your network to find you a job. Use

your network to discover what areas of the business

are experiencing growth, who the key players are, to

whom you should target your application(s)

6. Follow-up on all job leads

7. Conduct research on each job position/ organization/

department

8. Do not quit your current job until you have a new job


Give proper notice to your current employer

9. Do not burn bridges



Remain positive in all your communications, even if

you did not receive positive news. Send thank you

notes to interviewers

Leave your current employer on good terms

10. Wait until you have an offer before you negotiate

salary/benefits

47


Telephone and Voice Mail Etiquette

Using the telephone is one of the most important aspects of

how a positive (or negative) impression is made in building

relationships – for a job search, establishing a mentoring

relationship, or in the workplace.

Six tips:

1. State your name clearly. If you have a difficult name to

pronounce for other languages, speak slowly

2. Spell your name. If you have a complicated name, or one

that can be spelled many different ways, take the time to

spell it for the other party

3. Answer the phone with a clear HELLO

4. In a business setting, it is appropriate to answer the

phone:

♦ Hello, you have reached Catherine, how may I

help you?

♦ Hello, you have reached Abdul in Engineering,

how may I help you?

5. Leaving a voice mail message, speak slowly and clearly:

♦ Hello, John, this is Abdul, from Engineering, my

phone number is: 416-111-2222

♦ I would like to speak with you about the meeting

agenda for Friday

♦ Can you please call me back on Wednesday

♦ Again, my name is ABDUL and my number is 416 –

111 – 2222

♦ Thank you

6. Your personal voice mail message needs to be clear

Speak slowly:

• Hello, you have reached Gretchen at 416-222 -

1111

• I am not available to answer your call right now

• Please leave a message and I will return your call

within one business day

• Thank you

48


Tips to Build and Maintain a Network

Networking is a process of exchanging information; it is one of

the most effective means of getting needed information and

assistance. Attend networking events at community and

professional association events to get started.

Why networking is important




Through networking you have access to valuable

information

Networking is a life long skill

Networking builds mutually beneficial relationships

How to begin networking for an effective job search

There are four areas where networking is most valued:

1. Find out about an industry

♦ What are the current trends in an industry

♦ Where/what are the market pressures and

opportunities in the industry

2. Find out about companies

♦ What are the companies in the industry I wish to

be in

♦ What is/are the current pressures and

opportunities the company is facing

♦ How does the company typically hire new talent

♦ What is important to be successful in the company

3. Find out about jobs

♦ Does the job I wish to do exist in the workplace

♦ What are the qualities needed to be successful in

this job

♦ What are the qualifications needed to be

successful in this job

♦ Who hires for these kinds of jobs

4. Find out about people

♦ What is important to be successful working for....?

♦ What is the leadership style of..?

♦ What is important to the manager to be successful

in the job/company

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Useful Tips for Successful

Networking








Have a business card

Be conscious of maintaining

meaningful eye contact

Listen, listen, listen

Ask prepared questions

Be interested in their story

Include others in conversations (if

others are present such as attending a

networking event)

Keep in touch with people when you

say you are going to keep in touch

Engaging in the networking

conversation: high-gain

questions for researching and

networking







Give me an example of…

Describe how you…

Tell me more about…

Help me understand…

How do you see…?

How might that…?


Share information generously


What might happen if…?


Never say negative things about

another person or company


What else…?



Say ‘thank-you’

Have fun!

Attending networking events:



What are your perceptions of the

needs in the marketplace?

Where or how do you see me

fitting the needs of the

marketplace?


Set a goal to meet new people – 3- 5 is

a good number for most people

♦ Make notes on who you have met –

what do they do; what are their likes

and dislikes; who do they work for and

what do they like about the company –

make notes that will help you

remember who they are




Follow-up by sending an email

Find a good reason to call them again

Have a reason to meet again to keep

the relationship going

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Email Etiquette

Email, telephone and “chat” are all used in

mentoring relationships where distance and

convenience present an obstacle to spending

time in person. Email will also be an important

form of communication in an active job search.

There are several concerns to be managed:

♦ Confidentiality – email is NOT confidential.

Be aware that what you send in an email

will be forwarded to others; company email

systems track all incoming and outgoing

email; wireless users can and will pick-up

unsecured email. Be thoughtful about what

you write in your email.

♦ Writing style – take the time to clearly

convey your thoughts. Treat email as a

business letter. Use proper words (not “u”

for you) and spell check your document.

Use grammar correctly.

♦ Use the “subject” line to identify the key

point or request (see sample provided).

♦ Requests for information – keep the

request simple and focused on one area at

a time.

♦ Place your request in your opening line

followed by a background paragraph.

♦ Allow 24-48 hours to respond or for a

response.

♦ Provide your contact information in your

“signature”; phone number and email

address.

From: jgrant@aaa.com

Subject: application for DG, response requested

Date: October 23, 2009

To: CEM@bbb.com

Dear Ms. Mark:

I am pleased to provide my application for the position of DG,

as posted on the AAA website.

My resume and letter are attached to this email.

I respectfully request you send a received message by return

email such that I can be assured you have my application.

Thank you for you time and consideration.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Yours truly,

Jane Grant

(416) 999-2222

jgrant@aaa.com

From: jgrant@aaa.com

Subject: introduction and request for information

Construction Industry Electrical

Engineers for BC

Date: October 23, 2009

To: CEM@bbb.com

Dear Ms. Mark:

I am considering a move to Vancouver and am in need of

information on the market for Electrical Engineers in the

construction industry.

Joe Smith at ABC in Toronto suggested you may be able to

provide me with information on the credentials requirements in

BC as well as information on the major Electrical Contractors in

the Vancouver area.

For your convenience I have attached my resume to this email.

Thank you for your time and I look forward to hearing from you.

Yours truly,

Jane Grant

(416) 999-2222

jgrant@aaa.com

51


Cover Letters and Answering

Advertisements

♦ Get more information on the job, the company and hiring

manager

♦ Identify clearly what they are looking for beyond the

“qualifications” listed

♦ On a worksheet, list all qualifications requested and identify

your corresponding strengths against the list

♦ Write the letter highlighting what you offer against the

qualifications requested

♦ Enclose a copy of your resume

♦ Review your letter and ask yourself, “Have I written anything

that will cause me to be eliminated?”

♦ Forward all requested material by regular mail or by email

52


Top Ten Resume Tips

1. Use your full name and address

♦ Your name should appear on all pages; if you have a

long and difficult name to pronounce, place the short

form in brackets: Catherine (Cathy)

2. Have a clearly stated job objective


Target the job you want, and focus your résumé to

support your objective; use the job title when you can

3. Use a format/design that is focused and grabs

attention



Highlight the most important qualifications or

skills/capabilities related to the job you are seeking

Layout should be easy to read at a quick glance

4. Create content that sells / Quantify and use power

words



Outline your achievements and highlight results – do

not just list “duties” of the job

Use words/phrases that match the level of position

you want. Analyze job description to identify key

words

5. Prioritize the content of your résumé



List the most important achievements as they relate

to the job competition first

Include your volunteer work

6. Tweak and target your résumé and cover letter


Include a cover letter highlighting key

accomplishments

7. Aim for a résumé no longer then 2 pages – a third

page for published works is fine

8. Do NOT use unusual size/colour paper, or include

photographs, your age/religious belief/marital status,

salary or salary expectations, or state why you left or

are leaving your last position(s)

9. All content must be truthful and verifiable

10. Spell check and grammar check!

53


Ten Tips for the First 6-Months of the New

Job

1. Be on time for meetings. The work culture in Canada is one

of time consciousness

2. Find a “buddy” or a mentor to learn and find your way around

as soon as you get started

3. Approach everything with absolute integrity – all you have

is your word and reputation; learn about ethics and

confidentiality for the company

4. Give credit to those who help – all the members of the team

5. Work diligently on your communication skills –

presentations, interpersonal, writing, listening, building

relationships

6. Look good and maintain professional dress - cleanliness,

laundering, shoe-repair, fabric care, scent-sensitivity

7. Customers are number one! Everyone has a customer –

understand their needs and work to meet them on a timely

basis

8. Clarify your mandate for the first 90 days and beyond -

Understand the needs of your supervisor and work toward

meeting those needs

9. Take the time to get to know your peers and what they are

working to accomplish - Peer relationships are often the most

important ones for your success. Be assertive with managing

and resolving conflict

10. Participate in the social atmosphere - Sports, family day,

volunteering opportunities

54

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