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General contractor benefits from<br />

Roadtec fleet for mill and lay<br />

Navigating Australia’s Barrow Island<br />

with portable asphalt plant<br />

Astec’s depth of control offerings provide<br />

innovation for plant operations<br />

Dillman branches out into new markets<br />

for industrial sales<br />

YOUR DEPENDABLE SOURCE FOR NEWS ABOUT HMA TECHNOLOGY<br />

PUBLISHED BY ASTEC INDUSTRIES, INC.<br />

VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2 - 2013


10 16<br />

VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2<br />

Copyright © 2013<br />

<strong>Hot</strong>-<strong>Mix</strong> <strong>Magazine</strong> is published by<br />

the family of companies known<br />

as Astec Industries, Inc.<br />

Our mission is to provide members<br />

of the HMA industry with up-to-date<br />

news about HMA and WMA<br />

technology and the recent advances<br />

in the industry.<br />

22<br />

30<br />

Editorial Staff<br />

Editor:<br />

Donna Campbell<br />

Staff Writer:<br />

J. Campbell<br />

Staff Photographers:<br />

Paul Shelton (Astec)<br />

Brandon Meredith (Astec)<br />

Scott Lee (Roadtec)<br />

Sam Anselmi (Astec)<br />

Subscription Services:<br />

Diane Hunt<br />

Directors of Advertising:<br />

Paul Shelton (Astec)<br />

Frank Eley (Heatec)<br />

Stephanie Rider (Roadtec)<br />

Editorial Board:<br />

Dr. J. Don Brock<br />

Ben Brock<br />

Tom Baugh<br />

Paul Shelton<br />

Norman Smith<br />

Contact Information<br />

If you would like to be added<br />

to our free subscription list,<br />

just call, fax, or write:<br />

<strong>Hot</strong>-<strong>Mix</strong> <strong>Magazine</strong><br />

c/o Astec<br />

P.O. Box 72787<br />

Chattanooga, TN 37407<br />

Phone: 423.867.4210<br />

Fax: 423.867.3570<br />

Website: www.astecinc.com<br />

www.hotmixmag.com<br />

5 Point of View<br />

Words from Sergio Cinerari, AAPA Chairman<br />

6 Plant 17<br />

Iowa contractor excels by replacing old with new<br />

10 Change is the Only Constant<br />

Astec’s training schools continue to evolve<br />

12 In Demand and In Control<br />

Astec’s latest plant controls—PMIII<br />

14 The Shape of Things to Come<br />

Astec uses 3D printing to bring ideas to life<br />

16 Mobility Down Under<br />

Astec Australia delivers asphalt portability to civil contractor<br />

21 On Your Side<br />

Earning a customer’s trust is job #1 for Astec’s Travis Sneed<br />

22 In the Heart of Texas<br />

Company excels and mill and lay with Roadtec fleet<br />

26 Every Day is Recycle Day<br />

Astec’s warm mix system enhances new asphalt plant<br />

30 The Power of Portability<br />

Tennessee contractor welcomes efficiency with portable plant<br />

34 Wake Up the Echoes<br />

Asphalt plant completes retrofit<br />

38 Branching Out<br />

Dillman ventures into new territory for industrial sales<br />

39 <strong>Hot</strong>-<strong>Mix</strong> News<br />

What’s happening at Astec Industries<br />

ON THE FRONT COVER<br />

LL Pelling Company, Inc. set up the relocatable Astec Double Barrel ® plant<br />

in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. The plant features the 72,457 CFM Pulse Jet<br />

baghouse, a 10 ft x 14 ft (3.05 m x 4.27 m) eight-compartment cold feed<br />

system, and three 200-ton (181 tonne) silos.<br />

Here’s how to get all future issues<br />

of <strong>Hot</strong>-<strong>Mix</strong> <strong>Magazine</strong> absolutely free!<br />

To have your name added to our mailing list at no charge,<br />

just call 423.867.4210 and ask for Diane Hunt,<br />

or you can email your request to dhunt@astecinc.com.<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 3 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


Bitumen is a unique<br />

substance that starts<br />

as crude oil, is refined,<br />

and then combined with<br />

aggregate to make asphalt<br />

and sprayed seal road<br />

surfaces. These surfaces<br />

provide safe, quiet, and longlasting<br />

pavement that connect<br />

people, goods, and services<br />

right across Australia.<br />

Without these durable<br />

surfaces, society would be vastly different, but most<br />

people take asphalt pavements for granted. Those<br />

of us who work in the pavement industry know the<br />

significance of asphalt pavements, and I encourage<br />

each of you to be proud of the work we do. I also<br />

encourage you all to promote the importance of<br />

what we do to others around us.<br />

Even more importantly, we should ensure that<br />

all stakeholders in our industry are aware of the<br />

environmental advantages of asphalt over other<br />

paving materials.<br />

PROCESS CAN BE REPEATED<br />

Firstly, asphalt paving is 100-percent recyclable and can be recycled<br />

over and over again.<br />

A deep lift asphalt pavement or perpetual pavement that is over<br />

20 years of age may have suffered some surface damage, but<br />

generally this damage is only “skin deep.” The minor surface<br />

damage in a wearing course can be milled off and quickly replaced<br />

with a new wearing course, with minimal interruption to traffic<br />

flows and at low cost.<br />

POINT OF VIEW<br />

More Than Just<br />

Sticky Black Stuff<br />

Words from Sergio Cinerari,<br />

Chairman, AAPA (Australian Asphalt Pavement Association)<br />

Asphalt removed from a road pavement remains asphalt, a valuable<br />

combination of bitumen and high-quality aggregates. This material is<br />

referred to as reclaimed asphalt pavement or RAP. RAP can be readily<br />

returned to an asphalt plant where it can be combined with virgin<br />

materials and applied to another road or pavement project. In another<br />

20-plus years, the same process can be repeated.<br />

Asphalt is not consumed, but remains asphalt indefinitely. This<br />

is unlike other materials, such as concrete, that can be used for<br />

Asphalt surfaces are 100-percent<br />

recyclable and save significant<br />

amounts of new material.<br />

Sergio Cinerari, Chairman, AAPA<br />

pavement surfaces once,<br />

and then if it is recycled,<br />

can only be used for lower<br />

value purposes, such as<br />

fill or road base.<br />

Asphalt surfaces are<br />

therefore 100-percent<br />

recyclable and save<br />

significant amounts of<br />

new materials.<br />

REDUCES GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS<br />

Using RAP not only reduces the demand for new<br />

materials, it also greatly reduces greenhouse gas<br />

emissions. The manufacture of bitumen is a low<br />

source of greenhouse emissions, but some energy<br />

is used in its manufacture and in the extraction,<br />

crushing, and transport of aggregates. The use<br />

of RAP reduces the greenhouse emissions by<br />

removing the need to make and supply new<br />

materials. The use of RAP in asphalt readily<br />

reduces greenhouse emissions by at least 10 to 20<br />

percent. RAP also has great synergies with warmmix<br />

asphalt providing even more environmental<br />

benefits, as well as performance benefits.<br />

Those of us working in our industry can be proud of the part we<br />

play in society, not only as we build quality roads and pavements,<br />

but also because we are a green industry. An industry that produces<br />

low greenhouse emissions compared to other road surfaces and an<br />

industry that can recycle asphalt over and over again.<br />

BENEFITS ARE CLEAR<br />

The benefits of asphalt as an environmentally friendly product<br />

are clear, and we should help to educate communities and all<br />

stakeholders that asphalt is more than sticky black stuff, letting<br />

them know that, as asphalt is 100-percent recyclable, it is one of the<br />

greenest construction materials available on the market today.<br />

As an industry that takes its impact on the environment very<br />

seriously, we should continue to encourage the use and development<br />

of green pavements through practices such as the increased use of<br />

RAP and low-energy technologies such as warm mix. <br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 5 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


Plant 17<br />

Iowa contractor excels by<br />

replacing old with new<br />

There comes a time in any<br />

venture when moving<br />

forward requires change.<br />

Whether it’s transitioning to the<br />

latest technology or acquiring<br />

new partners, company growth is<br />

earmarked with new decisions.<br />

LL Pelling Company, Inc. is one<br />

company that understands what<br />

it takes to reach the next level of<br />

expansion, and it includes Astec’s<br />

equipment and innovation.<br />

“The ability to recycle using the<br />

Astec Double Barrel ® drum mixer<br />

sets us apart from the competition.”<br />

HUMBLE BEGINNING<br />

Lloyd Pelling, Sr. started the LL<br />

Pelling Company, Inc. in 1948 in<br />

the Williamsburg, Iowa, area. It<br />

began oiling roads as road surfaces<br />

began moving away from<br />

mud to gravel and eventually<br />

to pavement. In the late 1960s,<br />

Lloyd Pelling, Jr. became president<br />

and moved the company to Iowa<br />

City to allow for expansion into<br />

the asphalt business. During the<br />

60s and 70s, LL Pelling traveled<br />

throughout Iowa with batch plants<br />

or continuous mix plants. The decision<br />

to put down roots happened<br />

in 1975 and the traveling stopped.<br />

An asphalt batch plant was erected<br />

in Coralville, Iowa.<br />

FORWARD PROGRESS<br />

In the late 80s, Russ Rhinehart<br />

purchased the company from the<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 6 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


Left: LL Pelling Company, Inc. set up the relocatable Astec Double Barrel ® plant in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Top: 10 ft x 14 ft<br />

(3.05 m x 4.27 m) eight-compartment cold feed system. Bottom: LL Pelling’s plant features the 72,457 CFM Pulse Jet baghouse.<br />

Pellings. Rhinehart and his partner,<br />

Manatts (a diversified heavy highway<br />

construction company based<br />

in Brooklyn, Iowa) took the company<br />

into the 21st century. It was<br />

Rhinehart who purchased the first<br />

Astec plant in 1997 for the Iowa<br />

City location. The 400 TPH (363<br />

MTPH) Astec Double Barrel ® plant<br />

replaced an old 6,000 lb (2,721<br />

kg) batch plant. This was quite a<br />

change for LL Pelling.<br />

“We knew technology had<br />

advanced beyond what we were<br />

currently using,” said Chuck<br />

Finnegan, current president of LL<br />

Pelling. “It was the vision and input<br />

of new people leading to new decisions<br />

for the direction of the company,<br />

and the path forward looked<br />

promising.”<br />

LL Pelling had three asphalt plants:<br />

the Astec Double Barrel ® plant in<br />

Iowa City (purchased in 1997); a<br />

small 4,000 lb (1,814 kg) batch<br />

plant in Marion; and a 16,000 lb<br />

(7,257 kg) batch plant in Cedar<br />

Rapids. In addition to its asphalt<br />

paving, concrete curb and gutter,<br />

chip and sealcoat, pavement marking,<br />

and oil transportation, being<br />

able to supply its own hot-mix<br />

asphalt (HMA) to its projects created<br />

a full-circle operation.<br />

THE NEXT PHASE<br />

In 2001, LL Pelling purchased a<br />

Dillman DuoDrum and put up this<br />

new plant in Marion. The plant<br />

replaced the small 4,000 lb (1,814<br />

kg) batch plant.<br />

In 2012, LL Pelling purchased an<br />

Astec Double Barrel ® plant for the<br />

Cedar Rapids location to replace<br />

the old 16,000 lb (7,257 kg) batch<br />

plant. The plant was operational<br />

mid-April 2013.<br />

“This replacement was five or six<br />

years overdue,” said Finnegan.<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 7 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


Relocatable Astec Double Barrel ® drum.<br />

“We had a five-year plan probably<br />

10 years ago to put the new Astec<br />

plant in place, but with economic<br />

times as they were, and still are, it<br />

just didn’t work out according to our<br />

original timetable.”<br />

LL Pelling purchased 40 acres (19<br />

hectares) of land outside its sister<br />

quarry in Cedar Rapids to set up the<br />

new plant, named Plant 17 by the<br />

accounting department’s numbering<br />

system.<br />

“We viewed the location as opportunistic,”<br />

said Finnegan. “We can<br />

haul much of our material to the<br />

plant and don’t have to travel on a<br />

public road. This saves on hauling<br />

and trucks.”<br />

A GOOD POSITION<br />

Astec equipment allows LL Pelling<br />

to be in a good position, especially<br />

with the ability to recycle. This was<br />

an area the company wanted to<br />

improve.<br />

“We knew technology had<br />

advanced beyond what we were<br />

currently using … with Astec, the<br />

direction of the company looks<br />

promising,” said Finnegan.<br />

“Using reclaimed asphalt pavement<br />

(RAP) and recycled asphalt<br />

shingles (RAS) is a capability that<br />

sets us apart from the competition<br />

and helps us control costs,” said<br />

Finnegan. “Anytime we can recycle,<br />

it’s a benefit to the environment and<br />

the community. The Astec Double<br />

Barrel ® at Plant 17 uses RAP and<br />

RAS. This saves on landfilling; we<br />

even grind our own shingles. These<br />

cost-saving factors allow us to cut<br />

cost for our consumers. And in a<br />

pro-portland cement state, we need<br />

to control costs to stay competitive.”<br />

LL Pelling generates a lot of RAP<br />

from its road construction projects.<br />

One project is Interstate 380<br />

(southbound) where a recycled<br />

mix is being utilized (4 percent<br />

RAS and 12 percent RAP).<br />

“We do a lot of night work in the<br />

corridor between Cedar Rapids<br />

and Iowa City, about 25 mi (40<br />

km) apart, connected by I-80 and<br />

I-380,” said Finnegan. “There’s a<br />

lot of congestion through this area,<br />

so having a ready supply of material<br />

enables us to work quickly.”<br />

Plant superintendent Rod Haerther,<br />

who has been with LL Pelling<br />

for 23 years, oversaw the construction/setup<br />

of Plant 17 from<br />

concept to completion. According<br />

to Haerther, Plant 17 uses up to<br />

25 percent RAP (alone in a mix),<br />

and when using RAS with RAP, the<br />

recycle amounts are 2 to 3 percent<br />

and 9 percent, respectively.<br />

RAS is not currently used alone in<br />

a mix.<br />

“We are finishing up the I-380<br />

southbound project and already<br />

have a contract for the northbound<br />

section of I-380, plus a project at<br />

the Cedar Rapids airport,” said<br />

Finnegan. “Business is looking<br />

good moving into 2014.” <br />

FOR INFORMATION<br />

Contact Diane Hunt<br />

423.867.4210<br />

dhunt@astecinc.com<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 8 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


Astec’s training school classes continue to evolve, expand and excite<br />

Service coordinator Troy<br />

Norris’s enthusiasm is<br />

contagious. And with his<br />

responsibilities, he needs the<br />

energy. As Astec Industries’ training<br />

school administrator, he is<br />

tasked with maintaining the high<br />

standards attendees expect of the<br />

Astec Advanced Customer School.<br />

Whether Troy is laying out the<br />

direction of new classes for coming<br />

years or discussing improvements<br />

and additions for current training<br />

sessions, he has to move as quickly<br />

as the pace of technology.<br />

Over the years, the look and focus<br />

of the Astec Advanced Customer<br />

School has changed to reflect<br />

the needs of customers and the<br />

demands of the industry. “When we<br />

started, we were having training<br />

classes in hotels—the Chattanooga<br />

Choo Choo, in the train car,” Troy<br />

noted. “Now we are here [at Astec’s<br />

training center] and there is a new<br />

facility across the street with a fullsize<br />

Astec Double Barrel ® drum and<br />

a range of scale models.”<br />

In the 1980s, the Astec Advanced<br />

Customer School moved to its permanent<br />

home on-site. Astec customers<br />

spent much of the training<br />

sessions in a single meeting room,<br />

with breakout classes that expanded<br />

throughout the facility. From that<br />

small initial footprint, the classes<br />

grew in scope, scale, and reputation.<br />

Word of the school’s benefits<br />

spread throughout Astec’s customer<br />

base, which led to more customers<br />

asking for training specific to their<br />

needs. “We add new classes all the<br />

time,” Troy said. And as the needs<br />

of customers changed, so too did<br />

the facility.<br />

As the classes’ popularity increased<br />

among customers, the school<br />

recognized the need for a bigger<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 10 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


learning space to accommodate the<br />

influx of new attendees. In 2009,<br />

Astec Industries opened its expanded<br />

training center. For the first time,<br />

trainers and customers were able<br />

to work in a hands-on environment,<br />

all-in-one dedicated area, providing<br />

immediate feedback from instructors<br />

and collaboration between<br />

attendees. New equipment was<br />

moved in to facilitate the increased<br />

range of class offerings.<br />

In 2011, the current facilities for the<br />

Astec Advanced Customer School<br />

took shape. “From where we<br />

began to where we are now—with<br />

Training Center East and Training<br />

Center West—it’s amazing to see<br />

where the school has come,” Troy<br />

added. Conveniently located across<br />

the street, the new training center<br />

is large enough to accommodate a<br />

full-size Astec Double Barrel ® for<br />

hands-on drum classes, as well as<br />

scale models of existing plants. The<br />

scale models are the same ones<br />

carried by Astec to different trade<br />

shows around the world.<br />

New for 2014, Astec will be offering<br />

two levels of training. Level I will<br />

be an enhanced and expanded version<br />

of basic training for first-time<br />

students. The new Level I training<br />

promises to be even more handson<br />

and include technical training for<br />

power houses. Level II, or the “Top<br />

Gun Class,” is for returning students.<br />

Any attendee of prior Astec<br />

basic customer schools meets the<br />

prerequisite to join Astec’s in-depth<br />

training on four critical categories:<br />

burners, drums, controls, and electrical<br />

systems. With a narrowed<br />

focus on these four main categories,<br />

Astec can delve deeper into<br />

critical areas of plant performance<br />

and offer more advanced operating<br />

and troubleshooting tips. <br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 11 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


In Demand<br />

and In Control<br />

From burners to silos, from<br />

motors to drums, each component<br />

of a hot-mix production<br />

plant can either be a trusted<br />

collaborator in increasing the plant’s<br />

efficiency or—with access to timely<br />

information or ability to fine-tune its<br />

operation—a frustrating adversary<br />

to a plant’s capability. The main<br />

way plant operators and managers<br />

interact with the full range of<br />

their plant’s production process is<br />

through the plant control system.<br />

The human element—how comfortable<br />

users are with this system—is<br />

often as important as its technical<br />

aspects in determining how<br />

efficiently a control system works<br />

within the plant. Over the years, the<br />

designers and engineers at Astec<br />

Developed with customers in mind,<br />

PMIII is Astec’s newest plant<br />

control system.<br />

Controls have looked at how plants<br />

use their various control systems<br />

and developed answers based on<br />

real-world demands. Their latest<br />

design, called the PMIII, has just<br />

been introduced and is earning<br />

praise from customers as a responsive<br />

and intuitive system for today’s<br />

hot-mix production.<br />

LAYING THE FOUNDATION<br />

Of Astec’s legacy systems, the<br />

PM96—commemorating the year<br />

of its release, 1996—was an<br />

early version of a single-bore or<br />

multi-bore control system. It provided<br />

reliable service for hot-mix<br />

plants throughout America for<br />

years. However, with new technology<br />

came changing expectations.<br />

Operators were pleased<br />

with the PM96’s ability but as<br />

more demands were put on the<br />

system, newer controls would<br />

need to be integrated as well.<br />

NEW EXPECTATIONS<br />

The next generation release, the<br />

PMII, was designed to be its<br />

replacement. It maintained the<br />

same level of control but replaced<br />

the PM96’s specialized user-interface<br />

with a standard PC terminal,<br />

which relied on a so-called soft<br />

PLC and ran in Windows. The benefits<br />

to the plant’s machinery were<br />

the same, but the benefits to operators<br />

were exponentially improved:<br />

necessary training time decreased,<br />

plant control increased.<br />

Just before the release of the<br />

PMII, Astec released the TCII, a<br />

highly automated and exceedingly<br />

detailed plant control system. “This<br />

is the Cadillac of control systems,”<br />

said Al Williams, one of Astec’s<br />

PM96 system overview<br />

PMII system overview<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 12 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


senior control engineers and<br />

head of the Industrial Control<br />

Group. Williams has over three<br />

decades’ experience with<br />

Astec’s asphalt control systems<br />

and has seen many of them<br />

put to the test—and pass with<br />

flying colors. “With a system<br />

like the TCII, for example,” he<br />

explained, “it can do whatever a<br />

plant operator needs. It’s almost<br />

as if, if something has an on/off<br />

switch, the TCII can automate<br />

it.”<br />

LEARNING BY DOING<br />

The TCII’s chief advantage over<br />

earlier systems is its capacity<br />

to learn and communicate<br />

with smart motors, variable<br />

frequency drives (VFDs), and<br />

other equipment. In addition to<br />

allowing operators easy manual<br />

control options and automated<br />

operations within preset limits,<br />

the TCII records and reports<br />

information about the plant’s<br />

efficiency from various points<br />

within the hot-mix production<br />

process. Thus, the TCII allows<br />

operators to use that information<br />

in realtime, establishing a more<br />

responsive and productive control<br />

system.<br />

However, not every plant<br />

requires that level of intricate<br />

data-management. Also, for<br />

some plants, a system like the<br />

TCII might be their ideal model,<br />

but perhaps management has<br />

not allocated enough resources<br />

to afford a “Cadillac” control<br />

system. With those customers’<br />

needs in mind, Astec Controls<br />

developed their latest version<br />

of plant control systems—the<br />

streamlined PMIII.<br />

MADE WITH CUSTOMERS<br />

IN MIND<br />

Developed by Astec’s in-house<br />

controls engineers, the PMIII<br />

is a PLC-based control system<br />

comprised of separate modules<br />

for burners, silos, motor controls,<br />

and blending and loadout. With<br />

these features, the PMIII can<br />

be as robust or as simplified as<br />

plant operators desire. Williams<br />

noted, “Customers can purchase<br />

CPUs for each part of the plant<br />

or just one for the motor or the<br />

PMIII system overview<br />

PMIII burner controls<br />

PMIII silo controls<br />

burner. If someone out there<br />

still wants to use the old PM96<br />

push-button control panel<br />

for one part of the plant, that<br />

customer can still install PMIII<br />

modules everywhere else.”<br />

The PMIII’s modules can be<br />

installed individually to specify<br />

the options to a unique asphalt<br />

facility or they can be installed<br />

together as a package, similar<br />

to the TCII.<br />

Some plant operators complain<br />

of “information overload” in<br />

competing control systems.<br />

With that in mind Astec updated<br />

the PMIII user interface to<br />

rely on minimal graphics on<br />

each screen, reducing distraction<br />

and increasing an operator’s<br />

ability to find information<br />

with speed and clarity. Also,<br />

even though each individual<br />

screen may appear simple, the<br />

PMIII retains the ability to drill<br />

down for more information.<br />

This layered approach to data<br />

management allows the PMIII<br />

to provide abundant information<br />

that an operator may need<br />

without overwhelming users.<br />

Lastly, the PMIII’s built-in diagnostics<br />

reduce plant downtime,<br />

helping operators probe for the<br />

source of any problems along<br />

the production line. Also, the<br />

system’s improved reporting<br />

makes a greater variety of data<br />

available, which will assist<br />

management in long-term<br />

plant decisions.<br />

“Instead of just sending a signal<br />

to start or stop, the PMIII<br />

can read current on motors,”<br />

Williams added. “This is normally<br />

a feature you would only<br />

find on a larger, more expansive<br />

control system. Now that<br />

a more streamlined system<br />

can provide this level of data,<br />

more and more plants will have<br />

a level of control they never<br />

thought possible.” <br />

FOR INFORMATION<br />

Contact Diane Hunt<br />

423.867.4210<br />

dhunt@astecinc.com<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 13 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


The Shape of Things to Come<br />

3D printing capability brings<br />

ideas into reality for Astec, Inc.<br />

Innovation, by its nature, tends<br />

to outpace resources. In custom<br />

manufacturing, ingenious solutions<br />

and next-generation ideas are<br />

sometimes put on hold because the<br />

cost of the equipment and materials<br />

to make them a reality are cost<br />

prohibitive or too rare to produce<br />

them in a widely accessible manner.<br />

Even building a prototype of<br />

a new machine part can require<br />

dedicated hours and expense with<br />

no guarantee of success. However,<br />

by using state-of-the-art 3D printing<br />

technology to create prototype burners,<br />

Astec, Inc. has narrowed the gap<br />

between what can be imagined and<br />

what is possible.<br />

THOROUGH PROCESS,<br />

PRECISION EQUIPMENT<br />

Working both with outside partners<br />

and engineers inside Astec, the<br />

3D printing process is overseen by<br />

Michael Swanson, P.E., manager of<br />

the Astec Burner Group. First, the<br />

engineer presents a problem and<br />

the idea for a new part, and it is<br />

designed and drawn as a 3D CAD<br />

model. Depending on the part, virtual<br />

tests are performed to assess<br />

the design’s performance using<br />

computational fluid dynamics (CFD),<br />

discrete element method (DEM),<br />

and other analysis software. Then, a<br />

physical prototype is built in the 3D<br />

printer and testing of the prototype<br />

determines if a new iteration is<br />

needed.<br />

The Astec Burner Group relies on a<br />

3DSystems ProJet 5000, a largescale,<br />

precision 3D printer that the<br />

team operates on an almost daily<br />

basis. The ability to create prototypes<br />

in precise detail meeting the design’s<br />

The 3DSystems ProJet 5000 professional 3D printer provides detailed<br />

prototypes for Astec.


The prototype printed nozzle part before test firing.<br />

needs is key to Astec’s successful<br />

use of 3D printing. “Every part is different,”<br />

said Michael Swanson, “and<br />

when building a prototype, even the<br />

smallest change in a design can<br />

yield different results. The more<br />

exact we can build a test part, the<br />

more accurate the tests will be.”<br />

OUT WITH THE OLD<br />

Historically, Astec outsourced such<br />

quick turnaround prototype manufacturing<br />

to third-party suppliers,<br />

a process that limited the amount<br />

of testing that could be performed<br />

and the number of prototypes that<br />

could be produced. “The old method<br />

of drawing a part and individually<br />

machining it took two weeks,”<br />

Swanson added. “The current technology<br />

has cut that time down to, on<br />

average, two days.”<br />

When Astec brought 3D printing inhouse,<br />

Swanson’s group now had<br />

the technology to machine more<br />

prototypes, quicker and at greater<br />

savings. With the lag time between<br />

iterations reduced to a mere couple<br />

of days, engineers can now finetune<br />

their tests and see immediate<br />

results. Today, Astec can build a prototype,<br />

assess it, and manufacture a<br />

Testing of the burner with its 3D prototype is successful.<br />

new version for testing in a fraction<br />

of the time it would have taken to<br />

machine just one prototype using<br />

the old method.<br />

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID<br />

DYNAMICS<br />

Accurate implementation of CFD<br />

is key to a 3D-printed prototype’s<br />

success, but it is also the starting<br />

point for innovative and cutting-edge<br />

designs. “In the past, some of the<br />

parts we’ve tested for burners would<br />

not have been possible to prototype.<br />

The complexity and intricacy of the<br />

design would have made it nearly<br />

impossible to find a shop with the<br />

equipment capable of machining<br />

them,” said Swanson.<br />

As Astec’s ability to prototype ever<br />

more intricate parts increases, so<br />

too is their opportunity to solve problems.<br />

Swanson noted that requests<br />

to build prototypes continue to<br />

increase and he sees no ceiling on<br />

3D printing’s potential. “If it can be<br />

drawn,” he noted, “it can be built.”<br />

NEW IDEAS, NEW OPTIONS<br />

Astec, Inc.’s use of 3D printing for<br />

prototype parts and sales and marketing<br />

display models benefits the<br />

entire company. Testing is now possible<br />

for more parts with increased<br />

complexity, leading Astec engineers<br />

to implement more concepts that<br />

would once be deemed too farfetched<br />

or prohibitively expensive<br />

for the real world. In the future of 3D<br />

printing, however, the real world is<br />

what you make it. <br />

FOR INFORMATION<br />

Contact Diane Hunt<br />

423.867.4210<br />

dhunt@astecinc.com


Mobility<br />

The<br />

Down Under<br />

Astec portable asphalt plant allowed Fulton Hogan<br />

to meet the requirements for working on Barrow Island.<br />

Astec Australia delivers asphalt<br />

portability to major civil<br />

contracting company.<br />

In 2012, Fulton Hogan<br />

Industries transported its new<br />

highly portable Astec asphalt<br />

plant to Barrow Island, a remote<br />

island off the western coast of<br />

Australia. Fulton Hogan Industries<br />

is a very prominent business<br />

“down under,” which specializes in<br />

building and maintaining transport<br />

and civil infrastructure in Australia,<br />

New Zealand, and the South<br />

Pacific so that communities can<br />

operate safely and efficiently.<br />

The plant was custom-designed<br />

and built for Fulton Hogan’s<br />

Asphalt Surfacing Operations to<br />

provide them with a highly portable<br />

asphalt plant which could be<br />

moved easily from state to state<br />

and offshore.<br />

Kellog Joint Venture Gorgon<br />

The Kellog Joint Venture Gorgon, an unincorporated joint venture<br />

between KBR, JGC, Hatch, and Clough, is the Gorgon’s Project’s<br />

downstream engineering, procurement, and construction management<br />

contractor. The scope of work includes three LNG trains,<br />

LNG storage, and load-out facilities, including a jetty, domestic<br />

gas plant, utilities, materials offloading facility, and a construction<br />

village.<br />

The first and biggest test for<br />

the plant’s “ease of portability”<br />

came when Fulton Hogan won<br />

the supply of hot-mix asphalt for<br />

the Gorgon Project on Barrow<br />

Island. To undertake the project,<br />

Fulton Hogan would need to move<br />

its new highly portable asphalt<br />

plant through four of Australia’s<br />

six states over 4,345 km (2,699<br />

mi) by road across the breadth<br />

of Australia and then by sea to<br />

get to the remote Barrow Island.<br />

The plant was moved along the<br />

project route using ten trailers to<br />

transport the plant components.<br />

Each trailer customized to meet<br />

strict Australian standards for<br />

safety and registration. Thanks to<br />

innovative engineering by Astec,<br />

Inc. engineers, the trailers met the<br />

transport solution required to keep<br />

Fulton Hogan’s Gorgon Project<br />

moving forward.<br />

THE PLANT’S ARRIVAL<br />

Fulton Hogan’s portable asphalt<br />

plant was originally bound for<br />

Brisbane, Queensland (Eastern<br />

Coast of Australia), which is the<br />

Port of Arrival of the portable<br />

asphalt plant. It was stored at<br />

Astec Australia’s head office facility<br />

for pre-commissioning work<br />

and registration with Queensland’s<br />

Department of Transport, something<br />

difficult to achieve if the<br />

plant does not comply with ADR<br />

regulations and Australian standards.<br />

Thanks to the efforts of<br />

Astec’s engineering team and<br />

liaising with Astec Australia, this<br />

was a successful task.<br />

After the arrival of the plant into<br />

Brisbane, Fulton Hogan was then<br />

awarded the Barrow Island project<br />

in partnership with the Kellog Joint<br />

Venture Gorgon. The portability<br />

of the plant was showcased as it<br />

was transported from Brisbane,<br />

Queensland, through New South<br />

Wales, South Australia, and all the<br />

way through to Perth in Western<br />

Australia.<br />

TRANSPORT PREP<br />

In Perth, the asphalt plant was<br />

shrink-wrapped and quarantined<br />

in order to comply with Barrow<br />

Island’s stringent environmental<br />

quarantine regulations, which<br />

applies to all buildings, materials,<br />

and equipment introduced to<br />

Barrow Island. The requirements<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 16 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


Barrow Island<br />

Home to Australia’s largest operating onshore oilfield, Barrow Island<br />

is a Class “A” Nature Reserve. This brings the highest level of protection<br />

under State legislation for the island’s plant and animal life.<br />

Approvals for work on the island underwent an intense assessment<br />

before being granted. State and Federal Governments put measures<br />

in place to protect the area throughout the life of the project.<br />

The Gorgon<br />

Project<br />

The Gorgon Project is a<br />

$43 billion joint venture<br />

developing the Greater<br />

Gorgon Area gas fields.<br />

Touted as the largest<br />

resources project in<br />

Australian history, it will<br />

also be the single largest<br />

investment of its<br />

kind in the world. The<br />

Greater Gorgon Area<br />

gas fields contain about<br />

40 trillion cubic feet of<br />

gas. This is the nation’s<br />

largest undeveloped gas<br />

resource. The Gorgon<br />

Project is owned by the<br />

Gorgon Joint Venture,<br />

which includes the<br />

Australian subsidiaries<br />

of Chevron, ExxonMobile,<br />

Shell, Osaka Gas, Tokyo<br />

Gas, and Chubu Electric.<br />

The venture will process<br />

15 million tonnes (16.5<br />

million tons) per year<br />

of liquefied natural gas<br />

(LNG) and 300 terajoules<br />

per day of domestic gas<br />

on Barrow Island, 70<br />

km (43 mi) off Western<br />

Australia’s Pilbara Coast.<br />

The gas processing portion<br />

of the project will be<br />

located on Barrow Island,<br />

limited is size to 300<br />

hectares (741 acres), or<br />

1.3 percent of the island.<br />

Fulton Hogan acquired the portable 180 MTPH (198 TPH) Astec 6 ft x 33 ft<br />

(1.83 m x 10.06 m) Double Barrel ® plant in 2012 and features the following:<br />

portable 8 ft x 11 ft (2.44 m x 3.35 m) three-compartment cold feed system;<br />

portable 24 in x 50 ft (61 cm x 15.24 m) conveyor/static scalping grizzly;<br />

Whisper Jet ® burner; portable Pulse Jet baghouse for 30,384 ACFM draft<br />

system; portable compact self-erecting 40 ton (36 tonne) surge bin; PM<br />

Continuous <strong>Mix</strong> Blending Controls; Heatec 15,000-gal (56,781 l) portable<br />

tank; and a Heatec 500-gal (1,893 l) horizontal calibration tank all tailored for<br />

transport on ten trailers through Barrow Island. All the components and trailers<br />

met the stringent compliance measures for doing work on the Gorgon Project.<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 17 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


10 Trailers<br />

Trailer One:<br />

1 PCF-811-3E-A portable<br />

8 ft x 11 ft (2.44 m x 3.35 m)<br />

three-compartment<br />

cold feed system<br />

1 x spare wheels and racks<br />

to each trailer<br />

Trailer Two:<br />

1 PCF-811-3E-B portable<br />

8 ft x 11 ft (2.44 m x 3.35 m)<br />

three-compartment cold feed system<br />

1 x spare wheels and racks to<br />

each trailer<br />

Trailer Three:<br />

1 PIC-2450E-SG portable<br />

24 in x 50 ft (61 cm x 15.24 m)<br />

conveyor/static scalping grizzly<br />

1 x spare wheels and racks<br />

to each trailer<br />

Trailer Four:<br />

1 PDB-633E portable 6 ft x 33 ft<br />

(1.83 m x 10.06 m) Astec Double<br />

Barrel ® drum<br />

1 DB-GRN001 Astec warm mix system<br />

Trailer Five:<br />

1 PBH-30E portable Pulse Jet<br />

baghouse for 30,384 ACFM draft<br />

system<br />

1 x spare wheels and racks<br />

to each trailer<br />

Trailer Six:<br />

1 DA-275 275 BBL Dry Additive<br />

System (10 ft, 6 in wide)<br />

(3.05 m, 15.24 cm wide)<br />

1 x spare wheels and racks<br />

to each trailer<br />

Trailer Seven:<br />

1 SEB-4024C portable compact<br />

self-erecting 40 ton (36 tonne)<br />

surge bin/24 in (61 cm) drag<br />

(10 ft, 6 in wide)<br />

(3.05 m, 15.24 cm wide)<br />

1 x spare wheels and racks<br />

to each trailer<br />

Trailer Eight:<br />

1 PMII-B Continuous <strong>Mix</strong> Blending<br />

Controls with 30 in (76 cm) console<br />

1 WM2000PB Profibus loadcell<br />

truck management system<br />

1 PCH-27.SP Pilot control center,<br />

9 ft, 8 in x 30 ft, 6 in (2 rooms)<br />

(2.74 m, 20.32 cm x 9.14 m,<br />

15.24 cm)<br />

1 ELIF-PM PMII electrical<br />

interface (MCC panels, main<br />

breaker, etc.)<br />

1 DNSWITCH day night switch<br />

1 TES-20 power and control<br />

cables with plugs and receptacles<br />

1 SPCL-ELEC special voltage<br />

electrical system 380/50/3<br />

1 x spare wheels and racks<br />

to each trailer<br />

Trailer Nine:<br />

1 TA-15PD.SP special design<br />

15,000-gal (56,781 l) portable<br />

tank (9 ft, 6 in diameter)<br />

(2.74 m, 15.24 cm diameter)<br />

1 MACC-2024 2.5 in (6.35 cm)<br />

twin pump asphalt metering<br />

system (10 hp pump)<br />

1 HACC-1437 3 in (7.62 cm) piping<br />

tank to asphalt metering package<br />

1 HACC-1440A Australia -<br />

3 in (7.62 cm) jacketed piping<br />

from metering package outlet<br />

1 HACC-1446 3 in (7.62 cm)<br />

piping - second compartment to<br />

metering package<br />

1 HACC-1451 3 in (7.62 cm)<br />

piping - AC unloading pump to<br />

second compartment<br />

1 SPEC-PPG special ball joint<br />

piping from trailer to TA-15PD<br />

1 x spare wheels and racks<br />

to each trailer<br />

Trailer Ten:<br />

1 HC-120 1,200,000 BTU/hr (output)<br />

gas/oil heater with manifold<br />

1 SPEC-TRLR portable trailer for<br />

transport of Heatec and Astec<br />

components<br />

1 CAL-1HE 500-gal (1,893 l)<br />

horizontal calibration tank<br />

(mounted on trailer)<br />

1 Astec Australia fibre feeder<br />

1 x spare wheels and racks<br />

to each trailer<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 18 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


include thorough cleaning and<br />

disinfection treatment of all items<br />

prior to transportation. After treatment,<br />

small items are placed in<br />

shipping containers and larger<br />

items, such as building modules<br />

and plant components, are shrinkwrapped<br />

to prevent contamination<br />

during transport. Shipping to<br />

Barrow Island is carried out by<br />

barges departing from both Perth<br />

and Dampier.<br />

In order to commission the plant,<br />

every employee and subcontractor<br />

to Astec Australia had to be<br />

approved and participate in an<br />

extensive induction program.<br />

The program consisted of an<br />

initial thirteen-page application<br />

to be inducted onto the project.<br />

Documentation included all licenses<br />

and tickets relevant to the person<br />

and the work to be completed.<br />

All inductees were flown to Perth,<br />

Western Australia, to attend inductions<br />

for Kellogs Joint Venture,<br />

Fulton Hogan, and Ertech. Each<br />

person had an extensive medical<br />

exam and an elevated work<br />

platform ticket check and competency<br />

demonstration. Upon arrival<br />

onto Barrow Island, the induction<br />

included a campsite and environmental<br />

inspection. The plant was<br />

commissioned on Barrow Island in<br />

October 2012.<br />

Fulton Hogan acquired two Roadtec pavers (RP170 and RP190) for night-paving projects<br />

on Barrow Island.<br />

“<br />

endeavor …<br />

”<br />

TRAILER-MOUNTED MOBILITY<br />

The Astec, Inc. portable asphalt<br />

plant for Fulton Hogan is comprised<br />

of various components<br />

that are all trailer-mounted on ten<br />

trailers for complete compliance<br />

with the strict ADR compliance<br />

rules in Australia. If the plant does<br />

not comply with ADR standards,<br />

the plant will not be allowed to be<br />

transported and would make the<br />

Astec stands by its equipment<br />

and provides unwavering<br />

support no matter the<br />

portability null and void. The main<br />

challenge was to ensure that no<br />

trailer was wider than 3.2 m (10 ft,<br />

5 63 / 64 in).<br />

Fulton Hogan also acquired two<br />

Roadtec Pavers (RP170 and<br />

RP190) for paving on Barrow<br />

Island. Both pavers also endured<br />

the stringent shipping, quarantine,<br />

and commissioning requirements.<br />

Astec Australia is devoted to continuously<br />

meeting the needs of its<br />

customer—and by working hand<br />

in hand with Fulton Hogan’s people<br />

were able to design, build, deliver,<br />

install, and commission this highly<br />

portable asphalt plant even under<br />

the extreme logistical challenges<br />

presented by the Gorgon Project<br />

on Barrow Island.<br />

Michael Thompson, who is Fulton<br />

Hogan’s national operations manager,<br />

airports, enjoys the challenge<br />

of tackling these logistically difficult<br />

projects. Michael said that<br />

the old saying “the devil is in the<br />

details” is very true, especially<br />

when it comes to the amount<br />

of planning, preparation, and<br />

management that is required to<br />

be successful on these types of<br />

projects. Michael also said that the<br />

key ingredients for success are<br />

safe, dedicated, reliable, and persistent<br />

people supported by highquality<br />

reliable equipment. Michael<br />

continued that with Fulton Hogan’s<br />

Astec plant and equipment, he felt<br />

extremely confident that Fulton<br />

Hogan was working with a company<br />

that listened intently to its<br />

needs, and had designed and built<br />

a plant accordingly.<br />

Fulton Hogan’s portable asphalt plant featured a burner and drum equipped for the Astec<br />

warm mix system.<br />

“Not only that, I know that Astec<br />

stands by its plant and equipment,<br />

and that they will always be<br />

there to support us wherever and<br />

whatever we do. Sure, there will<br />

be the odd occasions when things<br />

don’t go quite as you expect, but<br />

with Astec we know that they have<br />

a very good understanding of our<br />

business, and we know that we<br />

are dealing with very honest and<br />

reliable people that will always<br />

respond and support us,” said<br />

Michael.<br />

To further test the portability and<br />

reliability of its new highly portable<br />

Astec Double Barrel ® asphalt<br />

plant, following the completion of<br />

its Barrow Island project, Fulton<br />

Hogan plans to transport back to<br />

Australia’s east coast to tackle the<br />

refurbishment of the runway on<br />

Brisbane’s International Airport.<br />

Fulton Hogan knows that when<br />

they do, Astec will be there to support<br />

them.<br />

FOR INFORMATION<br />

Contact David Smale<br />

General Manager Australia<br />

+61 7 3714 8800<br />

+61 419 969 335<br />

dsmale@astecaustralia.com.au<br />

or Robert Messner<br />

Regional Sales Manager<br />

+61 419 965 202<br />

rmessner@astecaustralia.com.au<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 19 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


On<br />

Your<br />

Side<br />

The lead-up to Independence<br />

Day weekend is a quiet one<br />

for Travis Sneed, Astec’s<br />

regional sales manager for the<br />

Southeast. While people throughout<br />

his territory—from Florida up<br />

through Alabama, from Mississippi<br />

east to Georgia—will be buying<br />

fireworks and setting up backyard<br />

barbeques, Travis and the ten other<br />

regional sales managers are completing<br />

a safety training course at<br />

Astec headquarters. “On holiday<br />

weeks like this, a lot of our customers<br />

are off work,” Travis explained,<br />

“so that makes it a good time for<br />

us to come in and take care of<br />

in-house business like I’m doing<br />

today.” Before the week is out,<br />

Travis will not only complete more<br />

training courses but also familiarize<br />

himself with Astec’s newest<br />

product catalog and equipment<br />

changes, as well as deliver news<br />

on how products in the field are<br />

meeting expectations and where<br />

they can improve. Then he’s back<br />

on the road, because customers are<br />

expecting him.<br />

A NEW LEVEL OF SERVICE<br />

Travis Sneed has been with Astec<br />

in one position or another for over<br />

two decades, but back in February<br />

of 2001 his unofficial position was<br />

guinea pig. He was named the<br />

Earning a customer’s trust<br />

is job #1 for Astec’s Travis Sneed<br />

first regional sales manager for<br />

parts, meaning that he was now<br />

responsible for maintaining Astec’s<br />

customer relationships for a large<br />

section of the country, not just a<br />

few clients here or there.<br />

“I remember having a few weeks to<br />

see if we could get it off the ground<br />

before we wanted to commit everyone’s<br />

effort to it,” Travis recalled.<br />

Since then, the regional sales support<br />

system did not just get off the<br />

ground, but took flight. Today, Astec<br />

divides all of the United States and<br />

sections of Canada into eleven<br />

parts regions—each one with its<br />

own support person like Travis.<br />

SUPPORT FOR CUSTOMERS<br />

“I consider myself a liaison<br />

between Astec and the customer.<br />

I understand that this is a sales<br />

job,” Travis noted, “but I’m on the<br />

customer’s side. That is my most<br />

important job.”<br />

Other than three or four weeks a<br />

year for training, being on the customer’s<br />

side could be taken literally.<br />

“We serve as a support team for<br />

the customers,” Travis added. He<br />

travels his territory constantly,<br />

meeting with customers across<br />

the Southeast to answer their<br />

questions, provide solutions,<br />

and generally make their parts<br />

experience as easy as possible.<br />

Over time, customers know they<br />

can trust Travis to advocate their<br />

needs.<br />

“Without that level of trust,” Travis<br />

continued, “believe me, there is<br />

no sale.”<br />

RELATIONSHIPS WORK<br />

BOTH WAYS<br />

Through Travis Sneed and the ten<br />

other regional sales managers, the<br />

relationship between Astec and<br />

its parts customers is mutually<br />

beneficial. “We spend three or four<br />

days of each work week with our<br />

customers,” Travis added, “and they<br />

are the real-life test labs for our<br />

products.” With access to that raw<br />

amount of hands-on experience,<br />

Travis and his colleagues can report<br />

back to Astec’s engineers on the<br />

latest needs from the field—which<br />

is sometimes the easiest way to<br />

communicate. “Many times I’m<br />

the messenger of a great idea, one<br />

our customers brings to the table,”<br />

Travis said.<br />

“When our customers have information<br />

our engineers need, I<br />

want them to know that I’m there<br />

for them,” Travis continued. “My<br />

number one goal is to build that<br />

relationship.” Building relationships<br />

and building trust, improving<br />

service and improving products, the<br />

Astec Parts Regional Sales team<br />

is a major reason Astec customers<br />

expect and receive superior<br />

service. <br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 21 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


In the Heart<br />

of Texas<br />

According to Corey Clark,<br />

director of asphalt and<br />

fleet operations with Clark<br />

Construction of Texas, Inc., the<br />

family-owned and operated road<br />

construction’s bread and butter is<br />

“mill and lay.”<br />

In operation since 1978, Clark<br />

Construction specializes in seal<br />

coat and hot-mix asphalt projects<br />

across Texas. With innovative<br />

approaches to the chip seal<br />

industry and asphalt paving, the<br />

company has excelled in areas of<br />

safety, quality, and performance.<br />

What has been a contributing factor<br />

to its success? A fleet of equipment<br />

manufactured and supported by<br />

Roadtec.<br />

“We purchased the Roadtec<br />

RX-700 Cold Planer in June 2011,<br />

Company excels at mill and lay<br />

projects with Roadtec equipment.<br />

and we also have the SP-200 Spray<br />

Paver, SB-2500c Shuttle Buggy,<br />

RP-190 Paver, RX-60c Cold Planer,<br />

and the RX-600e Cold Planer,” said<br />

Corey Clark. “On a recent job, we<br />

rented the Roadtec RX-600e and<br />

liked the milling machine so much<br />

that we purchased it for future<br />

projects.”<br />

The project Clark referred to was<br />

the Marble Falls job northwest of<br />

Austin, Texas.<br />

BLANCO COUNTY HWY 281<br />

Marble Falls in centrally located in<br />

Texas on Highway 281 in Blanco<br />

County. Clark Construction of Texas,<br />

Inc. was awarded the road repair<br />

project in January 2013. Work<br />

began in May on Highway 281<br />

from the Burnet County Line to<br />

US 290 West in Johnson City. The<br />

15.051 miles (24.22 km) were set<br />

to be repaired using the traditional<br />

method of putting down the oil<br />

application (tack coat) ahead of<br />

putting down mix and sealing with<br />

a top coat. Clark Construction was<br />

able to have the application method<br />

changed to use a membrane<br />

underseal and a Roadtec SP-200<br />

Spray Paver. The SP-200 puts down<br />

the tack coat just seconds before<br />

putting down mix.<br />

This method, according to Clark, is<br />

more efficient. “Using the SP-200<br />

is cleaner, faster, and requires a<br />

smaller crew.” The spray paver<br />

used on Hwy 281 was the second<br />

machine Clark Construction had<br />

purchased from Roadtec. According<br />

to Roadtec’s Texas service technician<br />

James “JW” Whittington, Clark<br />

Construction was instrumental in<br />

helping Roadtec develop the first<br />

spray paver and purchased the unit<br />

in March 2005. Clark Construction<br />

traded this older machine for the<br />

SP-200 Spray Paver in its current<br />

fleet.<br />

MILL AND LAY<br />

The top 1.75 in (4.44 cm) of the<br />

highway was milled and replaced<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 22 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


Roadtec SP-200 Spray Paver<br />

The SP-200 Spray Paver sprays tack and<br />

applies hot-mix asphalt seconds later.<br />

Combining spraying and laydown produces<br />

a high-quality mat with a strong bond<br />

between layers. A spray bar just in front<br />

of the paver’s auger distributes the liquid<br />

through computer-controlled, self-cleaning<br />

valves. An onboard microprocessor precisely<br />

controls the rate of flow. Valves can<br />

also be controlled manually. Valves are<br />

arranged in sets of three, providing plenty<br />

of spray capacity so you can move fast.<br />

To cut down on refill stops, the SP-200 is<br />

equipped with a 2,100-gal (7,949 l) tack<br />

tank. The spray bars extend as needed<br />

with the screed and each nozzle can be<br />

manually shut off for partial passes. For<br />

paving at any time, a material transfer<br />

vehicle (MTV), such as the Roadtec<br />

SB-2500c Shuttle Buggy, delivers mix to<br />

the spray paver’s gravity-fed hopper, which<br />

has a capacity of 11 tons (9 tonnes). The<br />

spreading augers deliver the mix to the<br />

hydraulically extendable, vibrating screed.<br />

with 2 in (5.08 cm) of special<br />

specification 3224 dense-graded<br />

hot-mix asphalt. The road repair<br />

was approximately 15 mi (24.14<br />

km) long and consisted of four lanes<br />

(two north and two south). The<br />

Texas Department of Transportation<br />

(TxDOT) approved SS 3224 for use<br />

in May 2011.<br />

Once the milling was finished, the<br />

Roadtec SB-2500c Shuttle Buggy<br />

fed the Roadtec SP-200 Spray<br />

Paver as 2 in (5.08 cm) of hot-mix<br />

asphalt was put down. This process<br />

of pavement preservation is one of<br />

the most cost effective, efficient,<br />

and versatile options available on<br />

the market. The benefits include<br />

reduced noise levels, enhanced<br />

skid resistance, and improved ride,<br />

drainage, and aesthetics. Overlays<br />

can be placed in varying thicknesses,<br />

allowing flexibility to design<br />

according to the needs of the<br />

highway. Future maintenance of the<br />

roadway exists through the recycling<br />

of materials. <strong>Hot</strong>-mix asphalt (HMA)<br />

consists of well-blended aggregate<br />

and asphalt cement—a 100-percent<br />

recyclable product.<br />

The road work took Clark<br />

Construction through the small<br />

town of Round Mountain, population<br />

of 182 (according to the 2011<br />

census). A few weather-related<br />

delays hampered progress, but<br />

with the Roadtec equipment, Clark<br />

Construction kept pace and completed<br />

the project on time.<br />

“The project took about two<br />

months,” said Clark. “We experienced<br />

some rain delays and were<br />

pushed on the schedule, but with<br />

the Roadtec equipment, we finished<br />

the project on time near the end of<br />

July.”<br />

Clark continued, “We put down<br />

approximately 60,000 tons (54<br />

tonnes) of asphalt on the project.<br />

The Roadtec machinery held up well<br />

and we experienced fast production.<br />

The support we receive from<br />

Roadtec is essential to our success,<br />

and having a Roadtec fleet of equipment<br />

provides the right tools for<br />

what we love to do best ... mill and<br />

lay.”<br />

FOR INFORMATION<br />

Contact Roadtec Sales<br />

800.272.7100<br />

sales@roadtec.com<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 23 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


Every Day is<br />

Recycle Day<br />

Upgrade to new<br />

asphalt plant<br />

brings Astec’s<br />

warm mix system<br />

to the forefront<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 26 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


Callanan Industries’ Dillman<br />

UniDrum plant features a 600<br />

ton (544 tonne) New Generation<br />

Storage System.<br />

“With the counterflow design, we run recycle every day …<br />

and with the service we receive from Astec and Dillman,<br />

we are happy operators in the asphalt industry.”<br />

Callanan Industries, Inc. is a<br />

leading supplier of paving<br />

materials and construction<br />

services in New York. Founded in<br />

1883 by Peter Callanan in South<br />

Bethlehem, the company focused on<br />

aggregate mining. In 1895, Callanan<br />

won the first road building contract<br />

let by New York State. A forwardthinking<br />

man, Callanan pioneered the<br />

concept of a state highway system.<br />

Callanan Industries was acquired by<br />

Oldcastle, Inc. in 1985 and continues<br />

its mission to be cost competitive<br />

while providing high-quality materials<br />

today.<br />

FRESH START<br />

When it comes to asphalt, look no<br />

further than Callanan Industries’<br />

purchase of a Dillman UniDrum plant<br />

in 2012. Although the 1994 Astec<br />

Double Barrel ® plant had served<br />

them well, the company decided it<br />

was time to trade it in and upgrade<br />

to a newer model.<br />

“It made sense to upgrade and put<br />

in a new plant with the upcoming<br />

move to a new location,” said Jeff<br />

Frani, general manager of asphalt<br />

operations with Callanan Industries.<br />

“We were new to Dillman and were<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 27 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


Callanan Industries’ new Dillman UniDrum plant features a Pulse Jet baghouse, TCII controls, a low-profile truck scale, and a seven-compartment cold feed system.<br />

impressed with the counterflow<br />

design of the UniDrum.”<br />

BRAND NEW PLANT<br />

Callanan purchased a stationary<br />

400 TPH (362 MTPH) 9 ft x 54 ft<br />

(2.74 m x 16.46 m) Dillman Unified<br />

counterflow drum plant for the<br />

South Bethlehem, New York, location.<br />

The plant features the following:<br />

• 10 ft x 14 ft (3.05 m x 4.27 m)<br />

seven-compartment cold feed<br />

system<br />

• 5 ft x 12 ft (1.52 m x 3.65 m)<br />

dual deck scalping screen<br />

• 68,194 CFM Pulse Jet baghouse<br />

• 600 ton (544 tonne) New<br />

Generation Storage System<br />

• 11 ft x 100 ft (3.35 m x 30.48<br />

m) low-profile truck scale<br />

• Dual 10 ft x 14 ft (3.05 m x<br />

4.26 m) recycle feed bins<br />

• Pilot control center with TCII<br />

control system<br />

• Astec warm mix system<br />

COUNTERFLOW DESIGN<br />

What separates the Dillman<br />

UniDrum from other plants? It’s the<br />

unique nature of producing quality<br />

hot-mix asphalt at a high production<br />

rate with a high percentage<br />

of recycle. The extra-long drum<br />

length maximizes mixing and drying<br />

times to reduce fuel usage and<br />

provide optimal mixing. The system<br />

eliminates the time-consuming<br />

process of trunnion alignment and<br />

ensures the equipment operates<br />

correctly. Centered around a large<br />

20 in (50.8 cm) trunnion, fitted with<br />

adjustable double-row Timken<br />

bearings and ring fitters, this<br />

system is an industry exclusive,<br />

according to Dillman. The key is<br />

its unique pivot pin system, which<br />

allows the asphalt operator to easily<br />

dial in the dryer in a matter of<br />

minutes without the need of any<br />

special equipment. In the end,<br />

the dryer rotates properly without<br />

excess wear to the tires, trunnions,<br />

and thrust roller assemblies.<br />

Frani is a fan of the patented<br />

flighting design on the Dilman<br />

UniDrum. The flights are adjustable<br />

to better control the baghouse<br />

temperature and moisture<br />

removal from the aggregate. Its<br />

unique recycle entry is also a plus.<br />

The inlet into the drum allows<br />

immediate mixing of recycle<br />

with the hot aggregate, bringing<br />

the recycle up to temperature<br />

and removing moisture quickly.<br />

Maintenance is made easy with<br />

the clean-outs in the collar around<br />

the drum.<br />

“The Dillman UniDrum is operating<br />

well for us; we’re using 20-percent<br />

recycle on state surface mix and<br />

30-percent recycle on base mix,”<br />

said Frani. “We have several entities<br />

that we are supplying mix to<br />

for various projects around our<br />

area; we range anywhere from<br />

2,500 tons to 3,000 tons a day<br />

(2,267 tonnes to 2,721 tonnes)<br />

depending on the job.”<br />

Frani continued: “The combination<br />

of quality equipment with<br />

top-notch service from Astec<br />

and Dillman makes our partnership<br />

worth its weight in<br />

asphalt.” <br />

FOR INFORMATION<br />

Contact Diane Hunt<br />

423.867.4210<br />

dhunt@astecinc.com<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 28 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


The<br />

Power of<br />

Portability<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 30 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2<br />

Tennessee contractor<br />

welcomes efficiency with<br />

portable Astec plant


Hoover, Inc.’s 7 ft<br />

(2.13 m) Astec<br />

Double Barrel ®<br />

plant uses the<br />

PMIII controls<br />

and features a<br />

portable 10 ft x<br />

14 ft (3.05 m x<br />

4.27 m) five-bin<br />

cold feed system.<br />

You can’t miss the Omaha<br />

Orange blazing the skyline<br />

in Lebanon, Tennessee. The<br />

brilliant orange hue is the signature<br />

color of Hoover, Inc., and adorns<br />

all of the components of its new<br />

hot-mix asphalt plant.<br />

THE EARLY DAYS<br />

The Omaha Orange paint color<br />

stems from Tom Hoover, Jr.’s great<br />

grandfather Ephriam Hoover, Sr.<br />

Ephriam ran a motor freight company<br />

and the orange color was on<br />

all the trucks. Ephriam continued<br />

With a portable plant, Hoover, Inc.<br />

is able to bid on projects otherwise<br />

passed over; portability is an<br />

added benefit.<br />

the use of the color when he<br />

started his crushed stone business.<br />

He expanded into ready-mix concrete,<br />

hot-mix asphalt, and grading<br />

(construction in general). Even after<br />

the passing of Ephriam in 1979, the<br />

company remains family-owned<br />

and operated. Through the years,<br />

the company has delivered on<br />

its dedication to provide quality<br />

product. With devoted employees<br />

(some spanning employment over<br />

decades), the operations still focus<br />

on crushed stone and asphalt.<br />

NEW AND EFFICIENT<br />

The 7 ft (2.13 m) portable Astec<br />

Double Barrel ® plant has been in<br />

operation since December 2012. It’s<br />

not the only Astec plant that Hoover,<br />

Inc. has in operation.<br />

“We’ve been impressed with Astec<br />

since our introduction in the early<br />

2000’s,” said Tom Hoover, Jr., assistant<br />

construction manager with<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 31 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


Hoover, Inc. has a 400 ton (362 tonne) New Generation Storage System with two 200-ton (181 tonne) silos, and an Astec warm mix system with a Phoenix ® Talon burner.<br />

Hoover, Inc. has three asphalt<br />

plants located within quarry sites<br />

in Tennessee, which are able to<br />

provide competitive prices on<br />

quality hot-mix asphalt.<br />

Hoover, Inc. “Astec’s reliable service<br />

and top-quality product led us to<br />

purchase a new plant; it’s a relationship<br />

that has served us well.”<br />

Set up of the plant was smooth.<br />

Calibrating and troubleshooting the<br />

plant with PMIII controls took a bit<br />

longer. An Astec technician stayed<br />

over a period of three months to<br />

ensure operations were functioning<br />

at peak performance and the crew<br />

overcame the learning curve of the<br />

new plant. The Hoover, Inc. plant<br />

was one of the first plants to have<br />

the PMIII controls in use.<br />

“Once the guys had the controls<br />

figured out, they loved the functionality<br />

and ease of use for plant<br />

operations,” said Hoover. “Having<br />

on-site Astec training was a plus.”<br />

PERKS OF PORTABILITY<br />

The Hoover, Inc. plant is outfitted<br />

with an Astec warm mix system.<br />

According to the Tennessee<br />

Department of Transportation<br />

(TDPT), 10 to 35 percent of fractionated<br />

recycle is allowed in mixes.<br />

Producing 250 to 300 TPH (226<br />

to 272 MTPH), Hoover, Inc. is supplying<br />

material for I-40 in Wilson<br />

County and a TDOT job (State Route<br />

141).<br />

“Having the portable plant gives<br />

us the flexibility to bid on more<br />

projects,” said Hoover. “The ability<br />

to move when we need to<br />

and the added efficiency of the<br />

Double Barrel ® drum and the<br />

Phoenix ® Talon burner set us up for<br />

success.” <br />

FOR INFORMATION<br />

Contact Diane Hunt<br />

423.867.4210<br />

dhunt@astecinc.com<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 32 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


Wake Up<br />

the Echoes<br />

At Walsh and Kelly’s<br />

South Bend plant, the past<br />

prepares for the future.<br />

The Dillman UniDrum allows Walsh and Kelly’s South Bend<br />

plant to run a higher percentage of recycle than before.<br />

For most people, South Bend,<br />

Indiana, is best known as<br />

the home of the University of<br />

Notre Dame and its famed Fighting<br />

Irish football team. The Irish fans<br />

always hope the season ends with<br />

a chance to play for a national<br />

championship, but the operators<br />

at Walsh and Kelly’s South Bend<br />

plant were watching a different<br />

type of season come to its close.<br />

Just as Notre Dame’s fans cherish<br />

their program’s storied history, the<br />

team at Walsh and Kelly would<br />

also rely on their past to build a<br />

successful future.<br />

TIME FOR A CHANGE<br />

Walsh and Kelly noticed a growing<br />

problem—one that would<br />

require a careful decision and<br />

serious investment. The South<br />

Bend plant’s CMI triple drum was<br />

approaching the end of its lifecycle.<br />

Compounding the issue, the<br />

stainless steel ring between the<br />

recycle and the burner was wearing<br />

away. That component alone<br />

could cost the plant’s budget<br />

upwards of $50,000. Needing a<br />

new drum, in addition to a significant<br />

repair, the time was right to<br />

consider a major retrofit for the<br />

plant.<br />

Walsh and Kelly decided to<br />

replace their CMI triple drum<br />

with a Dillman unified drum. The<br />

Dillman UniDrum is often used for<br />

new plant packages but can also<br />

be used for retrofit jobs, making<br />

it a perfect choice for the South<br />

Bend replacement. Furthermore,<br />

with a capacity ranging from<br />

from 200 to 600 TPH (181 to<br />

544 MTPH), the Dillman UniDrum<br />

would be an improvement over<br />

the plant’s old drum.<br />

BIGGER AND BETTER<br />

Another consideration was that<br />

triple drums are notorious for<br />

filling up with reclaimed asphalt<br />

pavement (RAP) in the outer<br />

chamber. This had been an ongoing<br />

problem for the South Bend<br />

plant, one they could eliminate<br />

with the right replacement. The<br />

Dillman unified drum presents a<br />

high quality counterflow design.<br />

The inlet into the drum allows<br />

immediate mixing of recycle with<br />

the hot aggregate, bringing the<br />

recycle up to temperature and<br />

removing any residual moisture.<br />

This creates a natural moisture<br />

barrier for the recycled material<br />

and prevents deposits. Using this<br />

new drum, the South Bend plant<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 34 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


The Dillman unified drum is a high<br />

quality counterflow design offered<br />

in both portable and stationary<br />

arrangements.<br />

could expect to expand its use of<br />

RAP to between 40 and 45 percent<br />

without any problems.<br />

Walsh and Kelly was also able to<br />

make use of the existing frame<br />

by extending it to fit the Dillman<br />

UniDrum’s extra-long drum. The<br />

drive chain assembly, motor,<br />

and reducer were built the same<br />

as existing double drum plants,<br />

which greatly reduced the downtime<br />

and allowed for the drum to<br />

be fitted into place within a brief<br />

window. In addition to accommodating<br />

a high percentage of recycle,<br />

the extra-long drum length<br />

cut back on the amount of fuel the<br />

plant requires because it maximized<br />

mixing and drying times.<br />

A GOOD SWAP<br />

Another advantage presented by<br />

the Dillman unified drum is its<br />

reduced maintenance costs over<br />

its expected lifecycle. Dillman<br />

introduced the UniDrum as an<br />

option for both portable and stationary<br />

arrangements, making it<br />

one of the sturdier mixers found in<br />

today’s plants. Whereas the plant’s<br />

old CMI triple drum was increasing<br />

its operational costs in both<br />

routine maintenance and energy<br />

consumption, as it approached<br />

the end of its lifecycle, the Dillman<br />

UniDrum is expected to remain a<br />

consistent and efficient ingredient<br />

to the South Bend plant’s future<br />

success.<br />

For all its new advantages,<br />

though, the Dillman UniDrum<br />

looks perfectly at home at the<br />

South Bend plant. The total retrofit<br />

and upgrade of the plant lasted<br />

until April, making the relative<br />

ease of the drum’s quick installation<br />

all the more impressive to<br />

Walsh and Kelly. With the plant<br />

upgrade complete, Walsh and<br />

Kelly plans to make full use of<br />

their new Dillman UniDrum, routinely<br />

running a high percentage<br />

of recycle at a higher capacity.<br />

Building on a strong foundation<br />

and taking advantage of new<br />

innovations, Walsh and Kelly’s<br />

South Bend plant is poised for<br />

continued success. <br />

FOR INFORMATION<br />

Contact Diane Hunt<br />

423.867.4210<br />

dhunt@astecinc.com<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 35 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


The Dillman Service Department<br />

disassembles a fertilizer tower<br />

in preparation for a new<br />

tower to be erected.<br />

Branching<br />

Out<br />

Dillman<br />

reaches<br />

into new<br />

markets for<br />

industrial sales<br />

It’s been a busy year for Dillman,<br />

and it’s not over yet. The<br />

company known in the asphalt<br />

industry as a hot-mix asphalt (HMA)<br />

plant manufacturer is breaking new<br />

ground into the industrial and agricultural<br />

markets.<br />

“At Dillman, we are more than just<br />

a hot-mix asphalt plant manufacturer;<br />

we know our parts and expertise<br />

have crossover ability into other<br />

“<br />

markets using components and<br />

services we know well. Whether<br />

it’s an electric motor, bearing, or<br />

belts, we have the expertise to<br />

source those parts for industrial,<br />

agricultural, and power generation<br />

industries,” said Tony Schwab, vice<br />

president and general manager with<br />

Dillman, a division of Astec, Inc.<br />

“Our knowledge of setting up new<br />

plants and handling retrofits can<br />

easily be applied to companies in<br />

other markets needing large, metal<br />

structures torn down or needing<br />

help with operational setup.”<br />

There will be groundwork<br />

needed to create brand awareness<br />

in new markets.<br />

”<br />

NEW MINDSET<br />

New to industrial sales, Dillman’s<br />

main focus is agricultural co-ops<br />

and industrial companies that use<br />

a preferred vendor list. Being on an<br />

approved vendor list enables the<br />

ability to bid on jobs closed to those<br />

not pre-approved.<br />

“To get on a true vendor list with<br />

companies that typically don’t<br />

think of a HMA manufacturer as a<br />

resource will be a step in the right<br />

direction as we branch out and<br />

apply our expertise, quality service,<br />

and quality parts to new markets,”<br />

said Schwab.<br />

As an example: Wisconsin is a<br />

strong agricultural state and the<br />

transition in farming over that last<br />

10 years has been bigger, bigger,<br />

and bigger.<br />

“Farming is big business; mom<br />

and pop farmers don’t really exist<br />

anymore; it’s a big enterprise with<br />

corporations and investors spending<br />

money,” said Schwab. “The booming<br />

business of farming opens the<br />

door for us to introduce ourselves<br />

and share what we have to offer,<br />

and it doesn’t stop there—our<br />

expertise and services make sense<br />

for power plants and those in the oil<br />

and gas industry.”<br />

BREAKING NEW GROUND<br />

Dillman is in the infancy stage of<br />

breaking into new markets. There<br />

will be obstacles, but Dillman is<br />

ready and willing to overcome the<br />

hurdles of expanding its reach.<br />

“There will be groundwork needed<br />

to create brand awareness for<br />

Dillman as more than just an<br />

asphalt company building HMA<br />

equipment,” said Schwab. “To create<br />

the mindset in the consumer<br />

‘I’m calling Dillman for an electric<br />

motor’ will take time and positive<br />

persistence. We know we can<br />

service those in other industries<br />

needing the same parts, wanting<br />

quality service, and needing<br />

comparable expertise with setup<br />

and tear down of machinery and<br />

operational equipment. “<br />

In an effort to build an additional<br />

customer base, Dillman will be<br />

attending some farm shows and<br />

industrial trade shows to educate<br />

new markets on what Dillman has<br />

to offer.<br />

“We’ll do what is needed to be<br />

vetted as an approved vendor<br />

and we’ll continue doing the<br />

upfront work to be recognized,”<br />

said Schwab. “We want to be a<br />

business partner; we want to be<br />

the vendor that is called in an<br />

emergency; we want to be a ‘true’<br />

dependable resource; we want<br />

to be an expert for industrial and<br />

agricultural markets.” <br />

FOR INFORMATION<br />

Contact Tony Schwab<br />

608.326.4820<br />

tjschwab@dillmanequipment.com<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 38 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


NEWS<br />

Astec Names<br />

Claude<br />

Executive Vice<br />

President<br />

Astec Inc. announces<br />

the year-end<br />

promotion of Steve<br />

Claude to the position<br />

of executive<br />

vice president.<br />

Steve Claude<br />

holds a Bachelor<br />

of Science degree<br />

in marketing from<br />

Steve Claude<br />

the University of<br />

Northern Iowa and has broad experience in global and<br />

domestic Fortune 500 sales. He joined Astec as vice<br />

president for sales, international, in 2007. In 2011, he<br />

was promoted to senior vice president, sales.<br />

As executive vice president of Astec, Inc., Steve Claude<br />

will work closely with incoming president Malcolm<br />

Swanson to ensure the successful operation of Astec,<br />

Inc. <br />

Astec Customer Unveils New Project<br />

In June 2013, Posillico Materials announced the unveiling of their new rail siding<br />

and materials transfer depot in Farmingdale, New York. A ribbon cutting ceremony<br />

took place to showcase this and other energy saving and carbon reduction measures<br />

in the completion of phase one of this major capital project in conjunction<br />

with the Town of Babylon Industrial Development Association.<br />

The project completion enables most of the materials that are required for asphalt<br />

production to be shipped via rail rather than truck. The new rail system and<br />

improved plant layout reduces fugitive dust and also eliminates 5,000 truck trips<br />

from local streets and highways annually. These changes result in reduced net fuel<br />

consumption and less CO 2 emissions.<br />

Astec Industries has been working with Posillico’s engineering and material experts<br />

since 1971 to help lead the region with asphalt recycling technologies and other<br />

beneficial reuses of materials that would otherwise require landfilling as waste.<br />

Astec’s vice president of national accounts Gail Mize said, “This recent expansion<br />

into receiving aggregates by rail will remove a considerable amount of traffic from<br />

the roads and goes far to demonstrate how good a neighbor Posillico is for the citizens<br />

of Babylon Township. Removing traffic count from the roads is always a good<br />

thing for the public, but is seldom possible.” <br />

Astec<br />

Promotes<br />

Pack<br />

Astec, Inc. announces<br />

the appointment<br />

of Steve Pack to the<br />

position of manager,<br />

inside sales, effective<br />

September 1,<br />

2013. He will be<br />

responsible for<br />

managing all inside<br />

sales activities,<br />

including pricing,<br />

quotes, product<br />

Steve Pack<br />

descriptions, and<br />

direct coordination between field sales, engineering, and<br />

manufacturing of all placed orders.<br />

Most recently, Steve Pack has held the position of sales<br />

coordinator as a member of the inside sales team. Steve<br />

Claude, Astec senior vice president, sales, said, “Steve’s<br />

extensive experience and understanding of the inside<br />

sales position and its role will greatly support his efforts in<br />

his new position.” <br />

The ribbon cutting was well attended by several elected officials.<br />

Rendition of the new rail siding and materials transfer depot.<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 39 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


NEWS<br />

McClure Joins<br />

Astec Parts<br />

Astec, Inc.<br />

announces that Mike<br />

McClure is joining<br />

the Astec Parts team<br />

to cover California,<br />

Nevada, Arizona,<br />

New Mexico, and<br />

Hawaii. Prior to joining<br />

the Astec Parts<br />

team, Mike worked<br />

as a member of<br />

the Astec Service<br />

team. <br />

Mike McClure<br />

Astec Welcomes Bush<br />

Astec, Inc. welcomes Ryan Bush as the<br />

regional sales manager for the New<br />

England states including: New York, Maine,<br />

Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts,<br />

Connecticut, and Rhode Island. Ryan will<br />

be based in the Syracuse, New York, area.<br />

Tom Baugh, Astec vice president , North<br />

America sales, says of Bush, “His enthusiasm<br />

and knowledge of both the asphalt and<br />

aggregate sides of the business make him<br />

a valuable asset. I am confident that he will<br />

do well in his position as an Astec regional<br />

sales manager, servicing current customers<br />

and cultivating new ones.” <br />

Ryan Bush<br />

Williamson<br />

to Represent<br />

South Central<br />

Territory<br />

Astec, Inc. announces<br />

that Adrian<br />

Williamson will be<br />

representing Astec<br />

in Texas, Arkansas,<br />

and Louisiana. He<br />

will be based out of<br />

the Dallas, Texas,<br />

area.<br />

Adrian was previously<br />

the Astec<br />

Adrian Williamson<br />

Parts representative in California, Nevada, Arizona,<br />

New Mexico, and Hawaii. <br />

Brock Honored<br />

by Utah Asphalt<br />

Pavement<br />

Association<br />

Astec Industries, Inc.<br />

CEO and founder, Dr.<br />

J. Don Brock, was<br />

inducted into the UAPA<br />

Hall of Fame at the<br />

Dr. J. Don Brock<br />

2013 Utah Asphalt<br />

Conference. Each year, UAPA Hall of Fame plans to honor<br />

one individual who has made a major impact on the asphalt<br />

paving industry with the J. Don Brock Award. <br />

Brock Honored by Tennessee Road Builders Association<br />

Dr. Brock was honored by the Tennessee Road Builders Association with the 2013<br />

lifetime achievement award. The award was presented July 18 during a TRBA<br />

meeting held in Chattanooga, Tennessee.<br />

Given periodically, TRBA’s highest honor is given to individuals having demonstrated<br />

extraordinary support of the road building industry and association. This year’s<br />

recipient, Dr. J. Don Brock, only the 18th individual to receive the honor in TRBA’s<br />

85-year history, is more than deserving of the acknowledgement.<br />

An industry pioneer, Dr. J. Don Brock holds approximately 100 U.S. and foreign<br />

construction machinery and drying patents. His prowess goes way beyond<br />

Tennessee’s state lines and the 180 different products that Astec Industries and its<br />

subsidiaries provide, as Dr. Brock was recognized in 2012 by the American Road &<br />

Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA). Last September, ARTBA renamed its<br />

yearly Transovation Award, which recognizes innovative thinking in the transportation<br />

industry, after Dr. Brock. <br />

2013 TRBA President Tony Boals of Wright Bros. Construction presents award to Dr. J. Don Brock.<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 40 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


NEWS<br />

Astec, Inc. Recap from bauma 2013<br />

Built for Skanska, an Astec 8 ft<br />

(2.44 m) Double Barrel ® drum<br />

mixer was on display at bauma<br />

2013 in Munich, Germany,<br />

showcasing the Astec warm mix<br />

system, Whisper Jet ® burner,<br />

and Shaggy Dog system. The<br />

drum service door was opened<br />

to allow viewers to see the key<br />

internal benefits of the features.<br />

This allowed the Astec, Inc. representatives<br />

to explain the Double<br />

Barrel’s ability to produce up to<br />

50-percent recycle with very low<br />

emissions. This is made possible<br />

by the patented design of heating<br />

the recycle (RAP) on the outside<br />

section of the drum, utilizing indirect<br />

heating.<br />

The Astec stationary plant model<br />

was displayed on the ground floor<br />

of the interior part of the booth<br />

with exceptional viewing from the<br />

main area, as well as the second<br />

floor above. The Astec, Inc. longterm<br />

storage silos displayed with<br />

the plant model were the center<br />

of many great discussions at the<br />

show, focusing on the ability to<br />

store multiple mixes produced<br />

from one plant for up to four<br />

days.<br />

During the show, these capabilities<br />

sparked a lot of interests in a<br />

region predominantly consisting<br />

of batch plants, which produce<br />

mix in a batch process that<br />

typically don’t utilize the many<br />

benefits of long-term storage. The<br />

booth was well attended by key<br />

industry leaders from around the<br />

globe. <br />

Left: The Astec<br />

booth at bauma<br />

2013 showcased<br />

an open design<br />

lending itself to<br />

great conversational<br />

opportunities.<br />

Bottom Left: The<br />

open door of the<br />

drum allowed<br />

visitors to see the<br />

internal components<br />

up close.<br />

Bottom Right: The<br />

Astec stationary<br />

plant model was<br />

displayed on the<br />

interior portion of<br />

the booth.<br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 41 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2


NEWS<br />

Astec Promotes<br />

Renegar<br />

Astec, Inc. announces the promotion<br />

of Greg Renegar to the position<br />

of vice president, engineering.<br />

Greg Renegar brings a wealth of<br />

experience, knowledge, and skill<br />

with him to his new position.<br />

Renegar joined Astec in<br />

1985 after graduating from<br />

the University Tennessee at<br />

Chattanooga with a Bachelor of<br />

Science in mechanical engineering.<br />

Since joining Astec, Renegar<br />

has worked in the U.S., Canada,<br />

Greg Renegar<br />

and throughout Europe as a project<br />

engineer, field engineer, and design engineer. He was promoted<br />

to the director of thermal systems position in 1998 and became chief<br />

engineer in 2004. He will transition to vice president, engineering by<br />

the end of the year, and will be responsible for the overall performance<br />

of the Astec Engineering Department. <br />

Astec Names Swanson<br />

President<br />

Astec, Inc. announces the yearend<br />

promotion of Malcolm<br />

Swanson to the position of<br />

president of Astec, Inc. Swanson<br />

will fill the position vacated by<br />

Benjamin G. Brock who will<br />

transition to the position of chief<br />

executive officer and president<br />

for Astec Industries, Inc. at the<br />

end of the year.<br />

Malcolm Swanson holds a<br />

Bachelor of Science degree in<br />

Malcolm Swanson<br />

mechanical engineering from the<br />

Georgia Institute of Technology<br />

and has broad experience in both engineering and management and<br />

holds more than thirty patents.<br />

As president of Astec, Inc., Malcolm Swanson will be responsible for<br />

the overall performance of Astec, Inc. and Dillman. <br />

KPI-JCI Celebrates 3,000 th Screen Sold<br />

Johnson Crushers International,<br />

Inc. (KPI-JCI) celebrated the shipment<br />

of its 3,000th screen earlier<br />

this year, marking nearly $200<br />

million in revenue for the company<br />

from screen sales and providing<br />

47 high-quality, U.S.-based jobs to<br />

its skilled workforce.<br />

“We are very proud that our success<br />

as an American manufacturer<br />

has allowed us to create jobs in<br />

Oregon and beyond,” said JCI<br />

president Jeff Elliott. “We are also<br />

very proud of our employees, who<br />

have made this achievement possible<br />

through their commitment<br />

to continuous improvement and<br />

devotion to meeting the needs of<br />

the customer.”<br />

Today, as part of KPI-JCI and Astec<br />

Mobile Screens, JCI is the global<br />

technological and service provider<br />

of the foremost horizontal screening<br />

equipment on the market. JCI<br />

also specializes in roller-bearing<br />

cone crushers and portable, stationary,<br />

and track-mounted plants.<br />

“We are incredibly thankful to JCI’s<br />

founders for having the courage<br />

and vision to design this product,”<br />

Elliott said. “With the support of<br />

Johnson Crushers International, Inc. (KPI-JCI) celebrates its 3,000 th screen sold.<br />

Astec Industries, we have been<br />

able to create a state-of-the-art<br />

manufacturing facility to serve the<br />

needs of the market.”<br />

For more information about<br />

horizontal screens, visit<br />

www.kpijci.com. <br />

HOT-MIX MAGAZINE 42 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 2

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