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1 ARTICLE SIX: CREATING A DISPLAY BASE BY LESLIE PRATT ...

1 ARTICLE SIX: CREATING A DISPLAY BASE BY LESLIE PRATT ...

1 ARTICLE SIX: CREATING A DISPLAY BASE BY LESLIE PRATT

ARTICLE SIX: CREATING A DISPLAY BASE BY LESLIE PRATT Once you’ve got the essentials taken care of for your army - assembled and painted models – it’s time to ramp up the coolness factor of your force with a display base. Not only does a display base help you carry your troops from game to game at a tournament, it’s also a great way to emphasize the theme of your army, draw attention to specific models, and tie your various squads together into a cohesive force. The display base has come a long way in the past few years. At the 1998 Toronto Grand Tournament, Lucas Como attracted a lot of attention when he brought an 18” round tabletop covered in green flock to use as a display base. The judges declared they had never seen anything like it before. Now, nearly everyone you see at a tournament has some kind of display base. :: IF YOU’VE GOT IT, FLAUNT IT :: When used to its best advantage, a display base can be a great tool to show your troops to their best advantage. You can draw the viewer’s eye to specific units or models by creating a raised area for them to stand on, putting in a specially modeled combat scene, or otherwise separating a unit or units from the rest of the army. A small area of open area of space between your masterpiece and the rest of your army can show off a super paint job. Conversely, you can use positioning and camouflage to a certain extent to detract attention from models with less “star potential.” If you did a rush-job on your Devastator squad, then putting them in the back, or hiding in some trees will encourage people to focus on your other figs with better paint jobs instead. :: MODELS IN THEIR ‘NATURAL HABITAT’ :: Even something as simple as displaying your models on a board based the same way as your models will help your paint scheme attract notice. When your bases match the board, they tend to blend into the background, causing the actual models to come to the foreground. This assumes that your models are painted a contrasting color to your flock (probably a good idea, anyway, unless you’re doing camouflage). Because of this effect, a simple display board can drastically improve the eye appeal of your army. . :: A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS :: A display base is a great way to showcase your army’s theme. It doesn’t matter if you’ve written a complex history of the chapter and included it with your army list – if your opponent never reads it, they’re not going to get your theme, and you won’t get credit for your hard work. If, however, you depict an assault on a jungle planet or highlight your army’s fiery theme with some lava, then your opponent is more likely to pay attention. Once you have their attention, they’re more likely to read your short story, chapter history, coloring book, whatever. Of course, your display board doesn’t have to tell a story to highlight aspects of your army’s theme – there are other ways to highlight aspects of your army you want to emphasize. If your Chaos Marines have an affinity for green plasma, then put something on the board the same color as the plasma to bring out that color and paint the background a An artic stronghold! darker color so that it will stand out. If your paint scheme depicts chipped and muddy power armoured marines, then draw attention to that with a cityfight scene or a muddy battlefield strewn with wreckage. If your all-sniper Space Marine force is geared up to battle in the snow, then show off your 1