Activity Report - European Aluminium Association

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Activity Report - European Aluminium Association

Activity Report

2011


About EAA

The European Aluminium Association (EAA) represents the aluminium industry in Europe.

The association was founded in 1981 and its members include primary aluminium producers

in Europe, manufacturers of rolled and extruded aluminium products and their national

associations in 18 European countries, the Organisation of European Aluminium Recycling

Industry (OEA) and the European Aluminium Foil Association (EAFA).

Aluminium key facts and figures:

Europe (excluding Russia) 2010

Direct jobs 255,000

Mining 3.2 mio tonnes

Refining (alumina) 6.5 mio tonnes

Primary production 4.4 mio tonnes

Recycling

Production of semis

4.3 mio tonnes

Rolled products 4.5 mio tonnes

Extrusions 3.2 mio tonnes

Castings 3.4 mio tonnes

Wire, slugs, powder... 1.2 mio tonnes

Main end-uses for aluminium products in Europe (2010):

Engineering

Packaging

17%

14%

Others

7%

25%

Transport

37%

Building

Number of plants

Mine production 6

Alumina refining 12

Primary production 34

Extrusion plants 300

Rolling mills 55

Refiners (recycled aluminium) 160

Casters 2400

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4 | EAA Activity Report 2010


INDEX

ABOUT EAA ..................................................................................................................................3

INDEX .......................................................................................................................................... 5

INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................................................7

SUMMARY OF THE EUROPEAN ALUMINIUM MARKET SITUATION IN 2011 ..................................9

ALUMINIUM FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS (AFFG) ........................................................................10

Sustainabe Development Indicators (SDIs) .............................................................................10

Media outreach ..................................................................................................................... 12

Aluminium in electric vehicles ............................................................................................... 12

Energy performance of buildings: Renovation case studies .................................................... 12

KEY ISSUES: ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY ....................................................................13

Industrial Emissions Directive and non-ferrous metals BREF .................................................. 13

Sustainability ......................................................................................................................... 14

Food contact ........................................................................................................................ 15

EU Emissions Trading Scheme ................................................................................................16

REACH .................................................................................................................................. 17

Health ................................................................................................................................... 17

Safety ....................................................................................................................................18

Standardisation .....................................................................................................................18

ALUMINIUM STANDARDISATION IN EUROPE ..............................................................................19

European standardisation ..................................................................................................... 19

Eurocode design and execution standards for aluminium .....................................................20

International standardisation and harmonisation ...................................................................20

International alloy registration ...............................................................................................20

AUTOMOTIVE AND TRANSPORT .................................................................................................21

Advocacy and standards .......................................................................................................21

Communication .....................................................................................................................23

Education .............................................................................................................................23

BUILDING ....................................................................................................................................24

Advocacy and standards .......................................................................................................24

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) ..........................26

Communication .....................................................................................................................27

PACKAGING ...............................................................................................................................28

Beverage can markets continue to grow, foil markets decline ...............................................28

Recycling at record levels ......................................................................................................28

Annual aluminium packaging seminar in Belgrade ................................................................30

EU packaging and waste legislation ......................................................................................30

Metal Packaging Europe (MPE) ..............................................................................................30

International standards on packaging and the environment ..................................................31

Aluminium foil highly appreciated by barbecue lovers ...........................................................31

Aluminium foil rollers go for sustainability worldwide ...........................................................32

Aluminium aerosol cans at the forefront ...............................................................................32

RECYCLING DIVISION ..................................................................................................................33

EAA LAUNCHES A BRAND-NEW WEBSITE AND NEW MONITORING TOOLS ..............................35

CONTACTS ..................................................................................................................................36

EAA MEMBERSHIP ......................................................................................................................39

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INtRoDuCtIoN

2011 was once again a year of intense activities for the European

aluminium industry, with the European Aluminium Association

(EAA) at the helm of significant developments at EU level. In

particular, EAA has been engaging with EU institutions and

key stakeholders in the context of the implementation of the

EU 2020 agenda and of the so-called “flagship initiatives” that

are relevant to our sector: Industrial policy, Innovation Union

and Resource-efficient Europe. Last but not least, we turned

our efforts to the revision of the guidelines for state aid in the

context of the amended EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS).

Indeed, we seized every opportunity to influence policies needed to ensure that the

aluminium industry will continue to operate efficiently and successfully in Europe. We

made it very clear that, while supporting EU sustainability goals, we will not be able to

shoulder costs derived from unilaterally applied EU environmental legislation, resulting in

carbon leakage and endangering the mid-term survival in Europe of an industry linked to

global price-setting mechanisms. Full compensation for the indirect effects of the ETS in

terms of electricity prices, an adequate framework to adopt bilateral long-term contracts

and measures to avoid aluminium scrap exports outside the EU were all drivers of our

advocacy activities.

In these difficult times, the aluminium industry has to be even more proactive in evidencing

its contribution to society and demonstrating the added value it provides to peoples’ life

and the environment. EAA will pursue a quality dialogue with policy-makers and keep

engaging with all stakeholders.

Despite partial economic recovery in 2011, we are nevertheless facing a serious decline in

primary aluminium production capacity in the EU 27. We therefore urge policy makers to

secure adequate conditions for the European aluminium industry to remain competitive

and for Europe to retain its technology advantages.

Patrick de Schrynmakers

Secretary General

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SuMMARY oF tHE EuRoPEAN ALuMINIuM MARKEt

SItuAtIoN IN 2011

After good recovery of demand for

aluminium in Europe in 2010, market

evolution in 2011 was characterised by

sound performance during the first half of

the year, and weakening demand towards

the end of the summer, following general

economic trends and the double-dip crisis

that started in the fourth quarter of 2011.

On the whole, growth in demand for rolled

products remained positive, mainly due to

buoyant demand in the automotive sector and

consistent demand for aluminium in general

engineering. A slight slowdown in demand

was observed in aluminium packaging

applications, and only limited growth in the

building and construction sector, since this

sector never truly recovered from the economic

crisis of 2009. As it is the main end-use market

for extrusions, this affected demand for these

aluminium products significantly. Taking the

whole year into account, total demand for

extruded products showed a slight decrease in

2011 compared to 2010.

European primary aluminium producers were

already contending with huge structural

problems, mainly because of artificially

high electricity prices in Europe, no ETS

compensation and low London Metal

Exchange (LME) prices. On top of that, they

found themselves having to deal with the

second global economic crisis in the space

of three years. This once again resulted in

closures of some plants, leaving Europe

with only 80% of its pre-crisis capacity and

dependent on non-European imports for

more than one-third of its supply.

On the recycling side, favourable performance

in the automotive sector sustained demand,

but leakage of aluminium scrap out of

Europe continued on a large scale, resulting

in further loss of its own resources.

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ALuMINIuM FoR FutuRE GENERAtIoNS (AFFG)

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS

2011 was a year marked by a key event:

the launch in the European Parliament of

the 2010 report on sustainable development

indicators (SDIs) entitled Sustainability of the

European Aluminium Industry 2010.

The event, Aluminium’s Performance Towards

a Sustainable Europe, was hosted by UK MEP

Martin Callanan, and gathered a number of

key international officials as well as the main

Brussels-based media. The report outlines

the significant contribution made by the

aluminium industry to sustainability in the EU

thanks to the material’s unique properties,

such as light weight, ductility, durability and

conductivity, and presents data from both

SMEs and large integrated companies within

the sector, employing a total of 255,000 people

across Europe. Callanan strongly encouraged

sustainability reporting and acknowledged

that the aluminium industry has much to offer

when it comes to sustainability, as it makes a

key contribution towards achieving the EU’s

20-20-20 objectives.

Over 30 SDIs had been identified for the

production of aluminium and the scope

of the 2010 report had been enlarged to

include the main uses and applications.

Among the key findings of the report, it is

worth underlining that in terms of GHGs,

emissions of CO per tonne of primary

2

aluminium were down by almost 50% since

1997, with perfluorocarbon (PFC) emissions

reduced by 90% since 1990. Moreover, 48%

of the energy required to produce primary

aluminium was coming from renewable

sources. Europe is a world leader in the

area of recycled aluminium, producing 3.5

million tonnes of the metal through recycling

activities. Of the aluminium produced in

Europe, 48% is from recycled sources, while


MEP Martin Callanan hosting the launch

of EAA 2010 SDI’s report

4 million tonnes (11% of global production)

comes from primary sources.

The aluminium recycling process uses

95% less energy than primary production

and this has paved the way for global

competitors to move in and purchase

European scrap for reuse in other markets.

During the presentation EAA Secretary

General Patrick de Schrynmakers called for

market distortion to be taken into account

because, with competitiveness essential to

the survival of the whole value chain, it is

vital to keep it in Europe. EAA Environment,

Health and Safety director Eirik Nordheim

maintained that even if Europe could keep

its scrap, it would still need to import

primary aluminium. EAA chairman Tadeu

Nardocci stressed that scrap is energy,

but that it is very hard to keep it in

Europe. Representatives from the European

Commission’s DG Environment highlighted

the huge discrepancies that exist between

Member States in recycling and collection

rates and pointed out that the amount of

scrap available is actually increasing.

Patrick de Schrynmakers took the opportunity

to remind those present that some EU policies

applied unilaterally at EU level, such as the

ETS, are actually damaging to European

industry competitiveness. He called for

compensation for the additional costs of

production incurred by inclusion in the ETS

of power plants, adding that aluminium

is “the best example of an industry that

needs exemptions”. Tadeu Nardocci EAA

Chairman then stressed that these issues

are particularly pertinent in the context of

the aluminium industry, since it is unable to

pass on additional costs to its consumers, as

the LME sets the global price of aluminium.

Energy attaché for the Hungarian permanent

representation to the EU Marianna Jakab

underlined the importance of sustainability as

one of the main energy policy objectives for

the Hungarian presidency and acknowledged

that a sustainable and competitive Europe is

crucial to achieving the Energy 2020 strategy.

As for the representative of DG Enterprise,

Didier Herbert head for sustainable

industrial policies, fully supported industry’s

work to develop indicators for sustainability,

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12 | EAA Activity Report 2011

underlining that “Industry has the best

knowledge and knows which indicators

are most relevant. Europe needs more

evidence-based policy and must recognise

that sectors have different challenges,” he

said. Michael Kuhndt, head of the UNEP/

Wuppertal Institute collaborating centre on

sustainable consumption and production,

agreed and praised the aluminium industry

for trying to proactively assess its net impact

on sustainability.

Herbert concluded that the European

Commission is preparing a broad roadmap

with areas for action on resource efficiency

policy and that the EU must look for

win-win situations. He pointed out that

“many businesses have already begun

resource efficiency measures, but require

investment decisions. Life cycle benefits

may outweigh costs, but costs may still be

too much for some businesses.”

MEDIA OUTREACH

2011 was also a year dedicated to

strengthening EAA’s media relations with EU/

Brussels-based journalists and consolidating

its presence in the EU press office, with the

objective of promoting positive environmental

and safety aspects of aluminium, both for

primary production and different applications.

Our key messages were picked up in

numerous publications such as Euractiv, Ends

Europe, New Europe, Europolitics, Reuters,

Recycling Today and Packaging Europe as

the results of press releases, face to face

meetings with journalists and interviews.

ALUMINIUM IN ELECTRIC VEHICLES

Electrification of vehicles is of increasing interest

to both policy makers and automotive original

equipment manufacturers (OEMs). However,

the development of electric cars is hampered

by the high cost of battery systems relative to

the power and autonomy they can deliver.

A preferable way to decrease the required

battery capacity of a fully electric vehicle is to

reduce its dead weight. A study co-funded by

EAA/AFFG, EAA Automotive and Transport

and the International Aluminium Institute

(IAI) developed models to assess cost savings

for battery systems and those made during

the use phase with lightweight aluminium

designs. The results should be available during

the first quarter of 2012.

ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF BUILDINGS:

RENOVATION CASE STUDIES

Aiming to determine the contribution of

aluminium building products to the upgrade

of energy performance of existing buildings,

three renovation cases were studied in 2011,

identifying CO payback periods in the range

2

of one to four years. The buildings were

located in Zeist (NL), Dekendorf (D) and

Thessaloniki (GR). Further cases are set to be

investigated in 2012.

Other projects are ongoing and will yield

results in the course of 2012. Documentation

of these cases will therefore be postponed

until the 2012 Activity Report and will

appear together with other 2012 projects.


KEY ISSuES: ENVIRoNMENt, HEALtH AND SAFEtY

INDUSTRIAL EMISSIONS DIRECTIVE

AND NON-FERROUS METALS BREF

Industrial Emissions Directive 2010/75/EU,

intended to replace previous measures

on Integrated Pollution Prevention and

Control (IPPC), waste incineration and large

combustion plants, among other things,

came into force in early January 2011.

The main new element included in the

revised legislation on the control of industrial

emissions is the enhanced importance

of sector-specific BREF documents, and

particularly their best available technique

(BAT) conclusions, containing descriptions

of BATs for specific sectors and their related

performance. While for the previous IPPC

Directive these BAT conclusions were

considered a non-binding reference to

define permit conditions for a plant, the

present IED now considers them as the

default performance not to be exceeded by

an installation, unless specific derogation is

granted based on a cost-benefit assessment.

This latter element of flexibility introduced in

the Directive is crucial especially for existing

plants, as in some cases technical characteristics

and local conditions would make compliance

costs disproportionately high compared to

actual environmental benefits.

The new provisions of the IED will of

course apply to the non-ferrous metals

BREF, whose revision was initiated in 2007

under the old legislative framework, and

continued in 2011 in the Technical Working

Group (TWG) coordinated by the new

BREF author appointed in 2010. EAA,

supported by company experts gathered in

its BREF shadow group, is actively engaged

in discussions within the TWG, ensuring

that technical descriptions, current best

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14 | EAA Activity Report 2011

practices and achievable performances are

correctly reported in the BREF. Furthermore,

EAA is devoting special attention to revising

the document, originally meant to be a

non-prescriptive technical reference tool, in

view of how it will be used according to the

new legislation.

The end of the revision process is expected in

2012, with publication of the BAT conclusions

in the Official Journal of the European Union

in all the official EU languages in 2013.

SUSTAINABILITY

The EAA Sustainability Committee,

which benefits from the participation

of all constituents of the association,

continued its assessment of the challenges

and opportunities for the aluminium

value chain in the field of sustainability

throughout 2011. This exercise is aimed at

Aluminium makes design part of our lifestyle

positioning aluminium as a key contributor

to sustainability in Europe thanks to its

special properties, which serve to enhance

an extremely wide range of applications,

yielding energy savings, longer use and

endless recyclability, among other things.

In this context, as planned, EAA published

its new report entitled Sustainability of

the European Aluminium Industry 2010,

publicly available from the association’s

website at www.alueurope.eu. The

document provides a comprehensive list

of quantitative indicators related to the

production of aluminium in Europe, covering

environmental, social and economic aspects.

Furthermore, with respect to previous

editions, the report has been enriched

with a section on aluminium use, and

quantitative and qualitative information

related to automotive and transport,

packaging and building applications.


Owing to this report, EAA was able to

demonstrate a definite trend towards

improvement recorded by the industry

in terms of better use of resources,

reduced environmental impact and,

generally speaking, overall contribution to

sustainability.

As in the past, EAA will continue to

regularly issue a sustainability report and

use it to monitor progress and help define

the way forward, by identifying areas that

require intervention and those that can be

leveraged.

FOOD CONTACT

For the third consecutive year, EAA’s

Aluminium in Contact with Foodstuff

WG was engaged in contributing to the

development of the Council of Europe’s

resolution on metals and alloys used in food

contact materials. This activity is coordinated

by the European Directorate for the Quality

of Medicines (EDQM) of the Council of

Europe, with the participation of delegations

of experts from numerous relevant national

governments. The importance of this

resolution lies in the fact that its provisions,

although non-binding unless implemented

in national legislation, will constitute the

official reference on metals in contact with

food at both EU and international level.

With this in mind, EAA submitted to EDQM

the results of the latest scientific studies

on the interaction of aluminium and

human health, including those developed

for REACH registration, and the most

informative and detailed documentation

on the characteristics, benefits and best

use of aluminium products in contact

with foodstuff. In addition, at the open

consultation held in Strasbourg in April

2011, EAA presented and discussed its

position and suggestions with the EDQM

secretariat and national delegations.

These activities will continue throughout

2012 with the expected publication of

the resolution, completed by a series of

technical annexes by the end of the year.

EAA’s efforts, supported by experts from

member companies, will continue to

focus on obtaining a resolution which will

simultaneously safeguard consumer health,

enable enforcement by local authorities and

protect safe aluminium applications from

unfair competition.

Parallel to this, EAA continued to be an active

partner of FACET (Flavourings, Additives

and food Contact materials Exposure Task),

a project initiated in 2008 under the 7th Framework Programme of the European

Commission and due for completion in

Activity Report 2011 EAA | 15


16 | EAA Activity Report 2011

2012, with the participation of industry,

universities and relevant research institutes.

In addition to up-to-date databases of food

consumption patterns throughout the EU,

the project is expected to deliver an electronic

tool to perform risk-based assessments

of exposure of European consumers to

substances contained in food flavourings

and additives, or migrated from packaging.

EU EMISSIONS TRADING SCHEME

The European Commission decision on

harmonised rules for allocation of free

allowances under the EU ETS was published

in April 2011, and set numbers for the

two product benchmarks foreseen for the

aluminium industry, namely electrolysis metal

and baked anodes. The figures were, as

expected, based on our earlier communication

of benchmarking data to DG Climate Action

and their consultants. The rest of the aluminium

production chain under the ETS was given

fuel mix or heat benchmark fall-back options

based on reported production and emission

levels. Reporting from plants to Member State

authorities was scheduled for 30 June and

further reporting from Member States to the

Commission by 30 September. However, this

process is severely delayed in several Member

States, and the full set of reports is now not

expected to be submitted to the Commission

before February 2012. This also means that

at this stage we have no overview of the

full quota of free allowances granted to the

aluminium industry or possible application of

any cross-sector correction factors.

Monitoring and reporting guidelines for the

new sectors, including aluminium, were

published by the Commission in August and,

as a result of our close cooperation with the

Commission on these rules, found to be

satisfactory from our point of view.

The main remaining issue at this point

is compensation for indirect effects, or


increase in electricity prices due to the ETS.

The message from EAA and the rest of the

non-ferrous metals industry has consistently

been that this aspect is vital for the survival

of primary aluminium smelters in Europe.

EAA continued to communicate this

message to relevant Commission officials

and the European Parliament throughout

the year. The guidelines for compensation

must come from DG Competition, as this

needs to be done according to state aid

rules, and the first drafts of these rules were

finally delivered towards the end of the

year. Draft guidelines will now be discussed

by the Member States before publication,

probably in March 2012.

REACH

REACH registration dossiers for aluminium

metal, aluminium oxide and aluminium

hydroxide were submitted to the European

Chemicals Agency (ECHA) before the 30

November 2010 deadline. The aluminium

REACH consortium, which deals with this

on behalf of the international aluminium

industry, decided to start immediately on a

process of updating the dossier, as it was

recognised that certain elements, particularly

environmental aspects, would need to be

improved. This is now being conducted

in cooperation with consultants used for

the original dossier and with inclusion of

additional test date.

At the same time it was decided to go

ahead with publication of the work done

for REACH in order to release our new data

to the public domain. This is also done in

cooperation with the same consultants used

for the REACH dossier.

As a service to companies and their customers,

the EAA REACH task force developed new

generic safety data sheets for our aluminium

substances and aluminium alloys. This is not

mandatory for these substances according to

REACH. However, the industry and producers

have a tradition of providing such information

and decided to continue doing so.

The aluminium consortium also took part

in a workshop organised at the request

of ECHA to teach their junior staff about

risk assessment of metals and some of the

particular problems encountered due to the

specific properties of metals.

HEALTH

The dossier on aluminium intake submitted

to the WHO/FAO Joint Expert Group on

Food Additives (JECFA) was reviewed by

JECFA in June 2011. This dossier was put

together as a joint effort between several

aluminium associations and involved mainly

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18 | EAA Activity Report 2011

new studies generated through the REACH

process. At their meeting, JECFA decided

to increase the recommended intake limit

for aluminium from all sources, set by the

same group in 2007, from 1 to 2mg/kg

body weight/week. As such limits are not

often revised upwards, this was considered

a success for the industry.

Another result of the REACH process was a

short paper on Potential Health Effects from

Exposure to Aluminium and Aluminium

Compounds intended for public use, which

is an addition to our previous aluminium

and health fact sheets. These fact sheets are

all available from the EAA website.

The REACH dossier on coal tar pitch and

its use in the aluminium industry continues

to be a concern. The dossier proposes an

unrealistically low limit value for occupational

exposure. This dossier will now be revised

and the aluminium industry is invited to be

part of this process.

SAFETY

EAA again held a safety workshop with 60

participants last year after a gap of several years

due to industry recession. With help from major

companies, a 1½ day programme was put

together, focusing the first day on Fatalities and

High Risk Incidents and the second on Practical

Approaches and Tools for Risk Reduction.

Feedback from participants was very positive

and EAA aims to continue arranging such

workshops, alternating between environment

and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), and health

and safety issues.

In the context of the workshop, EAA also

organised a safety solutions competition. The aim

was to exchange best practices on safety

measures, which are easy to implement and

not too expensive for other plants to adopt.

Each idea was presented on one page with a

photo for others to evaluate and decide if it was

something they could copy. We received 24

entries, and those from Aluminium of Greece

and Alcoa San Ciprian were voted best proposals.

STANDARDISATION

CEN/TC 264/WG 33: GHG emissions

from energy-intensive industries

WG 33 has now been formally established and

one of its sub-groups will work on a standard

for monitoring and reporting emissions from

aluminium plants. This will be based on the IAI

GHG monitoring protocol, but a verification

process is required to document the accuracy

of the calculation procedures applied. The

work will be organised by EAA, with DIN,

the German Institute for Standardisation

(Deutsches Institut für Normung), acting as

the secretariat for WG 33 and Standard

Norway for the aluminium sub-group.


ALuMINIuM StANDARDISAtIoN IN EuRoPE

Management of the EAA Standards Committee

(STC) and all European standardisation activities

relating to aluminium semis, castings and alloys

by the Gesamtverband der Aluminiumindustrie

e.V. (GDA), initiated at the beginning of

2008, continued successfully during 2011. In

addition, having accepted STC chairmanship

in autumn 2008, the GDA agreed to hold onto

the position until an industry representative

could be found.

EUROPEAN STANDARDISATION

The Aluminium and Aluminium Alloys Technical

Committee of the European Committee

for Standardisation (CEN/TC 132) focused

its European standardisation efforts on the

following areas:

● Ongoing revision of existing standards,

such as those concerning terminology,

pressure equipment and anodisation.

● Continued revision of terminology standard

EN 12258-1:1998 in CEN/TC 132. The

revised draft standard prEN 12258-1 was

submitted to the CEN formal vote, closing

in February 2012.

● Revision of anodisation standards under

ISO leadership, which means replacing

the complete set of corresponding

EN standards (EN 12373 parts 1-19)

with EN ISO standards, identical to ISO

standards, which were published between

the end of 2010 and 2011.

As in previous years, EAA funded CEN/TC

132 management and secretariat activities,

executed by AFNOR, France. In addition

to resources invested by EAA, GDA and

AFNOR, many highly motivated aluminium

industry experts spent significant time and

effort on standardisation issues, to the

benefit of the whole industry.

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EUROCODE DESIGN AND EXECUTION

STANDARDS FOR ALUMINIUM

All parts of Eurocode 9 Design of Aluminium

Structures (EN 1999) were published.

Necessary corrigenda and amendments were

finalised during the course of 2011. In most

EU Member States draft national annexes

have already been or are being prepared.

CEN/TC 250 and CEN/TC 250 SC 9 were

discussed and proposals put forward for the

further development of the Eurocode.

Regarding execution standard Execution of

Steel Structures and Aluminium Structures

(EN 1090), all parts relating to aluminium

were accepted throughout Europe following

the formal vote.

EAA and EPAQ (European Quality Assurance

Association for Panels and Profiles) also

launched an initiative for specific standards

concerning the execution of aluminium and

steel structures with cold-formed structural

sheeting for facades and roofing.

INTERNATIONAL STANDARDISATION /

HARMONISATION

The Global Advisory Group (GAG) continued

its efforts to coordinate aluminium-related

standardisation activities on a worldwide basis.

The International Aluminium Institute (IAI)

maintained its observer relationship and

frequent communication with GAG.

INTERNATIONAL ALLOY REGISTRATION

Since 2008, EAA has also intensively pursued its

collaboration with the Aluminum Association

(AA). As a result of sponsorship efforts,

International Aluminium Alloy Registration

Records (known as Teal Sheets) are available

as a free electronic download from the EAA,

AA and GDA websites. Addenda to the Teal

Sheets are also published on a regular basis.

For further details go to www.alueurope.eu.


AutoMotIVE AND tRANSPoRt

The activities of the Automotive & Transport

Group focus mainly on cars, trucks, trailers

and buses, where our main mission is

to promote aluminium as a feasible,

sustainable and effective way of reducing

CO emissions and increasing road and

2

pedestrian safety.

ADVOCACY AND STANDARDS

As a complement to Regulation (EC) No

443/2009, which sets emission performance

standards to reduce CO emissions from

2

new passenger cars, Regulation (EU) No

510/2011, relating to light commercial

vehicles was published on 11 May 2011.

These two regulations link CO emission

2

targets to vehicle mass, partially offsetting

the benefits of using lightweight materials,

while EAA was seeking a more relevant

utility parameter, e.g. vehicle footprint.

Nevertheless, thanks to intensive advocacy

efforts since 2007, we managed to

include two important points in the final

regulations: a revision clause to change

utility parameters for calculating emission

limits, as well as revision of the average

mass of new vehicles, thereby limiting the

adverse effects of increased vehicle mass in

case it is kept as a utility parameter.

In 2011, we provided input for the study

Support for the Revision of Regulation (EC)

No 443/2009 commissioned by the European

Commission, which concluded that vehicle

footprint looks to be a more favourable

parameter from a consumer perspective,

and might increase acceptance of legislation

based thereupon. We had the opportunity

to underline our position with regard to the

above study during stakeholder consultation

held on 6 December 2011. The European

Commission is set to release its amended

regulation proposal by the end of 2012.

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EAA is also involved in two studies initiated

by the European Commission on the

reduction and testing of GHG emissions

from heavy duty vehicles. The first one,

entitled Strategy Support, was published

on 22 February 2011. Using numerous

sources of EAA data, it concluded that

lightweighting was the most important

technological option to control CO2 emissions from heavy duty vehicles. The

second study, on the Development and

Testing of a Certification Procedure for CO2 Emissions and Fuel Consumption of Heavy

Duty Vehicles, should be completed during

the first quarter of 2012.

The European Parliament launched its own

initiative report on road safety in response to

the policy orientation on road safety 2011-

2020 from the European Commission. EAA’s

successful advocacy efforts ensured that the

AMAG rolled aluminium products for automotive applications

importance of passive safety of trucks and

energy absorption criteria for front underrun

protection devices were included in the

final European Parliament report.

EAA also participated in a task force at the

Centre for European Policy Studies dealing

with EU Transport Policy – Innovation,

Integration and 21st Century Infrastructure.

The task force held four meetings where

members could express their views on

how EU transport policies could help make

transport sustainable for the future. In 2012,

a report summarising these discussions will

be made public.

At global level, EAA is also following the

activities of UN WP 29, the World Forum

for Harmonisation of Vehicle Regulations,

dealing with CO emission measurement

2

procedures and road safety standards.


COMMUNICATION

Alongside sustained advocacy activities, EAA

Automotive & Transport Group spent much

of 2011 actively disseminating communication

materials. The brochures Aluminium in Cars and

Moving up to Aluminium (trucks) are still widely

read and highly appreciated by their respective

target groups. Our newsletters addressed

a number of pertinent issues. The Aludrive

newsletter, aimed at the automotive industry,

essentially dealt with four recurrent themes:

high-strength aluminium alloys, aluminium

applications in the latest car models, aluminium’s

contribution to hybrid and electric vehicles, and

LCA. The Alutransport newsletter, targeting the

commercial transport sector, focused on passive

safety and featured the latest innovations in the

truck and bus segments.

EAA also unveiled the results of its latest

study conducted with the Institut für

Kraftfahrwesen Aachen (IKA) on passive

safety in and around heavy goods vehicles.

The study shows that the severity of car-to-

truck accidents could be significantly reduced

if an energy-absorbing crash management

system was used. Using aluminium for this

purpose would minimise weight, while

maintaining optimal crash performance. The

study results were summarised in a leaflet that

can be downloaded from the EAA website.

A project on electric vehicles is also ongoing

(see AFFG p12).

EDUCATION

A training manual for manufacturers

entitled Aluminium in Commercial Vehicles

was published in 2009. French and German

versions were completed in 2011 and are

accessible on the EAA website.

For passenger cars, revised application

sections of the Aluminium Automotive

Manual were uploaded to the EAA website

in December 2011 (www.alueurope.eu).

The revision process will continue with other

sections over the course of 2012.

Activity Report 2011 EAA | 23


uILDING

24 | EAA Activity Report 2011

Throughout 2011, the EAA Building Group

was involved in intense activity related to the

implementation of the Ecodesign Directive,

in the context of which three studies were

launched simultaneously, as well as recently

adopted EU legislation and standards pertaining

to buildings and building products in Europe.

The EAA Building Group also federated ten

other metals associations under the METALS

FOR BUILDINGS umbrella, advocating for

better consideration of the recyclability

of building products in the EU legislative

framework (www.metalsforbuildings.eu).

ADVOCACY AND STANDARDS

At the end of 2009 and in mid-2010

respectively, the Ecodesign and Energy

Labelling Directives were extended from

energy-using products to all energy-related

products utilised in the construction sector,

as part of the Sustainable Consumption

and Production (SCP) action plan. The EAA

Building Group participated in three studies:

● New Methodology for the Ecodesign

of Energy-Related Products: EAA had

two major issues with the previous

methodology, only one of which was

solved. Metals and plastics are now treated

in the same way, but the recyclability

of products is still not embraced by the

methodology. The EAA Building Group

will continue to coordinate joint metals

advocacy in this domain in 2012.

● Evaluation of the Ecodesign Directive:

This study, examining developments so

far as well as future prospects, is set to

be completed during the first quarter of

2012. EAA is using this consultation to

stress its disappointment with the abovementioned

methodology.


● Study on Amended Working Plan: Despite

the fact that the EAA Building Group

appears as the first stakeholder in the

windows charter and our comments

on the risk of regulation overlap were

all validated, windows came second

in the priority list of the study, even

though the Commission proposed that

windows should rank first for its 2012-

2014 working plan. This is mainly due

to energy labelling of windows being

clearly solicited by several members of the

European Parliament and Member States.

The EAA Building Group communicated

its objection to Ecodesign of windows

and its preference for an energy labelling

system where installer labels should be

given greater importance than commonly

used standard energy labels.

Green Public Procurement (GPP) and

Ecolabels are also part of the SCP action

plan. EAA successfully campaigned for

energy gains and climatic conditions to

be taken into account in GPP criteria for

windows introduced in 2010, and is now

participating in the revision of those criteria.

This process began during the last quarter

of 2011 and could serve as a basis for the

development of an Ecolabel for windows.

The EAA Building Group is also involved in

the development of a European Ecolabel for

office buildings through the METALS FOR

BUILDINGS alliance, and obtained inclusion

of a criterion on recyclability in the latest draft

published in 2011. The process will continue

into 2012 to secure this achievement.

Replacing the previous Construction

Products Directive and aiming to create a

single European market for construction

products, the new Construction Products

Regulation (EU 305/2011) was published on

4 April 2011. The most relevant articles for

the aluminium industry will apply from 1 July

2013. The EAA Building Group defended

the principle allowing window and curtain

wall manufacturers to use test reports

from their suppliers (cascading) through

amendments successfully introduced in

the final regulation, and organised a Q&A

session with the European Commission in

Activity Report 2011 EAA | 25


26 | EAA Activity Report 2011

June 2011 to allow its member companies

to clarify several implementation points.

EAA is actively engaged in the revision and

development of standards for window

and curtain walling, which are needed to

declare product performance and enable

use of the CE-mark under the Construction

Products Directive. EAA is also involved in the

development of European Technical Approval

Guidelines (ETAGs) and technical reports that

set rules to declare performance and allow

CE-marking of aluminium products utilised

by the cladding industry.

Particular attention was paid to standards

related to the energy efficiency of products and

implementation of the Energy Performance of

Buildings Directive (EPBD).

Release of dangerous substances, durability

and service life, reaction to fire and fire

resistance are additional areas that the

EAA Building Group is currently addressing.

Studies conducted over recent years all

prove that aluminium products can retain

their performance over an economically

viable lifespan and affect neither building

users nor the environment.

LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT (LCA) AND

ENVIRONMENTAL PRODUCT DECLARATION (EPD)

Proper consideration of the recycling benefits

of aluminium building products at end-oflife

is still a major challenge for the building

sector. Indeed, many EPD programmes and a

number of building sustainability assessment

schemes are exclusively based on recycled

content, disregarding recyclability and the

benefits resulting from the end-of-life stage.

Aluminium modern window

Within CEN/TC 350 (Sustainability of

Construction Works), most standards

were finalised in 2011. Standard EN15978

Assessment of Environmental Performance of

Buildings – Calculation Method was published

in November, while EN15804 Environmental

Product Declarations (EPDs) – Core Rules

for the Product Category of Construction

Products will be published in the first quarter

of 2012. It is likely that most national EPD

programmes in European countries will align

their methodology to EN15804. In 2011,

EAA analysed the challenges and options

for aligning its ISO-based EPD programme to

this new EN15804 standard. A new EAA EPD

tool will be developed accordingly in 2012.

While the two above-mentioned new EN

standards allow reporting on the benefits

of end-of-life recycling, inclusion of these

benefits in LCAs is not addressed. Hence,


integration of these benefits is far from being

secured in many EPD programmes or building

assessment schemes. There is still considerable

advocacy work to be done in the coming

years, both at national and European level.

COMMUNICATION

Two years ago, the EAA Building Group

became an official partner of BUILD UP, the

European Commission’s web platform for

building professionals, local authorities and

building occupants willing to share their

experience on how to cut energy consumption

in buildings. EAA launched and is moderating

the windows and cladding communities on

the BUILD UP platform. These communities

are now embedded in the new EAA website as

from November 2011, giving more visibility to

news and views that EAA member companies

post on BUILD UP.

The EAA Building Group translated

its brochure entitled Sustainability of

Aluminium in Buildings into six additional

languages. Available from the EAA website,

the brochure explains why aluminium is so

successful in this sector and chronicles its

cradle-to-cradle life cycle and contribution

to energy efficiency in buildings.

METALS FOR BUILDINGS published its leaflet,

whose development was coordinated by

EAA, explaining the benefits of using metals

in buildings and how to best measure their

recyclability. The brochure particularly

stresses the high relevance of the end-oflife

recycling rate as an indicator, rather than

recycled content, to reflect the recycling

performance of metal building products.

Activity Report 2011 EAA | 27


28 | EAA Activity Report 2011

PACKAGING

BEVERAGE CAN MARKETS CONTINUE TO GROW,

FOIL MARKETS DECLINE

The European market for beverage cans

continued to gain ground over the course

of 2011, with solid growth recorded in a

number of Western European countries and

further increases in some Eastern European

countries. Today, around 3 out of 4 cans

consumed are made of aluminium, out

of a total market of more than 55 billion

beverage cans. It appears that the European

consumer increasingly prefers recyclable

beverage cans over refillable containers.

However, the economic slowdown in Europe

affected deliveries of aluminium foil in 2011.

According to data published by the European

Aluminium Foil Association (EAFA), total

production declined by almost 6% to 798,000

tonnes. Market segments for thinner foil, mainly

used for flexible packaging and household

purposes, fell by almost 9%, while thicker foil

segments declined by 2%. On the other hand,

exports outside the EAFA region were stable.

RECYCLING AT RECORD LEVELS

Recovery and recycling rates of used

aluminium packaging continued to rise

and currently stand at close to 60%. In

addition to an overall material recycling rate

of 55% for aluminium collected via specific

packaging recovery schemes, an increasing

number of incinerators of household waste

now recover smaller aluminium parts in

their bottom ashes, either through material

recycling or via energy recovery of very thin

oxidised foil packaging. EAA is supporting

several bottom ash treatment initiatives

in countries like France, Italy, Poland and

Portugal to promote the use of the latest

eddy current technology for collecting even

the smallest particles.


More than 130 bottom ash experts from all

over Europe came together in September

in Copenhagen for a seminar organised by

the EAA Packaging Group and the energyto-waste

coalition CEWEP, to discuss the

potential of bottom ash treatment and the

use of innovative technologies to further

enhance aluminium recovery yields at an

affordable cost.

It should be stressed that EAA generally

favours selective collection of aluminium

packaging items over mixed collection

systems. This is of particular interest in case

of aluminium beverage cans, which were

again recycled at record levels, especially

in countries that use the high scrap value

of aluminium as a key driver to improve

their collection rates. Today, 64% of all

aluminium beverage cans consumed are

recycled Europe-wide and, if we include

informal collection activities in this figure, it

would be safe to assume that more than 7

out of 10 cans are now recycled.

The successful out-of-home collection

programme Every Can Counts (ECC), initiated

by ALUPRO UK, is now being implemented in

at least four other countries: France, Austria,

Romania and Hungary. ECC programmes focus

on out-of-home collection of beverage cans at

festivals and events, at the workplace (offices,

etc), and on-the-go. In Hungary, it will even be

used to support the new collection initiative

Returpack, which is officially recognised by the

authorities.

ECC programmes can be combined with other

specific collection campaigns, such as those

utilised for foil containers and aerosols. The

UK programmes Aerofoil and Metal Matters

clearly demonstrate that metal packaging

items, once collected, can easily be recycled

into other highly valuable applications. Such

campaigns are instrumental in convincing

local authorities to improve their collection

systems, and encourage consumers to

separate their packaging items.

The EAA Packaging Group is also involved in

a new EAFA initiative to promote the use of

aluminium closures. Aluminium screw caps

on wine bottles are becoming increasingly

popular in Europe and, in order to demonstrate

how they actively contribute to sustainability,

it is essential to prove that they can be easily

collected together with glass and separated

thereafter. Several countries already record

high recycling levels for closures either via the

glass sorting plants or within the collected

aluminium packaging fraction.

ANNUAL ALUMINIUM PACKAGING SEMINAR

IN BELGRADE

The annual Aluminium Packaging Seminar

held in Belgrade (Serbia) in September, in

close cooperation with the Serbian RECAN

Fund, was an outstanding success. Again, a

record number of participants representing

can makers and other customer groups

attended the seminar, with keynote speakers

from the Serbian government, including the

deputy prime minister, and contributions from

Coca-Cola and regional waste management

and recycling initiatives. During the field trip,

participants visited several local aluminium

can recycling programmes actively supported

by the RECAN Fund.

EU PACKAGING AND WASTE LEGISLATION

The EAA Packaging Group actively

participated in a number of European

Activity Report 2011 EAA | 29


30 | EAA Activity Report 2011

Metal Packaging Europe’s infinite recycling loop

discussions on the Coherence of European

Waste Legislation and Use of Economic

Instruments and Waste Management

Performances within the Thematic Strategy

on Waste Prevention and Recycling, as well

as an EU study on Deposits for Beverage

Cans, initiated by the European Parliament.

We further contributed to the food and drink

industry’s Sustainable Consumption and

Production Round Table and to FACET, the

European research programme on materials

in contact with foodstuffs.

Metal Packaging Europe

(MPE), the European metal

packaging platform of beverage and food

can makers and aluminium and steel

suppliers, further intensified its activities in

2011 and published its manifesto, in which

all members committed to recycle at least

80% of all metal packaging used in Europe

by the year 2020. On top of this, it was

pledged that no metal packaging would

go to landfill any longer, thus keeping all

metal packaging in the material loop as a

permanent resource for recycling. GHG

emissions and other environmental impacts

need to be further reduced by dedicated

programmes and initiatives in the steel and

aluminum production sectors.

INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS ON PACKAGING

AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Work on the ISO project entitled Standards on

Packaging and the Environment progressed

very well and input from aluminium experts

in the various WGs was well reflected in

the draft standards on recycling and energy

recovery. Furthermore, EAA, together with

its US partner CMI (Can Makers Institute),

successfully developed a draft ISO technical

report on substances and materials which

may impede recycling.

A first Global Can Forum meeting was

held in Los Angeles (USA) and experts from

CMI, the US Aluminium Association (AA),

the Brazilian ABRALATAS, the Japanese

canmakers, MPE and the EAA Packaging

Group discussed regional and global

packaging issues of common interest.

ALUMINIUM FOIL HIGHLY APPRECIATED

BY BARBECUE LOVERS

EAFA, AEROBAL and the EAA Packaging

Group teamed up in a joint stand at Interpack,

the largest packaging fair in Europe. The

Alufoil BBQ Arena, set up by EAFA on

the central square of Interpack, proved a

spectacular success: professional BBQ teams

from all over the world demonstrated how

many different features of aluminium foil

could be put to good use for barbecues and

grills. Visitors enjoyed a feast of tasty foods

at regular intervals throughout the day and

enjoyed a cool beer served in aluminium cans

with decorative foil lids.


EAFA was also the main sponsor of the World

Grill and Barbecue Championship 2011,

which took place in Gronau, Germany. More

than 100,000 visitors turned out to watch

professional teams showcase their skill at the

grill across the full range of BBQ disciplines.

The 73 competing teams used aluminium

BBQ foil, supplied by a major aluminium

foil roller and important manufacturer

of household foil. The creative flair of

aluminium foil in the world of barbecuing

was very much at the centre stage, showing

that it is an ideal partner for protective,

convenience and efficiency purposes. Over

the course of the competition and the

whole event, 52km of household foil was

utilised and subsequently recycled!

There was extensive media coverage of the

event (TV, radio, press and online), with very

positive reports on the use of aluminium foil

in the context of barbecuing.

2011 World BBQ Championship sponsored by EAFA

ALUMINIUM FOIL ROLLERS

GO FOR SUSTAINABILITY WORLDWIDE

Sustainability was at the top of the agenda

at the second Global Aluminium Foil Roller

Conference held in Bangkok (Thailand) in

January 2011, on the initiative of EAFA.

The importance of aluminium foil to the global

market was underlined by 90 participants

from China, Europe, India, Japan, the Middle

East, North America, Russia, South Korea,

Thailand and Turkey, representing almost

80% of global aluminium foil production.

The conference programme covered the

development of aluminium foil on a global

scale, the environmental performance

of smelters and its impact on the ecoperformance

of end-products, technical

developments in the rolling sector and

foundries, and the position of aluminium

foil in the sustainability debate.

Activity Report 2011 EAA | 31


32 | EAA Activity Report 2011

The first mutually financed project, A

Global Moment with Alufoil, was launched

to show the industry’s united voice on

foil sustainability. It includes a brochure

and website, www.global-alufoil.org, and

illustrates alufoil’s contribution to more

sustainable consumption and resource

efficiency through a series of vignettes,

showing aluminium foil usage in different

countries around the world at one moment

in time.

Participants at this global event agreed to

coordinate actions on sustainability in order

to support market growth and promote

innovative development of aluminium foil for

both packaging and technical applications,

saving far more resources than are consumed

in its production, through complete supply

and value chains.

ALUMINIUM AEROSOL CANS AT THE FOREFRONT

Innovation in can design and improved

efficiency and sustainability in can production

are key challenges for the industry and will

therefore continue to be at the top of the

agenda for members of AEROBAL, the

International Organisation of Aluminium

Aerosol Container Manufacturers. After

record world production of aluminium

aerosol cans of around 6 billion units in

2010, the industry was expecting another

production peak in 2011. With average

worldwide market growth of 8% in the

last six years, the aluminium aerosol can

industry has proven its sustained dynamism.

Aluminium aerosol cans constitute a

convincing multi-functional packaging

solution, offering utmost convenience,

striking design and perfect recyclability to

brand owners and consumers alike.

Winner of the AEROBAL World Aluminium Aerosol Can Award

Innovative printing and embossing technologies

that turn the packed product into an eye

catcher on the shelves were the hallmark of the

2011 World Aluminium Aerosol Can Award

competition organised by AEROBAL. For the

first time, application of high-gloss printing

foil was fully integrated in the manufacturing

process of cylindrical aluminium aerosols.

In November 2011, a seminar was held in

Gelsenkirchen (Germany) on the subject of

sustainability and recycling of aluminium aerosol

cans, jointly organised by the German Aluminium

Association (GDA) and AEROBAL, with active

participation of representatives from the EAA

Packaging Group. Participating scientists,

aluminium aerosol can manufacturers and major

customers in the cosmetics industry all agreed that

the best way to demonstrate the sustainability of

aluminium would be to further improve its socalled

end-of-life recycling rate, rather than using

the more restricted concept of recycled metal

content. Aluminium from used packaging items

like aerosol cans needs to be kept in the material

loop together with other aluminium scrap, so

that it is always available for new applications

in packaging or other key end-use markets for

aluminium, such as transport and building.


RECYCLING DIVISIoN

In Europe, efficient recycling of aluminium

is of interest in many respects. On the one

hand, recycled aluminium increases the

basis of raw material, which is of particular

importance to Europe, being poor in raw

material reserves. On the other hand,

recycling of aluminium activates the energy

stored in the metal that uses electrolysis

for the production of primary aluminium.

Indeed, the melting of aluminium scrap

only requires 5% of the energy used for

primary production. In view of the increasing

energy prices in Europe over the last years

and the need to reduce GHG emissions, the

aluminium industry has both an ecological

and also a considerable economic interest in

recycling its material as efficiently as possible.

Thus, the activities of the aluminium recycling

industry are being perfectly integrated into

initiatives launched by the EU to increase

resource efficiency and secure raw material

supplies. With collection and recycling rates

of more than 90%, application sectors

such as transport or building are already

at the very limit of what is possible. But

there are still areas of application with

open questions with regard to recycling

of end-of-life products, including, for

example, aluminium-containing devices

in the household, offices and handicraft

businesses. Since the larger scrap streams are

being ever better researched, the aluminium

industry is now intensifying its efforts to

show what happens to these devices after

the end of their product life and to establish

their recycling rates. Moreover, in so doing,

it is possible to determine the weak points

in the recycling chain. An ongoing project

entitled Comprehensive Recycling of Endof-Life

Aluminium Products, supported

by funds from the AFFG, is currently

investigating material streams on the basis

of three case studies in France, the UK and

Activity Report 2011 EAA | 33


34 | EAA Activity Report 2011

Germany. Using methodology developed

for this purpose, further investigations in

other countries will be initiated in order to

be able to make a representative statement

towards the EU.

For decades, collected aluminium scrap was

destined for one specific purpose: it was

used to produce casting alloys mainly for

the automobile industry. Typical application

areas include cylinder heads, engine blocks

and gear boxes. However, aluminium scrap

is now being increasingly sorted according

to its chemical composition, so that it can

also be used for the production of wrought

alloys. Typical application areas for wrought

alloys are window profiles, sheets and foils.

A particularly prominent example of wrought

alloy scrap for recycling is used beverage cans.

A prerequisite for a functioning aluminium

recycling industry is sufficient availability

of aluminium scrap. By and large, scrap

originating in Europe is sufficient to supply

existing production facilities, but due to

considerable Chinese and Indian interest,

this scrap supply is constantly in danger.

In 2011, the EU exported some 946,300

tonnes of aluminium scrap to third countries.

This was accompanied by imports totalling

370,650 tonnes, so the net scrap outflow

amounted to 575,650 tonnes. Although

this resulted in temporary supply shortages

regionally, looking at the whole year, the

scrap supply still sufficed.

In individual Member States, considerable

differences were observed in recycled

aluminium production. While production

of casting alloys in Germany and, to some

extent, Italy, thanks to thriving automobile

production almost reached previous record

production levels, other countries, mainly in

Southern Europe, could not keep up.

For 2012, the aluminium recycling industry

expects to achieve similarly high production

rates. Use of scrap for the production of

wrought alloys is also set to increase. In

any case, the aluminium industry will, by

means of its recycling initiatives, continue to

contribute to enhancing resource efficiency

as well as securing an adequate supply of

raw materials.


EAA LAuNCHES A bRAND-NEw wEbSItE

AND NEw MoNItoRING tooLS

WELCOME AT ALUEUROPE.EU

In October 2011 EAA launched a new

website. It is now better adjusted to the needs

of external stakeholders and reflects a more

functional, issue-driven structure, making it

more accessible and comprehensive to use

for the target audience. The Public Affairs

and Communication department created

a vibrant and lively platform to inform and

communicate the positive messages and

activities of the industry to the wider public.

The new website features enhanced tools

to improve the navigation and offers a

complete overview of the aluminium sector

in Europe, with detailed information on the

production processes and the material’s

properties. Dedicated sections cover, among

others, major policy themes, the metal’s

main applications and the benefits of its

use-phase (automotive, transport, building,

packaging and others). The website also

provides credible and accurate sustainability

indicators and life cycle data, which

underpin and support the industry’s vision

and the sustainability of its products and,

thus, highlight the contribution to a more

sustainable future.

The members’ area can still be accessed

directly from the EAA homepage and now

features a direct access to the so-called Issue

Management Tool, allowing our members

to access many relevant documents.

MONITORING TOOLS

A new tool called EAA Watch was created to

complement the existing “Heads-up” and

ensure monitoring of all issues of interest to

our industry, as well as to inform members

about upcoming events.

The Issue Management Tool was updated

to make this tool even more intuitive and

simple to use. The system is composed of

three parts: document library, calendar and

issue tracker. New pieces of information

were added and, among others, members

are now able to access an annual calendar

of activities that is constantly updated.

Activity Report 2011 EAA | 35


CoNtACtS

36 | EAA Activity Report 2011

Patrick de Schrynmakers ....................... Secretary General ........................schrynmakers@eaa.be

Natacha Kukin ...................................... Assistant .................................................. kukin@eaa.be

Viviane Verbiest ....................................Assistant ............................................... verbiest@eaa.be

PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND COMMUNICATION

Claude Claire Sönmez ...........................Director .................................................sonmez@eaa.be

Erich Cuaz ............................................Deputy Director ......................................... cuaz@eaa.be

Coline Lavorel .......................................Manager ................................................. lavorel@eaa.be

Tadeja Prosen .......................................Junior Officer ..........................................prosen@eaa.be

David Van Heuverswyn .........................Assistant ....................................vanheuverswyn@eaa.be

ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH, SAFETY AND REACH

Eirik Nordheim ......................................Director ..............................................nordheim@eaa.be

Sandro Starita .......................................Manager ..................................................starita@eaa.be

Annie Marthoud ...................................Assistant ............................................ marthoud@eaa.be


DATA MANAGEMENT

Bob Lambrechts ..........................Director ......................................................lambrechts@eaa.be

Ana-Maria Danila ........................Manager ............................................................ danila@eaa.be

AUTOMOTIVE AND TRANSPORT

BUILDING

Bernard Gilmont .........................Director ...........................................................gilmont@eaa.be

Christian Leroy ............................Director Education, LCA and Sustainability ...........leroy@eaa.be

Patrik Ragnarsson .......................Manager Automotive & Transport ...............ragnarsson@eaa.be

Pavlos Vatavalis ...........................Manager Technical Affairs Building .................vatavalis@eaa.be

PACKAGING

Maarten Labberton .....................Director ....................................................... labberton@eaa.be

David Van Heuverswyn ...............Assistant ..............................................vanheuverswyn@eaa.be

Activity Report 2011 EAA | 37


38 | EAA Activity Report 2011

RECYCLING

Organisation of European Aluminium Recycling Industry (OEA)

Günter Kirchner ..........................Secretary General ...................... kirchner@oea-alurecycling.org

Zheng Luo ..................................Recycling Manager ............................luo@oea-alurecycling.org

FOIL APPLICATIONS

European Aluminium Foil Association (EAFA)

Stefan Glimm ..............................Executive Director ...............................stefan.glimm@aluinfo.de

LCA AND SUSTAINABILITY

Jörg Schäfer ................................Sustainability Expert ..........................joerg.schaefer@aluinfo.de

STANDARDISATION

Wolfgang Heidrich ......................Director ......................................wolfgang.heidrich@aluinfo.de


EAA MEMbERSHIP

COMPANIES*:

• Alcoa Europe S.A.

• Aleris Europe

• Alinvest

Aluminium S.A.

• Basemet

• Bridgenorth Aluminium

• Constellium

• Hydro

• Kubikenborg Aluminium AB

• Mäkaelä Alu Oy

• Metra Aluminium

EUROPEAN ASSOCIATIONS:

• EAFA – European Aluminium Foil Association e.V

• OEA – Organisation of European Aluminium Recycling Industry

NATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS:

• AEA – Asociación Española del Aluminio, Anexpa (Spain)

• Alcoa – Köfém kft (Hungary)

• Alfed – Aluminium Federation Ltd (United Kingdom)

Aluminium Association of Greece (Greece)

Aluminium Center Belgium (Belgium)

Aluminium Danmark (Denmark)

Aluminium-Verband Schweiz Fachgruppe Halbzeug (Switzerland)

Association Française de l’Aluminium (France)

• Fachverbände Bergbau-Stahl und NE-Metall - Wirtschaftskammer Österreich (Austria)

• Centroal – Centro Italiano Alluminio (Italy)

• Fachverband Aluminiumhalbzeug (Germany)

• Impol d.d. (Slovenia)

• Swedish Aluminium Association (Sweden)

• TALSAD – Turkish Aluminium Industrialists Association (Turkey)

• V.N.M.I. Vereniging Nederlandse Metallurgische Industrie (The Netherlands)

ASSOCIATED MEMBERS:

• Reynaers Aluminium NV/SA

• Schüco International KG

• 3A Composites

• Nordurál

• Novelis

• Profilgruppen

• Purso Oy

• Rio Tinto Alcan

• Sapa

• Slovalco a.s.

• TALUM

• TRIMET ALUMINIUM AG

• VIMETCO - ALRO

* Beside the above listed direct members, several companies are also members of EAA via their national

associations, such as Alumil, AMAG, APT Group, Assan, Etem.

Photo credits:

The EAA would like to thank its members and partners for the use of the photos in this report.

Activity Report 2011 EAA | 39


Avenue de Broqueville, 12

BE - 1150 Brussels - Belgium

Phone: +32 2 775 63 63

Fax: +32 2 779 05 31

Email: eaa@aluminium.org

Website: www.alueurope.eu

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