appendix

orla.hegarty

appendix

APPENDICES

AGUISÍNÍ


APPENDIX 1

STRATEGIC PEDESTRIAN ROUTES / BEALAEI STRAITÉISEACHA SIÚLÓIDE

APPENDIX 1 STRATEGIC PEDESTRIAN ROUTES

The Existing Routes (to be developed/consolidated).

1. From Parnell Square to Heuston Station.

2. From Parnell Square to St Stephen’s Green, via Grafton Street

3. From Docklands to Heuston Station, via the Henry Street Retail Area.

4. From Kildare Street to Georges Street South.

5. The “retail route” from Grafton Street to Henry Street, via Temple Bar

6. From St. Stephens Green to Heuston Station, via the Liberties.

7. From Point Depot to Heuston Station along Liffey Quays (north side).

8. From Sir John Rogerson’s Quay to Heuston Station along Liffey Quays (south side).

Strategic Pedestrian Routes

From Parnell Square to Heuston Station

From Docklands to Heuston Station, via the Henry Street Retail Area

From Kildare Street to Georges Street South

The "retail route" from Grafton Street to Henry Street, via Temple Bar

From St.Stephens Green to Heuston Station, via the Liberties

From Point Depot to Heuston along Liffey Quays (north side)

From Sir John Rogerson's Quay to Heuston along Liffey (south side)

N

St. Brendan's

Hospital

King's

Inns

Connolly

Street

Phoenix

Park

Bolton Street

College

GPO

Custom

House

River Liffey

Heuston Station

Royal

Hospital

Guinness

Trinity

College

Dail

St. Stephens

Green

.

N.C.H

154

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


STRAITÉIS TITHÍOCHTA AGUISÍNÍ 2

APPENDIX 2 HOUSING STRATEGY

2.0.0

Introduction

Part V of the Planning and Development Acts 2000 to 2002 requires each Planning Authority to include in any

Development Plan it makes “ a strategy for the purpose of ensuring that the proper planning and sustainable

development of the area of the Development Plan provides for the housing of the existing and future population to the

area in the manner set out in the strategy”.

The Act specifies that the housing strategy shall:

• Include an estimate of, and provision for, the existing and likely future need for housing in the area covered by the

Development Plan. While the estimate of likely future needs should relate at least to the life of the Development

Plan, it should also relate to broader and longer term strategies (e.g. Regional Planning Guidelines and the National

Spatial Strategy).

• The Planning Authority shall ensure that sufficient and suitable land is zoned in its Development Plan for residential

use (or for a mixture of residential and other uses), to meet the requirements of the housing strategy and to ensure

that a scarcity of such land does not occur at any time during the period of the Development Plan.

• Take into account the need to ensure that housing is available for persons who have different levels of income, and

in particular for those in need of social or affordable housing in the area. A housing strategy shall therefore provide

that as a general policy a specified percentage, not being more than 20% of the land zoned in the Development

Plan for residential use, or for a mixture of residential and other uses, shall be reserved for social and/or affordable

housing.

• Ensure that a mixture of house types and sizes is developed to reasonably match the requirements of the different

categories of households, as may be determined by the Planning Authority, including the special requirements of

elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

• Counteract undue segregation in housing between persons of different social backgrounds. The Planning Authority

may indicate in respect of any residential area that there is no requirement for social/affordable housing in respect

of that area, or that a lower percentage than that specified in the housing strategy may instead be required.

This housing strategy will extend over the lifetime of this Development Plan and has had regard to the housing

strategy adopted by the City Council in May 2001. It is noted that at the time of preparing this strategy the world

economic and political situation are in a state of change. It is therefore difficult to predict with accuracy the levels of

income, employment, house prices and the housing market that will prevail over the period of the Development Plan.

The Planning and Development Acts 2000-2002 provides that the Manager shall prepare a report two years after the

adoption of the Development Plan and that this report will include a review of the progress achieved in implementing

the housing strategy. If the report indicates that new or revised housing needs have been identified, the Manager may

recommend that the housing strategy be adjusted and that the Development Plan be varied accordingly. The

Manager may also bring such a report to the members if he or she considers that there has been a change in the

housing market or in the regulations made by the Minister under the Act, that significantly affects the housing strategy.

In view of the deficiency in information and the changing economic climate referred to above it is not unlikely that the

housing strategy will need to be updated within the lifetime of this Development Plan.

2.0.1 National and Regional Context

The Dublin and Mid-East Regions together comprise the Greater Dublin Area (GDA). Regional Planning Guidelines for

the Greater Dublin Area (RPGGDA) were published in July 2004. The Dublin Regional Authority and the Mid-East

Authority in conjunction with the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government and the local authorities

in the GDA, prepared these. The RPGGDA provide a robust sustainable framework for the GDA within the context of

the Planning and Development Acts, 2000-2002 and the National Spatial Strategy 2002 – 2020 (NSS). They provide

a long term strategic planning framework for the development of the GDA in the 12 year period up to 2016 within the

NSS vision for 2020.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

155


APPENDIX 2

HOUSING STRATEGY

National Spatial Strategy 2002 - 2020

It is the policy of Dublin City Council to accept and promote the development strategy set out in the National Spatial

Strategy.

RPGGDA 2004

It is the policy of Dublin City Council to meet the population and household targets set out for Dublin city in the

Regional Planning Guidelines for the Greater Dublin Area and its reviews and updates.

2.1.0

2.1.0

Housing Demand

Dublin City Council - Overall Demand

The RPGGDA sets out projections for population and household growth for the seven local authority areas within the

GDA i.e. Dublin City Council and the County Councils of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal, South Dublin, Kildare,

Meath and Wicklow. It indicates that the growth in housing requirements in Dublin city for the period 2003 to 2010

will be 39,926. The Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government Housing Statistics Bulletin indicates

that 3,370 house units were provided in Dublin City in 2003. Therefore the demand for the period 2004 to 2010 is

36,630. This amounts to an average requirement of 5,233 units per annum. (It should be noted that the RPGGDA

estimates extend to the end of 2010 and the Development Plan extends to Feb 2011 but for the purpose of the

strategy the RPGGDA 2010 estimate is used to cover the period of the strategy).

In calculating the phasing of the levels of demand for housing over the period of the strategy it is necessary to have

regard to the level of supply and the need to phase these in a balanced way over the period of the strategy. The

proposed phasing of the estimated demand for 36,630 units is shown in Table 2.1 below and takes account of the

construction industries ability to meet the demand.

The estimated demand for 36,630 units includes private, social and affordable housing. The demand in each of these

three sectors is estimated as follows:

• The social housing requirement is derived from the housing list prepared under Section 9(2)

of the Housing Act 1988

• The combined social and affordable housing requirement is calculated using the step by step

‘Louth Model’ prepared by the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government

• The private housing requirement is the residue after taking out social and affordable demand

from the overall demand

2.1.2

Calculation of Social and Affordable Demand

Section 94 of the Planning and Development Acts, 2000 to 2002 provides that a housing strategy shall, inter alia,

• Take into account the need to ensure that housing is available for persons who have different levels of income

• Include an estimate of the amount of affordable housing required in the area of the Development Plan during the

period of the Development Plan

Eligible persons and affordable housing have the meanings as assigned to them in the Planning and Development

Acts, 2000 to 2002.

In preparing this strategy, reference was made to the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government’s

Model Housing Strategy and Step by Step Guide and the previous housing strategy for the Dublin City Council area,

which was adopted by Dublin City Council in May 2001.

The calculation of the step by step method involves a series of steps, each of which is based on a combination of

known baseline information and a number of assumptions regarding future developments. It is not proposed to outline

in detail the step by step process used to derive the supply and demand figures for social and affordable housing.

However, the following sections outline the main steps in the process and the assumptions made at each stage.

156

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


STRAITÉIS TITHÍOCHTA AGUISÍNÍ 2

2.1.3

2.1.4

2.1.5

Calculation of Household Numbers

The levels of supply to date and the targets for provision of new house units over the period of the Development Plan

(2005-2011) are based on the projected household figures contained in the Regional Planning Guidelines for the

Greater Dublin Area 2004-2016.

Calculation of Household Disposable Income

Household income information is obtained from the most recent available Central Statisics Office (CSO) Household

Budget Survey (1999-2000). A Dublin inflator of 1.16 has been used when converting average national disposable

income information to the equivalent figures for the Dublin city area. Projections for the growth in disposable incomes

were based on the most recent projections made in the ESRI Medium Term Review 2003-2010.

House Prices

The step by step method requires an assessment of house prices in the Dublin City Council area to be made. This

assessment takes two forms as follows, (a) an estimate of current house price distribution, and (b) a projection of

house price inflation over the period of the strategy (i.e. 2005-2011). Information on current house prices was

obtained from the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government and validated, as far as practicable,

by examining available house price information from the main lending institutions and estate agents.

The projection of future house price changes is difficult, and, unlike the case at the time of the preparation of the first

housing strategy for the city in 2001 when projections on house price rises contained in the third Bacon report entitled

“The Housing Market in Ireland: An Economic Evaluation of Trends and Proposals” (Bacon III, June 2000) were used,

there is very little available information on which to base a projection.

2.1.6

The estimate of house price inflation used has regard to current continuing trends of growth, with a gradual levelling

off in the rate of increase to a level less than inflation towards the end of the plan period. It is considered that this is

a best estimate given the available information at the time of preparation, however, it is recognised that the property

market can change quickly and that a significant change could render the strategy rapidly out of date. In such an

eventuality a review of the strategy would have to be made and incorporated into the Development Plan by way of a

variation.

House Affordability Analysis

Section 93 (1) of the Planning and Developments Acts, 2000-2002 specifies a number of criteria to be used in the

determination of affordability as follows; (a) yearly loan repayment not to exceed 35% of net household income and (b)

the loan to value ratio should not exceed 90%. These factors were both used in the calculation of affordability.

The term of the loan was taken as being 25 years as this is considered to be the normal loan period for the majority of

first time purchasers. An interest rate for the period of the strategy is also required. Rates have continued to fall

since the adoption of the last housing strategy in 2001 and are now at an all time low.

For the purposes of the strategy an average interest rate of 4.5% was used and this rate approximates to current long

term (5-10 year) rates. In the event that interest rates rise significantly above this level, a review of the strategy may

be required.

Table 2.1 Additional Households Dublin City 2004 to 2010

2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

______________________________________________________________________________________________

Units required as per RPGGDA 5,000 5,270 5,270 5,270 5,270 5,270 5,270

______________________________________________________________________________________________

No. Eligible as Social and Affordable 1,672 1,872 1,910 1,889 1,851 1,560 1,550

______________________________________________________________________________________________

Eligible as % of Total Required 33% 36% 36% 36% 35% 30% 29%

Table 2.1 shows the level of additional households and the proportion of social and affordable households over the 7

years up to March 2010. This is based on the RPGGDA predictions for household increase in the period. The social

and affordable percentage is calculated using the step by step model.

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that the step by step analysis is as realistic as possible, the results of the

analysis should be regarded as providing the broad pattern of supply and demand rather than precise results.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

157


APPENDIX 2

HOUSING STRATEGY

2.1.7

2.1.8

Dublin City – Demand for Social and Affordable Housing

Social Demand and Provision

Dublin City Council is the housing authority for the city and has a statutory responsibility to provide social housing.

Voluntary Housing Associations and Co-operatives meet an ever increasing proportion of the provision of social

housing. Part of this provision is also met by private developers in accordance with Part V of the Planning and

Development Acts 2000-2002.

Since the adoption of the housing strategy in May 2001, Dublin City Council has carried out another

Assessment of Housing Need, (March 2002).

Table 2.2 sets out the need for local authority housing in the Dublin City Council functional area for the years

1991 – 2002 as follows:

Table 2.2 Social Housing Demand Dublin City Council

Year Net Housing Need % + -

1991 4,377 households

1993 5,152 households +18%

1996 3,966 households -23%

1999 6,477 households +63%

2002 6,993 households +8%

An analysis of the numbers joining the list has shown an average of 115 persons being accepted on the list from

April 2002 to 31st August 2003. This figure does not take account of casual vacancies (relettings) during this period.

The increase is in part attributed to the following:

• In the process of conducting an Assessment, persons are removed from the list for a variety of reasons. A

percentage of these people ordinarily apply again to re-join the list

• Rent Allowance recipients now require official proof that they are on the Assessment of Housing Need prior to

receiving assistance from the Health Board

• Income limits for acceptance on the Assessment have recently been increased to bring them into line with Dublin

City Council’s Loan Schemes

• The impact of non-EU Nationals seeking accommodation and the transition from temporary to more permanent

accommodation, (there are approximately 1,400 non-EU Nationals on the current Assessment)

158

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


STRAITÉIS TITHÍOCHTA AGUISÍNÍ 2

Table 2.3 below shows a break down by Housing Allocation areas of the 2002 statutory Assessment

of Housing Need.

Table 2.3 Housing Assessment by Housing Allocation Area 2002

Housing Allocation Area Housing Allocation Area Description Assessment 31/3/2002

______________________________________________________________________________________________

B Coolock/Kilbarrack/Donaghmede/Donnycarney 1,235

______________________________________________________________________________________________

D Ballymun/Poppintree 426

______________________________________________________________________________________________

E Finglas/Whitehall/Cabra/Beaumont 947

______________________________________________________________________________________________

H North East Inner City/Sheriff St./East Wall/Ballybough 973

______________________________________________________________________________________________

J Ballyfermot/Inchicore/Kilmainham 762

______________________________________________________________________________________________

K Crumlin/Drimnagh/Walkinstown 860

______________________________________________________________________________________________

L Clanbrassil St./The Coombe/Maryland/Rialto 686

______________________________________________________________________________________________

M Pearse St./Ringsend/Donnybrook 348

______________________________________________________________________________________________

N Rathmines/Ranelagh/Terenure 505

______________________________________________________________________________________________

P North West Inner City 250

______________________________________________________________________________________________

Total 6,993

Table 2.4 Category of Housing Supply

BREAKDOWN OF APPLICANTS IN NET NEED INTO CATEGORIES

CATEGORY OF HOUSEHOLD

TOTAL ALL HOUSEHOLDS

(A) Homeless Persons 1,214

______________________________________________________________________________________________

(B) Travellers 99

______________________________________________________________________________________________

(C) Persons living in accommodation that is unfit or materially unsuitable 1

______________________________________________________________________________________________

(D) Persons living in overcrowded accommodation 2,460

______________________________________________________________________________________________

(E)

Persons sharing accommodation involuntarily and having a reasonable

requirement for separate accommodation 882

______________________________________________________________________________________________

(F) Young persons leaving institutional care or without family accommodation 0

______________________________________________________________________________________________

(G) Persons in need of accommodation for medical or compassionate reasons 127

______________________________________________________________________________________________

(H) Elderly Persons 361

______________________________________________________________________________________________

(I) Disabled or handicapped persons 12

______________________________________________________________________________________________

(J)

Persons not reasonably able to meet the cost of the accommodation

they are occupying or to obtain suitable alternative accommodation 1,837

______________________________________________________________________________________________

Total Net Need 6,993

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

159


APPENDIX 2

HOUSING STRATEGY

2.2.0

2.2.1

Housing Supply

Overall Supply Position

Since the adoption of the last Development Plan in 1999 and the last housing strategy in 2001 considerable progress

has been made in improving the supply of housing in Dublin city. Table 2.5 shows the level of production in the

number of all housing units since 1996 and the increase in output over recent years.

Table 2.5 House Constructions Dublin City

Year 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Total

________________________________________________________________________________

Units 3,427 3,777 2,804 2,362 3,091 4,124 3,320 22,905

It is anticipated that the increased level of production seen in recent years will continue into the coming years when

the large housing developments at Pelletstown, North Fringe and Docklands come on stream. Permission for 1,000

units has been granted at Pelletstown and building works on this site are well underway. Permission for 3,500 units

has been granted at North Fringe and construction commenced in 2004.

The recently adopted master plan for the Dublin Docklands area indicates that permission has been secured for a

considerable quantum of proposed imminent residential development in the Grand Canal Docks and North Lotts areas.

Several other large developments throughout the city also have permission and are proceeding with construction. It is

anticipated that these strong levels of production will continue into the future.

2.2.2

Lands Zoned for Residential Development

The most recent housing capacity survey for the Dublin City Council area was carried out in June 2004. This showed

that a total of 317 Ha of zoned land could be developed for residential use over the period 30/6/2004 to 30/6/2010.

When other vacant, brownfield and underutilised sites (e.g. Living Over the Shop sites) are taken into account, it is

estimated that a total of 41,000 units could be accommodated in the city.

This possible provision of 41,000 units compares to a predicted demand/increase for 40,000 house units over the

period 2003-2011 (the period of this housing strategy). Consequently there is just sufficient land identified at present

to cater for the projected needs.

In practice, however, an amount greater than this is needed for the following reasons:

• To provide for an element of choice of location

• To allow for the fact that not all of the zoned land may come on the market

• To allow for the fact that some of the designated land may be developed for purposes other

than housing in mixed use zonings

To cater for this demand Dublin City Council will continue in its policy of identifying underutilised and brownfield sites

in its area which are suitable for residential development. Policy Res 15 (Chapter 4) commits Dublin City Council to

carrying out a comprehensive audit of all vacant, derelict and underutilised lands in the city to establish its capacity to

accommodate housing and other uses.

Dublin City Council also recognises that there is an overall limit to the capacity of lands within its area and there is a

need to ensure efficient use of this scarce resource. Consequently having regard to national and regional strategies

requiring the efficient use of residential land and the need to integrate land use and transport facilities, Dublin City

Council will seek to increase the capacity of the city by permitting higher density development in certain locations

such as the inner city, prime urban centres and sites close to transport routes.

160

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


STRAITÉIS TITHÍOCHTA AGUISÍNÍ 2

2.2.3

Supply of Social, Voluntary and Affordable Housing including Part V

Dublin City Council seeks to provide housing for the above categories as follows:

• The construction of new housing on existing or future lands in their ownership

• The purchase of previously occupied houses

• Accommodation being returned to Dublin City Council for re-letting, (casual vacancies)

• Proactive involvement of the Voluntary/Co-operative Housing Sector

• Provision of Affordable Housing –non Part V

• Agreements under Part V of the Planning and Development Acts 2000-2002

• Shared Ownership Scheme

2.2.4

Table 2.6 Dublin City Council Stock 1999 – 2010

Year

Total Stock

____________________________________

1999 25,570

____________________________________

2002 26,417

____________________________________

Aug. 2004 26,632

____________________________________

Dec. 2010 – Est. 28,500

• The figures do not take account of a possible sale of flats scheme

• The figures do not include the stock of the Voluntary Housing Sector

• The figures do not include homeless hostel or emergency accommodation

Casual Vacancies

Casual vacancies occur when existing local authority tenants vacate their premises for various

reasons such as improved circumstances etc.

It is estimated that Dublin City Council will continue to have approximately 50 casual vacancies per month at its

disposal up to March 2011.

This figure is based on an examination of the number of casual vacancies arising in Dublin City Council’s housing

stock over the period of the current strategy. The decline in the level of casual vacancies that was a feature of the

nineties has stabilised during the last few years.

No significant increase in casual vacancies is expected up to 2011 as Dublin City Council continues with regeneration

of its stock and examines other management alternatives in this regard.

2.3.0 Summary Supply and Demand

Table 2.6 shows a summary of the Social and Affordable Housing supply and demand up to the end of the strategy

along with the transition period of the May 2001 strategy.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

161


APPENDIX 2

HOUSING STRATEGY

Table 2.6 Summary of Social and Affordable Housing

Supply and Demand 2004-2010

Supply

Social Housing New Construction

Dublin City Council New Build 2,850

Part V Social Housing 1,630

Voluntary Sector New Build 2,020

Total New Build 6,500

Additional Social Housing Supply

Casual Vacancies 4,200

House Purchase Programme 1,000

Total Additional Social Housing Supply 5,200

Affordable Housing New Construction

Dublin City Council/Government

Initiative 3,500

Part V 2,000

Total Affordable Housing Supply 5,500

Total New Construction Social and Affordable 12,000

Total Supply Social and Affordable 17, 200

Demand

Assessment of Housing need at 31/03/2002 6,993

Additional number on list at 31/12/2003 2,529

RPGGDA additional households 2004-2011 12,304

Total Demand 21,826

• Table 2.6 is a summary of social and affordable housing supply showing new construction and additional supply

through casual vacancies and purchase of secondhand houses.

• It should be noted that although casual vacancies and secondhand house purchases cater for social housing

demand the figures do not supply additional housing units in Dublin city.

• Table 2.6 illustrates that new construction of social and affordable housing will cater for the additional households

as predicted in the RPGGDA for the period 2004-2011.

It should be noted that these projections are dependant on a number of factors including:

• Accuracy of RPGGDA predictions and subsequent Review

• Delivery targets being achieved

• Role of Voluntary/Co-operative Sector in expanding delivery

• Increase in level of EU National immigration due to increase in EU membership

162

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


STRAITÉIS TITHÍOCHTA AGUISÍNÍ 2

• Non-EU members with right to reside

• Fluctuations in the housing market

2.4.0

Housing Strategy Policies

2.4.1

2.4.2

Adequacy of Lands Zoned for Residential Development

The primary objective of a housing strategy is to ensure that sufficient and suitable lands are zoned in the

Development Plan and serviced for residential development (whether solely for residential use, or for a mixture of

residential and other uses) to meet the requirements of the strategy and to ensure that a scarcity of such land does

not occur at any time over the period of the strategy. The strategy covers the period up to March 2011.

The section dealing with lands zoned for residential development above, showed that while there is sufficient land

zoned for residential development to cater for the projected needs over the period of the strategy, additional lands

need to be identified to provide an element of choice and to allow for the fact that all designated lands may not be

developed for residential use.

Lands to be Reserved for Social and/or Affordable Housing

Table 2.1 shows that over the period of the strategy an average of 34% of new households will fall within the social

and affordable category each year. Taking account of the additional units generated by the estimated pent up demand

for social and affordable housing, it will be necessary to set aside 20% for social and affordable housing permitted

under Section 94, Part V of the Planning and Development Acts 2000 – 2002 for the duration of the Development Plan.

It is therefore an objective of the Dublin City Development Plan, 2005-2011, as required under Section 94 of the

Planning and Development Acts, 2000 to 2002, that 20% of the land zoned in the Plan for residential use, or for a

mixture of residential and other uses, shall be reserved for the provision of housing for either or both:

• Housing for persons referred to in Section 9(2) of the Housing Act, 1988

• Affordable housing (as defined at Section 93 of the Planning and Development Acts, 2000 to 2002)

This objective shall apply in respect of land use zones in the Development Plan where residential development is

classified as being either ‘Permitted’ or ‘Open for Consideration’.

2.4.3

2.4.4

Implementation of Housing Strategy

Section 96 of the Planning and Development Acts 2000 to 2002 provides that the objectives of a housing strategy in

relation to social and affordable housing shall be implemented by means of conditions attached to planning

permissions for residential development.

Conditions attached to planning permissions for residential development to which the 20% social/affordable quota

applies will require developers to enter into an agreement with Dublin City Council. Section 96 of the Planning and

Development Acts, 2000 to 2002 provides a number of options for such agreements. In so far as it is known at the

time of the agreement, Dublin City Council will indicate to the developer its intentions in relation to the provision of

social/affordable housing, including a description of the proposed houses, on the land or sites to be transferred.

Dublin City Council, in making such agreements, will have regard to Section 3 of the Planning and Development

(Amendment) Act, 2002.

Dublin City Council’s Planning Department provides a pre–application consultation service. Housing developers are

advised to discuss their proposals in relation to the social and affordable provision with the Housing Department

before lodging a planning application. Ideally a tentative agreement in relation to this provision should be reached

following these discussions prior to the lodging of a planning application.

Exemptions from requirement to provide 20% Social and Affordable Quota

In certain circumstances, apart from the exemptions referred to in the Planning and Development Acts, 2000 to 2002,

the requirement to provide the 20% Social and Affordable quota shall not apply.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

163


APPENDIX 2

HOUSING STRATEGY

These are as follows:

A Ballymun

The tenure pattern in Ballymun before the commencement of the current regeneration programme was that 80% of

the housing was rented from the local authority and 20% was owner occupied which is the direct opposite to the

pattern in the state generally. The master plan for Ballymun identified increased tenure diversity within the area as an

important tool for social and economic regeneration. As the existing imbalance is in favour of social housing in the

area and the objective of the master plan is to provide for a greater diversity in tenure the 20% social and affordable

quota shall not apply to the Ballymun Regeneration Ltd, (BRL) housing programme. Instead, it is an objective of this

housing strategy to support the implementation of the Ballymun Master Plan in achieving a more balanced range of

house types and tenures in the area.

B Third Level Student Accommodation Qualifying for Section 50 Finance Act 1999

The 20% quota of social and affordable housing shall not apply to proposed third level student accommodation. The

definition of student accommodation included in the document ‘Guidelines on Residential Developments for Third

Level Students’ issued by the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government shall apply. Only

proposals which have the living/kitchen space associated with study bedrooms in a shared arrangement will be

acceptable under this exemption. Self contained apartments, including studio apartments will not qualify.

2.4.5

Balance Between Social and Affordable Housing Requirement

As stated, it is an objective of the Dublin City Development Plan that, on lands zoned mainly or in part for residential

development the 20% quota shall apply. In general, within all such areas, 10% shall be reserved for housing for

persons referred to in section 9(2) of the Housing Act, 1988 (i.e. social housing) and 10% shall be reserved for

affordable housing.

The May 2001 Housing Strategy indicated that the general split of the 20% quota, i.e. 10% for social housing and

10% for affordable housing would not apply to electoral wards where social housing already exceeded 50% of the

total housing in the ward. (Map 3, May 2001 Housing Strategy refers).

Since the adoption of the May 2001 Strategy considerable progress has been made in improving the supply of

housing in Dublin city (see table 2.5 – Housing Constructions Dublin City). This increase in supply has substantially

redressed the imbalance between social and private housing in the electoral wards concerned.

Social housing in this context comprises rented housing provided by Dublin City Council and the Voluntary and Cooperative

Housing sector. It also takes account of hostel accommodation and transition housing provision.

An amount to cater for households in receipt of Supplementary Welfare Rent Allowance has also been factored into

the numbers in determining social housing levels within the electoral wards that formerly had an excess of 50% social

housing. It is the policy of Dublin City Council to prevent a proliferation of institutions/hostels in any one residential

area of the city and to ensure that any new proposals are considered in the light of the quantity of and management

of existing institutions in the area.

In carrying out an analysis of private and social housing supply for the purposes of this strategy the results show that

there are no longer any electoral wards in the city with the exception of Ballymun B, C, D, that have an excess of 50%

social housing. Therefore it is not deemed necessary to identify particular electoral wards (with the exception of

Ballymun B, C, D) as only suitable for the provision of affordable housing where Part V applies.

The electoral wards previously identified as having an excess of 50% social housing are recognised as being in

transition from areas of high social housing. The general presumption of a 50:50 split of the 20% quota may not apply

to planning applications for developments in these wards. The proximity of any development to existing social

housing will be a factor in the determination of the social/affordable split within the development.

The reserving of the full 20% for affordable housing only in electoral wards that were identified in the May 2001

Strategy as having an excess of 50% social housing is not a requirement of this strategy.

164

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


STRAITÉIS TITHÍOCHTA AGUISÍNÍ 2

2.4.6

2.4.7

2.4.8

2.4.9

2.4.10

In determining the affordable/social split the 20% quota in any residential development there are other cases where

the 50:50 split may not apply. Dublin City Council may consider it desirable to request a higher proportion of social

than affordable to ensure economies and efficiencies in the management of the housing stock.

Notwithstanding the objectives of the Development Plan with regard to the 20% quota, the determination of the split

will be a matter for the Planning Authority.

Mix of House Types and Sizes

It is an objective of the Development Plan to ensure that a mixture of house types and sizes is developed to

reasonably match the requirements of different categories of households within the city, including the special

requirements of elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

The city already has a lower average household size than that of the Greater Dublin Area as a whole, and the trend

towards smaller household size is expected to continue over the next decade. Both private developers and Dublin City

Council, as a provider of social housing, have responded by building an increasing amount of smaller apartments and

houses, which in turn facilitates the achievement of higher residential densities in accordance with Government policy.

The policy with regard to house type and size is shown in Sections 15.9.1 and 15.9.2 of the Development Plan. This

shall generally apply to all types of housing including social and affordable. Where a particular need is identified the

mix of house type and size may be varied in the case of social and affordable housing. Dublin City Council will

continue to target the accommodation needs of single persons in social housing provision.

Dublin Docklands Development Authority

The Dublin Docklands Development Authority Draft Master Plan 2003 for the Dublin Docklands Area states a number

of key objectives as follows:

• To allow the existing community to continue to live in Docklands and enjoy the social and economic

regeneration of the Master Plan project

• Provide a wide range of new housing in the area in order to achieve a good social mix

• The integration of new residential communities with existing local communities in the area

In order to cater for social and affordable housing demand in the Docklands Area over the period of its plan, the

Authority proposed that at least 20% of new development be allocated for social/affordable housing

Housing Practices and Policies.

Dublin City Council will continue to be a major provider of housing in the city during the period of this strategy. It is the

policy to identify and address the various categories of housing need. In relation to social housing Dublin City Council

will continue to explore and implement options to meet the social housing need. The following sections outline policies

and practices, which will be pursued in this regard.

New Construction/Purchase Programme

The provision of new build social housing will become more difficult during the period 2005-2011 due to a shortage of

sites, however a programme of new construction will be maintained during the period of the strategy.

The Purchase Programme has been pivotal in the delivery of social housing to date. It is envisaged that this

programme will continue to deliver a significant number of houses over the period of the strategy.

Role of Voluntary Housing Sector

It is government policy to increase the volume of housing units provided by the voluntary and co-operative sector.

The National Development Plan (NDP) envisages that this output should increase to 4,000- 5,000 units per year.

Dublin City Council’s policy is to support the voluntary housing sector to the greatest possible extent. The principal

condition that Dublin City Council attaches to this support is that 75% of the resulting residential units are let to

applicants on Dublin City Council’s Assessment of Housing Need. In recent years, the reality has been that 100% of

those housed by the voluntary and co-operative sector have been drawn from Dublin City Council’s Assessment of

Housing Need.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

165


APPENDIX 2

HOUSING STRATEGY

As a general principle, it is the intention of Dublin City Council to continue to engage with the voluntary and cooperative

housing sector as fully as possible in responding to the ongoing provision of social housing including social

housing provided under Part V.

2.4.11

Non-Part V Affordable Housing

Since the adoption of the 2001 housing strategy, the affordable housing unit has been set up. The role of this unit is

to progress the design, planning and provision of affordable housing on sites currently in the ownership of Dublin City

Council or through joint venture agreements with private developers and the voluntary and co-operative housing

sector. A scheme of priorities for the provision of affordable housing (non-Part V) has been approved by Dublin City

Council.

There are a limited number of sites in the ownership of Dublin City Council that are suitable for affordable housing.

The majority of these sites are infill sites in areas that were originally developed for social housing.

The ‘Sustaining Progress Affordable Housing Initiative’ has the potential to release significant lands to Dublin City

Council for the development of affordable housing.

During the lifetime of the Development Plan, Dublin City Council will proactively seek to involve private developers and

the voluntary and co-operative housing sector in exploring and developing innovative methods of ensuring an ongoing

supply of affordable housing into the future as these lands and other sites in our ownership are developed.

2.4.12

Part V Housing

The Planning and Development Act, 2000 was amended in December 2002. The amendment to the legislation has

brought a greater degree of certainty to the legal framework and with it a greater recognition on behalf of developers

of their role in relation to the provision of social and affordable housing.

The role of private developers in providing a supply of social and affordable dwellings is expected to be an important

factor in meeting the demand for social and affordable housing in the future.

In the context of Part V it is important to note that the most significant delivery of social and affordable housing during

the lifetime of the Development Plan will be in the following areas:

Pelletstown

North Fringe

Docklands

400 social/affordable units

1,400 social/affordable units

2,200 social/affordable units

The above figures represent 20% of the total housing provision at these locations. The numbers indicated for

provision of housing at these locations form part of longer term plans for the overall development of these areas that

is likely to continue beyond 2011.

Dublin City Council adopts a flexible approach to negotiations with developers on Part V agreements which allows it

consider the particular features of each case while retaining a firm focus on Dublin City Council’s own interests and

core requirements.

The implementation of Part V has raised some unanticipated issues. These include a high level of management

charges, legal issues relating to claw backs and ownership and limitations of the current funding mechanism for

individuals purchasing affordable housing.

It is not always possible to describe in advance how these issues will be addressed or how the challenges they

represent will be resolved. Nevertheless Dublin City Council is clear that, irrespective of the detail that is finally worked

out on these matters, it is critical that all developers are treated equitably and that consistency is maintained.

It should be noted that one of the main roles of Dublin City Council, in relation to Part V, is to conclude agreements

with developers. However, once agreements have been concluded there will be an additional requirement for the

ongoing management of the Part V social housing stock.

166

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


STRAITÉIS TITHÍOCHTA AGUISÍNÍ 2

2.4.13

The Voluntary and Co-operative Housing Sector represent an increasingly important partner for Dublin City Council in

the long term management of Part V housing units (social and affordable). The sector has demonstrated a capacity to

respond and adapt to a changing housing market and Dublin City Council is confident it can respond to the

challenges of Part V.

The overall aim of Dublin City Council is to secure the maximum return of social and affordable residential dwellings

under Part V.

Private Rental Sector

This sector is critical and will always be a key element of the city’s housing. The introduction of the Private Rental

Tenancy Board is expected to improve tenancy arrangements and ensuring more certainty both for tenants and

landlords.

It is clear that there are parts of Dublin city that have a preponderance of rented accommodation to persons in receipt

of Supplementary Welfare Rent Allowance. The annual report of the Department of Social and Family Affairs 2002

indicates that there are 54,000 recipients of supplementary welfare allowance country wide. Measures are required to

address this sector of housing need as it has the potential to become ‘hidden social housing’ and undermines

strategies which are striving to achieve social integration.

During the lifetime of this strategy, Dublin City Council will collaborate with various stakeholders and the Department of

Environment, Heritage and Local Government to bring forward proposals with regard to the private rental sector.

2.4.14

Empty Properties/Voids

Dublin City Council has specific practices to ensure that vacancies in its housing stock are minimised and that voids

are returned for reletting without delay.

However, there is evidence that there are vacancies and empty properties in the private sector that could be better

utilised. There is a significant potential in this area to increase the availability of housing accommodation.

Dublin City Council will explore mechanisms with the private sector in this regard.

2.4.15 Travellers, Accessibility/Disabled, Elderly and Homeless

Travellers

The Housing (Travellers Accommodation) Act, 1998 put in place a legislative framework to meet the needs of travellers

normally resident within the administrative area of each local authority within five years. Following on from this Act,

Dublin City Council drew up a Traveller Accommodation Programme for the period up to December 2004.

It is the policy of Dublin City Council to support the policies within the existing Traveller Programme and to support

future reviews of the programme. In addition, Dublin City Council will seek to identify and provide a transient site for

Traveller accommodation.

Accessibility/Disabled

It is a priority of Dublin City Council to improve accessibility in the provision of new housing and alterations to existing

housing stock.

Part M of the Building Regulations 2000 aims to ensure that buildings are accessible and usable by everyone,

including people with disabilities.

Whilst acknowledging the contribution of Part M of the Building Regulations to set a standard across all housing to

cater for disability, there is considerable scope within the various supply programmes to deal with the issue of

disability and specific housing need.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

167


APPENDIX 2

HOUSING STRATEGY

A number of key principles are recognised including:

• Assistance from disability focus groups in compiling statistics of need and developing policies to address this need

• Identification of specific need and involve the individual/interest groups at pre design and planning stage

• Encourage communications between disability focus groups and housing providers

Dublin City Council has a key role to play in addressing this specific type of housing need. Affordable housing

programmes and Part V has the potential to ensure a supply of housing within this sector.

Elderly

Dublin City Council aims to provide suitable accommodation to meet the housing needs of the elderly. This housing

need is addressed in several ways e.g. in standard housing, in group housing schemes which facilitate independent

living and initiatives such as the “Financial Contribution Scheme”.

Dublin City Council will continue to provide suitable accommodation to meet the housing needs of the elderly and will

also work in partnership with statutory and other organisations to meet the needs of this group.

Homeless

The last three years have seen many improvements in the range and quality of services available to people who are

homeless in Dublin. Particular progress has been made in addressing the needs of rough sleepers, through the

expansion of existing services and the establishment of new services, specifically catering for the needs of those

people who have been difficult to place in traditional services. The overall supply of emergency accommodation and

transitional housing has been increased, in line with targets in “Shaping the Future – An Action Plan on Homelessness

in Dublin 2001 – 2003”.

Over the period of the strategy there is a need to ensure the continued provision of permanent accommodation for

single homeless persons.

2.4.16

Estate Management – Social Housing

Dublin City Council has a duty to manage and control dwellings let under the Housing Acts and to secure and protect

the interests of tenants and their families in the peaceful occupation of those dwellings. To this end, Dublin City

Council is committed to taking action to avoid, prevent and abate anti-social behaviour.

Dublin City Council is committed, in the interest of good estate management, to protect residential amenity and to

ensure as far as is reasonably possible that conditions for the peaceful occupation of its tenancy dwellings will prevail.

2.4.17

Future Management of Social Housing Stock

Dublin City Council currently manages over 25,000 housing units in the city. In recent years, much of this housing

stock has been significantly upgraded through various regeneration projects. In striving to improve the management

and maintenance of the housing stock, Dublin City Council is keen to explore alternative housing management

methods. One such alternative is the transfer to Voluntary and Co-operative Housing Associations of the housing

management and maintenance function. This option would only be considered following extensive consultation with all

interested parties, especially tenants. Dublin City Council will continue to develop its own role and responsibility in

direct housing management. In relation to any future scheme for the sale of flats Dublin City Council undertakes to

undertake full consultation with tenants in relation to such sales.

During the period of the strategy, Dublin City Council will consider the option of housing stock transfers to the

Voluntary and Co-operative Housing Sector and will bring forward proposals in this regard for discussion.

2.4.18

Review of Housing Strategy

Not more than two years after the making of the Development Plan, the City Manager will give a report to the Dublin

City Council on the progress achieved in securing the objectives of the Development Plan. If the report indicates that

new or revised housing needs have been identified, the Manager may recommend that the housing strategy be

adjusted and the Development Plan be varied accordingly.

168

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


TREOIRLÍNTE I LEITH ÁISEANNA CÚRAM LEANAÍ AGUISÍNÍ 3

APPENDIX 3 GUIDELINES FOR CHILDCARE FACILITIES

Suitable Sites for Childcare

New and existing residential areas:

For new housing areas, an average of one childcare facility providing for a minimum of 20 childcare places per

approximately 75 dwellings will be required (and a pro rata increase for developments in excess of 75 houses), unless

there are significant reasons to the contrary.

In existing residential areas detached houses/sites or substantial semi-detached properties with space for off street

parking and/or suitable drop-off and collection points for customers and also space for an outdoor play area will

generally be permitted provided the premises remains primarily residential and traffic and access arrangements do not

interfere with general residential amenity.

Primary traffic routes where there is suitable and safe pull in areas to the front for dropping off children by car are

more suitable than tight residential culs-de-sac.

Applications for full day-care facilities in premises other than those listed above (e.g. terraced houses or houses

located on a cul-de-sac) should be treated on their merits having regard to parking/drop-off points, layout and design

of the housing area and the effect on the amenities of adjoining properties.

In relation to sessional after-school care, the provision of such facilities may be considered in any residential area as

ancillary to the main residential use subject to parking/drop-off points, layout and design of the housing area and

effect on the amenities of adjoining properties.

The City Council will have regard to the Dublin City Childcare Committee and their identification of areas that are

under-provided or over-provided in terms of childcare provision.

Industrial Estates/ Employment Areas

In general, childcare facilities should be located in light industrial zones/technology and business parks.

• Where feasible, the premises should be located on a site which is convenient to the entrance to the industrial

estate to facilitate easy access. This location will also obviate the necessity to walk/drive through active industrial

areas; it will facilitate easier access to public transport nodes. In addition, the premises should be served by off

street parking.

• The premises should be provided with outdoor play space or have safe and easy access to a safe outdoor play area.

Unsuitable sites/premises in relation to this category are locations in general industrial estates/mining areas, where the

processes carried on or the machinery/equipment in use, or emissions, could be injurious to the health and safety of

the children.

City/Town Centres, District Centres and Neighbourhood Centres

Neighbourhood and District Centres

In the existing built up areas, many of the smaller neighbourhood centres are under pressure from larger retail centres.

Those that contain vacant units are often under pressure to convert to residential use. These units are a valuable

community resource and would provide ideal childcare premises, provided that the premises can accommodate open

space (or have easy access to a safe outdoor play area). In addition, the unit should be able to avail of ancillary

parking associated with neighbourhood shops for the purposes of drop-off and collection, or be close to a public

transport node.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

169


APPENDIX 3

GUIDELINES FOR CHILDCARE FACILITIES

City/Town Centres

Premises opening directly onto the more heavily trafficked retail centres of towns and cities will not generally be

suitable locations. Smaller, quieter streets adjoining these will often prove more suitable.

The premises should be capable of providing outdoor play space or have safe or easy access to a safe outdoor play

area/park.

The premises should be so located that it is within easy reach of public transport nodes and has car parking

facilities/turning area which will accommodate staff and customers respectively.

Shopping Centres

In considering applications for shopping centres, planning authorities should take account of the need for drop-in

childcare facilities for shoppers. In general centres greater than 10,000 sq. m. shopping floor area shall be provided

with childcare facilities consisting of both changing/feeding facilities, and supervised self-contained play areas for

young children. Preferably, such facilities should be required to be located at ground floor level. Planning authorities

should, as a separate issue, consider the possible childcare requirements of the staff of the shopping centre.

Educational Establishments

Third Level Colleges

In general, third level colleges should provide at least one child care facility to cater for staff and students. The size of

the facility will be calculated on the basis of the existing and potential needs of staff and students and in the light of

the availability or otherwise of other suitable child care facilities in the locality.

The location of the premises within the college will be a matter for each individual college. However, it is important in

determining the most suitable location to take into account the nature and use of the premises surrounding the

campus. If the college is located in a residential area, a central location within the college complex would be

preferable to a site on the boundary.

Those responsible for the choice of location should take into account the nature of the campus, whether it is on a

restricted city centre site or spacious suburban location, in a commercial area or a more residential area.

Primary and Second Level Schools

In order to reduce the number of trips made by parents and guardians, the location of childcare facilities and schools

in close proximity to each other would be desirable.

The use of school premises to cater for after school care is recommended and school authorities are encouraged to

examine how they can help address this demand.

Public Transport Nodes

In each of the above cases, closeness to public transport nodes may be a deciding factor, as it will promote

sustainable modes of transport.

ADEQUACY OF PREMISES

All applications for full day-care childcare facilities should apply the following standards:

Service Age of Child Floor area per child

____________________________________________________________________

Full day care 0-1 years 3.70sq.m

____________________________________________________________________

Full day care 1-2 years 2.80sq.m

____________________________________________________________________

Full day care 2-6 years 2.32sq.m

____________________________________________________________________

Drop-in Centre 0-6 years 2sq.m

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

Sessional Services 0-6 years 2sq.m

____________________________________________________________________

170

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


TREOIRLÍNTE I LEITH ÁISEANNA CÚRAM LEANAÍ AGUISÍNÍ 3

• The space requirements set out above relate to clear floor space per child and is exclusive of kitchen, bathroom

and hall, furniture or permanent fixtures.

• Adequate and suitable facilities for a pre-school child to play indoors and outdoors during the day should be

provided, having regard to the number of pre-school children attending the service, their age and the amount of

time they spend in the premises.

• The care of babies should be confined to the ground floor only.

ACCESS

Access for the disabled and the elderly to all childcare facilities should be encouraged and facilitated.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

171


APPENDIX 4

MOBILITY MANAGEMENT PLAN

APPENDIX 4 MOBILITY MANAGEMENT PLAN

What is a Mobility Management Plan?

The providers of public transport continually advertise and provide information on their services. Dublin City Council in

turn endeavours to provide the operators with infrastructure and facilities to utilise and so enhance operator efficiency.

The City Council has thus assumed the role of a strategic partner in the continual quest to encourage commuters to

use public transport. The City Council also seeks to promote the use on non-motorised forms of transport and

greater efficiency in current modes.

A Mobility Management Plan (MMP) consists of a package of measures put in place by one organisation or a group of

organisations (e.g. within an office park or industrial estate) to encourage and support more sustainable travel patterns

among staff, visitors and customers.

A MMP therefore seeks identify the feasibility and attractiveness of a range of options which may relate to mode

choice and work style, with the objective of facilitating a reduction in single occupancy car based commuting, in

particular during typical peak transport demand periods.

A MMP may also require the implementation of variable working hours as a means to influence the demand for travel.

Dublin City Council regards mobility management as an important element in the promotion of sustainability and in the

achievement of the objectives of the Dublin Transportation Office (DTO) strategy and the subsequent “Platform for

Change” strategies. These strategies particularly aim to increase the modal share of public transport, walking and

cycling during peak travel times.

Where a MMP is submitted in support of a planning application it should be noted that the acceptability of the

proposed development, including the MMP, will be judged only on elements within the immediate control of the

applicant/occupier of the proposed development.

What Type and Scale of Development Will Require Submission of a MMP?

MMPs may be required for proposed centres of employment, or existing centres where expansion/redevelopment is

proposed, and which the Planning Authority considers to have significant trip generation and attraction rates at peak

hours, or throughout the day, and where the utilisation of existing or proposed public transport may be employed to

good effect. Consideration may also be afforded to the provision of facilities and opportunities for non-motorised

travel modes.

MMPs may also be required for mixed use, leisure and other developments, which generate a significant level of peak

and/or off peak travel.

The requirements for the submission of a MMP will be assessed on a case by case basis. Account will be taken of

the location, scale of development, the precise nature of the uses proposed and the anticipated impact on the

surrounding area, in terms of congestion and the existing and proposed transport network

Generally, applications that require an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) will also require a Transport Impact

Assessment (TIA), which in turn may need to incorporate a MMP. The need for a MMP and its form and content will

be the subject of negotiation and consultation between the applicant and, initially, the Planning and Development

Department and the Department of Roads and Traffic.

As a general guideline the City Council may request a MMP if an existing or proposed commercial development

exhibits the potential to generate more than 500 vehicle trips per day and/or more than 100 vehicle trips in the peak

period. Similarly, where the potential total employment in the development exceeds or will exceed 300 workers, a

MMP may be requested. Such developments may include office and commercial buildings, warehousing and

wholesaling and integrated multiple occupancy shopping centres. It is accepted that shoppers may be unlikely

candidates for public transport where bulk purchases are prevalent, therefore pure retail establishment may not be the

subject of a request for a MMP. However measures such as bus links, web based retail purchases, etc., will be

encouraged.

172 DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


PLEAN BAINISTÍOCHTA DO SHOGHLUAISTEACHT AGUISÍNÍ 4

A Note on the Form and Content of MMPs

It is recognised that the preparation and submission of a full MMP, where required and as an integral element of an

outline and/or detailed planning application for development, may not be possible.

At the application stage of the planning process, information on employment and thus travel demand and trip

characteristics may not be available. These circumstances, however, may not be encountered if the occupant of the

new development is an existing and established employer, for example, a corporate entity relocating to new premises

or expanding an existing premises.

It is with considerations such as this in mind that the City Council may exercise its discretion and call for two

categories of MMP. The first category relates primarily to developments where the end occupier(s), and hence the

numbers of employers and employees, travel needs and trip characteristics, are unknown. The second category

applies to situations where the development is existing or where the occupier is known at the outset.

Category 1 (Employers/Employees Unknown)

In such instances, the applicant is required to:

• Submit an estimate of the numbers of employees and their characteristics based on, for example, conditions at

similar developments and the extent and floor area types (uses) to be provided

• Provide a comprehensive outline of public transport services (existing and proposed) available to the future

employers and employees

• Prepare a conceptual plan indicating proposed links (footpaths, traffic routes) from the development to the public

transport services – the plan would clearly show the positioning of the building(s) relative to the site boundary and

access roads/links

• Prepare a statement on the nature and extent of facilities that will be considered for provision, and that would serve

to encourage non-motorised transport

• Set out the anticipated targets in respect to modal choice, in accordance with the standards set out in the Dublin

Transportation Office publication ‘A Platform for Change’

• Provide an outline of the various schemes that may be appropriate to facilitate a change in travel patterns to and

from work, (refer to point 5 below)

Category 2 (When the development is existing or when the occupier is known at the outset)

The applicant is required to submit:

• A Staff Travel Survey – as soon as development is occupied. This shall include details of current and projected

commuter trends and needs based on origin/destination information.

• Results of any Transport Impact Assessment (TIA).

• Targets for the desired modal shift consistent with the targets set out in the Dublin Transportation Office’s

‘A Platform for Change’.

• The phasing of targets and measures should be outlined and should reflect the phasing of the development relative

to the provision of transport infrastructure as outlined in the Dublin Transportation Office’s Short Term Action Plan.

In this regard, the allocation of temporary parking (in lieu of public transport provision) may be appropriate, (See

Paragraph 14.10.1(f)).

• An outline of the various schemes that the organisation plan to make available to its staff to encourage the desired

change in their travel patterns to and from work.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

173


APPENDIX 4

MOBILITY MANAGEMENT PLAN

Examples of such schemes include the following:

• Shared parking provision (dual use of facilities):

• Priority parking for car-sharers.

• Provision of car fleet for use by employees during business hours.

• Car parking management proposals to restrict parking availability.

• Provision of a range of cycle facilities and measures to encourage

showers, lockers, cycle repair facilities.

cycling, e.g. cycle parking, cycle tracks,

• Bicycle mileage rate allowance.

• Shuttle bus to public transport nodes.

• Bus/Rail/ ticket subsidies.

• Interest free loans for bicycles and associated equipment.

• Company bicycles.

• Provision of a reliable and efficient taxi service back up for car-sharing scheme.

• Encouragement of flexible working hours and e-working.

• Development of a strategy to allow for walking.

o Details of how these measures will operate on a daily basis and how they will achieve the desired modal split.

o A detailed site plan, indicating the positioning and layout of buildings and their pedestrian/vehicle access

points and proposed links (for motorised and non-motorised transport), from the development to the existing,

proposed and potential public transport services.

(Applicants can obtain more information on MMPs in: “The Route to Sustainable Commuting – An Employers Guide

to Mobility Management Plans”. Publisher: Dublin Transportation Office, 2001)

Co-Ordination and Information Update

• The selection of a co-ordinator from among members of staff in the proposed development is an essential part of

the MMP. For a large development or large grouping of developments e.g. within a Business park, a full time

Transport Manager may be required to oversee the implementation of the plan.

• Regular updated information on the various schemes/incentives and initiatives in the MMP as well as updated

information on new public transport routes/timetables etc. ought to be provided for employees by the

Coordinator/Transport Manager.

Monitoring

• An initial evaluation will take place 1 year into the operation of the MMP, at which stage it will be evaluated and

appropriately adjusted.

• The MMP shall be monitored by an appropriate independent specialist or consultant at the expense of the

applicant. The results of such monitoring shall be forwarded to the Planning Authority at intervals determined

during the initial consultations and negotiations.

174 DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


MEASÚNÚ TIONCHAIR AR IOMPAIR AGUISÍNÍ 5

APPENDIX 5 TRANSPORT IMPACT ASSESSMENT

Introduction

Many developments are of a nature and extent that they would impact on the environment and attract traffic to the

development site. Applicants would then be required to accommodate the traffic generated by and destined for the

development by the provision of suitable facilities – such as access roads, loading areas, parking facilities, traffic

signals etc. The City Development Plan requires that the nature and extent of the impact of any substantial

development on the immediate and surrounding road network and, if deemed necessary, on the wider transportation

system, be rigorously and comprehensively described.

Scoping for Transportation

Applications to carry out development that would require a Transport Impact Assessment (TIA) will be the subject of

initial consultations and negotiations with the City Council. The initial consultations are required regardless of whether

the TIA would be an integral element of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or an appendage to an application

for development which does not require an EIS. The Planning and Development Department and the Department of

Roads and Traffic are to be approached in the first instance.

The purpose of these consultations and negotiations would be to obtain clarity and consensus on the content, focus

and detail required in the assessment. The applicant will also be offered guidance and suggestions on the

methodology to be adopted for the statement, including, particularly, the elements and extent of the area and

transportation system and network on which the assessment is to be made. Where appropriate an indication of other

agencies/departments which may need to be consulted in the process will be offered.

The need for a TIA

As a general guideline the City Council will require a TIA if the proposed development meets

with one or more of the following criteria:

• The proposed development provides for 200 or more dwelling units

• The development generates more than 500 private vehicle trips per day and/or more

than 100 trips in the peak period

• The office and commercial component of the development provides for 5000Sq.m.

or more Gross Floor Area (GFA)

• Retail development with a GFA of 1000 sq. m. or more is provided in the scheme

• Warehousing and wholesaling with a GFA of 10000 sq. m. or more is contained in the development

• The development provides for 100 or more off street parking spaces with a single access to the adjoining street

network

• The development generates vehicle movement through adjacent residential areas of goods vehicles

of 3 tons weight limit or greater

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

175


APPENDIX 5

TRANSPORT IMPACT ASSESSMENT

Contents of a TIA

The required TIA would typically be composed of chapters or sections that provide for or outline:

• A non-technical summary of the statement

• Existing development and traffic/transportation conditions

• Proposed development

• Traffic/transportation implications which in turn would include consideration of:

o trip attraction/mode choice

o trip distribution

o assignment of traffic or trips by mode

o time period(s) applicable to the TIA

• Impact on the local and surrounding street networks

• Effect on the environment (natural and man-made) and urban fabric

• Road and traffic safety considerations

• Site plan and internal layout and circulation

• Loading (if required) and parking provision

• Provision for public transport

• Provision for non-motorised transport

• Provision for mobility disadvantaged and impaired persons

Concluding Note

The preparation of a Transport Impact Assessment should be informed by a current national and regional land use

and transport policy guidance in particular the Regional Planning Guidelines and the DTO Strategy 2000 –2016 (A

Platform for Change)

By the same token the policies and priorities embodied in the Development Plan should not be diminished in the

preparation of the TIA. Similarly the integrity of local area and action plans or similar initiatives should not be

compromised.

176

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


LÍONRA STRAITÉISEACH ROTHAÍOCHTA AGUISÍNÍ 6

APPENDIX 6 STRATEGIC CYCLE NETWORK

To facilitate the identification of Dublin City’s Strategic Cycle Network an indicative list has been provided under the

following subdivisions:

• Routes outside inner city (Suburban)

• Inner city cycle routes

• Recreational routes

• Quality Bus Corridor/cycle routes and Quality Bus Network (QBN) routes

The following indicative list includes existing routes, proposed routes, and routes under construction. In some cases

e.g. where significant traffic calming measures have been implemented or are proposed, cycle routes may be

signposted rather than marked. In other cases, e.g. along important routes where insufficient width for cycle tracks

exists, safety/accessibility improvements will be incorporated wherever feasible. Existing routes have been included as

in many cases they will be upgraded during the lifetime of the Plan.

Section A: Routes outside Inner City (Suburban)

Southside

• Leeson Park, Sallymount Avenue and onto Ranelagh Road.

• Kimmage Road: Commences at the City Council boundary on Lower Kimmage Road. The route then proceeds

northwards onto Kimmage Road Lower to Harold's Cross, to intersect with Rathfarnham QBC/cycle route on

Harold's Cross Road.

• Grand Canal West/Luas Route: Commences at the City Council boundary just past Labre Park. The route then

continues along the canal side onto and along Davitt Road to Suir Road junction. The cycle route then continues

alongside the Luas alignment to the junction with Basin Street Upper.

• Eglinton Road/Dartry Road: Beginning at the junction of Donnybrook Road with Eglinton Road, the cycle route

proceeds to Milltown Road and from here to Dartry Road.

• South Circular Road: Commences on South Lotts Road, and from here the cycle route will travel onto Haddington

Road, Mespil Road, Grand Parade, Canal Road, Grove Road, Parnell Road, Dolphin Road, Suir Road and South

Circular Road, connecting with Conyngham Road.

• Clogher Road, Sundrive Road to Parnell Road

• Fortfield Road (Kimmage Cross Road junction to Templeogue Road)

• Walkinstown Avenue

• Walkinstown Road

• Kildare Road (Crumlin Road to Sundrive Road)

• Lorcan O'Toole Park

• Stannaway Road

• St. Agnes Road

• Sundrive Road

• Larkfield Road

• Clareville Road

• Kenilworth Park(Clareville Road to Harold’s Cross Road)

• Herberton Road

• Kimmage Road West (Lorcan O'Toole Park to Kimmage Cross Road)

• Terenure Road West (Kimmage Cross Road to Terenure Place)

• Waterloo Road

• Church Avenue

• Sean Moore Road

• Herbert Park

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

177


APPENDIX 6

STRATEGIC CYCLE NETWORK

• Anglesea Road

• Appian Way

• Chelmsford Road

• Nutley Lane

• Rathmines Road Upper

• Dartry Road

• Orwell Road

Boundary Roads in Charge of South Dublin County Council

• Cromwellsfort Road and Kimmage Road West (St. Agnes Road to Lorcan O'Toole Park)

Northside

• Phibsborough Road, Connaught Street, St Peter's Road, part of Faussagh Road and part of St Eithne Road.

• Ballygall Road: Beginning at the junction of Glasnevin Avenue and Beneavin Drive, from here the cycle route

proceeds onto Ballygall Road East to Old Finglas Road and from here to Glasnevin Road and onto Botanic Road.

• Grace Park Road to Beaumont Hospital: This cycle route begins on Beaumont Road opposite Beaumont Hospital.

The cycle route then continues from Beaumont Road along Grace Park Road and onto Richmond Road.

• Beaumont Hospital to Malahide Road: Skelly's Lane, Kilmore Road and onto Malahide Road.

• Shantalla Road

• Junction of Clontarf Road and Alfie Byrne Road along Alfie Byrne Road, southwards along East Wall Road, across

the East Link Toll Bridge and along Thorncastle Street.

• North Circular Road onto Cabra Road, and will then connect with the Old Cabra Road. Another subsidiary route off

the North Circular Road incorporates Summerhill Parade, Ballybough Road and Bayview Avenue.

• Collins Avenue: The cycle route will extend along Collins Avenue East from its junction with the Howth Road along

Collins Avenue, Glasnevin Avenue and Ballygall Road West, ending at North Road junction with the Ballygall Road.

• Griffith Avenue: From Malahide Road to Ballymun Road and further along Griffith Avenue East

to Ballygall Road East.

• Oscar Traynor Road: Cycle route commences at Malahide Road junction with Oscar Traynor Road.

This orbital cycle route will then travel along Oscar Traynor Road onto Santry Avenue where it terminates

at the Ballymun Road junction.

• Mobhi Road to Fairview Park: This cycle route will begin at Fairview Strand approaching Fairview Park and from

here will travel along Richmond Road to Millbourne Avenue, Walsh Road, western end of Home Farm Road,

up to the junction with St. Mobhi Road.

• Rathdown Road, Grangegorman Upper & Lower, Brunswick Street

• Ratoath Road to Royal Canal to Navan Road

• Nephin Road, Navan Road to Ratoath Road

• Botanic Avenue

• Mountjoy Square South and East, Belvedere Place, Belvedere Road

• Old Finglas Road, Ballygall Road East to Finglas Road

• Sheriff St Upper, New Wapping Street

• East Road

Section B: Inner City Cycle Routes

All cycle routes in the inner city, generally not associated with QBCs or QBN,

are listed under this heading 'Inner City cycle routes”

Primary Priority (not in priority order)

• East Wall Road-Eastlink Bridge-Thorncastle St

• Conyngham Road-Parkgate Street-North Quays

• Phibsborough Road-Chancery Place

• Parnell Square-Parnell St

• Capel St-Capel St Bridge

• Dorset Street Upper

• North Circular Road

178

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


LÍONRA STRAITÉISEACH ROTHAÍOCHTA AGUISÍNÍ 6

• O’Connell Street- O’Connell Bridge-D’Olier Street-College Street

• Nassau Street- Suffolk Street-Dame Street-Westmoreland Street

• Saint Stephen’s Green North-Saint Stephen’s Green East-Earlsfort Terrace

• St John’s Road West-Frank Sherwin Bridge and South Quays from Heuston Station to Usher’s Quay

• Essex Quay to a bridge over the Dodder mouth to York Road

• Cuffe Street-Kevin’s Street include crossroads with Bride Street-New Bride Street

• Leeson Street Bridge-Fitzwilliam Place – Fitzwilliam Street, Merrion Square East-Holles Street

• Townsend Street-Sandwith Street

• Lombard Street-Westland Row-Merrion Square West- Merrion Street Lower.-Clare Street-Merrion Square West

-Merrion Street Upper

• Nassau Street-Leinster Street-Lincoln Place-Fenian Street-Hogan Place

• Grand Canal Quay-Grand Canal Street Junction-Clanwilliam Street

• South Circular Road-Parnell Road

• Canal Road-Thorncastle Street

• Charlemont Street-Camden Street-Charlotte Way

• Parliament Street

• Winetavern Street

Secondary Priority (not in priority order)

• Infirmary Road

• Annamoe Terrace-Annamoe Road

• Grangegorman-Queen Street

• Mountjoy Street-Dominic Street-Saint Mary’s Place North

• Denmark Street-Belvedere Road

• Jervis Street

• Killarney Street-Sean Mc Dermott Street-Cathal Brugha Street

• Buckingham Street

• Sheriff Street

• Mayor Street

• Wood Quay-Usher’s Quay

• Hanover Street-Hanover Quay

• Erne Street-Lime Street

• Forbes Lane-James Walk-Grand Canal View

• Grand Canal Street

• Baggot Street Lower – Merrion Row –Ely Place – Hume Street

• Kildare Street

• Harcourt Street

• Bride Road

Existing/Under Construction/Design Stage

• Amiens Street-Memorial Road-Memorial Bridge

• Leeson Street-Saint Stephen’s Green South-Saint Stephen’s Green West-Dawson Street

• Pearse Street-Ringsend Road

• Dolphin Road-Parnell Road-Grove Road-Canal Road-Grand Parade-Mespil Road

• Crumlin Road-Dolphin’s Barn Street-Cork Street Ardee Street-The Coombe-Coombe Bypass-

Dean Street-Kevin Street

• Werburgh Street-Bride Street

• Bull Alley

• South Circular Road - Clanbrassil Street Cross to Camden Street Cross

• George’s Street-Aungier Street-Redmond’s Hill-Wexford Street-Camden Street

• Charlemont Street-Ranelagh Road

• Leeson Street-Sussex Street

• Jame’s Walk

• Kilmainham Lane-Bow Bridge-Bow Lane West-James’ Street-Thomas Street-Cornmarket-High Street-Christchurch

Place-Lord Edward Street-Dame Street

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

179


APPENDIX 6

STRATEGIC CYCLE NETWORK

• Nicholas Street-Patrick’s Street

• City Quay

• Cardiff Lane-Macken Street

• Fitzwilliam Quay

• Old Cabra Road –Prussia Street-Manor Street-Stoneybatter-Blackhall Place

• Hendrick Street

• North King Street-Bolton Street

• Capel Street-Bolton Street to Parnell Street

• Chesterfield Avenue

• George’s Street Great South –Dame Street

• Portland Row-Seville Place-Guild Street

• Amiens Street from Buckingham Street-North Strand Road

• Alfie Byrne Road

• Sheriff Street (Connolly Station- Commons Street)

• North Road

• Dorset Street Lower-Drumcondra Road

• Conyngham Road-Parkgate Street-Wolfe Tone Quay-Ellis Quay-Arran Quay-Inns Quay-Ormond Quay Upper-

Bachelor’s Walk

• Library View Terrace-North Circular Road (Library View Terrace-Berkeley Road)- Berkeley Road- Berkeley Street-

Blessington Street-Frederick Street North-Parnell Square East

• Shaw Street –Moss Street

• George’s Quay

• Marrowbone Lane-Thomas’s Court

Section C: Recreational Routes

These routes will be progressed where development opportunities arise, generally in association with walking routes

(see relevant policies in Transportation and Recreational Amenity Chapters in Development Plan)

• River Dodder

• River Tolka

• Section of proposed S2S (Sutton to Sandycove) cycleway/promenade that would proceed through the Dublin City

Council area, subject to feasibility study.

Dublin City Council supports the development of a Sutton to Sandycove (S2S) promenade and cycleway, in so far as

it is practicable, subject to final approval of detailed design and agreement at each stage by the elected

representatives of the City Council.

Section D: Combined QBC/Cycle Routes and QBN Routes

QBC

• Malahide Road QBC/Cycle Route

• Swords Road QBC/Cycle Route

• Finglas Road QBC/Cycle Route

• Blanchardstown QBC/Cycle Route

• Lucan QBC/Cycle Route

• North Clondalkin/Ballyfermot QBC/Cycle Route

• South Clondalkin QBC/Cycle Route

• Tallaght QBC/Cycle Route

• Rathfarnham QBC/Cycle Route

• Stillorgan QBC/Cycle Route

• Ballymun QBC/Cycle Route

QBN

Cycle routes/facilities will also be provided along Quality Bus Network/Bus priority routes.

180

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


STRAITÉIS MIONDÍOLA AGUISÍNÍ 7

APPENDIX 7 RETAIL STRATEGY

Introduction

In recent years significant developments have taken place in the area of planning legislation and advice, which will

have significant effects on retail developments in the future. Strategic Planning Guidelines for the Greater Dublin Area

(SPGGDA) were issued in 1999, National Retail Planning Guidelines were issued in December 2000, the Dublin

Transportation Office issued its latest version of Strategy 2000-2016 - “A Platform for Change” in November 2001 and

a Retail Planning Strategy for the Greater Dublin Area (RPS/GDA) was published in 2001. The policies and objectives

of the Development Plan have been drafted to have regard to all these new developments and the provisions of the

RPS/GDA have been incorporated and updated to have regard to recent proposals for retail developments.

The following sections set out the detail of the retail strategy for the Dublin City Council area, including projected floor

space demand, details of the retail hierarchy and how it applies to Dublin city, and the assessment criteria that will be

used in determining applications for planning permission. All policies and objectives relating to the implementation of

the strategy, as well as a strategic overview of retailing in the City Council area, are included in Chapter 8 of the main

text of the Plan.

Retail Hierarchy

The RPS/GDA has proposed a five-tier hierarchy of retail centres based on the National Retail Planning Guidelines.

Dublin City Council has accepted this hierarchy as the basis for future planning for retail floor space subject to an

adaptation of the proposed level 3, (Town/District Centres), classification to take account of its particular

circumstances. New retail developments should respect this hierarchy and shopping provision should be appropriate

in scale and character to the hierarchical role of the centre.

The hierarchy, with particular reference to Dublin City Council, is as shown in Table 1.

Table 1: Retail Centres Hierarchy

Level GDA Classification Dublin City Classification / Areas

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Level 1 Metropolitan Centre Central Shopping Area

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Level 2 Major Town Centre None

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Level 3 Town/District Centres District Centre Category A*

District Centre Category B*

District Centre Category C*

Market Streets

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Level 4 Neighbourhood Centres Neighbourhood Centres

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Level 5 Corner Shops Local/corner shops

* Note: See section 2.6 of this Appendix for list of centres in each category.

Level 1: Central Shopping Area

The Central Shopping Area is the main shopping, tourist and employment destination for residents of the Greater

Dublin Area (GDA) and beyond. In retail terms, the Central Shopping Area dominates ‘fashion’ and higher order

comparison goods retailing within the GDA and acts as a significant attraction for persons from outside the region.

The area is therefore at the top of the hierarchy of retail centres within both the GDA and the Dublin City Council area.

The RPS/GDA recognises the dominant role of the Central Shopping Area, at a national and regional level, and states

that it accounts for approximately 80 per cent of comparison retail floor space. The RPS/GDA proposes that this

dominant position would be protected in terms of comparison goods, and especially higher order comparison goods.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

181


APPENDIX 7

RETAIL STRATEGY

Level 2: Major Town Centres

There are no examples of this level of centre in the Dublin City Council Area. Such centres serve a sub-regional

function, i.e. a large population catchment. There are only six designated level 2 centres in the Greater Dublin Area –

Swords, Blanchardstown, Lucan/Clondalkin, Tallaght, Dundrum and Dún Laoghaire.

Level 3: District Centres

These centres are usually anchored by convenience shopping. They offer middle to lower order comparison retailing

and also contain a range of service uses. Typically they serve catchments within 10 to 15 minutes drive time, but

density of population and the proximity of adjoining centres determine the size of their catchments. With the

consolidation and expansion of the metropolitan area, the potential exists for further level 3 centres to be developed

with planned residential communities.

A number of Market Streets within the Inner City also function as level 3 centres. In summary, these streets are as

follows: Thomas Street, Meath Street, Francis Street, Camden Street/Wexford Street/Aungier Street, Dorset Street,

Manor Street/Stoneybatter.

Level 4: Neighbourhood Centres

These centres typically comprise a parade of convenience stores, the occasional lower order comparison outlet and a

limited range of service outlets. Their primary purpose is to provide a range of convenient retail outlets and services

within walking distance for the local population. These centres provide an essential and sustainable amenity for

residential areas and it is important that they should be maintained and strengthened where necessary.

Level 5: Local/Corner Shops

The definition of local/corner shops is self-explanatory. They are normally provided as single units providing primarily

convenience goods and occasionally a limited range of lower order comparison goods. They are generally located

within a short walking distance of the local population.

Sub-Categories of District Centres

While the RPS/GDA proposes a five-tier hierarchy for the categorisation of retail centres within the GDA, the large

number of district centres within the Dublin City Council area necessitates a more refined breakdown within this level

in the retail hierarchy. The following factors have been taken into account in defining the sub-categories of District

Centre:

• Character

• Size

• Location

• Access by public transport

• Vitality and viability

• Potential for expansion

The district centres within the Dublin City Council area (excluding the Market Streets) have been divided into 3

separate sub-categories as shown in Table 1. Such classification is also relevant in providing guidance for the

allocation of additional floor space.

Category A Centres: These are new centres in the planned areas where a large population increase is anticipated

or where, as part of the proposed development of an existing centre as a Prime Urban Centre incorporating a range

of retail, community and employment uses, the retail element of the centre is expected to be significantly

strengthened.

Centres included in this category are: Docklands, Ballsbridge and the Prime Urban Centres of: Ballymun, North

Fringe, Finglas, Northside Shopping Centre, Ballyfermot, Rathmines, Phibsborough and Crumlin Shopping Centre.

182

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


STRAITÉIS MIONDÍOLA AGUISÍNÍ 7

Category B Centres: These are existing or proposed centres with large floor areas of retail use. There are

opportunities for expansion and improved access and the centres act as a local community/employment focal point.

Centres included in this category are: Artane Shopping Centre, Donaghmede Shopping Centre, Finglas Clearwater,

Kimmage, Omni Park, and Terenure.

Category C Centres: These are the smaller district centres serving areas of limited population. They are larger than

neighbourhood centres in terms of the range of activities they provide and generally service a local population.

Centres included in this category are: Baggot Street Upper, Cabra, Coolock, Crumlin Village, Donnybrook,

Drumcondra, Edenmore, Fairview, Harold’s Cross, Inchicore, Kilbarrack, Killester, Merrion Shopping Centre,

Pelletstown, Park Shopping Centre, Raheny, Ranelagh, Rathgar, Ringsend, Walkinstown, and other smaller centres

not included in Categories A or B above.

Shopping Area Boundaries

Central Shopping Area – Level 1

The boundaries the Central Shopping Area is shown on Figure 4 Principal Shopping Streets and form part of the area

of zoning objective Z5. Here, the main shopping streets are classified as Category 1 and Category 2 shopping streets.

In Category 1 retail use predominates whereas in Category 2 there is a mixture of retail and non-retail (including

entertainment) uses (see also Improvement Policies below).

District Centres – Level 3

The district centres located in both the inner city (including Docklands) and in the suburbs are defined by the zoning

objective Z4 on the land use zoning maps in the Development Plan.

Within the inner city, a number of Market Streets have been identified as set out below. Some of these streets are

defined by the Z4 zone within which they are located, however a number are now proposed to be either wholly or

partially zoned objective Z5 (central area) in recognition of their central locations and mixed use role.

• Thomas Street

• Meath Street

• Francis Street

• Camden Street/Wexford Street/Aungier Street

• Dorset Street

• Manor Street/Stoneybatter

A number of draft framework plans have been prepared or are proposed for these streets including an Urban Design

Framework for the Liberties/Coombe area to including Meath Street, Francis Street and part of Thomas Street. This

Urban Design Framework sets out a physical framework for the implementation of the actions identified in the

Integrated Area Plan for Liberties/Coombe.

Neighbourhood Centres – Level 4

The neighbourhood centres are defined by the zoning objective Z3 on the land use zoning maps in the

Development Plan.

Need for Additional Floor Space

The Retail Planning Strategy for the Greater Dublin Area(RPS/GDA) presents a broad assessment of the future

quantity of retail floor space required in the region based on projected economic growth and disposable incomes.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

183


APPENDIX 7

RETAIL STRATEGY

It adopts the 2001-2007 ESRI Medium Term Review forecast as a “high” rate and presents a “low” rate that is 25%

lower than the high rate, for forecasting retail expenditure growth to 2006 and 2011.

The most recent ESRI Medium Term economic forecast is contained in the 2003-2010 Medium Term Review. This

forecast is for the annual average growth for the 2005-2010 period (which approximately coincides with the Plan

period) to be slightly higher than that projected in the 2001-2007 Review. The projected annual average growth for

2000-2005 has remained the same under both reviews. It is considered therefore that, over the short to medium

term, the economic growth figures on which the projected demand for additional floor space made in the RPS/GDA

still hold.

The RPS/GDA presents county strategies that accord with the thrust of existing planning guidelines and policies for

the GDA as a whole and broadly assesses how future retail development should be distributed by location and by

type of floor space.

In general terms, the strategy indicates that the city area attracts a large inflow of comparison goods expenditure and

a more modest inflow of convenience goods expenditure from the surrounding counties, mostly to the Central

Shopping Area. Outflow of comparison expenditure is low and there is a negligible level of convenience expenditure

outflow. Inward comparison expenditure is projected to increase to 114% by 2006, and 118% between 2006 and

2011. The projected surplus retail expenditure capacity for the Dublin city area as a whole is in the range of €1,175m

(low) to 1,676m (high) for 2011, the vast bulk of this being in comparison goods.

The RPS/GDA provides details of the quantity of additional floor space required to 2006 in Table 5.6 of the report,

however no corresponding floor space figure for the Dublin City Council area in 2011 was produced. The RPS/GDA

does give projected turnover figures for the Dublin City Council area in 2011 and these figures have been converted to

a projected floor space demand using the same ratio of turnover to floor space as was the case for the Dublin City

Council area in 2006. Table 2 below details the quantity of additional floor space that will be required for the periods

to 2011.

The figures given in Table 2 are the projected demand for new floor space in addition to the existing floor space and

existing planning permissions for retail development that have not yet been constructed.

Table 2. Projected Floor Space Requirements 2011 (sq. m.)

City Centre

Rest of City Council Area

___________________________________________________________

Low High Low High

___________________________________________________________________________________

Convenience 2,400 2,912 9,900 11,856

___________________________________________________________________________________

Comparison

___________________________________________________________________________________

High Order 54,675 80,448 13,725 20,160

___________________________________________________________________________________

Low/Middle Order 12,600 18,240 50,850 72,960

___________________________________________________________________________________

Retail Parks 0 0 34,650 52,992

___________________________________________________________________________________

Total Comparison 67,275 98,688 99,225 146,112

___________________________________________________________________________________

Overall Total 69,675 101,600 109,125 157,968

Source: Derived from turnover and net projected floor space requirement figures for Dublin City Council area in 2006 given in

Retail Planning Strategy for the Greater Dublin Area 2001, (Tables 5.5 and 5.6) using same ratio of turnover : floor space as given in

these tables. Note: “Inner City” and “Suburbs” are referred to as “City Centre” and “Rest of City Council Area” in the RPS/GDA.

It should also be noted that in the RPS/GDA, the figures for the Inner City include provision for the Docklands Area.

In the case of estimated floor space requirements for 2011, a number of amendments are required to take account of

a relatively small number of permitted and proposed retail developments that have been built or proposed since the

gathering of the baseline data on which the RPS/GDA projections are based. In addition, a small number of

developments which were included in the RPS/GDA figures do not now appear likely to be developed to the scale

envisaged at the time of the preparation of the strategy.

184

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


STRAITÉIS MIONDÍOLA AGUISÍNÍ 7

Table 3 indicates the projected floor space requirements to 2011 taking account of the main recently permitted and

proposed retail developments.

Table 3. Projected Floor Space Requirements 2011 Amended to

Take Account of Recent or Proposed Developments (sq. m.)

City Centre

Rest of City Council Area

___________________________________________________________

Low High Low High

___________________________________________________________________________________

Convenience 938 1,450 181 1,775

___________________________________________________________________________________

Comparison

___________________________________________________________________________________

High Order 47,700 73,473 7,568 14,003

___________________________________________________________________________________

Low/Middle Order 8,275 13,915 41,380 63,490

___________________________________________________________________________________

Retail Parks 0 0 34,650 52,992

___________________________________________________________________________________

Total Comparison 55,975 87,388 83,598 130,485

___________________________________________________________________________________

Overall Total 56,913 88,838 83,417 132,260

Even before allowance is made for recent permissions, (Table 2 figures), the projections indicate relatively minor

increases in convenience goods floor space and substantial increases in comparison goods floor space over the

period to 2011. When provision is made for these (short-medium term) extant permissions and likely future

developments (see Table 3), it is clear that there is still projected to be demand for a relatively large additional

quantum of comparison floor space both in the city centre and more particularly in the rest of the city council area.

For convenience goods floor space however, under the terms of the RPS/GDA demand for additional floor space to

2011 is projected to be very small.

Guidance on the Scale and Location of Retail Development

General

The existing retail centres provide an important sense of place and community identity. They provide a mix of retail,

services and entertainment/leisure uses serving a local, neighbourhood, district or citywide community. It is essential

that new retail floor space is appropriately located in order to maintain the vitality and viability of existing and permitted

centres, to avail of improved public transport access and to cater for population growth areas.

Retail developments should relate to the hierarchy, should locate within designated centres and should be of a scale

that is compatible with the function of the centre.

In determining the allocation of the projected additional floor space, and in accordance with the requirements of the

Retail Planning Guidelines for Planning Authorities and the criteria influencing the RPS/GDA, the following will be taken

into account in the determining the location and scale of additional retail floor space.

• The availability of public transport to serve the retail centre

• Current population catchment and areas of projected population growth

• Current availability of retail floor space in each part of the city

• Potential impact on the vitality and viability of existing and permitted retail centres

• The sequential approach to site assessment

• Relevant provisions of Action Area Plans, Integrated Area Plans and Planning Schemes

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

185


APPENDIX 7

RETAIL STRATEGY

Inner City

Notwithstanding the indicative floor space indicated in the RPS/GDA, Dublin City Council is committed to maintaining

the dominant position of the Central Shopping Area and will seek to facilitate development within it which consolidates

and strengthens this dominant position.

The higher order comparison goods floor space of 47,700 to 73,473 sq. m. net in Table 3 shall be located principally

within the Central Shopping Area but with some additional element in Docklands. It is considered that the extent of

the existing city centre zonings is adequate to cater for such an increase. This indicative floor space excludes the

extant planning permissions on the north side of the Central Shopping Area, which are located at Millennium Mall

O’Connell Street, Moore Street/Parnell Street and ILAC Centre. In order to maintain a reasonable balance between the

north and south parts of the Central Shopping Area, there would appear to be greater potential for additional retail

floor space to be located on the south side in the immediate future.

It is envisaged that additional comparison goods floor space would be located

• In the main Docklands centre zoned Z4 at the Point Depot, and

• In the Market Streets and other inner city district centres.

In order to strengthen and encourage the Market Streets to develop further for comparison shopping, it will be

necessary to prevent an over-supply of services (such as restaurants, takeaways and public houses) at ground level

on such streets. The policy contained in chapter 15 (15.29.0) will be applied in particular to Market Streets.

The RPS/GDA figures as revised above indicates that, on completion of permitted and proposed developments, a

very small quantum of additional convenience floor space will be required up to 2011 in the inner city area (see Table

3). Dublin City Council is conscious that in the Docklands area an additional population of 25,000 is proposed for the

target year of 2011 and that substantial additional population might be envisaged in other redevelopment areas such

as Heuston Station and environs over the lifetime of the Plan. The City Council is also conscious of the trend for

comparatively significant population increase in the city centre area over recent years, the likelihood given major

development proposals that this trend will continue, and the trend towards new formats of convenience retailing (e.g.

mini supermarkets in city centre locations) which will combine to generate demand for additional convenience goods

floor space.

Consequently, despite the projections made in the RPS/GDA in respect of convenience goods retailing, it will be the

policy of Dublin City Council that where a significant increase in local population, or developments in the format or

patterns of retailing, gives rise to a need for additional convenience floor space, proposals will be considered on their

merits and in accordance with the assessment criteria set out in following sections.

Suburbs

The figures for projected floor space demand for 2011 given in Table 3, take account of proposed developments in

Ballymun, North Fringe and other recently completed convenience goods outlets in suburban areas.

On completion of these developments it is estimated that there will be a very small demand for additional convenience

goods floor space with the ‘high’ estimate suggesting that only approximately 1,775 sq. m. net retail floor space

projected will be required to 2011. Consequently, as with the city centre, it is not considered realistic or desirable to

impose a definite cap on convenience floor space at this level, and, where a significant increase in local population

gives rise to a need for additional convenience floor space in district, neighbourhood or local centres, proposals will

be considered on their merits and in accordance with the assessment set out in following sections.

An indicative floor space of 64,167 sq. m. to 106,868 sq. m. for comparison goods has been allocated to the

suburbs. This type of comparison floor space is likely in part to be attracted only to the largest existing district centres

or the larger population growth areas, and partially to the district centres which have been identified as Prime Urban

Centres on the basis of established need and in accordance with the assessment criteria set out in following sections.

186

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


STRAITÉIS MIONDÍOLA AGUISÍNÍ 7

Retail Parks and Retail Warehouses

Retail parks have emerged as agglomerations of retail warehouses grouped around a common car park selling mainly

bulky household goods. Retail parks and warehouses do not fit easily into the formal retail hierarchy given their size

requirements and the need for good car parking facilities and ease of servicing. The Retail Planning Guidelines advises

that, generally, planned retail parks do not have any material impact on town centres provided that the range of goods

sold is limited to truly bulky household goods or goods generally sold in bulk. However, the sale of non-bulky durables

has the potential to impact on nearby district centres or the city centre.

The provision of retail parks will be preferred to individual retail warehouses. Table 3 includes an indicative floor space

range of 34,650 to 52,854 sq. m. for retail parks to 2011. This level of floor space provision suggests that a number

of new retail parks could be established in addition to extending existing establishments. In general, there would

appear to be greater opportunities for establishing or extending retail parks on the northern, northwestern and

western perimeters of the city. In line with the Retail Planning Guidelines, proposals for retail warehouses/parks, either

singly or cumulatively, should not exceed 6,000 sq. m. maximum.

Applications for new retail parks and retail warehouses must demonstrate that they will not impact on existing district

and neighbourhood centres, and that they are accessible by public transport.

Discount Stores

As noted in the Retail Planning Guidelines, smaller discount stores of up to 1,500 square metres gross have a

potential role in extending the choice of retailing particularly for certain sectors of the community. Their customer

catchment and retail offer is different to the mainstream superstores and supermarkets and their trade draw will be

different; this will be relevant when assessing impact, although the effect on neighbourhood centres and other shops

should also be considered.

Discount food stores can effectively anchor smaller centres, and proposals for such developments will be considered

in relation to the Dublin City Development Plan and the provisions relating to the assessment of retail development

contained in this appendix. For the purpose of zoning a discount store shall be assessed as convenience floor space

and on the basis of the area it is proposed to serve.

Improvement Policies

Category 1 Streets

This category includes the main shopping streets as well as some shopping malls and arcades. Here the introduction

of non-retail frontages will not be permitted. Applications for retail service outlets, such as takeaways and car rentals,

will generally be treated on their merits (see General Site Development Standards - Chapter 15).

Category 2 Streets

Streets in this category are those which already have a mixture of retail and non-retail (including entertainment) uses.

In order to strengthen the retail character of these streets, it is intended to encourage further development of retail

frontages. Additional non-retail uses, however, may be permitted, provided that such development would not result in

the predominance of non-retail frontages on the street.

Casual Trading

The streets and areas designated for casual trading are listed in the Casual Trading Bye-laws 1996 adopted by the

City Council in October 1996.

Assessing New Retail Development

All applications for significant retail development will be assessed against the criteria specified in the Retail Planning

Guidelines for Planning Authorities. As a general rule, significant retail development means 1,000 sq. m. gross of

convenience development and 2,000 sq. m. gross of comparison development. However, what is significant will vary

from area to area and may include factory outlets or forecourt retailing at petrol filling stations. It is to be noted that the

Guidelines impose a cap of 3,500 sq. m. on the total net retail sales space of superstores and the convenience goods

net retail sales space of hypermarkets delineated on applications drawings. The Guidelines also impose a cap of

6,000 sq. m. for retail warehouses.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

187


APPENDIX 7

RETAIL STRATEGY

Sequential approach

All significant developments will be subject to assessment through the Sequential Test as follows:

• Sites or premises within defined district centres or the Central Shopping Area, as appropriate, will be given highest

preference. Second highest preference will be given to sites or premises on the edge of district centres or the

Central Shopping Area as appropriate (defined as 300 to 400 metres walking distance provided there are no major

intervening barriers to movement). Least preference will be given to out of centre sites.

• In all cases, the site which offers the optimum accessibility options by all transport modes, including walking and

cycling will have highest preference.

• It should be demonstrated that all existing centre options have been fully evaluated and that flexibility has been

adopted in regard to the retail format.

Retail Impact

New developments can have an adverse impact on the vitality and viability of established centres. This is a

consequence of the competitive environment in which retailing operates. Though it is not an objective of the

Development Plan to prevent competition, proper planning and sustainable development includes promoting healthy

town centres, in the public interest. Where new developments compromise this planning goal, they will be rejected.

In making an application for planning permission for retail development which is considered to be large scale in

relation to existing centres, the applicant will be required to demonstrate compliance with the Development Plan and

that there will not be a material adverse impact on the vitality and viability of any existing centre.

In submitting evidence in relation to retail impact the applicant shall address the following criteria and demonstrate

whether or not the proposal would:

• Support the long term strategy for the Central Shopping Area and district centres as established in the

Development Plan and not materially diminish the prospect of attracting private sector investment into one or more

district centres.

• Cause an adverse impact in one or more district centres or the Central Shopping Area, either singly or cumulatively

with recent developments or other committed planning permissions, sufficient to undermine the quality of the

centre or its role in the economic and social life of the community.

• Diminish the range of activities and services that the Central Shopping Area and district centre can support.

• Cause an increase, likely to persist in the long term, in the number of vacant properties in the existing centres.

• Ensure a high standard of access both by public transport, foot and private car so that the proposal is easily

accessible by all sections of society.

• Link effectively with an existing district centre so that there is likely to be commercial synergy.

Design

New retail developments should be of a high quality of design and should contribute to a good urban environment

and public domain. Developments should present an attractive frontage which integrates the development with

existing streets and public spaces, thus allowing for a synergy between the proposed development and existing uses

in the vicinity. Extensive surface car parking to the front of developments, which detracts from the character of a

centre and discourages pedestrians, should be avoided and parking standards should be in accordance with the

relevant Development Plan standards.

New retail developments should be accessible by a range of transport options including public transport, private car,

bicycle and by foot. Development should be located close to existing public transport links including, where possible,

rail links or QBCs. Provision should also be made for secure parking for cyclists and secure routes for pedestrians.

There should also be an emphasis on access for all, including the mobility impaired, the elderly and those with babies

and young children.

The appropriateness of providing ground floor retail uses in zones adjacent to the inner city Market Streets will need to

be critically assessed. The provision of any convenience or comparison floor space in such areas must take account

of policies and objectives which seek to maintain and strengthen existing district centres, provide additional floor

space related to the hierarchy of existing centres and encourage the regeneration of Market Streets.

188

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


BLOIC PHÁBHÁLA CLOICHE LE COINNEÁIL, LE HATHCHÓIRIÚ NÓ LE TABHAIRT ISTEACH SNASRÁIDEANNA SEO A LEANAS AGUISÍNÍ 8

APPENDIX 8

STONE SETTS TO BE RETAINED,

RESTORED OR INTRODUCED IN

THE FOLLOWING STREETS

No. District Street

1 Dublin Castle Area a) Cork Hill (part of)

b) Ship Street Great (whole)

c) Ship Street Little (whole)

d) John's Lane East

2 Guinness Hop Store/Liberties Area a) Crane Street (part of)

b) Rainsford Street (part of)

c) Bellevue

d) John's Lane West

e) St. Augustine Street

f) Mullinahack to Usher's Quay

g) St. Catherine's Lane

h) Market Street South

Wards Hill

3 Smithfield Area a) Bow Street (part of)

b) Church Street New (part of)

c) Haymarket (whole)

d) Smithfield (whole)

4 Temple Bar Area a) Fownes Street Lower (whole)

b) Fownes Street Upper (part of)

c) Crown Alley

d) Exchange Street Upper (whole)

e) Foster Place South (whole)

f) Anglesea Street

g) Cecilia Street

h) Cope Street

i) Crowe Street

j) Crown Alley

k) Essex Gate

l) Temple Lane South

m) Crane Lane

n) Sycamore Street

o) Eustace St

p) Fleet St

q) Asdill’s Row

r) Bedford row

s) Aston Place

t) Price’s Lane

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

189


APPENDIX 8

STONE SETTS TO BE RETAINED, RESTORED OR INTRODUCED IN THE FOLLOWING STREETS

No. District Street

5 North City a) Anglesea Row (whole)

b) Halston Street (part of)

c) North Lotts (whole)

d) Abbey Cottages

e) Anglesea Row

f) Castleforbes Road

g) Church Street New

h) Cuckoo Lane

i) Guild Street

j) Haymarket

k) Hendrick Place

l) The North Lotts

m) King's Inn

n) Stanley Street, northwards,

o) and entrance to the City Council

Cleansing Depot Henrietta Street

6 South City a) Britain Quay

b) Green Street East

c) Hanover Quay

d) Green Street East

e) Forbes Street – stretching from

Sir John Rogerson`s Quay to

junction with Hanover Quay.

190

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


LIMISTÉIR PHÁBHÁILTE AGUISÍNÍ 9

APPENDIX 9 PAVED AREAS

Paved Areas and Streets with Granite Paving Flags and Kerbing, Original Coal-Hole Covers,

Traditional Pattern Manhole Covers, and Stone and Cast-Iron Protective Bollards, to be retained

or restored and included in the City Council’s Programme for Restoration.

Anglesea Street

Blessington Street (west of Berkeley Street)

Castle Street

Cecilia Street

Chancery Place (at Four Courts)

Chancery Street (at Bridewell)

Charlemont Bridge

Charles Street Great (granite paving to front of Free Church)

Christ Church Place (at Christ Church Cathedral)

City Hall

College Green (Bank of Ireland and Trinity college)

Crown Alley

Custom House Quay (at Custom House)

Dominick Street Lower (at Church)

Earlsfort Terrace (at National Concert Hall)

Essex Gate

Essex Street East

Eustace Street

Exchange Court

Exchange Street Lower

Exchange Street Upper

Fitzwilliam Square

Fitzwilliam Street Lower

Fitzwilliam Street Upper

Fleet Street

Foster Place South

Fownes Street Lower

Fownes Street Upper

Frederick Street South

Grattan Bridge

Green Street (at Courthouse)

Halston Street (at Courthouse)

Harcourt Street

Henrietta Street

Heuston Bridge

Huband Bridge

Inns Quay (at Four Courts)

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

191


APPENDIX 9

PAVED AREAS

John's Lane West

Johnston Court

King Street South

Latouche Bridge

Lord Edward Street

Merrion Square

Merrion Street Lower (at Government buildings)

Merrion Street Upper

Moore Street

North Great George's Street

O'Connell Bridge

O'Connell Street Lower ( At GPO)

O'Connell Street Upper

Palace Street

Parliament Street

Pearse Street (at St. Mark’s Church)

Pembroke Street Lower

Pembroke Street Upper

Percy Place

Smithfield

Temple Bar

Temple Lane South

Werburgh Street (at Bishop’s House)

Winetavern Street (at Civic Offices)

Wood Quay (at Civic Offices)

192

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


LIMISTÉIR PHÁBHÁILTE AGUS SRÁIDEANNA INA BHFUIL FÓIRCHLOCHA EIBHIR AGUISÍNÍ 10

APPENDIX 10 PAVED AREAS AND STREETS WITH

GRANITE KERBING

Paved Areas and Streets with Granite Kerbing, Concrete Flags or Brick, and/or some other

traditional features such as Coal-Hole Covers, Manhole Covers, and Stone And Cast-Iron

Protective Bollards, to be retained or restored and included in the City Council’s Programme

For Restoration.

Abbey Cottages

Abbey Street Lower

Abbey Street Middle

Abbey Street Upper

Amiens Street

Arran Quay

Arran Street East

Aston Quay

Aungier Street

Bachelor's Walk

Baggot Street Lower

Balfe Street

Bellevue

Belvedere Road

Beresford Place

Beresford Row

Berkeley Road

Berkeley Street

Blackhall Place

Blackhall Street

Blessington Street

Bolton Street

Bow Street

Bride Street

Bride Street New

Bridgefoot Street

Bridgefoot Street Lower

Bridgefoot Street Upper

Brighton Square: granite kerbing

Broadstone

Buckingham Street Lower

Buckingham Street Upper

Bull Alley Street

Burgh Quay

Camden Street Lower

Camden Street Upper

Capel Street

Castle Street

Cathal Brugha Street

Cathedral Street

Cavendish Row

Cecilia Street

Chancery Place

Chancery Street

Charlemont Bridge

Charlemont Street

Charles Street Great

Chatham Lane

Chatham Row

Chatham Street

Christ Church Place

Church Street

Church Street New

Church Street Upper

City Quay

City Wall

Clanbrassil Street Lower

Clanbrassil Street Upper

Clanwilliam Place

Clare Street

Clarendon Market

Clarendon Row

Clarendon Street

Clonmel Street

College Green

Constitution Hill

Cook Street

Coombe, The

Cope Street

Cork Hill

Crampton Court

Crane Street

Cross Kevin Street

Cuffe Street

Custom House Quay

Dalymount

Dame Court

Dame Street

Daniel Street

Dawson Street

Dean Street

Denmark Street Great

D'Olier Street

Dominick Street Lower

Dominick Street Upper

Dorset Street

Drury Street

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

193


APPENDIX 10

PAVED AREAS AND STREETS WITH GRANITE KERBING

Earlsfort Terrace

Eccles Street

Eden Quay

Ellis Quay

Ely Place

Exchange Street Lower

Exchange Street Upper

Exchequer Street

Fade Street

Fenian Street

Fishamble Street

Fitzwilliam Place

Fitzwilliam Street Lower

Fitzwilliam Street Upper

Fleet Street

Francis Street

Frank Sherwin Bridge

Frederick Street North

Gardiner Place

Gardiner Row

Gardiner Street Lower

Gardiner Street Middle

Gardiner Street Upper

George's Quay

Gloucester Diamond

Golden Lane

Granby Row

Grattan Bridge

Great Western Avenue

Great Western Square

Great Western Villas

Green Street

Grenville Street

Halston Street

Hammond Lane

Harcourt Street

Hardwicke Street

Harry Street

Harty Place

Hatch Street Lower

Hatch Street Upper

Hawkins Street

Haymarket

Herbert Lane

Herbert Place

Herbert Street

Heuston Bridge

High Street

Hill Street

Hogan’s Place

Holles Street

Huband Bridge

Hume Street

Inns Quay

James Street

Jervis Street

John's Street West

Johnston Court

Kelly's Lane

Kevin Street Lower

Kevin Street Upper

Kildare Street

Killarney Street

King Street North

King’s Inns Street

Leeson Street Lower

Leinster Street South

Lincoln Lane

Lincoln Place

Litton Lane

Lombard Street East

Long Lane

Lord Edward Street

Manor Street

Market Street South

Marlborough Street

Mary Street

Mary's Abbey

Meath Street

Meetinghouse Lane

Mercer's Street Lower

Merchants Quay

Merrion Row

Merrion Street Lower

Merrion Street Upper

Michaels Hill

Military Road

Molesworth Street

Mount Street Crescent

Mount Street Lower

Mount Street Upper

Mountjoy Street

Mullinahack Street

Nassau Street

New Street

Nicholas Street

North Circular Road

North Wall Quay: mooring posts

O'Connell Bridge

O'Connell Street Lower

O'Connell Street Upper

Ormond Quay Lower

Ormond Quay Upper

194

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


LIMISTÉIR PHÁBHÁILTE AGUS SRÁIDEANNA INA BHFUIL FÓIRCHLOCHA EIBHIR AGUISÍNÍ 10

Palace Street

Park Gate

Park Gate Street

Parnell Square East

Parnell Square North

Parnell Square West

Parnell Street

Patrick Street

Pearse Street

Pembroke Street Lower

Pembroke Street Upper

Percy Place

Phibsborough Road

Portland Street North

Quays from Grattan Bridge to O'Connell Street

Queen Street

Rainsford Street

Rathdown Road

Redmond’s Hill

Richmond Street South

Rutland Place

Ryder’s Row

Usher's Island

Usher's Quay

Victoria Quay

Warrington Place

Waterloo Avenue

Wellington Quay

Werburgh Street

Western Way

Westland Row

Westmoreland Street

Wexford Street

Whitefriar Place

William Street South

Wilton Place

Winetavern Street

Wolfe Tone Quay

Wood Quay

Wormwood Gate

York Street

Sackville Place

Saint Mary's Place North

Sarsfield Quay

Seán McDermott Street Lower

Seán McDermott Street Upper

Sheriff Street

Sherrard Street Lower

Sherrard Street Upper

Ship Street Great

Ship Street Little

Smithfield

South Great Georges Street

St Patrick's Hospital

St Stephen's Green

St Stephen's Green West

Stafford Street

Steeven's Lane

Stephen's Street Lower

Stephen's Street Upper

Stoneybatter

Store Street

Swan Yard

Swift's Row

Synod Hall

Talbot Street

Temple Lane South

Thomas Street

Thomas Street West

Townsend Street

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

195


APPENDIX 11

GUIDELINES FOR WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES

APPENDIX 11 GUIDELINES FOR WASTE

STORAGE FACILITIES

Standards for Apartments

The requirements set out in the Bye-laws for the Collection, Storage and Presentation of Household Waste and

Certain Related Waste Management Matters must be adhered to and, in particular, the requirement in the Bye-Laws

to segregate waste into separate fractions to facilitate the collection of dry recyclables, organic kitchen/garden waste

and residual waste.

Bins that comply with IS EN 840 1997 must be used. Ideally 1,100 Litre bins should be used with dimension of 1.3

metres long by 1.0 metres wide by 1.3 metres high and with a load capacity of approximately 0.5 tonnes. Other

types of receptacles may only be used with the written consent of Dublin City Council.

There must be enough storage space for a minimum of 1 No. 1,100 Litre Bin per 15 people availing of the communal

collection scheme for residual household waste.

Sufficient space must be provided to accommodate the collection of dry recyclables and organic kitchen

waste/garden waste. Provision should also be made for the collection of glass (separated by colour) in Bottle Banks

within the curtilage of the apartment block. The total footprint of each of these Banks is 4 metres by 2 metres wide.

The location must be external, with sufficient access and clearance for servicing using a crane.

The bin storage areas must not be on the public street and should not be visible or accessible to the general public.

The bin storage areas should be designed so that each bin within the storage area is accessible to occupants of the

apartment block (including people with disabilities).

Suitable waste water drainage points should be installed in the bin storage area for cleaning and disinfecting purposes.

If more than one weekly collection is required from Dublin City Council, a contract must be signed in advance with

Dublin City Council.

If the waste is collected by a private contractor, that contractor must be the holder of a current Waste Collection Permit.

Sufficient access and egress must be provided to enable bins to be moved easily from the storage area to an

appropriate collection point on the public street nearby. The access and egress area should have no steps and have

a minimal incline ramp.

Standards for Commercial/Industrial Developments

The requirements set out in the Bye-laws for the Collection, Storage and Presentation of Commercial Waste and

Certain Related Waste Management Matters must be adhered to and, in particular, the requirement in the Bye-Laws

to segregate waste into separate fractions to facilitate the collection of dry recyclables, organic kitchen/garden waste

and residual waste.

Bins that comply with IS EN 840 1997 must be used. Ideally 1,100 Litre bins should be used with dimension of 1.3

metres long by 1.0 metres wide by 1.3 metres high and with a load capacity of approximately 0.5 tonnes. Other

types of receptacles may only be used with the written consent of Dublin City Council.

There must be enough storage space for a minimum of 1 No. 1,100 Litre Bin per 10 bags to be collected.

Sufficient space must be provided to accommodate the collection of dry recyclables and organic kitchen

waste/garden waste. Provision should also be made for the collection of glass (separated by colour) in Bottle Banks

within the curtilage of the development. The total footprint of each of these Banks is 4 metres by 2 metres wide. The

location must be external, with sufficient access and clearance for servicing using a crane.

196

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


TREOIRLÍNTE AR ÁISEANNA STÓRÁLA DRAMHAÍOLA AGUISÍNÍ 11

The bin storage areas must not be on the public street and should not be visible or accessible to the general public.

The bin storage areas should be designed so that each bin within the storage area is accessible to

occupants/employees of the development (including people with disabilities).

Suitable waste water drainage points should be installed in the bin storage area for cleaning and disinfecting

purposes.

A waste collection contract must be signed with Dublin City Council or a private waste collector who is the holder of a

Waste Collection Permit, prior to the commencement of the collection of waste.

Sufficient access and egress must be provided to enable bins to be moved easily from the storage area to an

appropriate collection point on the public street nearby. The access and egress area should have no steps and have

a minimal incline ramp.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

197


APPENDIX 12

GUIDELINES ON COMMUNICATIONS ANTENNAE / TREOIRLÍNTE AR AERÓGA TEILEACHUMARSÁIDE

APPENDIX 12

GUIDELINES ON

TELECOMMUNICATIONS ANTENNAE

Siting and Design

Telecommunications antennae and supporting structures should preferably be located on industrial estates or on

lands zoned for industrial/employment uses. Possible location in commercial areas, such as rooftop locations on tall

buildings, may also be acceptable, subject to visual amenity considerations. The viability of locations, such as existing

ESB sub-stations, should also be explored.

Only as a last resort, and after all the alternative options are found to be unavailable or unsuitable, will the location of

free-standing masts be considered in a residential area or beside a school. If such a location should become

necessary, sites already developed for utilities should be considered, and masts and antennae should be designed

and adapted for the specific location. The support structure should be kept to the minimum height consistent with

effective operation, and should be monopole (or poles) rather than a latticed tripod or square structure.

Possible Sharing of Installations

Where existing support structures are not unduly obtrusive, Dublin City Council will encourage co-location or sharing

of antennae on existing support structures, masts and tall buildings. Applicants must satisfy Dublin City Council that

they have made every reasonable effort to share with other operators.

Visual Amenity

Telecommunications antennae and support structures shall not detract from the special character and appearance of

designated conservation areas or from the special artistic, architectural and historic interest of buildings listed for

preservation and protection in the Development Plan.

In assessing proposals for telecommunications antennae and support structures, factors such as the object in the

wider townscape and the position of the object with respect to the skyline will be closely examined. These factors will

be very carefully considered when assessing proposals in a designated conservation area, open-space amenity area,

historic park, or in the vicinity of protected structures, special views or prospects, monuments or sites of

archaeological importance.

The location of antennae or support structures within any of these areas or in proximity to protected structures,

archaeological sites and other monuments should be avoided.

Health and Safety

As part of their planning application, operators should furnish a statement of compliance with the International

Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) Guidelines (Health Physics, vol. 54, no.1, Jan 1988) or the equivalent

European Pre-standard 50166-2, which has been conditioned by the licensing arrangements with the Department of

Transport, Energy and Communications, and to furnish evidence that an installation of the type applied for complies

with the above guidelines.

198

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


SAINMHÍNITHE AR RANGÚ ÚSÁID TALAIMH AGUISÍNÍ 13

APPENDIX 13 LAND USE CLASS DEFINITIONS

The definition of various uses which appear in the land-use zoning are for guidance only. Where a use is not defined in

this appendix the definition to be used will be as set out in the Planning Acts and Regulations.

Advertisements and Advertisement Structures

Any word, letter, model, balloon, kite, poster, notice, device or representation employed for the purpose of

advertisement, announcement or direction. The definition includes any structure on which the advertisement is

mounted, such as a hoarding, scaffold, framework, pole, standard, device or sign (whether illuminated or not), and

which is used or intended for the use of exhibiting advertisements.

Agriculture

Use of land or buildings for the purposes set out in Section 2(1) 'agriculture' of the Planning and Development Acts

2000-2002.

Amusement/Leisure Complex

A building, or part thereof, used for the playing of gaming machines, video games or other amusement machines as

defined in Article 5 of the Planning and Development Regulations, 2001. It may also include a bowling alley, quasar

complex, pool or snooker hall, or indoor children's play centre.

Bed and Breakfast

A building, or part thereof, where sleeping accommodation and breakfast are available solely to residents. Such an

establishment is distinguished from a guesthouse, which is regarded as a more intensive form of land use where the

possibility of additional meals to be provided for residents exists.

Boarding Kennels

A building, or part thereof, or land used for the temporary accommodation of dogs and cats for reward.

Buildings for the Health, Safety or Welfare of the Public

Use of a building as a health centre, hospital, hostel (where care is provided), retirement home, nursing home, day

centre and any other building for:

• The provision of residential accommodation and care to people in need of care

(but not the use of a dwelling house for that purpose)

• Use as a residential school, college or training centre

Caravan Park (Holiday)

The use of land for the accommodation of vehicle caravans or temporary chalets, during the period from

1 March to 31 October each year, for holiday purposes only.

Car Park

A building, or part thereof, or land (not being part of the public roadway) used for the parking of mechanically

propelled vehicles, excluding heavy commercial vehicles. Car parks may, if ancillary to a use such as recreation, be

included within the definition of the principal use.

Car parks are to be taken also as multi-storey and underground structures.

Car parks for public transport users: see under Park and Ride.

Casual Trading

Refers to on street trading from pitches designated by the City Council.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

199


APPENDIX 13

LAND USE CLASS DEFINITIONS

Cemetery

Land used as a burial ground.

Childcare Facilities: Class 8

Childcare is taken to mean full day care and sessional facilities and services for pre-school and school-going children

out of school hours. It includes services involving care, education and socialisation opportunities for children. Thus

services such as pre-schools, naíonraí (Irish language playgroups), day-care services, crèches, playgroups, and after

school groups are included, but childminding, schools (primary, secondary and special) and residential centres for

children are excluded.

Sessional Childcare: This category is defined as the provision of a service which offers a planned programme to

pre-school children of up to 3.5 hours per day by trained personnel. Sessional services include playgroups and

Montessori groups.

Full Day Childcare: The provision of a structured day-care service for children for more than 3.5 hours per day,

supervised by competent personnel. Full day-care includes crèches and nurseries.

After School Childcare: This involves extended day-care for school-going children, usually Monday to Friday.

Drop-in Centre is defined as a centre in a shopping centre, leisure centre or other similar establishment which is

provided as part of a customer/client service, and where children are left for a short period of time while the parent or

guardian is availing of a service or attending an event.

Childminding is defined as the minding of not more than 6 children, including that person’s own children, in his or

her own home. This category of childcare is categorised as exempted development under the Planning and

Development Acts 2000 to 2002.

Civic Amenity/Recycling Centre

A facility to which materials can be brought for sorting and subsequent recycling.

Cultural/Recreational Building

A building, or part thereof, used for purposes of a concert hall/music hall, theatre, conference centre, cinema, bingo

hall, swimming pool, skating rink, gymnasium, squash centre, health studio, and most indoor sports facilities not

involving the use of firearms or motorised vehicles. It also includes:

• An art gallery (but not for the sale or hire of works of art)

• A museum

• A public library or public reading room

• A public hall

• An exhibition hall

• A social centre, community centre, or non-residential club, but not a dance hall.

Discount Food Store

Single level, self service store normally of between 1,000 – 1,500 square metres of gross floor space selling a limited

range of goods at competitive prices, often with adjacent car parking.

200

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


SAINMHÍNITHE AR RANGÚ ÚSÁID TALAIMH AGUISÍNÍ 13

Education

• The use of a building, or part thereof, or land as a school, college, technical institute, academy, lecture hall or other

educational use. Such activities may be controlled in particular land use zonings regarding hours of operation.

• Where a building, or part thereof, on the same site as an educational use or on an adjoining site, is designed for

use or is used as a residence for staff or pupils, such a use is regarded as educational.

• A distinction is made between establishments which do not offer educational facilities of any kind after 6.00pm.

Those that do may not be regarded as compatible with local residential amenities. Where a day time facility offers

night classes to the public or other than daytime students, planning permission for a change of use will be

required.

Embassy

A building, or part thereof, or land used by a foreign government for diplomatic purposes. The use may include a

residential content for the staff of the embassy which is ancillary to the embassy activities. The use does not include a

foreign trade delegation or trade office.

Enterprise Centre

Use of a building, or part thereof, or land for small-scale 'starter type' industries and services usually sharing grouped

service facilities.

Funeral Home

Use of a building, or part thereof, for the laying out of remains, the holding of burial services, and the assembling of

funerals. A building, or part thereof, used solely for making funeral arrangements is considered to be an office use.

Garages

• Motor Repair: a building, or part thereof, or land used for providing lubrication, repair or mechanical service to

vehicles. It may also be used for the supply of fuel, washing facilities and the sale of vehicles or spare parts. (See

also Petrol Stations).

• Private: a building, or part thereof, or land used for the overnight storage of cars on a private basis where no sales

or services are provided.

• Motor Sales Outlet/Showroom: a building, or part thereof, or land used for the display and/or sale of motor

vehicles, excluding the sale of spare parts or accessories. A motor sales outlet is not a shop.

Garden Centre

The use of land, including buildings, for the cultivation, storage and/or the display and sale of horticultural products

and the display and sale of related goods and equipment.

Golf Club

Includes pitch and putt courses, ancillary car parking and the provision of a clubhouse.

Goods Convenience

Examples of such goods are food, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, tobacco, and non-durable

household goods.

Goods Comparison

Examples of such goods are clothing and footwear, furniture furnishings and household equipment (excluding nondurable

foods), medical and pharmaceutical products, therapeutic appliances and equipment, educational and

recreation equipment and accessories, books, newspapers and magazines, goods for personal care and goods not

elsewhere classified.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

201


APPENDIX 13

LAND USE CLASS DEFINITIONS

Guest House: Class 6

A building, or part thereof, where sleeping accommodation, meals and other refreshments are available to residents

and non-residents, and which has a minimum of five rooms and no more than nineteen rooms.

Halting Site

An area provided for residential use by members of the travelling community to include both caravan parking and

limited storage by members of the travelling community residing on the site.

Heavy Vehicle Parks

Land used for the temporary parking (meaning overnight or a weekend) of heavy goods vehicles but excluding the

storage of containers or trailers unattached from a cab.

Holiday Home

A residential building, or part thereof, which is rented/contracted as accommodation for short periods of time.

Home-Based Economic Activity

Small-scale commercial activities carried out by residents of a dwelling being subordinate to the use as a single family

dwelling.

Hostel: Class 6

A building, or part thereof, which would provide meals, sleeping accommodation and maybe other refreshments and

entertainment to residents only, and is other than a hostel where care is provided.

Hotel

A building, or part thereof, where sleeping accommodation, meals and other refreshments and entertainment,

conference facilities, etc., are available to residents and non-residents, and where there is a minimum of twenty rooms

en suite. A hotel includes an 'aparthotel'.

Household Fuel Centre

Use of a structure or lands for the storage and sale of solid fuel or bottled gas for retail sale.

Industry Building

An industrial building is a structure (not being a shop or a structure in or adjacent to and belonging to a quarry or

mine) used for the carrying on of any industrial process. Uses that are ancillary to an industrial use, e.g. car parks and

offices, are included in the definition.

Industrial Process

Means any process which is carried on in the course of trade or business other than agriculture and which is for or

incidental to the making of any article or part of an article (including a vehicle, aircraft, ship or vessel, or a film, video or

sound recording), or the altering, repairing, ornamenting, finishing, cleaning, washing, packing, canning, adapting for

sale, breaking up or demolition of any article, including the getting, dressing, or treatment of minerals.

Internet Cafés and Call Centres

An internet café is an outlet where the service is principally to visiting members of the public and consists of the

provision of access to online computer services including the internet and email with or without limited restaurant

facilities.

A call centre is an outlet where the service is to visiting members of the public and consists principally of the provision

of telephone and communication services.

Light Industrial Building

Means an industrial building in which the processes carried on or the plant or machinery installed are such as could

be carried on or installed in any residential area without detriment to the amenity of that area by reason of noise,

vibration, smell, fumes, smoke, soot, ash, dust or grit.

202

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


SAINMHÍNITHE AR RANGÚ ÚSÁID TALAIMH AGUISÍNÍ 13

Live work units

Live work units are commercial units designed to accommodate a residential element.

Science and Technology-based Industry

Knowledge based processes and industrial activities (including ancillary offices) in which research, innovation and

development play a significant part, and which lead to and accommodate the commercial production of a high

technology output, e.g. data processing, software development, commercial laboratory, healthcare, research and

development, media recording and general media associated uses, training, publishing, financial, administrative

headquarters, film production, telemarketing, teleservicing, light industry, enterprise centre.

Medical and Related Consultants

This applies to the use of part of a dwelling by a medical doctor or related consultant or those engaged in

paramedical consultancy. In either case, the practitioner must also be the occupier of the dwelling.

Nightclub

A building, or part thereof, in which dancing or the performance of music or cabaret with the service of food or

beverages is the primary function at hours between 6.00pm and 6.00am.

Office

A building in which the sole or principal use is the handling and processing of information and research, or the

undertaking of professional, administrative, financial, marketing or clerical work, and includes a bank or building

society but not a post office or betting office.

Open Space

Any land, including water, whether enclosed or not, on which there are no buildings, or of which not more than 5% is

covered with buildings, and the remainder of which is laid out as a garden or for the purposes of recreation, or lies

vacant, waste or unoccupied. It also includes school playing fields, playgrounds, urban farms and forests.

Park and Ride Facility

Car park to facilitate the users of private cars to complete their journey by public transport.

Petrol Station

A structure or land used for the retail sale of petrol, diesel, gas for motor vehicles, motor oils, car parts or accessories,

and the provision of minor services required in transit (air, water or car wash and vacuum). It excludes a commercial

garage for motor sales but may include a retail element, depending on location and subject to the controls outlined in

Chapter 15.

Pigeon Loft

Any structure, whether purpose built or not, used for the housing of pigeons which are kept for the purpose of pigeon

racing or for any other purpose related to pigeon keeping.

Place of Public Worship

A building, or part thereof, or land used as a church, chapel, oratory, mosque, temple, synagogue, meeting house or

other place of public devotion. It also includes use of such a structure for the social or recreational activities of the

religious body using the structure. This definition also includes use as a monastery or convent.

Public House

A building, or part thereof, or land licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor to the public, and may also include an offlicense

premises as an ancillary use. Such premises are regarded as business premises.

Public Service Installation

A building, or part thereof, a roadway or land used for the provision of public services. Public services include all

service installations necessary for electricity, gas, telephone, radio, television, data transmission, drainage and other

statutory undertakers: public libraries, public lavatories, public telephone boxes, bus shelters, etc., but does not

include incinerators/waste to energy plants. The offices of such undertakers and companies involved in service

installations are not included in this definition.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

203


APPENDIX 13

LAND USE CLASS DEFINITIONS

Recycling Facility

A building, or part thereof, or land for the provision of recycling facilities/treatment for dealing with wastes such as

packaging waste and harmful wastes (e.g. batteries, oils and paints).

Residential

The use for human habitation of a building, or part thereof, including houses, flats, bedsitting rooms and residential

mews buildings. The definition of house and habitable house in Section 2 of the Planning and Development Acts,

2000 to 2002 shall apply.

Restaurant

A building where the primary function is the sale of meals/refreshment for consumption on the premises.

Retail Parks

A single development of at least three retail warehouses with associated car parking.

Retail Warehouse

A large single-level store specialising in the sale of bulky household goods such as carpets, furniture and electrical

goods, bulky DIY items, vehicles, caravans, boats, building materials and gardening products.

Scrapyard

Land used for the reception, dismantling, packing and storing of waste and used materials and goods before

transport for processing and recycling elsewhere.

Shop: Class 1

Means a structure used for any or all of the following purposes, where the sale, display or service is principally to

visiting members of the public:

a) For the retail sale of goods a)

b) As a post office

c) For the sale of tickets or as a travel agency

d) For the sale of sandwiches or other (cold) food for consumption off the premises, where the sale of such food is

subsidiary to the main retail use,

e) For hairdressing

f) For the display of goods for sale

g) For the hiring out of domestic or personal goods or articles

h) As a launderette or dry cleaners

i) For the reception of goods to be washed, cleaned or repaired

j) But does not include any use associated with the provision of funeral services or as a funeral home, or as a hotel,

a restaurant or a public house, or for the sale of hot food for consumption off the premises, except under

(d) above, or any use to which Class 2 or 3 of Part 4 of Schedule 2 of the Planning and Development

Regulations, 2001 applies.

Shop: Neighbourhood

A neighbourhood shop is one which primarily serves a local community and does not generally attract business from

outside that community. They will primarily serve a “walk-in” population and have limited carparking.

204

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


SAINMHÍNITHE AR RANGÚ ÚSÁID TALAIMH AGUISÍNÍ 13

Shop: District

A shop (excluding retail warehousing) which is larger in scale and more varied in what it may sell than a

neighbourhood shop, and therefore serves a wider area, including the district centres.

Shop: Factory Shop

A shop adjacent to the production unit and specialising in the sale of manufacturers’ products direct to the public.

Shop: Major Comparison

Shops selling comparison goods (excluding retail parks/warehouses) which are larger in scale than neighbourhood or

district shops, or are very specialised and therefore serve a wider area.

Takeaway

A structure used for the sale of hot food for consumption off the premises.

Tea Room

Use of a building, or part thereof, for the sale and/or consumption of tea, coffee and light refreshments only, and is

not a full restaurant facility.

Training Centre

Use of a building, or part thereof, or land for the training or retraining of persons of an industrial or service nature.

Transfer Station

A structure or land, usually enclosed and screened, and which is used for the temporary storage of refuse and waste

materials pending transfer to a final disposal facility or for reuse. The definition includes a baling station, recycling

facility, civic amenity facility, materials recovery facility, and materials recycling facility.

Transport Depot

Use of a building or land as a depot associated with the operation of transport business to include parking and

servicing of vehicles.

Veterinary Surgery

Use of a building, or part thereof, or land as a clinic or surgery for the treatment and care of animals. If animals are

housed on the premises overnight or longer, the use is not consistent with adjoining residential amenity.

Warehousing: Class 5

A structure, or part thereof, where the business, principally of a wholesale nature, is transacted and where goods are

stored or bonded prior to distribution and sale elsewhere.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

205


APPENDIX 14 SAFETY DESIGN GUIDELINES / TREOIRLÍNTE AR DHEARADH NÓSANNA IMEACHTA SÁBHÁILTEACHTA

APPENDIX 14 SAFETY DESIGN GUIDELINES

New developments and refurbishments should be designed to promote safety and security. The following items

should be taken into consideration in the design of safe environments, including within Prime Urban Centres and

Urban and Framework Development Areas:

• Overlooking of public areas;

• Preventing the creation of dark or secluded areas, or enclosed public areas;

• Eliminating left-over pockets of land with no clear purpose;

• Provision of adequate lighting;

• The use of natural barriers between private and public areas;

• Increasing the use of public areas by promoting a variety of land uses in their vicinities;

• Where possible residents should be able to watch over the entrance to their house or flat (recessed entrances

should therefore be avoided). Front doors should also be overlooked from other houses or from well trafficked

public areas;

• Where it is necessary to use common entrances, e.g. in apartment blocks, the aim should be to limit access to the

building to residents, their guests and others who have legitimate business in the building. Common entrances

should be arranged so that as few households as possible share each entrance;

• Back gardens should back onto other back gardens or secure private areas and not onto roadways or other public

areas;

• The layout and design of roads within residential areas should aim to ensure that traffic volumes and speeds are

appropriate and that all forms of through traffic are discouraged;

• Materials used in public areas should be sufficiently robust to discourage vandalism;

• Fast growing shrubs and trees should be restricted to areas where they will not obscure lighting or pedestrian

routes. Shrubs should be set back from the edge of paths.

206

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


ACCESS FOR ALL / ROCHTAIN DO CHÁCH AGUISÍNÍ 15

APPENDIX 15 ACCESS FOR ALL

In accordance with the City Council’s policy of providing a fully accessible environment for everybody, Dublin City

Council will ensure:

• A place to park adjacent to a building or complex for passengers with disabilities as well as for drivers with

disabilities;

• Dished or level crossings at all traffic junctions;

• Parking bays which are sufficiently wide to allow access for wheelchairs;

• A route from a parking place to a building which is level or ramped and unimpeded by steps;

• An entrance to a building which is easy to distinguish and must be under cover;

• Signposting for buildings which is legible, well illuminated with lettering and numerals embossed or raised, and

names and numerals on doors at eye level;

• Pedestrian routes in open spaces or between buildings which are free from obstructions, pathways which are wide

enough for people who use wheelchairs, and surfaces which are slip-resistant;

• In the case of changes in level, shallow ramps in addition to steps and stairways which are clearly marked and

equipped with handrails;

• The careful siting of bollards, gully gratings and signposts to avoid hazards

• Public toilets for people with disabilities, which are sited so that they are accessible and usable;

• Level access to all public buildings, with a door which is easy to open and wide enough to permit the entry of a

wheelchair (revolving doors and frameless glass doors are considered to be hazardous);

• Floor surfaces inside the building which are slip-resistant, and where there are changes in level, ramps as well as

steps or stairways which are clearly marked;

• Where a building is multi-storey, a lift large enough for a wheelchair and a minimum of one other person, with

controls that are usable from a seated position to serve all main circulation areas which provide facilities;

• Clear sign-posting and usability of amenities, e.g. lavatories and telephone;

• The improvement of access to existing buildings and their surroundings, as opportunities arise, through alterations,

extensions and changes of use.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

207


APPENDIX 16 ROAD AND FOOTPATH STANDARDS FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT /

CAIGHDEÁIN BÓITHRE AGUS COSÁN LE HAGHAIDH FORBARTHA CÓNAITHE

APPENDIX 16 ROAD AND FOOTPATH STANDARDS FOR

RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

In general, where houses are on both sides of the road, the minimum width should be 6.5 metres with two 1.8 metre

footpaths. Where houses are on one side only, the minimum width of road should be 5.5 metres with a 1.8 metre

footpath on the side next to the houses, and a footpath or rubbing kerb on the opposite side, depending on likely

pedestrian usage. Roads in housing areas which are intended for use as bus routes should be 7.5 metres wide, with

2.5 metre footpaths.

Where only one footpath is deemed by the Planning Authority to be necessary, a brush kerb of 0.5 metres shall be

provided. Where appropriate, measures for traffic calming should be included in the design of all new housing estates.

The Planning Authority will adopt a flexible attitude in regard to restricted road widths over short lengths where no

other practicable solution is possible. However, this flexible attitude will not apply where it is not possible to provide an

access of sufficient width to comply with safety and engineering requirements.

Building set-backs at the front of houses shall be such as to provide for off street parking either to the front or to the

side of the dwelling. Where off street group parking is provided in innovative layouts, building lines can be reduced to

2 metres to allow provision for a privacy strip and/or landscaping.

Reductions in building lines to the front of dwellings should be compensated for by extra provision at the rear.

Garages may be set back at the side of a house to allow for parking behind the building line.

Where driveways are provided, they shall be at least 2.5 metres or, at most, 3.6 metres in width, and shall not have

outward opening gates. The design standards set out in the Planning Authority's leaflet ‘Parking Cars in Front

Gardens’ shall also apply. In residential developments, a turning bay/parking area for all vehicles, including public

service vehicles, shall be provided, and such roadway/turning area shall be designed to the standards set down by

Dublin City Council.

A 1.8 metre footpath shall be provided where large open spaces abut site roadways, in the interests of safety. On all

large open spaces, a suitable boundary treatment shall be provided, including landscaping treatment.

Internal roads within housing estates shall have, in general, a junction radii not greater than 3 metres. However, a

junction of a housing access road with a main road should have a radius of 6 metres. If the housing access road is a

bus route, a radius of 10.5 metres shall be provided.

208

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


GUIDELINES FOR STUDENT ACCOMODATION / TREOIRLÍNTE DO LÓISTÍN DO MHIC LÉINN AGUISÍNÍ 17

APPENDIX 17 GUIDELINES FOR STUDENT

ACCOMMODATION

In considering planning applications for student accommodation Dublin City Council will have regard to the

Department of Education and Science Guidelines on Residential Development for 3rd Level Students (1999).

In addition a number of criteria will be taken into account including:

• The location and accessibility to Educational Facilities and also proximity to existing or planned green routes or

other quality transport corridors and cycle facilities;

• The potential impact on local residential amenities;

• The level and quality of on-site facilities, including storage facilities, waste management, cycle storage, leisure

facilities (including shop/café uses), car parking and amenity;

• The architectural quality of the design and also the external layout, with respect to materials, scale, height and

relationship to adjacent structures. Internal layouts should take cognisance of the need for flexibility for future

possible changes of uses;

• In larger schemes a Design Statement will be required;

• In all schemes the applicants will be required to provide written documentary confirmation to prove that the

accommodation is let to students within the academic year;

• All permissions for student housing shall have a condition attached requiring planning permission from change of

use from student accommodation to other type of accommodation. Such applications will be resisted except

where it is demonstrated that over provision of student accommodation exists in the city.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

209


APPENDIX 18

PROTECTED STRUCTURES AND BUILDINGS IN CONSERVATION AREAS

APPENDIX 18 PROTECTED STRUCTURES AND

BUILDINGS IN CONSERVATION AREAS

Barrier Free Access and Protected Structures

The creation of barrier free access to protected structures can be problematic and difficult to reconcile. Where

access devices are proposed, the following information should be submitted:

• An assessment of the building’s access requirements, including details on the circulation and user requirements of

the building.

• An assessment of the impact of access devices on the special character and setting of the protected structure,

particularly where architectural details such as plinths, staircases and railings, which contribute to the special

interest of the building, are involved.

• An assessment of alternative design options considered to ensure the proposal would represent the most sensitive

access solution available.

• Details of the materials and specifications of both permanent and temporary devices which should be appropriate

to the location so as to reduce the visual impact of the mechanism.

Creative architectural responses which represent the most sensitive access solution will be actively encouraged.

Proposals should be so designed to ensure the device can be removed without damage to the fabric of the building,

where possible. In certain cases, it may be necessary to locate such devices on/in less significant parts of the

building. All works should retain the maximum amount of historic fabric in situ and should be designed to cause

minimum interference to the historic building fabric and reduce the visual impact of the mechanism.

Fire Safety Works and Protected Structures

Fire protection works to protected structures relate directly to the use requirements of a building and can have a

significant impact on the character of a protected structure. Such works can include lobbying, partitioning, provision

of fire doors, treatment of panelling and other joinery, enclosure of staircases and fire detection systems.

When considering proposals for fire safety measures, a strategic approach to fire protection works to the building will

be encouraged. In this regard, a fire safety plan should be drawn up in the initial stage, prior to the lodgement of a

planning application. In addition to identifying the user requirements for the building, the fire safety plan should

address the special interest of the structure and should aim to provide a satisfactory balance between fire safety and

protecting the historic fabric of the protected structure. In all instances, the most appropriate use for the building

which would not have a high fire safety risk factor will be sought. Uses which may diminish the special interest of a

protected structure through inappropriate alterations will generally not be encouraged.

Applications for fire protection works shall be guided by the principles of minimum intervention to the historic fabric

and the reversibility of alterations, where achievable.

Lighting of Protected Structures and buildings in Conservation Areas

Well designed exterior lighting of buildings, structures and spaces can play an important role in defining the character

of the built heritage. A successful lighting scheme will relate to the architectural form of the building and will sensitively

utilise the detailing and features of such buildings with low wattage light sources and discreet light fixtures. It will also

minimise the spillage of potential obtrusive light to adjacent areas and will avoid unnecessary over lighting, which can

alter the appearance of a building or area. Successful schemes may also combine exterior lighting with interior

lighting; however, in certain cases, interior lighting only may be appropriate.

In considering applications for lighting schemes, the need for such schemes should be clearly established. Proposals

for lighting schemes should include details of the size, type, siting, and number of fixtures, as well as wattage, colour

of light source, light pattern and potential impact on the building material.

210

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


DÉANMHAIS AGUS FOIRGNIMH CHOSANTA I LIMISTÉIR CAOMHANTAIS AGUISÍNÍ 18

To avoid conflict, proposals should demonstrate how lighting schemes would enhance and protect the character of an

area or group of protected structures and/or co-ordinate with any adjacent lighting schemes. Powerful wide angled

over lighting which can diminish the architectural features of a building or area will be discouraged.

The overriding consideration for such schemes will be to ensure the protection of the special character and setting of

protected structures and conservation areas.

Lighting schemes may not be appropriate in certain areas, as the spillage of light from lighting schemes can impact

on the amenities of such areas.

Residential Parking in the Curtilage of Protected Structures and in Conservation Areas

Features including boundary walls, railings and gardens are important to the character and setting of protected

structures and conservation areas. In addition to the development control standards laid out in Chapter 15, proposals

for off street parking shall comply with the following design requirements:

• A high standard of design and layout will be expected to integrate the proposal into the sensitive context

• The retention of most of the original boundary wall and/or railings and plinth wall and the re-use of the removed

railings for new access gates will be sought

• The width of the vehicular access shall be kept to a minimum, having a maximum width of no more than 2.6m and

gates should open inward or should slide/fold back where there is insufficient depth

• The outlook of rooms with regard to light, including basement rooms, should not be obstructed

• Works which would involve the loss of mature trees (those in good condition) which contribute to the character of a

protected structure or conservation area, both within the private and public domain, will be discouraged

• High quality appropriate surface treatment, which should be influenced by the surrounding context and buildings,

will be sought, particularly traditional materials such as granite/paving slabs and setts. Bituminous surfacing or

concrete surfacing are not acceptable.

• The extent of designated hardstanding area for the parked car shall be kept to a minimum and the maximum

amount of grassed area and soft landscaping shall be retained. The use of planting and soft landscaping will be

encouraged to reduce the visual impact of the parked car.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

211


APPENDIX 19

GUIDELINES FOR PIGEON LOFTS / STREOIRLÍNTE AR ÁILÉIR COLÚR

APPENDIX 19 GUIDELINES FOR PIGEON LOFTS

Location

Pigeon lofts should be located as far as possible from neighbouring dwellings. In general, they should be a minimum

distance of 5 metres from adjoining residential premises, but in locations where this is not possible, the particular

circumstances of each case will be considered.

Construction

Pigeon lofts should be of sound construction with a concrete floor or sub-floor. They should be constructed so as to

ensure ease of cleaning and to provide adequate ventilation, while being secure against rodents.

Design

The external design and finish of pigeon lofts should be of good quality and they should be maintained in good

condition.

Height and Area

The appropriate size of a loft would depend on the nature of the property and the proximity of neighbours. As a

general rule, pigeon lofts should not exceed 25 sq. m. in area, and should have a maximum height of 3 metres with a

pitched roof, or 2.5 metres with a flat roof.

Restrictions

In no circumstances will an open loft be permitted. (An open loft is one which pigeons may enter or leave at any time).

212

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


GUIDELINES FOR INDUSTRY, WAREHOUSING AND BUSINESS PARK DEVELOPMENTS / AGUISÍNÍ 20

TREOIRLÍNTE AR FHORBAIRTÍ TIONSCAIL, TRÁDSTÓRÁLA AGUS PÁIRCEANNA GNÓ

APPENDIX 20 GUIDELINES FOR INDUSTRY, WAREHOUSING

AND BUSINESS PARK DEVELOPMENTS

Where the carriageway width of the adjoining public road is less than 9 metres, the width of each vehicle access

opening to factories and similar premises (other than petrol stations) may, subject to planning permission, be

increased to 9 metres, provided they are suitably located with respect to road junctions or to similar openings in

adjoining premises. Generally, the building line must be at least 11 metres from the road boundary.

A main access road, likely to be used as a bus route, must have a minimum width of 14 metres, comprising a 9 metre

carriageway and two 2.5 metre footpaths. All side roads, including culs de sac should have a minimum width of 12.5

metres, comprising a 7.5 metre carriageway and two 2.5 metre footpaths. The latter standard is required in order to

facilitate the laying of services in footpaths.

In the case of a proposed development of major significance or in areas of particular urban quality, early consultation

with the planning department on design matters is advisable.

In the case of proposed developments which are of a nature and extent that they would impact on the environment

and attract significant volumes of vehicular traffic to the development site, Dublin City Council will require the

application to be accompanied by a Transport Impact Assessment (TIA). Appendix 5 gives further guidance on the

need for and content of a TIA and applicants are advised to undertake pre-planning consultations with Dublin City

Council regarding the requirement for a TIA.

In the case of proposed developments (or groups of developments located in close proximity to one another) which

would attract significant volumes of traffic, the preparation and submission of a Mobility Management Plan (MMP) may

be required as part of the application. Appendix 4 give guidance on the type and scale of developments that will

require the submission of a MMP and the required form and content of these documents.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

213


APPENDIX 21

GUIDELINES FOR PETROL STATIONS / TREOIRLÍNTE AR STÁISIÚIN PEITRIL

APPENDIX 21 GUIDELINES FOR PETROL STATIONS

Traffic Safety Standards

Every new petrol station must be laid out in such a way that vehicles are refuelled, and can wait to be refuelled, clear

of the highway. The means of access should be designed to give best visibility.

The layout of all new or redeveloped petrol stations shall permit safe access for delivery tankers (cab plus trailer) up to

15.25 metres in length, and an adequate off road area shall be provided for parking these vehicles safely without

obstructing access to pumps while fuel is being delivered to the petrol stations.

A road frontage of not less than 21.3 metres is required for a new petrol station, and this frontage must be kept clear of

any structure (apart from boundary fence) for a depth of not less than 4.6 metres from the street boundary of the site.

No pump, hosepipe or other service may be situated less than 4.6 metres from the street boundary of the site, nor

may it be adapted to serve a vehicle standing on the public street.

Where the petrol pumps and other services are sited not less than 9.2 metres from the street boundary of the site, the

street frontage of the station may be reduced to 12.2 metres.

The station may not have more than two vehicular openings on a street. The width of each such opening may not

exceed 7.7 metres. The street boundary of the station must be defined, except at openings, by a wall or railings to a

height of not less than 0.4 metres, or a shrub boundary with a low wall or kerb bounding the unsurfaced area to a

minimum height of 150 millimetres.

Kerbs and footpaths shall be dished in accordance with the detailed requirements of the Roads Authority.

Petrol stations shall generally not be allowed where a traffic hazard exists or might arise, for example, on a dual

carriageway, a bend, or where driving visibility is otherwise obstructed or reduced. They may be allowed on dual

carriageways but only if no median breaks are provided.

The placing of notice boards on footpaths or in any location that reduces driver visibility at entrances/exits shall not be

permitted.

Petrol stations shall not be permitted so close to junctions as to create a hazard.

The following standards must be observed with regard to their siting and access:

• Where the street width is greater than 15.3 metres, a vehicular entrance or exit shall not be sited nearer to a road

junction than 33.5 metres in the case of a junction with a street 15.3 metres in width or over, and 23 metres in the

case of a junction with a street between 7.7 metres and 15.3 metres in width.

• Where the street width is less than 15.3 metres, a vehicular entrance or exit shall not be sited nearer to a road

junction than 23 metres in the case of a junction with a street 7.7 metres in width or over.

• Where the junction occurs on the opposite side of the street from the petrol station site, no vehicular entrance or

exit may be sited nearer than 23 metres to the junction where the width of the intersecting street exceeds 7.7 metres.

214

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


CRITERIA FOR MULTI-STOREY CARPARKS / CRITÉIR DO CHARRCHLÓIS ILSTÓRACHA AGUISÍNÍ 22

APPENDIX 22 CRITERIA FOR MULTI-STOREY CARPARKS

The following requirements will apply to proposed multi-storey public car parks within the inner city.

Applicants for planning permission must submit a report, based on up to date, quantitative data, demonstrating a

need for the provision of additional short to medium term parking spaces within the vicinity of the site. An assessment

by a competent traffic consultant of the likely impact of the proposed car park on vehicular and pedestrian traffic

within the immediate vicinity of the site must also be submitted.

The location of proposed car parks must have regard to Dublin City Council’s policy with regard to environmental

traffic cells (e.g. ideally at the periphery of cells).

The proposed pricing structure must discourage long stay parking. Contract commuter parking must be prohibited.

Where possible, opening hours should be extended to facilitate evening and weekend uses in the area (e.g. leisure,

tourism).

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

215


APPENDIX 23

STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

APPENDIX 23 STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

OF THE DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN,

2005 - 2011

23.1.0

Introduction, Context and Methodology Employed

23.1.1

Introduction and Legislative Context (EU Directive 2001/42/EC)

The concept of Environmental Assessment has been central to development plan preparation and assessment in a

number of European countries for some time. In Ireland, there is a requirement under current legislation for the

assessment of the impact of development plans on the environment. Specifically, Section 10 (5) (a) of the Planning

and Development Acts, 2000 to 2002 requires that ‘a development plan shall contain information on the likely

significant effects on the environment of implementing the plan’.

The concept of environmental assessment has been required under national legislation in some European countries.

An EU Directive on Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), Directive 2001/42/EC, requiring all Member States to

assess the likely significant effects on the environment of plans and programmes prior to their adoption has been

produced. The Directive shall apply to plans and programmes where the first formal preparatory act is subsequent to

21 July 2004 and did not therefore apply to the review of the Dublin City Development Plan.

In November 2004, the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government published guidelines for local

authorities on implementation of the SEA Directive.

It should be noted, however, that the following appraisal was prepared in the absence of implementing regulations

and guidance on implementation from the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government and practical

experience of undertaking the process of environmental assessment in Ireland. The process undertaken does not

purport to be a strict interpretation of the requirements of the directive.

23.2.0

Methodology Employed

23.2.1

23.2.2

The following steps were taken in the environmental assessment process of the Dublin City Development Plan.

Screening

An assessment of the environmental impact of implementing the Plan is required under Section 10 (5) (a) of the

Planning and Development Acts, 2000 to 2002. The Plan would fall within the categories of plans requiring the

preparation of an Environmental Report under the provisions of the EU Directive on SEA (Directive 2001/42/EC).

Scoping

A range of organisations, government departments and internal Dublin City Council departments were consulted in

order to gather opinions on the issues which the environmental assessment should cover. From a total of seventeen

invitations issued, a total of nine responses were received the majority of which, while in several instances raising

issues of general importance to the Development Plan, were of limited direct relevance to the environmental

assessment process. The limited information gathered in these responses possibly reflects the lack of knowledge of

the nature and scope of the environmental assessment and Development Plan processes. Where relevant,

information collected from this process was used in the drafting of the environmental assessment criteria, (see below).

In addition to consultation with a range of local and state agencies and departments, a comprehensive public

consultation process was undertaken in March and April 2003 as part of the first stage of the review of the City

Development Plan. This public consultation process identified a range of issues about which the public were

concerned and these were taken into account in the formulation of environmental assessment indicators against

which the policies and objectives of the Plan were assessed.

216

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


MEASÚNÚ STRAITÉISEACH AR AN TIMPEALLACHT AGUISÍNÍ 23

23.2.3

Drafting of Environmental Assessment Criteria

Environmental criteria were devised taking into account the public consultation process carried out as part of the

Development Plan review, the scoping exercise and the review of a range of available data on environmental indicators

including those used in the assessment of other plans, those recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency

(EPA) and the published European Common Indicators.

In drafting the final assessment criteria considerable importance was attached to producing criteria the detail and

scope of which was relevant to the status of the Plan and the complexity and extent of the area which it covered.

This was achieved primarily by means of the identification of qualitative criteria, however, within each of these criteria a

quantitative indicator or target either has or could be identified to measure performance over time.

23.2.4

Consideration of Alternatives

The following alternative development options were considered as part of the Environmental Assessment process.

• The ‘do-nothing’ option

• The option of not reviewing the Dublin City Development Plan, 1999

23.2.5

23.2.6

Assessment of the Development Plan

The methodology used in the assessment involves a series of matrices in which the main policies and objectives of

the Development Plan were assessed against the selected environmental criteria. Policies and objectives were rated

as having a positive, negative, uncertain, or no effect when evaluated against the selected environmental criteria and the

results obtained were used, where appropriate, to refine and focus the policies and objectives of the Development Plan.

Monitoring

Section 15 (2) of the Planning and Development Acts, 2000 to 2002 requires the City Manager to give a report to the

City Council on the progress achieved in securing the objectives of the Development Plan, not more then two years

after making the Plan. Monitoring of the Strategic Environmental Assessment will take place under that review.

23.3.0

Environmental Assessment Criteria/Indicators

The criteria are broadly categorised in terms of the indicators set out in the SEA Directive (Annex I (f)) and have been

refined and amalgamated to avoid duplication and to ensure a clear set of criteria against which to measure the

policies and objectives of the Plan.

The objective of the process was to identify a limited number of indicators on which sufficiently detailed information

was available and which were relevant to the area for which the assessment was being made, i.e. Dublin City. Such a

list of indicators, and the assessment of the Development Plan against same, would have the effect of complying with

the requirement to assess the likely significant effects on the environment of implementing the Plan.

The following sources were used in deriving and checking the validity of the environmental assessment indicators

listed below:

• EPA, Measuring Progress Towards Sustainable Development.

• EPA, Environment in Focus 2002, Key Environmental Indicators for Ireland.

• Sustainable Development – A Strategy for Ireland.

• Local Agenda 21 Dublin’s Choice: A Better Future

.

• Heritage Appraisal of Dublin City Development Plan, 1999.

• The availability where possible of accurate and up to date baseline information sources.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

217


APPENDIX 23

STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

In recognition of the inclusion and important role of social, community and economic factors in the SEA process,

indicators under each of these headings have been drafted for the Dublin City Council area.

In addition, in formulating the indicators, reference was made to the European Commission report, “Towards a Local

Sustainability Profile: European Common Indicators”. This report identifies a number of indicators (core and additional

indicators) aimed at supporting local authorities in their work towards sustainability and providing objective and

comparable information on progress towards sustainability across Europe. The indicators are by their nature very

general, and in a number of cases it is difficult to see how these indicators could be measured and how they could

relate satisfactorily to specific environmental and development plan policies. Where practicable, the EC common

indicators have been incorporated into the environmental assessment indicators used to assess the Plan.

The environmental assessment indicators on which the policies and objectives of the Plan are to be assessed are as

follows:

23.3.1

23.3.2

23.3.3

23.3.4

23.3.5

Biodiversity/Flora/Fauna

B1 - safeguard designated areas and areas of conservation importance while increasing

the potential for wildlife/flora and fauna where appropriate

Population

P1 - promote the creation of a safe, healthy and high quality environment in which to live and work

P2 - promote access to education and training

P3 - promote the meeting of local housing needs

P4 - promote the involvement of local communities in the development of the city

Soil/Water

W1 - promote the decontamination to international standards of any contaminated lands in the city

W2 - ensure adequate good quality water supply

W3 - maintain/improve the water quality of waterbodies in the Dublin City Council area

W4 - reduce the risk of flooding in the city

Air/Climate/Noise

C1 - maintain/promote the improvement of air quality

C2 - promote the minimisation of greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere

C3 - reduce trip generation, trip length and the need for motorised transport

C4 - promote public transport and the attraction of cycling/walking

C5 - promote sustainable energy use/generation

C6 - minimise noise pollution

Cultural Heritage

H1 - safeguard protected structures and sites of architectural value

H2 - maintain the architectural quality of conservation areas and architectural conservation areas

H3 - ensure the provision of adequate quality open space areas and maintenance and/or improvement

of access to these areas

23.3.6 Material Assets

A1 - promote the generation of employment and economic development

A2 - promote the strengthening and diversification of the local economy

A3 - promote local employment opportunities

218

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


MEASÚNÚ STRAITÉISEACH AR AN TIMPEALLACHT AGUISÍNÍ 23

23.4.0

Consideration of Alternatives

The environmental assessment process requires that alternatives be compared in terms of their potential

environmental effects, but the reasons for the selection of the preferred alternative plan may also include economic

and/or social reasons as well as purely environmental factors.

The Plan is assessed in relation to two baseline alternatives:

• A ‘do-nothing’ scenario

• A scenario where the Plan is not reviewed

23.4.1

The ‘Do-Nothing’ Scenario

Under the ‘do-nothing’ scenario, the area would largely retain its current socio-economic and physical characteristics.

The scale location and nature of development would be entirely market dependent and would occur in a less coordinated

manner.

Investment by Dublin City Council would be absent and the stimulus of Dublin City Council in terms of area plans,

regeneration projects and civic spaces and the public domain would be lacking.

It is considered that these factors combine to ensure that the ‘do-nothing’ scenario is not a viable option.

23.4.2

23.5.0

The Option of Not Undertaking a Plan Review

The Planning Authority is required by Section 9 of the Planning and Development Acts, 2000 to 2002 to review the

City Development Plan at least every six years. The option of not undertaking a review of the City Development Plan

is not a viable alternative.

Assessment of Development Plan

The policies contained in the Development Plan were tested against the devised sustainability criteria by means of

matrices. For clarity and in line with UK Draft Guidance on SEA, not every policy was tested. Key policies were

selected relevant to each section of the review and these were the policies assessed for compatibility with each of the

identified environmental assessment indicators.

In making this assessment, policies and objectives with a strategic importance to the whole city were chosen ahead of

more area specific policies. In some cases policies have been edited to make them shorter, however, in all cases the

policy number is included to allow reference back to the full text of the policy given in the relevant section of the Plan.

The completed matrices summarising the predicted environmental impact of the main policies and objectives of the

Plan are shown in Tables 23.1 to 23.10 below.

Table No.

Assessment of Principal Policies and Objectives relating to:

23.1 Residential

_____________________________________________________________________________

23.2 Housing Strategy (Policies listed and assessed are in the

Appendix (No. 2) of the Plan)

_____________________________________________________________________________

23.3 Community Development

_____________________________________________________________________________

23.4 Economic Development

_____________________________________________________________________________

23.5 Transportation

_____________________________________________________________________________

23.6 Retail

_____________________________________________________________________________

23.7 Arts, Culture and Tourism

_____________________________________________________________________________

23.8 Built Heritage

_____________________________________________________________________________

23.9 Recreational Amenity and Open Space

_____________________________________________________________________________

23.10 Infrastructure

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

219


APPENDIX 23

STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Key

No Significant impact ? uncertain Effect or Impact

✔ Beneficial impact x Some Degree of Negative Environmental Impact

Table 23.1 Assessment of Principal Policies and Objectives Relating to Residential

POLICY

B1 P1 P2 P3 P4 W1 W2 W3 W4 C1 C2 C3

Res 1: to have regard to the Residential

Density Guidelines for Planning Authorities.









?




Res 2: promotion of high density

development in appropriate locations.













Res 7: to encourage the establishment

of sustainable residential communities.













Res 9: to seek to achieve

sustainability and energy conservation.













Res 12: regeneration of areas with

high percentage of social housing.













Table 23.2 Assessment of Principal Policies and Objectives Relating to Housing Strategy

(Policies listed and assessed below are in Appendix 2 of the Plan)

POLICY

B1 P1 P2 P3 P4 W1 W2 W3 W4 C1 C2 C3

2.2.2 identify under

utilised/brownfield sites.

?












2.4.2 reserve 20% under Section 94

for social and affordable housing.













2.4.10 support the voluntary

housing sector.













2.4.14 seek to minimise vacancies

in housing stock.












?

2.4.15 provide generally for

accessibility and disabled.













C4






C4




?


C5






C5






C6






C6






H1






H1

?




?

H2






H2





?

H3






H3

?


?



A1






A1






A2






A2


?

?

?


A3






A3






220

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


MEASÚNÚ STRAITÉISEACH AR AN TIMPEALLACHT AGUISÍNÍ 23

Table 23.3 Assessment of Principal Policies and Objectives Relating to Community Development

POLICY

B1 P1 P2 P3 P4 W1 W2 W3 W4 C1 C2 C3 C4

CD1: to ensure democracy, openness

and accountability through transparent

decision making and good communication.














CD2: to provide a community development

service for the people of Dublin city with a

view to improving their quality of life with a

particular emphasis on resident participation.














CD3: to take into account local needs, and

to reinforce existing community structures

as far as possible.














CD5: to support the Dublin City

Development Board in the implementation

of its economic, social and cultural strategy

for the city.














CD7: to encourage the provision and further

development of community facilities throughout

the city, which are flexible in their design and

promote optimum usage.














CD9: to support the development of innovative

centres in close proximity to third level institutions.














CD10: to ensure that school and college sites

are made available in accordance with the

requirements of the relevant education authorities.














CD13: to provide a library service for the people

of Dublin in line with best international practice.














CD15: to encourage the provision of childcare

facilities in appropriate locations, including residential

areas, city centre and prime urban centres, village

and neighbourhood centres, in areas of employment

and educational institutions and convenient to public

transport nodes.














CD16: to encourage the provision of community

facilities across the city, which cater for all age

groups and various community activities.














CD17: to provide Regional Integrated Sports,

Recreation and Youth Centres, in conjunction

with other relevant bodies.














C5












C6







?


?


?

H1












H2












H3












A1












A2












A3












PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

221


APPENDIX 23

STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Table 23.4 Assessment of Principal Policies and Objectives Relating to Economic Development

POLICY B1 P1 P2 P3 P4 W1 W2 W3 W4 C1 C2 C3

E3: to promote economic development without

compromising high environmental standards or the

principles of sustainable development.












?

E5: to identify, consolidate and exploit to their full

potential, the economic specialisms and drivers in

the city (tourism, education finance etc.) and to

develop and implement specific land use and other

planning policies so as to facilitate these sectors.










?

?


E6: to promote Dublin city centre as the primary

services and office based employment location in

the region.










?



E7: to encourage office development close to

strategic public transport corridors in the city

centre, district and neighbourhood centres, and in

employment and enterprise zones.













E8: to promote a number of identified Prime

Urban Centres as major employment centres.










?



E13: to implement the provisions of the Seveso II

(COMAH) Directive and to have regard to the

provisions of the directive and recommendations of

the HSA in the assessment of relevant planning

applications.













E18: to protect and encourage the location of

small business in the city centre, Prime Urban

Centres, district and neighbourhood centres, and

in areas designated for mixed use.













E21: to promote and facilitate the development of

the Digital Hub area as a principal location in the

city for the information and communication

technology (ICT) and multi media industries













E22: to promote the development of a knowledge

economy in Dublin City Council area through the

facilitation of telecommunications infrastructure,

including broadband connectivity and other

technologies.













E24: to support the continued development of

Dublin Port subject to the highest environmental

standards and minimisation of potential impact on

the surrounding environment.













C4











C5











C6



?

?

?


?



?

H1











H2











H3











A1











A2











A3











222

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


MEASÚNÚ STRAITÉISEACH AR AN TIMPEALLACHT AGUISÍNÍ 23

Table 23.5 Assessment of Principal Policies and Objectives Relating to Transport

POLICY B1 P1 P2 P3 P4 W1 W2 W3 W4

T1: to support the sustainability principles set out

in the National Spatial Strategy and the Regional

Planning Guidelines and ensure that land-use andzoning

are integrated with transportation and

identify land required for new transport infrastructure.










T2: to encourage modal change from private car

use towards increased use of more sustainable

forms of transport.










T3: to implement the Quality Bus Network

measures outlined in the DTO strategy in cooperation

with the QBN team, where an adequate

number of buses are provided.










T5: to provide improved facilities for cyclists and

pedestrians inclusive of new routes and to consult

with stakeholders re. the proposed cycle network










T7: to discourage commuter parking and to

ensure adequate parking provision for short-term

shopping, business and leisure use. The City

Council will also seek to control the supply and

price of all parking in the city in order to achieve

transportation policy objectives.










T9: to improve the management and traffic control

in the city to increase accessibility, and to tackle

the adverse road safety and environmental impacts

of the transport system.










C1





?


C2







C3







C4







C5







C6

?


?

?



H1







H2







H3







A1







A2







A3







PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

223


APPENDIX 23

STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Table 23.6 Assessment of Principal Policies and Objectives Relating to Retail

POLICY B1 P1 P2 P3 P4 W1 W2 W3 W4

S1: to have regard to the National Retail Planning

Guidelines and the Greater Dublin Area Retail

Planning Strategy in preparing plans and in the

assessment of planning applications for retail

developments.










S3: to maintain and reinforce the dominant

position of the Central Shopping Area as the

premier shopping area in the State.










S5: to seek to maintain and strengthen the

existing district and neighbourhood centres, and

where such centres are in close proximity to

residential areas, 24 hour and 7/24 shopping shall

not be permitted.










S8: to encourage the provision of local and/or

corner shops in residential areas where there is an

existing deficiency of retail provision.










S9: to control the provision of retail warehousing

and retail parks.










S19: to require adequate provision to be made in

new shopping developments for support facilities,

particularly access for people with disabilities and

secure parking for cyclists.










S20: that proposed commercial developments,

where appropriate, would incorporate retail,

residential, employment and entertainment/cultural

uses within the design.










S21: that new shopping facilities, where

permitted, should be located adjacent to public

transport routes.










C1









C2









C3









C4









C5









C6



?




?


H1









H2









H3









A1





?




A2









A3









224

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


MEASÚNÚ STRAITÉISEACH AR AN TIMPEALLACHT AGUISÍNÍ 23

Table 23.7 Assessment of Principal Policies and Objectives Relating to Culture, Arts and Tourism

POLICY B1 P1 P2 P3 P4 W1 W2 W3 W4 C1 C2 C3 C4

ACT1: to recognise the unique role of the city

centre in providing a focus for the performing arts,

including drama and music, and the extent to

which these contribute to the vitality of the city

centre. To this end, the City Council will encourage

and facilitate the development and retention of

cultural amenities, including theatres, concert halls

and other performance venues, in the city centre.














ACT2: to ensure that all residents, including those

in disadvantaged areas, have access to cultural

amenities including the arts, theatre and music,

and to this end to support the development of

multi-use cultural buildings in areas currently

deficient in these.














ACT5: to promote the exhibition of sculpture and

other works of art in parks, open spaces and other

focal points in the city.














ACT11: to ensure a high quality public domain in

the vicinity of cultural and heritage buildings and,

where possible, to ensure that such buildings are

linked to public spaces and to the wider open

space network.














ACT13: to support the development of

appropriate tourist infrastructure in the city and to

develop the necessary signage, information and

infrastructure to ensure optimal usage of these.














C5






C6






H1






H2






H3






A1






A2






A3






PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

225


APPENDIX 23

STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Table 23.8 Assessment of Principal Policies and Objectives Relating to Built Heritage

POLICY B1 P1 P2 P3 P4 W1 W2 W3 W4 C1

H1 + H2: to include all structures of special

interest in the RPS.




?







H6: to encourage uses which are compatible with

the character of protected structures through the

relaxation of zoning considerations for the main

protected structure and heritage buildings











H13, H14, H15, H16 & H17: to protect and

enhance the character of conservation areas and

ACAs in the control of development.











H18: to prepare schemes for Areas of Special

Planning Control











H21: to identify historic villages to ensure character

is preserved.


H27: to seek the retention, reuse and

refurbishment of older buildings.











H34: to protect archaeological material in situ.. ✔ ✔

H42: to protect plant, animal species and habitats

identified by the Habitats Directive, Birds Directive,

Wildlife Act and the Flora Protection Order.











H44: to update the Special Amenity Area Order for

the North Bull Island.











H45: to protect the special landscape character of

designated Landscape Conservation Areas.











H46: to protect natural amenities of all rivers and

to establish a River Basin Management Plan.











C2












C3











C4











C5











C6




?







H1












H2











H3











A1






?



?


A2







?





A3











226

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


MEASÚNÚ STRAITÉISEACH AR AN TIMPEALLACHT AGUISÍNÍ 23

Table 23.9 Assessment of Principal Policies and Objectives Relating to Recreational Amenity and Open Space

POLICY B1 P1 P2 P3 P4 W1 W2 W3 W4 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6

RO1: to continue to manage and protect public

open spaces, to meet the social, recreational,

conservational and ecological needs of the city,

and to consider the development of appropriate

complementary facilities which do not detract from

the amenities of spaces.
















RO3: to ensure that all of its parks and

recreational facilities are accessible to all groups

within the population.
















RO4: to ensure that public open space of

sufficient size and layout is provided in new

residential developments.
















RO5: to identify areas deficient in public open

space and seek the provision of additional space in

these areas by way of pocket parks or the

development of institutional lands.
















RO6: to manage street and roadside trees, to be

vigilant in ensuring their conservation and to make

tree preservation orders where appropriate. Where

the removal of street or roadside trees is necessary,

to replace them with an appropriate species.
















RO9: to develop linear parks, particularly along

waterways, and to link existing parks and open

spaces in order to provide green chains throughout

the city.
















RO11: to seek the continued improvement of

water quality, bathing facilities and other

recreational opportunities in the coastal, estuarine

and surface waters in the city.
















RO12: to endeavour to make provision for habitat

creation and maintenance and facilitate biodiversity.
















RO15: to ensure the availability of a range of

recreational facilities, including indoor sports

facilities and swimming pools, to the general

population at locations throughout the city.
















RO17: to facilitate the development of private

recreational lands for recreational purposes regard

being had to the amenities of residents in the

vicinity and to the environmental impact of the

development.


H1










H2










H3











A1










A2










A3










PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

227


APPENDIX 23

STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Table 23.10 Assessment of Principal Policies and Objectives Relating to Infrastructure

POLICY B1 P1 P2 P3 P4 W1 W2 W3 W4 C1

U1: it is the it is the policy of Dublin City Council to

have the following priorities in relation to waste

management: to prevent and minimise the harmful

effects of waste; to encourage and support the

recycling and recovery of waste including green,

organic and construction and demolition waste and

the recovery of energy from waste. to ensure that

waste, which cannot be prevented, recycled or

recovered is disposed of without causing

environmental pollution; to ensure that effect is given

as far as possible to the ‘polluter pays’ principle.











U4: to implement the Waste Management Plan for

the Dublin Region. It is the policy of the elected

members of Dublin City Council to oppose the

siting of an incinerator on the Poolbeg peninsula.











U5: to implement a strategy to ensure the

development of water systems and to provide for

the expansion of water systems to meet

anticipated demand.











U6: to ensure that the quality of treated water

supplied to all of its customers is in compliance

with the Water Quality Directives of the EU and

national legislation.











U11: to maximise the potential for beneficial reuse

of water and to reduce leakage to the

minimum possible level in the water supply system.











U13: to continue to develop and expand, in a

sustainable manner, the drainage system for the

city in co-operation with the adjoining local

authorities.











U15: to introduce Flood Risk Management in all

areas which have either been flooded in recent

years or which are assessed as being at risk of

flooding.




?







U19: to promote the improvement of water quality

in the rivers and bay area in line with the objectives

of the Water Quality Management Plan.











C2









C3

?

?







C4









C5



?






C6

?

?







H1









H2









H3









A1

?

?







A2









A3









228

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


MEASÚNÚ STRAITÉISEACH AR AN TIMPEALLACHT AGUISÍNÍ 23

Table 23.10 Assessment of Principal Policies and Objectives Relating to Infrastructure

POLICY B1 P1 P2 P3 P4 W1 W2 W3 W4 C1

U30: it is the policy of Dublin City Council to

require that all new development must be

constructed in compliance with the Greater Dublin

Strategic Drainage Study document entitled "New

Development Policy, Technical Guidence Document




U31: to control development in the natural flood

plain of a river and to develop guidelines, in cooperation

with the adjoining local authorities, for

such development.




?







U37: to recognize the risk from the impacts of

Climate Change, and to review these impacts on

an ongoing basis.




?







U44: to support a wide range of energy solutions

to meet consumption needs, including encouraging

renewable energy sources.

?










C2





C3




C4




C5




C6



?

H1




H2




H3




A1




A2




A3




PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

229


APPENDIX 23

STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

23.6.0

Compatibility of Development Plan Policies with Identified Environmental Criteria

As outlined above, the policies of the Development Plan were assessed for compatibility with a range of environmental

criteria. The following is a summary of the findings of the exercise, categorised under each of the main policy

areas/chapters in turn.

Residential Development (Table 23.1)

Policies RES1, RES2, RES7, RES9 and RES12 were tested for compatibility with the identified environmental

assessment criteria and were found to be compatible. Care will have to be taken in the continuing achievement of

higher densities required by government policy that development is not undertaken in areas liable to flooding. The

introduction of a flood risk management policy (Policy U15) should ensure this issue is addressed.

Housing Strategy (Table 23.2)

Policies 2.2.2, 2.4.2, 2.4.10, 2.4.14 and 2.4.15 were tested for compatibility with the identified environmental

assessment criteria and were found to be generally compatible. The identification of underutilised site and the

enhancement of the role of housing associations could have potential impacts on open space and institutional lands

that are uncertain and need to be considered in the implementation of these policies.

Community Development (Table 23.3)

Policies CD1, CD2, CD3, CD5, CD7, CD9, CD10, CD13, CD15, CD16 and CD17 were tested for compatibility with

the identified environmental assessment criteria and were found to be compatible. Th development of a number of

initiatives with regard to community development and particularly the Dublin City Development Board's (DCDB)

economic, social and cultural strategy will have a positive impact on the identified environmental criteria.

Economic Development (Table 23.4)

Policies E3, E5, E6, E7, E8, E13, E18, E21, E22 and E24 were tested for compatibility with the identified

environmental assessment criteria and were found to be generally compatible.

The potential impact of economic development on air quality and noise is slightly uncertain and needs to be taken into

account in implementing policies for economic development particularly in central areas. The policies assessed were

found to be overwhelmingly positive as regards the creation of a safe and high quality environment and the generation

of employment and economic activity (criteria P1 and A1).

Transportation (Table 23.5)

Policies T1, T2, T3, T5, T7 and T9 were tested for compatibility with the identified environmental assessment criteria

and were found to be compatible.

Retail (Table 23.6)

Policies S1, S3, S5, S8, S9, S19, S20 and S21 were tested for compatibility with the identified environmental

assessment criteria and were found to be generally compatible.

Arts, Culture and Tourism (Table 23.7)

Policies ACT1, ACT2, ACT5, ACT11 and ACT13 were tested for compatibility with the identified environmental

assessment criteria and were found to be compatible.

Built Heritage (Table 23.8)

Policies H1, H2, H6, H13, H14, H15, H16, H17, H18, H21, H27, H34, H42, H44, H45 and H46 were tested for

compatibility with the identified environmental assessment criteria and were found to be compatible and particularly

supportive of the aim of promoting the creation of a safe , healthy and high quality environment in which to live and

work.

Recreational Amenity and Open Space (Table 23.9)

Policies R01, R03, R04, R05, R06, R09, RO11, RO12, RO15 and RO17 were tested for compatibility with the

identified environmental assessment criteria and were found to be compatible.

230

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011


MEASÚNÚ STRAITÉISEACH AR AN TIMPEALLACHT AGUISÍNÍ 23

23.7.0

Infrastructure (Table 23.10)

Policies U1, U4, U5, U6, U11, U13, U15, U19, U30, U31, U37 and U44 were tested for compatibility with the

identified environmental assessment criteria and were found to be generally compatible. In the case of waste

management and implementation of the waste management plan for the city there is some uncertainty regarding the

potential impact on trip generation and trip length and on economic development and employment. Against this, the

bulk of policies are shown to promote a safe, healthy and high quality environment in the city.

Monitoring

Section 15 (1) of the Planning and Developments Acts, 2000 to 2002 requires Planning Authorities to take all

necessary steps within its powers to secure the objectives of the Development Plan. Section 15 (2) requires that the

Planning Authority report to the elected members of the authority on the progress made in securing the plan

objectives referred to above.

Indicators will therefore have to be prepared in relation to the assessment of the objectives of statutory development

plans and local authorities will be responsible for their monitoring. As stated previously, in drafting the environmental

indicators against which the policies and objectives of the Plan have been assessed, regard has been had to

ensuring that where possible the indicators are measurable or can be assigned quantitative indicators.

With regard to the ongoing monitoring of the Development Plan, Dublin City Council will undertake the appropriate

survey work and collection of data to ensure effective ongoing monitoring of the implementation of the Plan and

achievement of the plan objectives in accordance with the requirements of the Planning and Development Acts, 2000

to 2002.

In undertaking this Dublin City Council will, where appropriate, co-operate with the Environmental Protection Agency

(EPA) and other relevant agencies, to ensure that the environmental impacts of the Plan are monitored in accordance

with relevant Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government Guidelines introduced on foot of the EU

Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) Directive 2001/42/EC.

PLEAN FORBARTHA CHATHAIR BHAILE ÁTHA CLIATH 2005-2011

231


APPENDIX 23 SERVESO 2 SITES / SUÍMH SEVESO 2

APPENDIX 24 SEVESO 2 SITES

The following notified list of sites are covered by the SEVESO 2 Directive. The list includes consultation distances whereby

the Health and Safety Authority needs to be informed of any planning applications for development within the stated

distance. As these details change from time to time it is important that the Health and Safety Authority are contacted.

(The sites are also shown on the relevant zoning objectives maps) See also Policy E13 and E14. (Chapter 6)

• Calor Teo Ltd., Tolka Quay Road, Dublin 1 (600 metres from perimeter)

• Dublin Bay Power, Pigeon House Road, Ringsend, Dublin 4 (300 meters from bund wall)

• ESB Poolbeg Power Station, Pigeon House Road, Ringsend, Dublin 4. (300 metres from bund wall)

• ESSO Ireland Ltd., North Yard, Dublin Joint Fuels Terminal, Alexandra Road, Dublin 1 (300 metres from perimeter)

• ESSO Ireland Ltd., South Yard, Dublin Joint Fuels Terminal, Alexandra Road, Dublin 1 (300 metres from perimeter)

• Univar Ireland, c/o H. A .Crosbie, Tolka Quay Road, Dublin 1 (700 metres from perimeter)

• Iarnrod Éireann site, Inchicore, Jamestown Road, Dublin 8 (300 metres from bund wall)

• Irish Shell Ltd., No. 1 Yard, Alexandra Road, Dublin 1 (300 metres from perimeter)

• Irish Shell Ltd., No. 2 Yard, Dublin 1 (300 metres from bund wall)

• Irish Shell Ltd., No. 3 Yard, Dublin 1 (300 metres from bund wall)

• Statoil (Leeside) Oil Company Ltd., No. 1 Yard, Dublin 1 (300 metres from perimeter)

• Statoil (Leeside) Oil Company Ltd., No. 2 Yard, Promenade Road, Dublin 1 (300 metres from perimeter)

• Minchem Ltd., Alexandra Road, Dublin 1 (within land holding)

• ESB, North Wall Generating Station, Alexandra Road, Dublin 1 (300 metres from bund wall)

• Tedcastle Oil Products Ltd., Yard 1, Promenade Road, Dublin 3 (300 metres from perimeter)

• Tedcastle Oil Products Ltd., Yard 2, Promenade Road, Dublin 3 (300 metres from perimeter)

232

DUBLIN CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2005-2011

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines