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2004-2005 Annual Report

Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

July 2005


Cover image: Polygon image segments derived from the 2004 Arkansas Landsat 5 TM imagery

using eCognition software.


Highlights of FY 2004-2005 ............................................. 1

Background and Mission.................................................. 5

Hardware and Software.................................................. 5

Peripherals...................................................................... 7

Education........................................................................ 7

Research ........................................................................ 7

Public Service................................................................. 8

RGIS-MidSouth .............................................................. 8

CAST Staff Members...................................................... 8

Facilities.......................................................................... 8

Web Resources .............................................................. 9

Network Capabilities....................................................... 9

Data ................................................................................ 9

Photogrammetry/Surveying Hardware and Software... 10

Remote Sensing Hardware and Software .................... 10

CAST-Supported Teaching Labs ................................. 10

Corporate Partners ....................................................... 12

Education....................................................................... 17

Software Access........................................................... 17

Campus-Wide ESRI License........................................ 17

Students/Researchers Computer Accounts ................. 17

University of Arkansas Courses ................................... 17

Digital Library Project ................................................... 19

Educational Projects..................................................... 19

CADIS Project .............................................................. 19

EAST Project ................................................................ 20

C.R.A.T.E. Project ........................................................ 22

Educational Talent Search ........................................... 23

Animation Education..................................................... 24

Upward Bound Academy.............................................. 24

University REU Students .............................................. 24

GIS Days ...................................................................... 25

AmericaView Curriculum .............................................. 25

Environmental Dynamics Ph.D. Program..................... 26

Internship Program in Applied Spatial Info.Tech.......... 26

Conferences and Workshops ....................................... 26

Research and Externally Funded Projects............ 27

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Grants Awarded, FY 2004-2005................................... 27

1) Geospatial & Visualization Support & Training

for EAST Initiative.................................................... 27

2) USDA/RGIS Mid-South ........................................... 27

3) GeoStor Operations & Maintenance ....................... 30

4) GeoStor Operation and Data Transfer .................... 30

5) ArkansasView Program Development and

Operations ............................................................... 30

6) Development of an Online Tracking and

Mapping System for the Arkansas Game

& Fish Commission.................................................. 33

7) Establishing Framework Data Services Using

the OGC Web Feature Service ............................... 34

8) Digitization of the Arkansas Soil Survey ................. 35


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9) GIS-Based Natural Resource Analyses for the

Ozark Wetland Planning Region ............................. 36

10) GIS-Based Natural Resource Analyses for

Arkansas River Valley Wetland Planning ............... 36

11) Computing & Retrieving 3D Archeological

Structures from Subsurface Survey ...................... 38

12) Arkansas LULC Mapping – Phase II ..................... 39

13) National Archeological Database and National

NAGPRA Databases (Modification #2) ................. 41

14) Developing GIS based application projects

for the Facilities Management Department

(FAMA) at the University of Arkansas (#1)............ 41

15) Developing GIS based application projects

for the Facilities Management Department

(FAMA) at the University of Arkansas (#2)............ 41

16) Assessment of Local Community/Facility

Management Web Mapping Strategy.................... 42

17) University of Arkansas Economic Development

Institute (UAEDI) Collaboration and Support......... 42

18) Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning

Commission: Database Management Project....... 42

19) Aligning City, State and Federal GeoSpatial

Data Needs............................................................ 43

20) Load Quickbird High-Resolution Satellite

Imagery of Pulaski County into GeoStor ............... 43

Current Pending Proposals .......................................... 44

Public Service..................................................... 45

CAST’s Website ........................................................... 45

GeoStor ........................................................................ 46

Board memberships ..................................................... 46

State Service ................................................................ 47

Local Service ................................................................ 47

Campus Service ........................................................... 47

Technical Assistance.................................................... 48

Global Positioning System Base Station ...................... 48

CAST Visibility through Publications ............................ 48

Demos, Tours, Talks, Assistance to Public .................. 49

Appendix A: Publications................................... 51

Appendix B: Public Service ............................... 57

Appendix C: Staff Listing ................................... 67

Appendix D: Award Report from RSSP............. 69

Appendix E: Selected Articles ........................... 73

Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Ozark Hall, Room 12

Fayetteville AR 72701-1202

479-575-6159 phone

479-575-5218 fax

www.cast.uark.edu

info@cast.uark.edu

July 1, 2005


Highlights of the 2004 - 2005 report:

Education - THE ENVIRONMENTAL AND SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES INITIATIVE

(EAST). EAST is a project-based, student-centered, community-oriented learning initiative that

incorporates technology as tools for problem solving. Starting out at one rural Arkansas high

school in 1996, EAST is now found in

140 schools in Arkansas, 45 in California, 13 in Illinois, 7 in Hawaii, and 3 in Alabama,

Louisiana, and Mississippi (as of spring 2005). This year CAST staff visited 26 schools in

Arkansas. Page 20

NSF RESEARCH EXPERIENCE FOR UNDERGRADUATES (REU) AND THE

COMMUNITY ASSET AND

DEVELOPMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM (CADIS). CADIS represents a ongoing

community partnership where EAST high school and recently graduated high school students

participate in a intensive summer research effort addressing a critical community problem using

the full range of technologies available at the Center. The NSF REU Program supports

undergraduates on the U of A campus from campuses around the U.S. directly exposing them to

research. This year these programs have been combined.

Pages 19 and 24

EDUCATIONAL TALENT SEARCH. Educational Talent Search is an early intervention

project. Serving 1,200 students in grades 6-12. The program promotes the skills and motivation

necessary for

successfully completing a baccalaureate degree. Summer enrichment of each and campus-based

events provide ongoing opportunities for institutional and faculty involvement. Page 23

Research - RESEARCH FUNDING. A total of 20 new research proposals were funded in Fiscal

Year 2005 with a total award amount of $1,866,665. Page 27

COMPUTING & RETRIEVING 3D ARCHEOLOGICAL STRUCTURES FROM

SUBSURFACE SURVEY.

In this project, funded by the National Science Foundation, CAST staff and collaborating

archeologists from Universidad Mayor des San Andres, University of Pennsylvania, University

of Denver, and Harvard University will collect very large detailed, three-dimensional

geophysical datasets from approximately

60 subterranean acres of Tiwanaku. Page 38

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ONLINE TRACKING AND MAPPING SYSTEM OF MALLARD

DUCKS. During the spring of 2004, Arkansas Game and Fish Commission biologists placed

radio transmitters on 28 mallards. With the locations of each transmitter equipped mallard, they

can be measured to within 300

hundred meters on a weekly or even daily basis and stored in a groundbased computer. Page 33

Public Service - BOARD MEMBERSHIP. Cast members serve on numerous national, state, and

local boards. Jack Cothren serves on the Editorial Board of Earth Imaging Journal and the Board

of the


American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. Fred Limp serves on the Boards of

the Open Geospatial Interoperability Institute, the Oracle North America Spatial Interest Group,

the EAST Board, the Arkansas State Land Board Information Board, and the UA Information

Technology Research

Institute. Page 45

STATE SERVICE. The Center provides a range of public service throughout the state. In the last

fiscal years, an important arena of assistance was to support the legislature in a variety of

initiatives. Special demonstration efforts were offered to legislators such as Shane Broadway,

Jim Argue, Sue Madison, and Jan Judy, to the Legislative Research Bureau as well as help

provided to the Arkansas Geographic Information Office in a number of areas. CAST staff are

actively supporting Arkansas’ (and other state’s) schools and communities through the EAST

Project and AmericaView programs, described in detail in the Research section. Among the

Arkansas schools visited by EAST were: Little Rock, Fayetteville, Farmington, Gravette,

Lincoln, Perryville, Clinton, Southside, Dumas, Cave, Henderson, Morrilton, Camden, Lake

Village, McGehee, Smackover, Augusta, Brinkley, Vilonia, and Greenbrier. Outside the state,

schools were visited or school workshops were offered in Chicago IL, Eureka CA, Berkeley CA,

and Sacramento CA. Gorham provided a wide range of assistance to groups around the state in

the selection of image product and data, al well as in acquiring and using GPS data. Page 47

LOCAL SERVICE. Cristina Scarlat, Jack Cothren, and Brian Culpepper provided an extensive

amount of technical assistance to many groups in Northwest Arkansas, particularly to the

Northwest Arkansas Planning Commission and to the Northwest Arkansas Image Acquisition

Task Force in their very successful region-wide image and LIDAR data acquisition effort. As

part of that effort, Culpepper also completed a horizontal accuracy assessment of the 2004

Washington County orthoimagery. Scarlat also aided the Planning Commission in their regional

transportation planning efforts. Cothren served as a Northwest Arkansas Science Fair Judge.

Page 47

CAMPUS SERVICE.

The Center has active service efforts with a wide range of campus units. John Wilson provides

dozens of units on the campus with ESRI software technical support. The Center works closely

with the UA Center for Economic Development, Facilities Management, UA Extension, and

many other departments.

Page 47


THE ENVIRONMENTAL AND SPATIAL

TECHNOLOGIES INITIATIVE (EAST).

EAST is a project-based, student-centered,

community-oriented learning initiative that

incorporates technology as tools for problem

solving. Starting out at one rural Arkansas

high school in 1996, EAST is now found in

140 schools in Arkansas, 45 in California, 13

in Illinois, 7 in Hawaii, and 3 in Alabama,

Louisiana, and Mississippi (as of spring

2005). This year CAST staff visited 26

schools in Arkansas.

Page 20

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NSF RESEARCH EXPERIENCE FOR

UNDERGRADUATES (REU) AND

THE COMMUNITY ASSET AND

DEVELOPMENT INFORMATION

SYSTEM (CADIS).

CADIS represents a ongoing

community partnership where EAST

high school and recently graduated

high school students participate in a

intensive summer research effort

addressing a critical community

problem using the full range of

technologies available at the Center.

The NSF REU Program supports

undergraduates on the U of A campus

from campuses around the U.S.

directly exposing them to research.

This year these programs have been

combined.

Pages 19 and 24

EDUCATIONAL TALENT SEARCH.

Educational Talent Search is an early

intervention project. Serving 1,200 students

in grades 6-12. The program promotes the

skills and motivation necessary for

successfully completing a baccalaureate

degree. Summer enrichment of each and

campus-based events provide ongoing

opportunities for institutional and faculty

involvement.

Page 23

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CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 1


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RESEARCH FUNDING.

A total of 20 new research proposals were

funded in Fiscal Year 2005 with a total award

amount of $1,866,665.

Page 27

COMPUTING & RETRIEVING 3D

ARCHEOLOGICAL STRUCTURES FROM

SUBSURFACE SURVEY.

In this project, funded by the National

Science Foundation, CAST staff and

collaborating archeologists from

Universidad Mayor des San Andres,

University of Pennsylvania, University of

Denver, and Harvard University will collect

very large detailed, three-dimensional

geophysical datasets from approximately

60 subterranean acres of Tiwanaku.

Page 38

Laser scan of the Kalasasaya at the Tiwanaku ruins in

Boliva.

ARKANSAS LULC MAPPING.

The Arkansas LULC Mapping Project is

developing, through innovative and improved

classification techniques, statewide landuse/land-cover

(LULC) maps representing the

landscape of Arkansas in the year 2004 and

landscape changes from 1999-2004.

Page 39

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Mosaic of ten Landsat 5 TM scenes collected in the

spring of 2004.

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ONLINE

TRACKING AND MAPPING

SYSTEM OF MALLARD DUCKS.

During the spring of 2004, Arkansas

Game and Fish Commission

biologists placed radio transmitters

on 28 mallards. With the locations of

each transmitter equipped mallard,

they can be measured to within 300

hundred meters on a weekly or even

daily basis and stored in a groundbased

computer.

Page 33

Screen shots of Satellite Mallard Tracking webpage.

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 2


LOCAL SERVICE.

BOARD MEMBERSHIP.

Cast members serve on numerous

national, state, and local boards.

Jack Cothren serves on the

Editorial Board of Earth Imaging

Journal and the Board of the

American Society of Photogrammetry

and Remote Sensing.

Fred Limp serves on the Boards of

the Open Geospatial

Interoperability Institute, the Oracle

North America Spatial Interest

Group, the EAST Board, the

Arkansas State Land Board

Information Board, and the UA

Information Technology Research

Institute.

Page 45

Cristina Scarlat, Jack Cothren, and Brian Culpepper

provided an extensive amount of technical assistance

to many groups in Northwest Arkansas, particularly to

the Northwest Arkansas Planning Commission and to

the Northwest Arkansas Image Acquisition Task

Force in their very successful region-wide image and

LIDAR data acquisition effort. As part of that effort,

Culpepper also completed a horizontal accuracy

assessment of the 2004 Washington County orthoimagery.

Scarlat also aided the Planning

Commission in their regional transportation planning

efforts. Cothren served as a Northwest Arkansas

Science Fair Judge.

Page 47

CAMPUS SERVICE.

STATE SERVICE.

The Center provides a range of

public service throughout the state.

In the last fiscal years, an important

arena of assistance was to support

the legislature in a variety of

initiatives. Special demonstration

efforts were offered to legislators

such as Shane Broadway, Jim

Argue, Sue Madison, and Jan Judy,

to the Legislative Research Bureau

as well as help provided to the

Arkansas Geographic Information

Office in a number of areas. CAST

staff are actively supporting

Arkansas’ (and other state’s) schools

and communities through the EAST

Project and AmericaView programs,

described in detail in the Research

section. Among the Arkansas

schools visited by EAST were: Little

Rock, Fayetteville, Farmington,

Gravette, Lincoln, Perryville, Clinton,

Southside, Dumas, Cave,

Henderson, Morrilton, Camden, Lake

Village, McGehee, Smackover,

Augusta, Brinkley, Vilonia, and

Greenbrier. Outside the state,

schools were visited or school

workshops were offered in Chicago

IL, Eureka CA, Berkeley CA, and

Sacramento CA. Gorham provided a

wide range of assistance to groups

around the state in the selection of

image product and data, al well as in

acquiring and using GPS data.

Page 47

The Center has active service efforts with a wide range of campus units. John Wilson

provides dozens of units on the campus with ESRI software technical support. The

Center works closely with the UA Center for Economic Development, Facilities

Management, UA Extension, and many other departments.

Page 47

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CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 3


Background

and

Mission

The Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies

(CAST) was founded in 1991 by Dr. Fred Limp

and Jim Farley under the administrative direction

of then Dean Bernard Madison. It was

designated a formal Research Center by the UA

Board of Trustees and the Arkansas Department

of Higher Education that same year. The Center

is the administrative equivalent of a department,

and the Director reports to the Dean of the

William J. Fulbright College of Arts and

Sciences, Dr. Donald Bobbitt. Close linkages

exist between the Center and multiple academic

departments across Arts and Sciences and the

Colleges of Engineering, Sam M. Walton

College of Business, School of Architecture, and

Dale Bumpers College of Agriculture, Food and

Life Sciences.

providing opportunity for economic development

through the Center’s business incubator efforts.

CAST is active in a wide range of service to the

university, community, state, nation, and is also

active internationally. For example, Center staff

work with over 200 high schools in the EAST

program and provide technical geospatial

assistance to local and county governments

around the State of Arkansas through our

USDA-funded RGIS Program. By building upon

the expertise of staff; the cooperation of the

university community and state, regional, and

local governments; the support of corporate

sponsors; the assistance of federal agencies;

and many others, CAST blends its focus on

education, research, and public service to

multiply the benefits of all these cooperative

efforts.

Students have access to a large variety of software in CAST

labs.

View of Old Main (from the east green).

The Center focuses on three basic areas:

education, research, and service to the public.

CAST specializes in serving the academic

community through its emphasis on high quality

university courses in geospatial theory and

method. CAST is actively involved in extensive

research efforts, through multiple grants totaling

more than $1 million awarded each year. The

research efforts compliment and greatly benefit

the educational and public service focus by

allowing staff and students to stay on the leading

edge of emerging technologies as well as

HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE.

More than 76 high performance color

workstations are accessible to students in five

teaching labs and are linked to extensive

servers. There are a total of 35 additional

desktop systems on staff researchers’ desks.

Server systems include:

Microsoft Windows 2003:

• 2 Dell PowerEdge 750, 2.8 GHz P4, 2

Gb RAM, 465 Gb disk.

• 2 Dell PowerEdge 750, 2.8 GHz P4, 2

Gb RAM, 234 Gb disk.

• Dell PowerEdge 2850, 2 x 3.2 GHz

Xeon, 2Gb RAM, 263 Gb disk.

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 5


• Dell PowerEdge 2850, 2 x 2.8 GHz

Xeon, 1.5 Gb RAM, 683 Gb disk.

• Dell PowerEdge 2600, 2 x 2.4 GHz

Xeon, 3 Gb RAM, 272 Gb disk.

Microsoft Windows 2000:

• Dell PowerEdge 4500, 2 x 1 GHz P3, 1

Gb RAM 169 Gb disk.

• Dell PowerEdge 4300, 2 x 450 MHz P3,

1 Gb RAM, 67 Gb disk.

• Dell PowerEdge 2300, 2 x 450 MHz P3,

1 Gb RAM, 410 GB disk.

RedHat Enterprise Linux:

• 4 Dell PowerEdge 2850, 2 x 3.2GHz

Xeon, 4 Gb RAM

• 2 Dell/EMC AX100 dual processor Disk

Arrays with total storage of 6TB 1

• Dell L132 PowerStore tape Library with

2 LTO-2 Tape Drives and 24 tape

capacity

This hardware supports a full range of software

for a range of vendors including such

international leaders as Oracle, Intergraph,

MapInfo, ESRI, Trimble, Definiens Imaging,

Skyline Software, IONIC, and others.

Equipment available to the students ranges from

multiple E-size plotters and scanners, laser

scanners, survey and mapping grade GPS

systems, and many others.

A partial list follows of software provided to

students and faculty within the CAST labs.

General Office Productivity:

• Adobe Acrobat Reader.

• Altiris Client Management Suite.

• Microsoft Internet Explorer.

• Microsoft Office XP.

• Microsoft Outlook.

• Microsoft Windows XP.

• Mozilla Firefox.

• Mozilla Thunderbird.

• Roxio Easy CD Creator.

• Sassafras KeyServer.

• Seagate Crystal Reports.

• SSH Secure Shell and FTP.

• Sun Java Plugin.

• Symantec AntiVirus Corporate Edition.

• UltimateZip.

Database:

• Oracle 10G Suite.

• Microsoft SQL Server.

• Microsoft Access.

GIS:

• Clark Labs CartaLynx.

• Clark Labs Idrisi Kilimanjaro.

• Digitizer Technology Company Virtual

Tablet Interface.

• ESRI ArcGIS.

• ESRI ArcView.

• ESRI ArcGIS 3D Analyst.

• ESRI ArcGIS Network Analyst.

• ESRI ArcGIS Spatial Analyst.

• ESRI ArcGIS Geostatistical Ayalyst.

• ESRI ArcGIS Schematics.

• Intergraph GeoMedia Grid.

• Intergraph GeoMedia Raster.

• Intergraph GeoMedia Pro.

• GRASS.

GPS:

• Trimble Pathfinder Office.

Graphics/CAD:

• Adobe Creative Suite Premium.

• Adobe Premiere.

• Autodesk AutoCAD.

• Golden Software Surfer.

• Macromedia Studio.

• SketchUp.

Photogrammetry:

• Leica Photogrammetry Suite.

• ShapeCapture.

• PhotoModeler.

Remote Sensing:

• ArcheoSurveyor.

• Clark Labs Idrisi Kilimanjaro.

• Definiens eCognition.

• ENVI Runtime.

• ERDAS Imagine Pro.

• ERDAS Software Suite.

• ERDAS Stereo Analyst.

• Geoscan Research Geoplot.

• GPR_Process.

• GSSI RADAN.

• PCI GeoMatica.

Statistics:

• R.

• SPSS.

• SigmaPlot.

Visualization:

• PhotoModeler.

• SoftImage XSI.

• World Construction Set.

6 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


• Virtual Nature Studio.

Hydrogeology:

• WHI Aquachem.

• WHI Aquifer Test.

• WHI Visual Modflow Pro.

PERIPHERALS.

The Center has three E-sized color plotters

including a HP5000PS, multiple A/B color

printers, E-sized scanner, multiple A/B scanners,

two large ALTEC flat-bed digitizers, and a wide

range of other input and output devices including

color cameras, video cameras, etc.

The Environmental Dynamics Ph.D. program

focuses on human-environmental interactions

within recent earth history, and it includes a

strong GIS component.

In FY 04-05, there were 275 student research

accounts active at the Center, in addition to

approximately 100 faculty/staff accounts. There

were also students accounts active for the

fourteen UAF classes taught in CAST facilities

and for a variety of workshops, short-courses,

etc. Through its strong private partnership

programs and with the support of the College,

the Center has developed teaching facilities that

were described in one external review as world

class. (Also see the Education section of this

report.)

RESEARCH.

Each year, CAST staff members are involved in

major research projects, training programs, and

other cooperative efforts. This fiscal year, there

were 20 projects awarded by a variety of

governmental and business organizations

totaling $1,296,831.

Large color plotters produce crisp, accurate maps.

EDUCATION.

University of Arkansas undergraduate and

graduate students have a wide range of

geospatial method and theory courses available

to them at CAST. These include multiple GIS

courses, GPS, cartography, remote sensing,

image interpretation, photogrammetry, high

density surveying, and spatial statistics, and

these courses provide the student with a range

of career options. Courses are open to students

from any discipline who plan to use these

technologies in their research or work. In

addition to classroom instruction, CAST facilities

are used by students in both undergraduate and

graduate research projects.

The internship program in Applied Spatial

Information Technologies offers students an

opportunity to gain hands-on experience in GIS

technologies.

Recent research projects focused on areas such

as geospatial data warehousing and distribution,

web-mapping, natural resources analyses, highresolution

image acquisition, K-12 GIS

education, land-use/land-cover identification,

remote sensing for historic resources, and the

optimization of networking for the public sector

in Arkansas. (See the Research section of this

report.)

Researchers have access to a wide range of surveying

equipment.

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 7


PUBLIC SERVICE.

CAST is involved in a variety of activities that

are of benefit to the citizens of Arkansas.

CAST’s website offers a multitude of data of

interest to the general public ranging from

different forms of Arkansas’ land usage and land

cover to locating lakes, streams, highways,

cities, etc.

CAST staff regularly participate in, sponsor, and

lead demonstrations, tours, talks, workshops,

meetings, etc. in GIS technologies, archaeology,

forestry, biological sciences, architecture, and

many others. Over 500 events occur each

year. CAST staff members receive requests for

information via email, phone, and through

CAST's website: www.cast.uark.edu.

CAST’s involvement in the EAST Initiative has

helped support more than 200 EAST high

schools and their communities in their efforts to

use high tech tools to solve real world problems.

An extension of the EAST Initiative, the CADIS

Program, brought together the private and public

sector to create a high quality GIS specifically

for Northwest Arkansas.

Another extension of the EAST Initiative is the

C.R.A.T.E. program which offers high school

students opportunities to work on projects

developed in animation software. Detailed

information about EAST, CADIS, and C.R.A.T.E.

are available on CAST’s website. (Also see

Education section.)

RGIS-MIDSOUTH.

RGIS-Mid-South, located at CAST, has been an

integral part of CAST since September of 1991.

This program was established in 1990 as the

result of a federal grant, through the U.S.

Department of Agriculture, to the Dale Bumpers

College of Agriculture, Food and Life Sciences.

RGIS-MidSouth is one of eight regional centers

located throughout the United States whose

mission is to transfer GIS technology to state,

county, and local governments.

The association of RGIS with CAST has been

highly beneficial to both. The RGIS-MidSouth

mission has resulted in extensive ties with state,

county, and local government agencies (an

important segment of potential GIS users), and

the resources available through CAST have

greatly enhanced the RGIS teaching and public

service programs. The benefits to RGIS include

access to technical expertise from a number of

fields, more coordinated support for expanded

communications networks (both among campus

departments and in the state and region), and

formal agreements to share in the acquisition,

accessing, and cataloging of new digital data for

use in research. (See Research section of this

report.)

CAST STAFF MEMBERS.

Since GIS applications encompass a wide range

of knowledge from many fields of study, a

conscious effort has been made to insure that

CAST staff members are not only proficient in

GIS software, but also represent a broad

spectrum of disciplines.

CAST staff members represent diverse

backgrounds in areas such as architecture,

archaeology, agronomy, geodesy, landscape

architecture, surveying, engineering, geology,

computer science, remote sensing, photo

interpretation, historic preservation, geography,

forestry, wildlife biology, and the social sciences

See appendices A and B for listings of staff

publications, demonstrations, workshops, etc.

and appendix C for a list of CAST staff

members.

The total number of people working at CAST

during FY04-05 was 53, broken down as follows:

• 24 Non-classified staff members.

• 2 Classified staff members.

• 18 Hourly staff members.

• 5 CADIS high school students.

• 4 CRATE high school students.

FACILITIES.

CAST is located in Ozark Hall on the University

of Arkansas campus in Fayetteville. CAST has

7,500 sq ft including five teaching labs and three

research labs offering access to high

performance workstations, extensive servers

and peripherals, and a wide range of

commercial software.

8 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


CAST has responsibility for maintaining the

hardware and software for five teaching

laboratories used by students from the

Departments of Anthropology, Geosciences,

Environmental Dynamics, and many others. All

facilities are carpeted, climate-controlled, and

equipped with high quality furnishings through

funding provided by Fulbright College.

While most website accesses come from the

U.S., the site is utilized by students, the public,

and researchers from around the world. The

CAST website has an average of 32,000 hits per

day. This number has remained consistently

high since its dramatic rise in 2002 from 19,000.

(See Public Service section for more details).

NETWORK CAPABILITIES.

The Center is one of the highest consumers of

network bandwidth on campus with our remote

sensing and GIS applications that often

incorporate disk files that exceed one gigabyte

in capacity.

CAST lab (Ozark-208) is used heavily for classes and

research.

WEB RESOURCES.

Distribution of information over the worldwide

web is a key vehicle of communication to both

the research community and the public. The

Center's website continues to expand in the

quality and quantity of data it contains and in the

ease of access to that data.

The Center has a switched-ethernet network

running at 100MB/sec to all desktop systems

and 1 gigabit/sec to two of the Center's highbandwidth

servers. In addition, with access to

the Internet II community, Center researchers

can acquire and share data with colleagues at

other Internet II sites at speeds up to 145

megabits per second.

DATA.

A critical aspect of any research and teaching

facility is access to data. GeoStor is an online

data delivery system that allows any user, with

access to the web, seamless availability to

digital map data of any area in Arkansas with no

subscription fee. GeoStor provides web access

to a huge repository of geospatial data and

allows easy search and retrieval of more than

775 seamless feature classes (also called

themes or layers), representing more than four

terabytes of data.

There are more than 7,000 registered users of

the system.

At the core of this system is a massive Oracle

database, located at CAST facilities, containing

all publicly available geodata for the State of

Arkansas. This includes roads, streams, aerial

photography, satellite imagery, and elevation

data.

A variety of data are available to

anyone with access to the web.

There are extensive remote sensing data

publicly available in GeoStor including hundreds

of scenes from Landsat 5 and Landsat 7,

Hyperion, ALI, MODIS, and ASTER.

Commercial remote sensing data is available,

but limited to use within the Center. This data

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 9


includes multiple IKONOS and QuickBird

scenes, ADAR 5500 and Duncan MI4100.

GeoStor is a core element of the University of

Arkansas Digital Library Project. GeoStor is a

Smithsonian Computerworld Innovation Network

Laureate and received an Enterprise Systems

Award from the Urban and Regional Information

Systems Association (URISA). (See Reseach

and Public Service sections).

PHOTOGRAMMETRY/SURVEYING

HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE.

Access to photogrammetric systems is important

for both research and teaching, and CAST has a

number of different options. CAST operates 10

photogrammetric workstations running the latest

version of Leica Geosystems Photogrammery

Suite (LPS) and four high-end workstations

equipped with Crystal-Eyes stereo goggles and

3D feature collection devices running Leica's

advanced ORIMA and GPRO applications. In

addition, an Intergraph ImageStation with a 27-

inch monitor and Zeiss photogrammetric

scanner are available as is a range of

workstations running PCI Geomatica's

OrthoEngine and 3D Stereo.

For close-range photogrammetric tasks

associated with architecture, structural

engineering, and archaeology, CAST has

PhotoModeler and ShapeCapture as well as

other specialized software available. This

software, especially ShapeCapture, is also

important because it integrates 3D point clouds

with photogrammetric processes. For survey

applications, the Center has a Trimble 5600

robotic total station, two 5700 geodetic-grade

receivers, a 5800 integrated receiver/antenna,

two survey controller units, and five

GeoExplorerCE XM devices for hand-held

surveying to meter accuracy. All survey data is

processed using Trimble's Geomatics Office

software.

the Advanced Hyperspectral, Advanced Optical,

Advanced Pan Sharpening, Advanced Radar,

and the OrthoEngine suites; site license for

IDRISII Kilimanjaro; lab kit for ENVI; and lab kit

for eCognition.

Remote Sensing hardware includes an Optech

ILRIS-3D laser scanner, an ADSI field

spectroradiometer, a Ratheon 250 Thermal

imager, two Nikon D70 cameras with multiple

zoom and fixed focal-length lens, and a towable

boom-lift that can elevate a sensor up to 55 feet

above the ground.

CAST-SUPPORTED TEACHING LABS.

The Mapping and Geosciences Lab, the

Multipurpose Computer Lab, the Spatial

Technologies Research Lab, the Cartography

and Mapping Lab, the Geological and

Geophysics Computer Lab, and the EAST Lab,

all in Ozark Hall, are facilities used for teaching

and research by students. There are multiple

Windows servers to support these labs and the

use of the CAST Windows and Unix servers is

also available.

• The Mapping and Geosciences

Laboratory (Ozark Hall, Room 208)

provides a facility for undergraduate and

graduate education as well as

professional short-courses, demos,

workshops, etc. The facility consists of

16 student and one instructor Windows

computers in a classroom configuration

with a black and white laser printer, a

color laser printer, a color scanner, and

a large format color plotter.

REMOTE SENSING HARDWARE

AND SOFTWARE.

Multiple remote sensing software solutions are

available, including: site license for the full suite

of ERDAS Imagine software from Lecia

Geosystems Geospatial Imaging, including

Stereo and Virtual GIS; licenses of Rulequest

C5.0 decision tree classifier (integrated with

ArcGIS9.x); site license for PCI Geomatica with

The Mapping and Geosciences Lab (Ozark-208).

10 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


• The Multipurpose Computer Lab

(Ozark Hall, Room 209) provides access

to a number of different computer

hardware and software systems for

purposes of student access and

professional courses. This laboratory

consists of 19 Windows computers with

one black and white laser printer, one

color laser printer, one color scanner,

one large format black and white

scanner, and one Unix workstation with

digitizer.

The EAST Lab (Ozark-215).

The facility is designed for student

collaboration, featuring 18 workstationclass

PCs, 2 workstation-class

notebooks, dedicated Windows server

and instructor workstation, color laser

printer, and a ceiling-mounted LCD

projector.

The Multipurpose Computer Lab (Ozark-209).

• The Cartography and Mapping Lab

(Ozark Hall, Room 103). This lab is

primarily used for GeoSciences courses

and research activities. CAST provides

systems administrative support of this

lab. The lab contains 11 student and

one instructor Windows computers, one

black and white laser printer, one color

laser printer, one large format color

plotter, and one color scanner.

• The EAST Lab (Ozark Hall, Room 215).

The Northwest Arkansas EAST Training

Center is a cooperative facility

supported by the University of Arkansas

and the EAST Initiative (www.

eastproject.org). The EAST Training

Center is used by CAST staff and other

trainers to provide technical training to

regional EAST students in grades 6-12,

as well as being a location for summer

programs for EAST students and an

after-hours work lab for EAST graduates

who are now at the University.

• The Geological and Geophysics

Computer Lab (Ozark Hall, Room 44).

This lab is accessible to GeoSciences

students enrolled in classes and those

involved in active research. CAST

provides systems administrative support

for this lab. The lab offers the use of

seven Windows computers, one black

and white laser printer, one color laser

printer, one color scanner, and one

Windows-based digitizer.

The Spatial Technologies Research Lab (Ozark 214).

• The Spatial Technologies Research

Lab (Ozark Hall, Room 214) is a

general-purpose laboratory housing a

number of CAST researchers and

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 11


graduate students. There are seven

Windows-based computers and one

black and white laser printer and one

color laser printer.

CORPORATE PARTNERS.

CAST has developed a series of strong

relationships with many of the world’s leading

software and hardware companies. These

relationships are designed to be of mutual

benefit to the companies and to the University of

Arkansas.

All the companies involved in the Center’s

research and development efforts receive

valuable exposure, and each company has a

specific set of activities in which it cooperates

with the Center. University students and staff

receive access to state-of-the-art systems,

opportunities for internships with world class

companies, and the ability to cooperate in

significant research.

The Center works closely with both large and

small businesses in a business incubator role,

developing an educated consumer base and

raising the visibility and accessibility of

geospatial software and hardware solutions.

The following describes the specific agreements

that the Center has with:

• Definiens Imaging GmbH.

• ESRI, Inc.

• eSpatial, Inc.

• Intergraph Corporation.

• IONIC Enterprise Inc.

• Leica Geosystems Geospatial Imaging.

• MapInfo Corporation.

• Oracle Corporation.

• PCI Geomatics.

• Skyline Software.

• Sun Microsystems.

• Trimble Navigation Ltd.

Details of these agreements with corporate

partners are listed below.

Center of Excellence in Object Oriented

Image Analysis by Definiens Imaging

GmbH.

In October of 2001, Definiens Imaging, based in

Munich, Germany, entered into an agreement

with CAST to establish a Center of Excellence in

Object Oriented Image Analysis at CAST.

Definiens and CAST share a common set of

interests, highly compatible suites of expertise,

and parallel research initiatives. They also

share a genuine interest in promoting and

extending the use of raster-based digital

geodata in the context of the open, standardsbased

spatially enabled enterprise.

Definiens provides CAST with copies of its

Object Oriented Image Analysis software, called

eCognition, software maintenance, and

eCognition training.

• Cooperative Research and

Development Agreement (CRADA) by

ESRI, Inc.

In July of 2000, ESRI (Environmental Systems

Research Institute, Inc.) and CAST initiated a

cooperative research and development

agreement (CRADA). This agreement provides

CAST with a variety of ESRI software programs

at no cost, during the initial term of the CRADA,

for a range of ESRI-supported platforms for use

by CAST researchers, students, and staff to be

used in noncommercial research and education.

ESRI also provided CAST with complimentary

seats in ESRI ArcSDE training classes, and

CAST also received fifty free seats of the ESRI

Virtual Campus training program available on

the web. ESRI's support of CAST's education

and research mission helps to expand the

knowledge base of students, faculty, and

researchers.

Center of Excellence in Enterprise

Spatial Solutions by eSpatial, Inc.

In October of 2003, eSpatial, Inc. and CAST

completed a memorandum of agreement to

establish a Center of Excellence in Enterprise

Spatial Solutions at CAST. eSpatial contributes

both service-type and product-type deliverables

in support of this agreement, which includes a

full range of iSMART software and software

maintenance. eSpatial provides email technical

support of its iSMART software for the hardware

platforms in use at CAST, and iSpatial also

provides access to its local technical

consultants.

This Center of Excellence was established to

focus on a set of problem domains that include

enterprise spatial warehouses in support of

critical infrastructure management for homeland

12 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


security, location-based decision support, and

other identified research areas.

Center of Excellence in Mapping and

Geo-Sciences by Intergraph

Corporation.

The Intergraph Corporation, a Fortune 500 firm

and one of the world’s leading vendors of

geographic information systems software,

selected CAST as one of only four National

Centers of Excellence in Mapping and

GeoSciences in 1994. As a result, CAST has to

date received more than $5 million in hardware,

software, and support services.

GeoMedia is also being used by the

Environmental and Spatial Technology (EAST)

Program, and CAST and Intergraph cooperate in

assisting this program. CAST staff members

have developed extensive web-mapping

materials focused on Integraph software and

prepared a book called Harnessing Geomedia.

IONIC provided CAST with Red Spider Web

server software and software maintenance and

provided a complete set of hardcopy

documentation. IONIC provides CAST with up

to 60 hours of technical support, via telephone,

of its Red Spider Web software for the hardware

platforms in use at CAST.

• Coorperative Agreement with Leica

Geosystems Geospatial Imaging

(LCCI).

In May of 2005, Leica Geosystems Geospatial

Imaging (LCCI) and the Center for Advanced

Spatial Technologies formed the inaugural Leica

Geosystems Center of Excellence in

Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing at the

University of Arkansas.

"Leica Geosystems created the Centers of

Excellence program to foster collaboration with a

small group of outstanding academic institutions,

bound together by a commitment to advance the

technology and expertise that will foster the

development of image-based spatial data," said

Bob Morris, president of Leica Geosystems GIS

& Mapping. "As the charter Leica Geosystems

Center of Excellence in Photogrammetry and

Remote Sensing, CAST will work with us in

several important capacities."

The EAST Geospatial Virtual Camp provides self-paced

training in Intergraph’s GeoMedia Professional .

A press conference was held on May 2 to announce the

agreement with Leica Geosystems Geospatial Imaging.

Center of Excellence in Interoperable

Geospatial Data Distribution by IONIC

Enterprise Inc.

In October of 2003, IONIC Enterprise Inc.

designated CAST as a Center of Excellence in

Interoperable Geospatial Data Distribution.

CAST will integrate Leica Geosystems'

photogrammetric and remote-sensing software

into an array of graduate and undergraduate

courses in environmental dynamics,

geosciences and geography. All subsequent

centers of excellence will also integrate the

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 13


company's geospatial imaging tools into their

academic and research programs.

Leica Geosystems GIS and mapping helps

customers collect, analyze and present spatial

information. Leica Geosystems is powering

geospatial imaging by putting precise imaging to

work. Its broad array of airborne sensors,

photogrammetry and remote sensing software

capture data efficiently, reference imagery

accurately, measure and analyze easily and

present spatial information, even three

dimensionally. The company offers geospatial

imaging solutions with precision, integration, and

service.

• Coorperative Agreement with MapInfo

Corporation.

In September of 2000, MapInfo Corporation

provided CAST with MapInfo’s complete suite of

software products. In addition, a student

internship program was created. The first

internship involved CAST researcher and

Geosciences graduate student Shane Covington

working with MapInfo to develop cutting-edge

web-mapping geospatial products for the

internet.

Center of Excellence in Spatial Data

Management by Oracle Corporation.

In January of 1998, Oracle Corporation

announced its designation of CAST as its first

Center of Excellence for Spatial Data

Management. Oracle is the world’s largest

developer of database management software,

with annual revenues of more than $14 billion.

CAST is also a member of Oracle’s Academic

Alliance Program and a founding member of

Oracle’s Spatial Research Laboratory. Oracle

Corporation continues to provide CAST software

and technical support as part of an ongoing

collaboration, whose value now exceeds $4.5

million.

Center for Excellence in Remote

Sensing and Geomatics by PCI

Geomatics.

In May of 2000, PCI Geomatics announced the

signing of an agreement with CAST for joint

cooperation in the areas of remote sensing and

geomatics. PCI Geomatics has been developing

industry leading geospatial software since 1982

and has continuously been a tireless supporter

for the advanced study of remote sensing, digital

photograpmmetry, GIS, cartography, and all

earth sciences in academic institutions around

the world. This agreement includes the

establishment of a Center of Excellence in

Geomatics and Remote Sensing by PCI at

CAST.

PCI Geomatics provided CAST with a full range

of its remote sensing and geomatics software

and full software maintenance for the hardware

platforms in use at the Center.

As its primary contribution to this collaborative,

CAST provides a range of service-type

deliverables, including review and beta testing of

PCI Geomatics products, provision of externally

sponsored research opportunities that will test

PCI Geomatics technology, and the

implementation of an internship program. Such

a program offers qualified students

(undergraduate and graduate) from a wide

range of disciplines (including geography,

environmental dynamics, computer science, and

business/commerce) the opportunity to work

directly with PCI Geomatics personnel.

Center for Excellence in GeoSpatial 3D

Visualization by Skyline Software.

Skyline Software focuses on the creation of

geospatial visualization software that provides

highly realistic images of locations across the

web. A particular emphasis is on the ability to

provide user friendly visualizations of complex

enterprise geospatial data for marketing,

security, tourism, and similar purposes.

In 2002, Skyline initiated a Center of Excellence

agreement with CAST. CAST staff worked

closely with Skyline programmers in developing

a linkage between Oracle Spatial and Skyline

Software. Skyline provided the full range of

Skyline’s TerraSuite software. The TerraSuite

software was used by CAST staff to develop

web-accessible 3D views of the Fayetteville,

Arkansas, area as a part of the Center’s

C.R.A.T.E. Project.

Center of Excellence in Distributed

Computing for Spatial Applications by

Sun Microsystems.

Sun Microsystems established a Center of

Excellence in Distributed Computing for Spatial

Applications at CAST in 2000. This Center has

been established to focus on a set of problem

14 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


domains that include spatial data warehousing,

natural resource management, placed-based

decision support, enterprise applications, the

development of distributed application services,

and support for public administration, public

health, public safety, and disaster management.

SUN Microsystems provided the following

equipment to CAST: an Enterprise E4500 midrange

server with eight 400-Mhz Ultra Sparc

CPUs, a gigabit network StorEdge A5200 Raid

disk array with 4800-Gb capacity, StorEduge

L3500 Robotic tape backup systems with native

(uncompressed) 3500 GB capacity, and two

Enterprise E450 departmental servers with four

480-Mhz Ultra Sparc CPUs, 4-GbRAM and 144-

Gb disk.

The equipment includes a 5600 robotic total

station, two 5700 geodetic-grade receivers with

Zephyr antennas allowing millimeter level

surveys, a single 5800 integrated

receiver/antenna for millimeter/centimeter Real-

Time Kinematic applications, two Survey

Controller units to upgrade existing mapping

equipment, and five GeoExplorerCE XM devices

for hand-held surveying to meter accuracy.

Center of Excellence in Navigation and

GPS by Trimble Navigation Ltd.

In 2003, CAST extended its involvement with

Trimble by purchasing surveying and mapping

equipment valued at more than $150,000. This

equipment, purchased through the HARLS-CS

grant, significantly increases the scope of CAST

research to include high accuracy point- and

relative-positioning required for surveying

operations, rapid high-accuracy topographic

mapping, and GIS-integrated navigation.

Trimble equipment was used in research at Spiro

Mounds in Oklahoma.

New Trimble equipment was delivered in 2003.

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 15


16 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


Education

CAST is involved in a variety of types of

education for many different audiences.

University of Arkansas classes in geospatial

methods and theory are offered to both

undergraduate and graduate students.

Computer training lab support is provided to

students, faculty, and researchers on the

University of Arkansas’ Fayetteville campus who

are involved in geospatial applications and

choose to access CAST’s labs.

The digital library, GeoStor, is used as a vital

educational source of geographic information by

students; faculty; researchers; state, local, and

federal agencies; and the public. Through the

EAST, CADIS, and C.R.A.T.E. programs, CAST

works with high school students from all over

Arkansas and in California, Illinois, Hawaii,

Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi.

CAMPUS-WIDE ESRI LICENSE.

In 2001, CAST staff worked with Dan Puckett of

UAF Computing Services to put in place a

campus-wide site license for ESRI software.

CAST provides the services of John Wilson as

the ESRI technical support person for the

campus. More than 220 computers across

campus have had ESRI software installed as a

result of the site license, and over 1,400 hours of

technical support have been provided to campus

users.

John Wilson and Brian Culpepper are ESRI

certified trainers for two ESRI professional

courses. They have offered eleven ESRI

certified courses, reaching more than 150

students from city, county, state and federal

agencies, private companies, and University of

Arkansas Faculty/Staff/Students.

STUDENTS/FACULTY/RESEARCHERS

COMPUTER ACCOUNTS.

In FY 04-05, there were 275 student research

accounts active at the Center, in addition to

approximately 100 faculty/staff accounts. There

were also students accounts active for the

fourteen UAF classes taught in CAST facilities

and for a variety of workshops, short-courses,

etc.

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS COURSES.

CAST’s EAST lab provides a comfortable learning

environment and access to current hardware and software.

SOFTWARE ACCESS.

In addition to providing access to state-of-the-art

facilities, CAST also provides access to a wide

range of software systems to students and

faculty. (See Background and Mission for

details.)

University of Arkansas undergraduate and

graduate students have access to a number of

offerings in geospatial methods and theory

including courses in GIS, GPS, cartography,

remote sensing, image interpretation,

photogrammetry, surveying, and spatial

statistics. These provide the student with a

range of career options. Courses are open to

students from any discipline who plan to use

these technologies in their work and research.

In addition to classroom instruction, CAST

facilities are used by students in both

undergraduate and graduate research projects.

Access to CAST’s computer labs is of great

benefit to both graduate and undergraduate

students who attend GIS/GPS courses and to

students who are actively involved in research.

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 17


paralleled by workstation-based

laboratory exercises using raster-based

software, relational databases, and

exploratory data analysis.

• Fundamentals of Remote Sensing

(Fall 2004), taught by Pamela Jansma.

Theoretical and practical consideration

of radar imagery. Earth resource

problems related to agriculture,

archeology, engineering, forestry,

geography, and geology.

CAST labs are used for UAF classes, research, shortcourses,

demonstrations, etc.

UAF COURSES TAUGHT IN CAST

FACILITIES DURING FY 04-05.

A list of University of Arkansas courses held in

CAST's teaching labs during FY 04-05 follows.

• Geographic Information Systems (Fall

2004, Spring 2005, and Summer 2005),

taught by Malcolm Cleveland.

Computer assisted analysis and display

of geographic resource data. Course

develops the theory behind spatial data

analysis techniques and reinforces the

theory with exercises that demonstrate

its practical applications.

• Raster GIS (Fall 2004) taught by Jason

Tullis, and (Spring 2005), taught by Ken

Kvamme. Raster GIS provides an

introduction to spatial analyses in the

natural sciences and resource

management fields using GIS. Lectures

focus on development of principles,

• Vector GIS (Fall 2004), taught by John

Wilson. Vector GIS provides an

introduction to GIS applications in

marketing, transportation, real estate,

demographics, urban and regional

planning, and related areas. Lectures

focus on development of principles,

paralleled by workstation-based

laboratory exercises using arc-node

based software and relational

databases.

• Agricultural Remote Sensing (Fall

2004), taught by Sreekala Bajwa.

Introduction to passive and active

remote sensing, remote sensing

systems, optical radiation models,

sensor models, data models, spectral

transforms, spatial transforms,

correction and calibration, georectifications,

classification, vegetative

indices. Introduction to GIS, spatial

interploation, spatial modeling.

Applications in agriculture, variable rate

technology, hydrologic modeling, yield

monitoring, crop modeling.

• Introduction to Global Positioning

System (Spring 2005), taught by

Jackson Cothren. Introduction to GPS

introduces the student to navigation,

georeferencing, and digital data

collection using GPS receivers, data

loggers, and laser technology for natural

science and resource management.

Components of NavStar GPS are used

in the integration of digital information

into various GIS platforms with

emphasis on practical applications.

• GIS for Environmental Science

(Spring 2005), taught by Vaughn

Skinner. This course provides

instruction on the uses of GIS tech-

18 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


niques in solving practical environmental

and agricultural land use problems.

Areas include: a) an introduction to

spatial variability in soils with an

emphasis on the application of GIS

techniques to map and understand

spatial parameters important to different

land uses. b) development of individual

experience in the use of GIS in solving

environmental and agricultural problems

using an oral and written term project.

• Design Communications II (Spring

2005), taught by Nadia Amoroso.

Continuation of Design Communications

I with a focus on computer technologies

in two-dimensional graphic representation

and three-dimensional modeling.

Course includes an introduction to

computer system use and software such

as: CAD, GIS, Photoshop, desk-top

publishing, Word, and other professional

office programs.

• Remote Sensing of Natural

Resources (Spring 2005) taught by

Jason Tullis. Advanced course in

remote sensing technology with special

emphasis on interpretive techniques for

resource management and research.

• Quantitative Methods in Geosciences

(Spring 2005) taught by Jackson

Cothren. An introduction to the

application of standard quantitative and

spatial statistical techniques to

geographical analysis.

• Analysis of Wildlife Population

Studies (Spring 2005) taught by David

Drementz of the Biological Science

Coop.

DIGITAL LIBRARY PROJECT.

The CAST research project, GeoStor, is one of

the key components in the University of

Arkansas Digital Library project. GeoStor

provides web access to a huge repository of

geospatial data for Arkansas. It allows easy

search and retrieval to more than 750 different

data sets representing more than four terabytes

of data and the integration of more than 54,000

traditional map data files.

Students and faculty in classes and in many

research projects are able to utilize GeoStor

which has led to a dramatic increase in the

speed at which they are able to access data.

The seamless dataset downloads from GeoStor

during the past year represent more than

1,000,000 file downloads in a tradition file-based

system. (For more information about the

GeoStor project, see the Research and Public

Service sections of this report.)

EDUCATIONAL PROJECTS.

Each year, CAST is actively involved in a variety

of educational projects that provide training to

students in age brackets ranging from middle

school to university level to professionals in the

business community and government.

These projects also provide the added benefit of

being community-based projects, thereby,

returning the investment in this education back

to Arkansas' citizens. A few of these projects

are described below. Some examples follow.

COMMUNITY ASSET AND DEVELOPMENT

INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROGRAM

(CADIS).

The Community Asset and Development

Information System (CADIS) is a project that

brings together the private and public sector to

create a high quality geographic information

system for Northwest Arkansas. The Center for

Advanced Spatial Technologies is partnering

with local government and business entities, as

well as the EAST Initiative, to provide an

extensive suite of information about the region to

the counties, communities, and businesses of

the area. For seven years, the partnering of

CAST and CADIS has meant professional

development and new opportunities for

Northwest Arkansas' high school students.

This year's CADIS students range in age from

14 to 18, representing Greenland, Farmington,

and Fayetteville High Schools. Two of the

students are incoming freshman at the

University; one of those two is the winner of the

prestigious EAST New Horizons scholarship,

which is a full four-year award. The six students

working on this year's project bring a broad

range of interests and skills to the table.

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 19


The focus of this summer's CADIS project is the

protection of the Beaver Lake watershed,

Northwest Arkansas' vital water supply. Working

under the direction of Beaver Water District, the

students are assembling data to assess current

land use around the entire watershed, with

particular emphasis placed on locations close to

the lake itself or one of the many streams that

eventually feed into the lake. Using data that

ranges from satellite imagery to assessors'

property records, the students are creating maps

and reports that detail the land use practices in

each of the sub-basins that make up the

watershed. This information will be used by the

Beaver Water District and others to educate and

gain support from the four counties of Northwest

Arkansas in the effort to keep our water supply

clean.

they will be making presentations to

stakeholders of this project.

Financial support for the six students working on

this project comes from Beaver Water District,

the City of Fayetteville, Washington County, and

the Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning

Commission.

CADIS students.

Facilities and project management for CADIS

and CRATE are provided at the University of

Arkansas by CAST and the EAST Initiative. The

CADIS project may be viewed at:

www.cast.uark.edu/local/cadis

GEO-SPATIAL SUPPORT AND TRAINING

FOR EAST INITIATIVE.

The students are also assessing the value of

high-resolution imagery and aerial photography

versus lower-cost medium-resolution satellite

imagery for the purpose of evaluating land use

at both the regional and local scale. They are

learning and using a variety of cutting-edge

software, including hierarchical image

classification software and web-mapping

software. Upon completion of their research,

CAST has had the privilege to be closely

affiliated with the EAST (Environmental and

Spatial Technologies) Initiative (http://www.

eastproject.org) since its inception. EAST is a

project-based, student-centered, communityoriented

learning initiative that incorporates

technology as tools for problem solving. Starting

out at a rural Arkansas high school in 1996,

EAST is now found in 140 schools in Arkansas,

45 in California, 13 in Illinois, 7 in Hawaii, and 3

20 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi (as of

spring 2005). Each school has a dedicated

EAST classroom equipped with 14 workstations

and a server, high-speed internet access, largeformat

plotter, and a broad variety of advanced

applications ranging from web development

tools to digital video hardware/software to a

complete suite of the best-selling geospatial

software from Intergraph Corporation and ESRI.

Teamwork and collaboration are essential skills learned

during geospatial technology workshops.

Initiative is additionally raising awareness and

increasing the use of geospatial technologies all

across Arkansas, in both the public and private

sectors.

About one-third of all our training center based

workshops were taught at the Northwest

Arkansas EAST Training Center here in Ozark

Hall. Made possible by support from the Provost

and EAST, Inc., the state-of-the-art training

facility is specifically designed for the types of

team-based learning that occur in EAST labs.

Classes offered this year included Geospatial

Projects, Advanced Geospatial Techniques,

Introduction to SoftImage, Web Design,

Windows XP Administration, and Visual Basic

Programming. Additionally, the lab has hosted

the CRATE and CADIS projects during the 2004

and 2005 summers. Providing EAST training on

the University campus has already created

strong bonds with teachers at nearby EAST

programs.

As the number of EAST schools continues to

increase dramatically, CAST support staff has

grown to four full-time staff and two hourly

employees (former EAST students now

attending the University). The key efforts for this

year include:

• The School Mapping Project. In order

to allow more EAST students to get

involved with geospatial technologies at

a local level, a series of custom data

sets, one for each EAST school, was

created, including digital aerial

photography of the each school.

Downloadable, step-by-step tutorials

were created to permit any number of

students create their own base map of

their school. (http://www.cast.uark.

edu/east/SchoolMappingProject/)

Students and their teacher discuss how they will apply their

new skills to projects back at their own school.

CAST has developed and provided innovative

training, support, and data to EAST students

working in geospatial technologies, visualization,

and web design for over nine years. Working

with the dedicated educators of the EAST

Initiative and the individual schools, CAST helps

to move the education of our kids into the

Information Age of the twenty-first century. The

collaboration between CAST and the EAST

• EAST GIS Newsletter. In addition to

the regular outreach provided for the

EAST Initiative, CAST publishes a bimonthly

online newsletter focused on

geospatial issues facing EAST students.

Although the newsletter is aimed at

EAST student and facilitators, it is

available to any interested parties

across the globe. The newsletter’s

homepage is http://www.cast.uark.

edu/east/newsletter/

• Virtual Training Camp. Deployment,

support, and additional development of

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 21


comprehensive web-based training for

GIS and GPS. A series of professional

quality, non-linear GIS/GPS courses

have been created for use by any EAST

student. Development of these high

quality web materials allows this aspect

of the program to be much more

scalable and support increasing

numbers of students. (http://www.cast.

uark.edu/east/vc)

• Student Training Workshops. Tight

school budgets have made it

increasingly difficult for schools to send

students and teachers to multi-day

training workshops. This year CAST

staff took training “on the road” by

offering a series of two-day Regional

Preliminary Geospatial Workshops at

five different locations around Arkansas,

as well as two locations in California.

Each workshop was hosted by a school,

with other nearby schools bringing

students each day to attend. This has

proved to be a very successful model,

and will be expanded in coming years.

The cornerstone of our geospatial

technologies curriculum was the threeday

Geospatial Projects Workshop,

which focused on student growth in

team-based projects. Our advanced

Geospatial Techniques Workshops were

two-day sessions focusing on one of

three specialized areas: vector GIS,

raster GIS, or image processing. The

geospatial training was complimented

by courses in Web Design and

Introduction to SoftImage. Additionally,

fourteen 1-1/2 hour workshops were

offered at the Central and Western

Region EAST Conferences, with

approximately 300 students attending.

• On-Site Support Visits. The value of

on-site support visits has consistently

been demonstrated by renewed student

interest, improved hardware/software

performance, etc. This year CAST staff

visited 10 new schools in Arkansas, as

well as 26 legacy schools. Staff

members made contact and established

a support relationship with the

facilitators before making on-site visits.

Visits centered on activities that help to

raise the level of skill and knowledge of

students regarding geospatial technologies.

CAST trainers work directly with students to tackle difficult

issues.

C.R.A.T.E. – CREATING REALISTIC

ANIMATION THROUGH EAST.

This project allows high school students to

further their animation abilities by working in a

real world job environment on projects that

benefit the community. C.R.A.T.E. is made

possible through collaborations from various

community members and CAST. The students

participate in EAST training through the many

camps that are offered in the program, in

particular, are the animation camps. These

camps teach students the basics of 3D

animation with leading-edge software, such as

Softimage. They learn to model and animate

objects, scenes, and human characters.

The C.R.A.T.E. 2004 team.

22 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


While EAST provides the training, CAST

provides technological support and takes the

opportunity to enlist the EAST students in

various projects to further provide them with

more experience, such as C.R.A.T.E. and

CADIS. (Also see CADIS section.)

Previous C.R.A.T.E. projects enlisted EAST

students to develop projects that range from

recreations of a Native American village to 3D

animated science shorts. The 2004 students

worked on a pilot project creating an educational

science short called Chemistry in the Kitchen,

teaching fourth, fifth and sixth graders

interesting science facts. The pilot was targeted

for HDTV.

The objective of the pilot project was to

determine if student interns can form a core

development group to develop animated

projects in Northwest Arkansas. This requires

cooperation between the private sector, the

University, and interested students involved in

EAST, and other related incubators, as well as

the ability to attract development capital

and product distribution. CAST provided staff

and use of the EAST training facility and use of

CAST hardware and software to the project.

Emphasizing personal/career development,

technological/academic skills, ACT readiness,

and college preparatory workshops, students

are prepared to meet their college entry goals.

Academic monitoring, counseling, and tutoring

services are incorporated to facilitate the

progress of each student. Summer enrichment

and campus-based events provide ongoing

opportunities for institutional and faculty

involvement.

As part of the University of Arkansas’

Educational Talent Search Experience College

event, CAST provided a 2-day training session

to 15 students attending Junior High Schools in

Northwest Arkansas. The Educational Talent

Search is a program that targets students in

grades 6-12 to encourage the necessary skills

and motivation required to complete a

baccalaureate degree. The Experience College

project allows students to explore and

experience potential careers and college majors

at the University of Arkansas.

Screen shot of Chemistry in the Kitchen.

Students used GPS hand-held units to gather data.

The project included the development of the

storyboards, set design and development,

animation, artistry, and rendering. C.R.A.T.E.

team members traveled to the Motion Capture

Lab at Ohio State University.

EDUCATIONAL TALENT SEARCH.

Educational Talent Search is an early

intervention project. Serving 1,200 students in

grades 6-12, the program promotes the skills

and motivation necessary for successfully

completing a baccalaureate degree.

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 23


In the 2-day training, the Educational Talent

Search students were shown some of the

equipment available through CAST within the

context of how they are used in research.

These included the Optech ILRIS-3D Laser

Scanner and the Trimble 5700/5800 GPS

receivers.

The students worked through a project utilizing

GIS and GPS in order to create a map and 3D

flyover of the University of Arkansas campus.

Five groups of three students were sent on a

GPS Treasure hunt to locate important features

of the campus such as fountains, statues, and

the Senior Walk. While finding these features,

the students learned the basics of GPS data

collecting. After the students had collected the

campus data, they transferred it onto the

computer to learn some GIS techniques to

complete their map of the University.

Subsequently they added the GPS data and

aerial photographs into ESRI’s 3D GIS software

ArcScene to create a virtual 3D flyover of the

campus. This was presented by the students to

their parents and other Educational Talent

Search students and staff at the end of session

presentation. CAST people involved included

Fiona Trewby, Malcolm Williamson, Paxton

Roberts, Julia Danz, Jack Cothren, Angelia

Smith and Snow Winters.

was Luis' third summer of involvement with

Upward Bound, and he has demonstrated strong

interest and capability in computer-related fields.

CAST was able to pair him up with Dr. Jason

Tullis and an undergraduate researcher working

on a very unique remote-sensing project,

Searching for Sinkholes on Mars Using Mars

Orbiting Imagery.

The overall objectives of the Summer Research

Experience include:

• Developing an understanding of and

participating in the process of scientific

inquiry.

• Learning how to accurately measure

and document empirical data.

• Learning how to gather, organize, and

present data in a systematic way.

• Becoming aware of the characteristics

and preparation necessary to become a

professional scientist.

Luis' experience this summer has certainly given

him an excellent perspective on the skills,

education, and discipline necessary to become

successful in the field of remote-sensing. CAST

looks forward to hosting more Upward Bound

students in coming years for Summer Research

Experiences.

ANIMATION EDUCATION.

With growing interest in animation, especially

gaming animation, more students are interested

in education in this area. We've seen this

interest in our EAST interns and from inquiries

from the general student population at U of A

and have begun development of a certification

for animation education. Along with the

departments of Math, Computer Science,

Computer Engineering, Classics, Drama, and

Art, an initial course structure has been

developed. This curriculum would build on the

student courses in the above areas and require

them to take additional courses from other areas

to give them a well rounded understanding of

animation development, design, and use.

UPWARD BOUND ACADEMY.

CAST collaborated with the University's Upward

Bound Academy for Mathematics and Sciences

to host high school junior Luis Malfavon for an

intensive hands-on research experience. This

UNIVERSITY REU STUDENTS.

The University of Arkansas is one of several

National Science Foundations sites hosting

undergraduate students participating in the

Research Experiences for Undergraduates

(REU) program. This program supports active

research participation by undergraduate

students in any of the areas of research funded

by the National Science Foundation. REU

projects involve students in meaningful ways in

ongoing research programs or in research

projects designed especially for the purpose.

During the summer of 2005, the Center for

Advanced Spatial Technologies, provided

research experiences for three of these visiting

students, two geology students and one

computer science student. The three projects

are described below.

Getting the Next Generation Involved: Land Use

Analysis of a Vital Watershed. REU Student:

Adam Consentino, Augustana University,

Geology. Northwest Arkansas is undergoing

one of the fastest growth rates of any area in the

24 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


country, fueled largely by the presence of Wal-

Mart and Tyson corporate headquarters. One of

the attractions of the region to both corporations

and developers is the reliable water supply,

backed by the more than 40,000 surface acres

of Beaver Lake. CAST has joined forces with

Beaver Water District and other local entities to

host a project for six high-school students, who

have spent their summer assessing the land use

within the 1,186 square-mile watershed. The

students were led by REU student Adam

Consentino. Using GIS and image-processing

software, they have acquired data ranging from

Thematic Mapper-based land use/land cover

data to county assessors' parcel data. The

students have generated maps and reports for

each of the 12-digit HUCs within the watershed,

providing the Water District with valuable

information for their ongoing effort to preserve or

improve water quality. At the same time, the

students have become much more intimately

aware of the potential problems that could face

their generation as the region continues to grow.

Land Cover / Land Use Comparison in Central

America. REU Student: Julia Danz, Geology.

CAST is participating in an ongoing project

funded by NASA, the World Bank. and USAID to

develop methods to accuracy and efficiently

estimate carbon stocks in Central America.

Several land use/land cover (LULC)

assessments throughout the region, developed

primarily from Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 imagery

between 1999 and 2001, are available as a

baseline data set for estimating carbon stocks.

From this baseline, inexpensive MODIS imagery

will be calibrated and used to economically

assess LULC changes through 2006. The

quality of this baseline data must be assessed in

order to have a good estimate of the quality of

the changes developed from the MODIS data.

Julia Danz was responsible for comparing a

regional LULC map developed by the World

Bank to each countries’ individual LULC maps

and report on the changes. Her work found

significant differences between the maps even

though they were developed using the same

Landsat images. Her work provided valuable

information about the quality of the baseline data

and will be presented in Panama in October

2005.

Archiving and Disseminating Historical Remoting

Sensing Imagery REU Student: Lucija

Rakocevic, University of Arkansas, Computer

Science. The University of Arkansas Library

owns a very large collection of early airborne

and space-borne radar images accumulated

through years of research by Dr. Harold

McDonald, Geosciences, University of

Arkansas. This imagery not only has historic

value, but represents a snapshot of various

areas throughout the United States and Central

America from the 1960's and 1970's.

Researchers interested in land use and land

cover changes between the 1960's and the

present have found this collection to be

invaluable to their research. However, all the

imagery is film-based, and researchers must

travel to the library and search through

voluminous paper metadata records and over

200 rolls of film to find the images of their area

of interest. REU student Lucija Rakocevic spent

the summer investigation the digitization

requirements for this film. Ms. Rakocevic has

experimented with several different scanners

and analyzed the results in Fourier space to

determine the actual spatial content of the film.

In addition, paper metadata records are being

organized into a database schema designed by

Ms. Rakocevic. All the metadata and scanned

images will eventually be available through a

searchable website.

GIS DAY.

In the fall of 2004, CAST and staff from Mullins

Library, helped to organize and carry out the

activities of GIS Day. This annual event is held

in order to inform and educate the public on the

many valuable uses of spatial data and the

difference that this technology makes in our

lives. GIS day was attended by representatives

of local government, private enterprise, and

educators. A number of students, from both

local high schools, as well as the university,

attended GIS Day activities.

AMERICAVIEW CURRICULUM.

Bruce Gorham serves on the AmericaView

(http://www.americaview.org/) educational

curriculum committee. AmericaView partners

leverage existing education programs and

enable new programs that:

• Provide training and distribute

appropriate data and tools for K-12

educators.

• Expand remote sensing research at

research universities in each state by

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 25


distributing appropriate data and provide

support as necessary.

• Facilitate long-term workforce

development by expanding the number

of remote sensing courses taught at

community colleges, four-year colleges,

and universities in each state.

It is the specific purpose of the educational

curriculum committee to discover innovative

ways to effectively integrate earth remote

sensing theory and application into the overall

science curriculum of America’s K-12 schools.

AmericaView works in partnership with the

private sector to provide low-cost access to

image processing software and the remote

sensing data to students in the classroom. (See

Research section for more information on

AmericaView.)

ENVIRONMENTAL DYNAMICS PH.D.

PROGRAM.

This program’s prime focus is humanenvironmental

interactions within recent Earth

history. It stresses interdisciplinary regional

analysis of geophysical, biological, climatic, and

socio-cultural interactions and changes. The

program is an outgrowth of many years of

successful research in human adaptations to

past and present environments by faculty of the

J. William Fulbright College of Arts and

Sciences. Primarily, the program is staffed by

faculty from the departments of Anthropology,

Geography, and Geology and associated

research institutes and labs: CAST, the

Arkansas Water Resources Research Center,

the Tree-Ring Lab, the Bioarchaeology Lab, and

the Archaeology Lab.

INTERNSHIP PROGRAM IN APPLIED

SPATIAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES.

CAST, in cooperation with the University of

Arkansas’ Department of Anthropology, now

offers an internship program in Applied Spatial

Information Technologies. The emphasis is on

the practical skills needed to prepare the

candidate for careers in nonacademic

environments including employment in

consulting field, other private sector firms, or

federal, state, or local government. This

internship allows the candidate to gain hands-on

experience in one or more areas of computer

systems administration, remote sensing and GIS

applications and data, use of GPS, and/or

database design and management.

CONFERENCES AND WORKSHOPS.

Each year, CAST staff members attend, give

talks, and participate in major conferences and

workshops about the latest in GIS technologies.

These events help to continue the learning

process of CAST's educators and researchers.

Listings, by staff members, of conferences

attended can be found in appendix B.

The program stresses the application of

appropriate methodologies such as GIS, GPS,

remote sensing, computer modeling, and

cartography to environmental problems. The

research approach integrates the power,

efficiency, and economy of advanced computerbased

technologies into the study of human

environmental interactions within recent Earth

history. CAST's Director Fred Limp serves as a

faculty member of this program.

26 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


Research

and

Externally

Funded

Projects

access, and a broad variety of advanced

applications ranging from web development

tools to digital video hardware/software to a

complete suite of the best-selling geospatial

software from Intergraph Corporation and ESRI.

Each year, CAST staff members are involved in

major research projects, training programs, and

other cooperative efforts with a variety of

governmental and business organizations.

Recent research projects focused on areas such

as interoperability, image object analysis,

decision support, geospatial data warehousing

and distribution, web-mapping, natural

resources analyses, K-12 GIS education, remote

sensing education, multi-instrument data fusion,

water quality analysis, and expanding geospatial

capabilities of local governments in rural areas.

Malcolm Williamson and two EAST students collect data with

handheld GPS unit.

The total amount of externally-funded

research grants awarded to CAST during

Fiscal Year 04-05 is $1,296,831. A list of

grants awarded during the fiscal year

follows.

The total amount of current pending

proposals is $1,866,665.

______________________________________

GRANTS AWARDED DURING FY 04-05.

______________________________________

Geospatial & Visualization Support &

Training for EAST Initiative

07/01/04 – 06/30/05

EAST Initiative

$303,760.

Starting out at a rural Arkansas high school in

1996, EAST is now found in 209 schools in

Arkansas, California, Illinois, Hawaii, Louisiana,

and Mississippi (as of spring 2005). Each school

has a dedicated EAST classroom with 14

workstations and a server, high-speed internet

CAST has developed and provided innovative

training, support, and data to EAST students

working in geospatial technologies, visualization,

and web design for over nine years. This effort

represents one of the largest and most

successful efforts in the United States to bring

geospatial technologies into the K-12 curriculum.

Working with the dedicated educators of the

EAST Initiative and the individual schools, CAST

is helping to move the education of our kids into

the Information Age of the twenty-first century.

The collaboration between CAST and the EAST

Initiative is additionally raising awareness and

increasing the use of geospatial technologies all

across Arkansas, in both the public and private

sectors. (See Education section for more

information.)

USDA/RGIS MidSouth

07/01/04 – 06/30/05

National Consortium for Rural GeoSpatial

Innovations in America (RGIS)

$130,000.

The goal of RGIS–MidSouth (RGIS-MS) is to

improve the effectiveness of government and

the quality of life of the residents of rural

America by increasing the use, application and

awareness of geospatial technologies for city,

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 27


county, state and regional governments. We

accomplish this task through research,

appropriate technology transfer, education (at

multiple education levels), and distribution of

GIS data, supporting users, developing

applications and by offering professional GIS

education to a growing audience of new users.

Screen shots from RGIS MidSouth website:

www.rgis.cast.uark.edu

In FY 2004, RGIS-MS has continued its

supporting role in Arkansas’ development of

geospatial data models and standards for its

statewide street centerline file, infrastructure

data layer, and parcel data model through sideby-side

participation with local agencies and

technical consultants within Northwest Arkansas

and in collaboration with the Arkansas Office of

Geographic Information. The RGIS-MS site

continues to host Arkansas’ statewide geospatial

data distribution system GeoStor and we have

leveraged RGIS resources to assist in its

promotion to newly appointed officials and late

adopters within our state and local government.

Through our RGIS mandates, RGIS-MS staff

have provided key demonstrations and

supported over 470 individual outreach efforts

that have helped educate our elected officials

and their staff and citizenry as to the benefits of

geospatial technologies. The RGIS-MS/CAST

website activity has continued to increase during

the 2004 fiscal year to well over 35,000 hits per

day. RGIS-MS continues to build on the past

success of Arkansas’ geospatial data delivery

system GeoStor and has expanded its

usefulness by expanding its data holdings and

broadening its scope beyond the boundaries of

Arkansas into seven mid-American states.

Another exciting impact in FY 2003 that was

continued within FY 2004 was our participation

in the USGS-funded AmericaView program and

our leveraging of RGIS support to expand the

local support opportunities of the project.

Through this effort RGIS-MS has expanded

community access to a range of remotely

sensed data products (TM 5, ETM+, ASTER,

MODIS, and a private-sector, high-resolution

sensor (Quickbird ). Through this effort, we

provided a focused training program for our

regional extension agents and fellow university

researchers in the use of PCI Geomatics

software.

Our collaboration with the City of Fayetteville,

Arkansas and the Northwest Arkansas Regional

Planning Commission during our original

FY2003 special project initiative resulted in a

positive impact by providing a localized

demonstration of a community decision support

system for our local planners and in FY2004

RGIS MidSouth introduced them to the

capabilities of impervious surface classification

of high-resolution satellite imagery (QuickBird

). Our demonstration of the CommunityVIZ

software spawned an interest in a pilot project

with the City of Fayetteville and the Fayetteville

Public School District to purchase QuickBird

imagery of their complete service areas and to

develop a classification method for extraction of

impervious surfaces during FY2004. These data

not only provided up-to-date, high-resolution

imagery, but the results of the remote sensing

pilot with RGIS MidSouth demonstrated the

usefulness of new technologies for supporting

storm water management planning and site

28 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


selection for new elementary schools over the

past 14 months.

As in the past, the major emphasis for FY 2004

was the continued development of technologies

to seamlessly integrate spatial data from local,

county, and state sources within the larger

context of the National Spatial Data

Infrastructure (NSDI) and continuing technology

transfer to city, county, state, and regional

governments. The following projects were

participated and funded under the FY2004 RGIS

MidSouth office proposal:

Task Force Member of the Northwest Arkansas

Imagery Acquisition Committee (i.e. NWA

Imagery Co-operative). The NWA Regional

Planning Commission, Jack Cothren and Brian

Culpepper have assisted our local government

representatives with the identification and

specification of imagery needs for the task force,

plus the identification of a suitable

photogrammetric/engineering contractor. A

contractor was identified and a contract let via

the Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning

Commission (NWARPC). Data was delivered

on schedule and quality checked using a countywide

GPS survey of horizontal check points

Brian Culpepper collected/processed for

Washington County. Brian and John Wilson

also constructed the metadata entries for five

individual datasets that the GeoStor team has

loaded into GeoStor for free data distribution.

Four half-day meetings have been held

regarding the Northwest Arkansas Imagery Task

Force, and this effort will continue into the next

fiscal year.

Co-Developed a Proposal to the Mullins Library

for GeoStor data loading support. Brian

Culpepper assisted Jack Cothren (CAST) and

John McLarty of the Northwest Arkansas

Regional Planning Commission (NWARPC) with

the development of a proposal to the UA Mullins

Library. This $9,500. proposal supported Center

staff for their time and the resources required to

load the updated photography and elevation

datasets for Northwest Arkansas.

Task Force Member of the Northwest Arkansas

Street Centerline Committee. Brian Culpepper

participated in regular meetings over the past

eleven months regarding the migration of the

most current, accurate centerline datasets into

one seamless map within Washington County.

We have been working with and providing

technical support to all participating cities and

agencies within the county that are interested in

merging their centerline data into the Arkansas

Centerline Standard, as defined by the Arkansas

Geographic Information Office (AGIO). This

process will also provide useful insight into

future challenges of the National Map goals as

stated by the USGS.

RGIS Mid-South Outreach: Development of

updated RGIS MidSouth website and web

mapping application. Brian Culpepper, Tim

Sexton, and Peter Smith have developed and

updated RGIS MidSouth website that highlights

our specific accomplishments here at the

University of Arkansas. The website is similar to

our consortiums national website hosted at Penn

State University (www.ruralgis.org). This

website also includes a free imagery viewer for

Northwest Arkansas (2004 true-color imagery

acquired by the Imagery Task Force) which

enables free access to the full resolution

imagery for anyone with internet connectivity.

Users can print maps, geocode addresses within

Benton or Washington Counties, and even

download the photography from GeoStor.

Approximately 300 users have registered to use

this application since February 2005. The RGIS

MidSouth website is located at: (www.rgis.cast.

uark.edu).

RGIS Mid-South Outreach: Support of the

Arkansas Legislature and Arkansas Department

of Education. Under our RGIS initiative Brian

Culpepper has produced four large format maps

and held technical briefings at the request of

Richard Hudson for Senators Jim Argue, Shane

Broadway and Claire Bailey of the Arkansas

Department of Information Systems. Over the

past five months, we have been asked to

produce maps and other decision supporting

materials to assist various policy decisions

facing Arkansas’ elected officials, particularly the

Bureau of Legislative Research. Brian has

fulfilled these requests by the financial support

provided by the RGIS Consortium and within the

guidelines of the University of Arkansas mission

regarding outreach and support for our fellow

citizens as Arkansas’ Land Grant University.

RGIS Mid-South Outreach: Support of the

Private Sector offering Geospatial Services

within Arkansas. Brian Culpepper has met with

and/or supported between eight private sector

professionals with GIS related research or data

within the past six months.

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 29


GeoStor Operations & Maintenance

07/01/04 – 06/30/05

Arkansas Geographic Information Office

$123,394.

GeoStor Operation and Data Transfer

03/21/05 – 12/31/05

Arkansas Geographic Information Office

$105,422.

GeoStor is a comprehensive, enterprise

geospatial geodata system, including web-based

data search and delivery, support for multiple

enterprise applications, and an integrated oracle

enterprise-class distributed database

architecture. The system currently includes all

publicly available location-based geodata for the

State of Arkansas.

Total GeoStor downloads (GeoSurf Appliet plus

Raw raster data) since December of 2000 is

over 350,000. Downloaded data from

December of 2000 from the GeoSurf Applet

alone totaled over 99,000 and raw raster data

downloaed, using GeoStor http and ftp servers,

since May of 2002 totaled over 250,000.

GoeStor is the nation’s first seamless statewide

geospatial database that allows heterogeneous

access to spatial data, so that users can easily

locate, access, and use multiple scales of over

two terabytes of raster and vector spatial data.

Although many states now have digital data

warehouses, none have the versatility and

relative ease of use, due to the seamless nature

of data representation and underlying

architecture within GeoStor.

The data distribution component of GeoStor is

an internet-based Oracle 9i-based spatial data

warehouse, a set of Java-based services and

third party products that enable data discovery,

visualization, re-projection, reformatting, and

download. The warehouse contains more than

750 seamless feature classes (a.k.a. themes or

layers).

Screen shots from the GeoStor online system.

The GeoStor system provides easy access to

Arkansas’ geospatial data users, regardless of

their location, GIS software requirements or

technical limitations. The research and

development of the GeoStor system by CAST

has been aggressively promoted by the RGIS

Mid-South staff via the many outreach initiatives

mandated from the consortium. Lessons

learned from the interaction with local

government officials have also provided useful

feedback to the GeoStor development team at

CAST which will prositvely impact future users of

this and similar geospatial data delivery

systems. GeoStor can be found on CAST’s

website at: www.cast.uark.edu

ArkansasView Program Development and

Operations

9/25/03 – 07/01/04 – 06/30/05

U.S. Geological Survey

$89,500.

ArkansasView Program Summary

ArkansasView is a consortium of universities, K-

12 schools, as well as state agencies. The

consortium is dedicated to bringing about the

wide application of remotely sensed data, and

other earth science data products within the GIS

30 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


and remote sensing communities of Arkansas

through education, outreach, and relevant,

targeted research projects.

ArkansasView is part of a larger consortium of

individual states known as AmericaView:

(http://americaview.org/). There are currently

twenty states in AmericaView, and the number

of states is growing each year. Arkansas is one

of the eight founding members of the

consortium. Generally speaking, the goals of

ArkansasView are closely in line with the goals

of its national parent organization but have been

refined to address the specific needs of the

people of Arkansas. These goals are:

• To broaden the remote sensing data user

community in Arkansas by transferring

remote sensing technology to educational

institutions at all levels, state agencies, and

the private sector in Arkansas, and by

building a self sustaining consortium of

remote sensing data users within our state

• To create and maintain effective public

education and outreach programs promoting

the benefits gained through the use of

remote sensing technologies.

• To provide near-real-time data and data

products to a broad user community on an

easy-to-use web interface, and implement,

as much as possible, fully automated remote

sensing data processing.

• To conduct remote sensing research that

directly and positively benefits the people of

the State of Arkansas.

ArkansasView includes the following members:

• University of

Arkansas,

Fayetteville

• Arkansas State

University,

Jonesboro

• AR Game and

Fish Commission

• AR Sate Land

Information Board

• The EAST

Initiative

• University of

Arkansas,

Monticello

• Arkansas Precision

Ag. Working Group

• AR Soil and Water

Conservation Com.

• AR Geographic

Information Office

The ArkansasView consortium seeks to

encourage cooperation and collaboration among

its state members and across borders to other

“stateview” programs. Members cooperate

regularly on educational and outreach activities

such as sponsoring informational seminars,

developing appropriate curricula for K-12

education, and offering professional short

courses in user recommended remote sensing

topics. In recent months our members have

begun, in earnest, to collaborate on publication

and funding opportunities.

ArkansasView has played a key role in the

success of the national AmericaView

consortium. With key leadership positions on the

education, research, and data distribution

committees (2004-2005), ArkansasView helps

guide the overall national remote sensing

agenda.

Review of Accomplishments

Consortium Development: The remote sensing

user community in Arkansas is small, but

growing. Only a few universities within our state

offer advanced and topical courses in remote

sensing. ArkansasView has worked to enable

professors, both at UA Fayetteville and other

state universities, to offer more effective remote

sensing courses. We do this by providing them

with free or discounted satellite image data,

discounts on processing software, and

consultation services. Likewise, only a few state

agencies utilize remote sensor data and

applications as part of their overall geospatial

game plan. Two large state agencies: Arkansas

Game and Fish Commission, and the Arkansas

Soil and Water Conservation Commission have

long employed geospatial technologies such as

GIS and GPS.

In recent years, partly due to the work of

ArkansasView: data discounts, consultation,

etc., these and other agencies are making more

extensive use of remote sensing technologies in

their land-use management strategies. Within

the private sector a small but growing user

community continues to explore remote sensing

applications for specific purposes such as

precision agriculture and forestry. Cooperation

with the Arkansas Precision Agriculture Working

Group (ARPAWG) has opened new doors for

research with private sector firms like InTime,

Inc. (www.gointime.com).

Data distribution and technology transfer. Co-PI,

Bruce Gorham, continued to serve as the main

point-of-contact for data distribution and

technology transfer last year. These activities

overlap neatly with consortium development

endeavors, since most initial contact with

potential members comes at outreach functions

and requests for or queries about satellite image

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 31


data. Historically, these efforts have proven

successful in bringing on new members:

Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, and the

Arkansas Precision Agriculture Working Group.

Finally, we intend to make improvements to the

ArkansasView web page. We see our web page

as our face to the public, and we have continued

our efforts to keep the page up-to-date and

helpful to members and the public at large.

The image above is a satellite image from November 1984

from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper. The area shown is along

the I-40 corridor near Brinkley, Arkansas. The area in the

center, under the blue crosshair, is part of Dagmar Wildlife

Management Area on the Cache River. Landsat’s long

history allows researches to look into the past and compare

historical images to the current landscape.

ArkansasView has played a key role in the

development of programs to bring remote

sensing data to a greater number of people. In

2004-2005 AmerciaView established new

partnerships with data providers such as

DigitalGlobe, LLC of Longmont Colorado. Under

this new agreement DigitalGlobe will provide

very high resolution satellite images for

education purposes to AmericaView consortium

members and affiliated universities. The

ArkansasView program continues to promote

the use of, and provide access to, free and

discounted satellite imagery to a growing

number of researchers in a wide variety of

academic disciplines and public sector planning

agencies. We also continue to offer the ability to

provide Landsat satellite imagery in near realtime

through the RAPID Program (Real-Time

Acquisition and Processing of Image Data).

Existing funding from other sources is combined

with AmericaView funding to assist with the

maintenance and continued development of

data archival and online access services.

The following numbers are an indication of the

continued growth in the use of remote sensing

data for scientific investigation and planning.

• Direct Landsat Data Purchases 2004-2005:

46

• Raw Landsat 5 and 7 data downloads from

GeoStor: 3699

• Land use/Land cover data downloads: 2081

• Other derived Landsat 5& 7 image product

downloads: 2036

Education and Outreach: ArkansasView has

worked to offer a number of educational and

outreach activities for both members and nonmembers.

In addition to several poster and oral

presentations given around the state on a

variety of remote sensing topics, on February 2

ArkansasView co-sponsored the technical

session of the 26 th annual Arkansas Agricultural

Exposition. Co-PI, Bruce Gorham made a

presentation. In the same session Bill Baker, of

Arkansas State University, gave a presentation

on the use of aerial imagery for precision

agriculture applications. In conjunction with

ARPAWG and Arkansas State University, CAST

personnel are currently developing materials

and solidifying logistics for a workshop to be

held in the late fall of 2005: Remote Sensing for

Precision Agriculture.

In the past year, we have continued to provide

support to the EAST (Environmental and Spatial

Technology) Initiative (http://www.eastproject.

org). ArkansasView funds were used to begin

development of an on-line remote

sensing/image processing tutorial directed at

high-school (EAST) and undergraduate

students. The first step in this process was to

develop a sample data set, known as a data

stack. The course, to be developed in

conjunction with other AmericaView consortia,

will cover fundamental topics concerning the use

of imagery in GIS packages including georeferencing

using world files and geo-tiff

headers, enhancement using histogram

manipulation and linear filters, creating color

composites, and supervised classification. The

course materials may be used as a self-paced

tutorial or as a reference for the more

experience user.

Research: AmericaView sees research as an

important aspect of its overall mission. As in

past years, the research carried out in 2004-

2005 focused on developing and/or improving

applications for the use of remote sensing data.

32 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


It remains our intent to conduct research that is

pertinent to Arkansas’ social, environmental, and

economic interests. The availability and quality

of water is a significant issue to many

Arkansans, and an area where research utilizing

satellite remote sensing has been used with

great success. This year we used AmericaView

funding to leverage the water quality work being

done by Indrajeet Chaubey, Sudhanshu Panda,

and Vijay Garg at the University of Arkansas’

Department of Biological and Agricultural

Engineering. In the past two years, their

department, through AmericaView, purchased

twelve Landsat 5 scenes and one Hyperion

scene over Beaver Lake: northwest Arkansas’

chief water source. Dr. Chaubey is widely

published, and his involvement will bring some

notoriety to the ArkansasView consortium. Co-PI

Gorham provided technical assistance on

remote sensing related issues. Other CAST

staffers provided system’s administration

services.

assembling team vitae, writing institutional and

agency programs descriptions, and investigating

potential funding sources. We believe that this

exercise will produce positive results in the

coming years, and there is good reason to have

confidence in our success.

Summary: A strong consortium with an active

membership that builds upon the specific

strengths of each member is more likely to find

the resources, from both public and private

sources, which are necessary to build a vital

remote sensing infrastructure both in Arkansas

and nationwide. We believe that through our

continued investments in consortium building,

education, outreach, and research activities we

will advance the goals of AmericaView. The

remote sensing user community in Arkansas is

small, it is increasingly dynamic, and offers

much potential for growth. Our consortium

seeks to build on the strengths of members

while judiciously incorporating the strengths of

new and potential members both from within and

outside of Arkansas. Through cooperation,

collaboration, and the effective leveraging of

existing resources, we are building a stronger

and more viable remote sensing community in

Arkansas.

Development of an Online Tracking and

Mapping System for the Arkansas Game &

Fish Commission

08/30/04 – 08/29/05

Arkansas Game & Fish Commission

$79,737.

This hyperspectral “Data Slice” is a three-dimensional

representation of the Hyperion sensor’s 220 unique spectral

bands. Each layer, from top to bottom, captures information

from a discrete portion: 10-nm bandwidth ranging from 0.357

to 2.576 micrometers.

Finally, in an effort to create a more selfsustaining

consortium, in 2004-2005

ArkansasView members began collaborative

efforts to obtain funding from other sources. The

Arkansas Precision Agriculture Working Group

(ARPAWG) and other ArkansasView members

made some of the preparations necessary to

submit proposals as a group such as

Overview

During the spring of 2004, Arkansas Game and

Fish Commission biologists placed radio

transmitters on 28 mallards. These transmitters,

which weigh only 30 grams (less than 10% of a

duck's body weight), are part of a world-wide

tracking system know as ARGOS. ARGOS is

jointly operated by the French space agency

CNES, the U.S. National Oceanic and

Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the

U.S. National Aeronautics and Space

Administration (NASA). With ARGOS, the

locations of each transmitter equipped mallard

can be measured to within 300 hundred meters

on a weekly or even daily basis and stored in a

ground-based computer.

Unlike previous banding and tracking efforts,

ARGOS allows AGFC to collect mallard

movement without recapturing the animal. The

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 33


transmitter only becomes active for a short

period of time every two to four days. During the

active period it collects as many locations as

possible within the pre-programmed time frame.

CAST worked with ARGOS and AFGC to

develop a geospatial IT architecture to extract

this position information from the ARGOS

database and display them in near real time in a

web-map environment against a land-cover

background.

Mississippi fly-way and beyond – have

registered on the system.

Research Goals

1) Track movements and distribution of

migrating female mallards in spring. Describe

habitat characteristics of principle spring staging

areas, nesting areas and post-nesting areas of

adult female mallards migrating from Arkansas.

2) Track movements and distribution of

migrating female mallards in fall. Determine

proportionate use of fall migration corridors,

staging areas and dispersal relative to habitat

conditions.

3) Track movements and determine distribution

and habitat use within Arkansas.

4) Determine use of spring migration corridors

(e.g. Mississippi Flyway or Central Flyway),

spring staging areas, nesting areas and postnesting

dispersal relative to habitat conditions.

Screen shots of Satellite Mallard Tracking webpage.

5) Estimate efficiency of May survey to account

for mallards migrating from Arkansas

(Mississippi Alluvial Valley) by estimating

distribution of marked adult female mallards

between surveyed and un-surveyed regions

during the May surveys.

Establishing Framework Data Services Using

the OGC Web Feature Service

08/20/04 – 09/30/05

Department of Interior – US Geological Survey

$74,966.

In addition, to tracking the mallards, the

integration of tracking information with other

geographic information such as climate and land

use/land cover data will help researchers

understand the reasons for changing migration

patterns. Since the web-site was made publicly

available, over 3000 users – including hunters,

biologists and environmentalists throughout the

The National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI)

represents a broad consortium of government

agencies and non-government organizations

that work together to promote more costeffective

production, ready availability, and

greater utilization of geospatial data across a

wide range of disciplines. The NSDI Cooperative

Agreements Program (CAP) was established by

the Federal Geographic Data Committee

(FGDC) to help form partnerships among

organizations to implement the NSDI. As a

participant in the 2004 NSDI CAP Category 5,

CAST is implementing the ANSI/INCITS L1

standard for framework geospatial data using

the Open Geospatial Consortium's (OGC) Web

Feature Service (WFS) specification. The

ANSI/INCITS L1 standard for framework

geospatial data provides standard data models

or encoding framework data themes (Digital

34 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


orthoimagery, Cadastral data, Geodetic control,

Elevation, Hydrography, Transportation, and

Government units).

Digitization of the Arkansas Soil Survey

12/15/04 – 4/15/05

ASWCC

$63,113.

Traditionally, the results of a soil survey have

been presented in hard copy publications that

include maps and associated information in

tables and narratives. More efficiently, the digital

soil databases can serve all the purposes of the

traditional soil surveys and much more. Some of

the advantages of completing a state-wide

digital soil database include: a) they provide

county, city, state and federal governments, and

other decision makers a digital soils layer that

can be used with other data layers such as land

use and land cover, aerial photographic

imagery, topographic base maps and socioeconomic

data using Geographic Information

Systems (GIS) in order to facilitate analysis and

decision making; b) provide a more efficient and

economical method for keeping soils information

updated and available to users; c) offer cost

savings by reducing the number of traditional

hard copy soil surveys that need to be

republished, as original supplies are exhausted;

d) take advantage of computer technology to

store and manage large quantities of soils data,

which will result in savings of time and additional

expenses for county and state agencies; e)

provide easy access to soils information that can

be downloaded and captured for any area via

the Internet; f) facilitate policy makers easy

access to a critical, state-wide natural resource

database to help the development and

implementation of local and state policies related

to environment and natural resources issues; g)

assist County Conservation Districts, the

Cooperative Extension Service, consultants and

others to provide more efficient and timely

assistance to farmers and other land managers

when developing plans for animal manure

management, soil and water conservation,

pasture management, forest and site specific

soil and crop management.

The soil digitization project started in 1995 when

the Arkansas Legislature allocated funds to the

Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation

Commission (ASWCC) to digitize the soil

surveys of the Mississippi River Delta of the 26

counties in eastern Arkansas. This project was a

cooperative venture between the Department of

Agronomy at the University of Arkansas, the

Natural Resources and Conservation Service

(NRCS) in Little Rock and the Arkansas Soil and

Water Conservation Commission (ASWCC). By

the end of the fiscal year 2003 soil surveys of 68

counties in Arkansas were completed with the

support of previous legislatures and the

cooperation of the above mentioned agencies.

The present soil digitization project is a

continuation of the soil database development

project in which soil surveys of the 75 Arkansas

counties are being digitized. This project is

intended to cover the completion of the

digitization of the remaining seven counties in

Arkansas. The final products provided are the

digitized county soil survey maps, which will be

associated to relational databases and digital

maps of each county reflecting selected soil

surface properties. These digital data constitute

the first step in the completion of the Soil Survey

Geographic Database (SSURGO), which is part

of the National Soil Information System (NASIS).

The project is completed at the Center for

Advanced Spatial Technologies (CAST) with the

financial support of the Arkansas Soil and Water

Conservation Commission and in cooperation

with the Natural Resources Conservation

Service (NRCS).

The overall goal of this year’s Soil Surveys

Digitization project was to complete the

digitization of the following counties: Bradley,

Calhoun, Cleveland, Dallas, Ouachita, Pike and

Grant. Some of these counties, which are

strategically situated into the West Gulf Coastal

Plain area, have no published soil surveys. As a

consequence, the soil information for these

counties is of great importance for a wide variety

of professionals and public users.

The soil surveys are developed on mylars by

NRCS personnel and the digitization is

performed at the Center for Advanced Spatial

Technologies. The quality of the digitization

process is in accordance with the national

cartographic standards. Digitizing the soil

boundaries consist of three major stages. The

first stage consists of the creation and

processing the soil maps, and also raster and

vector editing of each individual map on a

7.5minute quadrangle map. Stage two involves

the joining of the quadrangle maps to provide

seamless county survey coverage. Stage three

includes error-checking for each individual map

and a seamless patch of the maps. NRCS is the

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 35


agency that conducts the final checks on the

overall quality of the work and has the final

approval authority before submitting the soil

survey for SSURGO certification. As of June

2005 the following counties have been digitized

and submitted to NRCS for quality control and

certification: Pike, Ouachita, Calhoun, Bradley,

Dallas and Cleaveland. The project also focuses

on developing communication tools for the soil

data for professionals and general public

interested in the soil information. Once the soil

surveys become SSURGO certified, compiled

datasets of selected soil attributes are

manipulated in an appropriate GIS format and

published within the on-line data delivery system

GeoStor

(http://www.cast.uark.

edu/cast/geostor/) hosted at CAST. Presently,

there are more than 30 counties available for

download with information including general soil

information, crops suitability, soil surface layer

properties and soil use interpretation

(representing more than 200 soil attributes).

Soils series within Fayetteville and surrounding cities.

Another tool for communicating soil information

at CAST is the Arkansas Soils Information

System (ARK-SIS), which can be accessed at

http://soils.cast.uark.edu. This is an on line

interactive mapping application built to provide

information on soil properties and soil related

characteristics on a county, as well as state

basis. The goal of this application is to provide a

useful and easy to use interactive tool for

visualizing, analyzing and interactively building

soil maps for each county, as well as for the

entire state. In addition to simple on-line

mapping, the user is offered the possibility to

identify, query and build maps at his/her choice

using the available soil databases.

GIS-Based Natural Resource Analyses for

the Ozark Wetland Planning Region

01/03/05 – 12/31/05

Arkansas Soil & Water Conservation

Commission

$58,697.

GIS-Based Natural Resource Analyses for

Arkansas River Valley Wetland Planning

07/01/04 – 06/30/05

Arkansas Soil & Water Conservation

Commission

$45,687.

For over ten years, CAST has continued its

collaborative research efforts to identify,

quantify, and analyze wetland resources across

Arkansas. As digital data of natural resources

have become more available, and computers

have become vastly more powerful, it has

become feasible to undertake the detailed study

of much larger areas in a much shorter time

period. The study area for these tow projects are

the Ozark wetland planning region,

encompassing the Illinois River, Upper White

River, Spring/Strawberry Rivers, and Southern

Boston watersheds, and the Arkansas River

Valley wetland planning area from Ft. Smith to

Little Rock. Much of the project encompassed

the gathering and translation of data to be

compatible with the geographic information

systems (GIS) of the Soil and Water

Conservation Commission (ASWCC). Analyses

of this data focused on the methodology codeveloped

by CAST and the Multi-Agency

Wetland Planning Team (MAWPT), as already

applied to all the watersheds of the Arkansas

delta and the Coastal Plain. Compatibility with

these previous analyses was of primary

consideration, in order to maintain the value of

the earlier research.

The project consisted of four principle steps:

• Gathering, development, and

conversion of ecosystem component

data.

• Creation of base component overlays

and hardcopy maps.

36 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


• Application of GIS analysis.

• Technical support of MAWPT personnel.

The first step focuses on assembling data both

for wetland delineation and for cartographic

production. Most definitions of wetlands contain

three components: (1) water, (2) unique soils

different from upland areas, and (3) vegetation

adapted to wet environments (“hydrophytic”

vegetation). This project utilizes water data from

the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and from

satellite imagery. The imagery was processed

by CAST personnel to identify areas that are

regularly inundated during flooding. Soils data

for the study area were obtained from NRCS in

the form of their digital county soils database,

SSURGO. Finally, hydrophytic vegetation was

extracted from the Arkansas GAP Analysis data.

Additional data, such as roads, political

boundaries, etc., were extracted from USGS and

Bureau of the Census sources.

Arkansas River wetland inventory map.

Once data has been gathered and converted to

a uniform database, a series of GIS overlays

and maps will be produced. These include a

hydric soils map (indicative of wetlands), a

wetlands inventory map, and a public ownership

map. These provide researchers of the MAWPT

with tools that can be used both for immediate

planning purposes, and also for evaluating the

latter GIS analysis stage of the project.

Delineating terraces along the Arkansas River.

One of the important differences between this

project and the earlier analyses in the Delta was

the presence of significant areas of non-riparian

wetlands. The Arkansas River Valley and the

Coastal Plains wetland planning regions are

unique in Arkansas for hosting hardwood flats

wetlands, a type of wetlands distinct from

riparian wetlands which are the focus of the

current analysis. Hardwood flat wetlands are

“precipitation-maintained wetlands” that are

located on the higher, older terraces of the river

landscape in areas of relatively low slope with

forested vegetation. The development of valid

methodologies to identify “flats”, using the

limited available data, became a critical

contribution of this particular project.

The core of the project is the GIS analysis of the

assembled data. CAST will conduct analyses

that identify priority wetland protection and

restoration sites based on the characteristics,

distribution, and functions of existing wetlands in

Arkansas. The Ozark wetland planning area

differs greatly from the earlier projects

completed in the Arkansas delta and the coastal

plain. Because of the much more rugged

topography, existing wetlands tend to be smaller

and more isolated than in the flatter regions.

Additionally, the large man-made reservoirs

within the study area have negatively affected

wetlands, flooding historic wetlands and

producing shoreline with non-hydric soils.

The final process involves the identification of

wetlands for protection, restoration, or

acquisition and prioritization of areas that would

benefit the most from limited state funds. The

end products will be both hardcopy paper maps,

useful for overall planning or presentation, and

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 37


the underlying GIS coverages, which allow more

precise identification of locations, as well as the

option of changing analysis criteria and recalculating.The

last step of this project is the

most critical. CAST’s long-term relationship with

the agencies of the MAWPT has fostered strong

collaboration between technical specialists. This

insures the future value of state dollars spent on

research at CAST.

Development/Management of the 2005 Regional

Wetlands Technical Conference Website and

Conference Registration. Peter Smith, Tim

Sexton and Brian Culpepper worked with Ken

Brazil of the ASWCC in Little Rock to design,

develop and host an EPA sponsored wetlands

conference held in Corpus Christi, Texas (May

17th-19th, 2005). Malcolm Williamson and Brian

Culpepper traveled to the conference and both

presented papers related to our past and

ongoing wetlands research here at CAST. We

also assisted the ASWCC staff by moderating

two sessions during the conference. The

website is linked off of the Arkansas Wetland

Resource Information Management System

(AWRIMS) website here at CAST

(http://vestig.cast.uark.edu/website/awrims/).

rare example of primary state and urban

formation, it has been selected as one of 754

recognized World Heritage Sites.

Stone faces line the walls of the semi-subterranean temple

(Courtesy Alexei Vranich).

Computing & Retrieving 3D Archeological

Structures from Subsurface Survey (Year 1)

10/15/04 – 09/30/05

US/NSF/U of Penn

$54,322.

Today’s archaeologists face several difficulties

with traditional field procedures of excavation

and subsequent exposure of findings.

Excavations are slow and the cost for

conservation can easily exceed the cost of

excavation.

University of Pennsylvania Museum archaeologists

have worked for 10 years at the Tiwanaku

site, a monumental city in the Bolivian highlands

13,000 feet above sea level. The city was

occupied between A.D. 500 and 1000, then

abandoned hundreds of years before the arrival

of the Inka in the 15th century. Erosion of the

adobe walls of this planned city caused by the

harsh climate and the reuse of the original stone

in later construction have resulted in the loss of

earlier surface construction. This loss of surface

data coupled with the large size of the site;

estimated at about four square miles, have

made it especially difficult to characterize the

spatial organization of this complex site. As a

The Akapana pyramid mound at the core of the site (Courtesy

Alexei Vranich).

In this project, funded by the National Science

Foundation, CAST staff and collaborating

archeologists from Universidad Mayor des San

Andres, University of Pennsylvania, University of

Denver, and Harvard university will collect very

large detailed, three-dimensional geophysical

datasets from approximately 60 subterranean

acres of Tiwanaku. This data will be used to

derive archaeological structural information. The

goals of the project include, (1) Mapping from

raw data to 3D-volumes with accurate and

robust estimation of the volumetric material

distribution in the presence of noise, (2)

Application of graph spectral segmentation to

extract distinct objects from the underground

image, and creation of a database documenting

38 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


all types of objects underground, and (3)

Introduction of a set-based representation for

surface reconstruction from detected boundaries

from ‘sparse’ data and employment of

multiresolution methods for the recovery of

manifold structures.

In a separate effort, digital models of this site

and the Machu Pichu site in Peru will be created

from data acquired with a 3D laser profiler.

landscape of Arkansas in the year 2004 and

landscape changes from 1999-2004. A modified

Anderson Level II-III classification schema is

being used for a 30 × 30 m spatial scale of

analysis. The bulk of the LULC information is

derived from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM)

image scenes acquired in spring, summer, and

fall of 2004. Additional ancillary datasets are

being used to extract LULC information. They

are derived from the USGS National Elevation

Dataset (NED), U.S. Bureau of the Census

maps, and Arkansas Highway and

Transportation Department road locations. The

project is producing specific from-to change

information about agricultural crops, pasture

types, forestland conversion, and seasonal

flooding patterns.

Laser scan of the Kalasasaya at the Tiwanaku ruins in

Boliva.

Photograph of the same area of the Kalasasaya.

Arkansas LULC Mapping – Phase II

11/01/04 – 06/30/05

Arkansas Soil & Water Conservation

Commission

$46,411.

Arkansas LULC Mapping – Phases II is

developing, through innovative and improved

classification techniques, statewide landuse/land-cover

(LULC) maps representing the

Mosaic of ten Landsat 5 TM scenes collected in the spring of

2004 and used as part of the classification process.

--

--

Training data, perhaps the most valuable data in

change detection studies, is collected through

extensive fieldwork, heads-up identification of

Landsat imagery, and inspection of National

Aerial Photography Program (NAPP) 1 × 1 m

aerial photography. An innovative classification

algorithm is being developed and utilized for this

project based on multi-resolution image

segmentation, a machine-learning decision tree,

and spatial aggregation scale optimization

techniques. In an effort to streamline and

systematize this effort, an interactive dialog has

been developed for labeling individual polygon

segments. A drop-down menu gave the expert

access to the list of 51 unique classes.

Thirty Landsat 5 TM images are first

orthorectified to a standard projection. Part of

this process includes correcting for distortions

such as sensor geometry, satellite orbit and

attitude variations, and earth shape, rotation,

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 39


and topographic relief. The satellite’s orbital

data, a series of ground-control points, and a

digital elevation model (DEM) are used to make

these adjustments.

Image segmentation is the grouping of adjacent

image pixels, based on their likeness in spectral

(color) space into polygons (spatial aggregates;

e.g. a rubber band around a corn field). Multiresolution

image segmentation involves

grouping similar polygons together based on

their spectral and shape properties into an

object hierarchy with partially matching

boundaries across levels. Studies have shown

that the appropriate use of multi-resolution

image segmentation can enhance classification

accuracy (and accurate from-to change

information rests heavily on the classification

accuracies for individual dates). The spatial cooccurrence

of similar objects in the landscape

(spatial autocorrelation) plays an important role

in this increase.

are then generated from each Landsat 5 TM

scene, each representing a particular size scale

of spatial aggregation. Subsequent

classification is performed on the polygons (and

not on the raster image pixels). Custom PCI

Geomatica scripts are developed to aggregate

all of the Landsat data and ancillary datasets

into each polygon.

Flow diagram representing the multi-resolution image

segmentation and classification logic used in the LULC 2004

project.

Polygon image segments derived from the 2004 Arkansas

Landsat 5 TM imagery using eCognition.

--

--

Most studies assume that only one scale of

spatial aggregation is needed to interpret a

given scene. This project utilizes an enhanced

multi-resolution image segmentation approach in

which three scales of spatial aggregation (three

segmentation levels each based on a different

scale parameter) are applied and an “optimal”

scale is selected for each part of the landscape.

The multi-resolution image segmentation

capability of eCognition is being utilized in this

project. An expert familiar with the landscape of

Arkansas and previous LULC work in the state

(in this case, CAST’s Bruce Gorham) selects the

appropriate scales to use. Three polygon files

The C5.0 inductive machine learning decision

tree is utilized for classification. However,

custom Arcview scripts are developed to

prepare classification training data and control

files (required to run C5.0), to read decision tree

output production rules, to infer predicted land

cover categories from those rules (classification

inference), and to generate a Kappa coefficient

of agreement (accuracy measure). Half of the

training data are randomly withheld from the

classification process in order to assess

accuracy. The classification model is developed

using training data from all Landsat scenes.

This magnifies the volume of training data

available for the classification of any one scene

and takes better advantage of the C5.0 decision

tree process. The multiple dates of Landsat

imagery within the year are utilized at the very

40 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


end of the process to identify polygons more

difficult to classify.

Two output products are being generated. The

first is an Arkansas 2004 statewide LULC map

using the 51 classes of the modified Anderson

Level II-III schema. The second is a from-to

(post-classification) change map showing

change information between 1999-2004. The

from-to change information about agricultural

crops, pasture types, forestland conversion, and

seasonal flooding patterns is vital for many

groups throughout Arkansas. Additionally, the

classification techniques being developed in this

study are relatively fit for potentially much

greater automation, an important research area

in multi-temporal change detection. Future work

will include automation and optimization

techniques and will address training data

reusability to minimize the manual effort that has

to go into training data selection for a single-date

classification.

searched by name, tribe, reservation, state,

country, and military installation.

This information is crucial to organizations who

must comply with the Native American Graves

Protection and Repatriation Act.

National Archeological Database and

National NAGPRA Databases (Modification

#2)

09/26/04 – 07/31/05

National Park Service/Department of the Interior

$31,403.

Since 1991, CAST has assisted National Park

Service (NPS) with its mandate to provide

archeological information to its local offices and

other federal agencies to meet the cultural

resources management requirements set by

various Acts of Congress. In order to achieve

this, NPS now has three sets of data currently

available to the public via the web.

NADB-Reports is a database of more than

359,000 bibliographic references and has been

accessed over 22,000 times.

The NAGPRA notices database provides the full

text of the Native American Graves Protection

and Repatriation Act, up-to-date information on

regulations and guidance, and summaries of

inventory and repatriation activities. NACD

(Native American Consultation Database), the

latest addition, is the result of a partnership

between the National Park Service and the U.S.

Air Force. It provides an easy way to identify

contacts for each of the federally recognized

Indian tribes, Alaska Native groups, and Native

Hawaiian organizations. Contacts can be

Screen shot of NAGPRA online system.

Developing GIS based application projects

for the Facilities Management Department

(FAMA) at the University of Arkansas

5/1/2004-12/30/2005

FAMA

$24,600.

Developing GIS based application projects

for the Facilities Management

Department (FAMA) at the University of

Arkansas

11/1/2004-3/4/2005

FAMA

$7,833.

The goal of this project is to develop a GIS

database of all utilities located on the University

of Arkansas, Fayetteville campus in order to

assist professionals at the Facilities

Management in the process of decision making.

The first stage of this project was to design and

develop a database that will include the

locations of the main utilities network on campus

and make them available in a fast and efficient

manner. This database includes the locations

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 41


and tabular data for sanitary manholes,

firestands, water tunnels, tunnel access,

lightpoles, etc. In addition to the utility network,

GPS locations of the trees, with measurements

and characteristics, were collected for the Old

Main and Maple Hill Arboretum on the

Fayetteville campus. In addition to this tree

database an interactive web mapper for the Old

Main Arboretum was published and hosted on

one of the CAST servers, which will allow wider

public access to this type of information. Another

task of this collaboration consists in developing

and maintaining an accurate University property

database in GIS format that the Facility

Management can access on a regular basis.

compilation of the data consists of receiving,

entering and editing the data within an online

system developed for the UAEDI website

(http://uaedi.cast.uark.edu). Maps related to

economic development, as well as other

geographic and demographic characteristics for

areas in Arkansas were published for the

Crossroads Coalition (a nine county group in the

Mississippi Delta area of Arkansas), and the

Cornerstone Coalition (a six county group in

South East Arkansas). About 100 thematic maps

for Crossroads Coalition and 80 maps for the

Cornerstone Coalition have been constructed

and made available online. Accompanying web

pages for each county in both coalitions were

also developed.

Assessment of Local Community/Facility

Management Web Mapping Strategy

02/01/05 – 08/31/05

AutoDesk

$25,000.

This project involves comparing the technical

performance of Autodesk MapGuide® 6.5 and

ESRI® ArcIMS 4.1 (Internet Map Server)

software programs in developing a

community/facility management web mapping

project. A set of layers of different GIS data for

the Northwest Arkansas region (Benton and

Washington counties) has been compiled and

published online using both types of software.

These layer datasets include: county

boundaries, incorporated city limits, roads,

property parcels, rivers and lakes, land use and

land cover data, aerial photography, digital

elevation models, soils, school districts, etc. The

data, both vector and raster, have been tested in

both MapGuide and ArcIMS. The results will be

compared and the results published as the

project advances.

University of Arkansas Economic

Development Institute (UAEDI) Collaboration

and Support Project

7/1/04 - 6/30/05

UAEDI

$15,000.

This ongoing collaboration project involves

support for developing the record datasets from

organizations as well as individuals within the

University of Arkansas System and elsewhere

who wish to be part of the UAEDI Databases

and also maps compilation and distribution

online within the UAEDI website. The

The Crossroads Coalition Atlas page. Each thumbnail image

is linked to a full size map in pdf. format.

Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning

Commission: Database Management Project

03/15/04 – 5/30/05

NWA Regional Planning Commission

$9,045.

The main purpose of this project is to continue

collaborating with the Northwest Arkansas

Regional Planning Commission in developing

the Travel Demand Model project and assist in

quality control tasks for the LIDAR aerial

photography project. This collaboration is

intended to continue for future projects in order

to develop a more effective regional GIS

coordination among cities and state offices in

the Northwest Arkansas region and the state.

The main purposes of this project are to assist

and work with the Northwest Arkansas Regional

Planning Commission in developing and using

GIS methods and techniques that would help

42 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


with the completion of the above mentioned

projects.

This project entails working with the Northwest

Arkansas Regional Planning and the region’s

jurisdictions in establishing procedures to

accomplish the working goals mentioned above

and also to collaborate with the various city

offices in problem solving scenarios. Also part of

the Travel Demand Model Development project

work will be related to developing an accurate

model road network that would support the

travel model scenario for 2015 and 2030.

harvest and display that data in a easily

accessible, dynamic on-line map. The vision

was that as city and state governments, utilities,

and other participants updated local data this

change would be reflected within 7 days on

TNM. Realizing the vision is no small task

however. Every community collects and

organizes data to suit their perhaps unique

needs making it necessary to developed

software protocols so that TNM can recognize

and understand data elements no matter what

they are called or how they are stored. In

cooperation with the Arkansas Geographic

Information Office, the city of Fort Smith, AR,

and the United States Geologic Survey, CAST

developed a pilot system, based in part on

Oracle and ArcIMS technologies and OGC

standards, by which the City of Fort Smith’s

geospatial data is harvested by The National

Map. This effort involved developing the

protocols necessary for automatically

understanding the Fort Smith data, converting it

the TNM data standard and displaying it using

the correct symbology in TNM. Several layers of

information, such as street centerlines and

streams, are now aligned with federal data. In

fact, the partnership has gone well beyond the

seven day currency requirement by showing that

the TNM can accurate Fort Smith geospatial

data within 24 hours of an update in Fort Smith.

This kind of currency is critical to many federal

agencies including FEMA and DHS.

Example of a transportation network map used by

community decision makers for planning future roads for

Northwest Arkansas.

Aligning City, State and Federal GeoSpatial

Data Needs

06/30/04 – 09/30/04

Arkansas Geological Information Office

$6,044.

In the modern world, where infrastructure and

the maps that describe it change continuously, it

is impossible for a single agency to maintain

current and accurate maps throughout the

nation, or even the state. USGS realized this

several years ago and began development of

The National Map, TNM. The idea is not that

USGS would produce 1:24000 scale nationwide

maps as they had done in the past, but rather

Load Quickbird High-Resolution Satellite

Imagery of Pulaski County into GeoStor

10/15/04 – 11/15/05

Arkansas Geographics Information Office

$2,898.

The grand-opening of the Clinton presidential

library in Little Rock in 2004 presented several

challenges to those charged with security for the

event. As part of the security preparations, the

Arkansas Geographic Information Office was

asked make recent satellite of the imagery of the

surrounding area (all of Pulaski County in fact)

available for on-demand viewing. AGIO

purchased an unrestricted license for 798 mi 2 of

2 foot resolution, true-color satellite imagery for

the event. This imagery represented almost

6GB of data in over 75 different files. CAST

worked with AGIO to make all this data available

through GeoStor so that it would be available to

a wide variety of individuals and agencies

working in Pulaski County. With GeoStor,

potential users are able to specify a subset of

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 43


the imagery, say just North Little Rock, and

download just that data in a format and

projection to suit their needs.

______________________________________

CURRENT PENDING PROPOSALS

______________________________________

GeoSpatial Analysis of Terrorist Activities:

The Identification of Spatial and Temporal

Patterns of Preparatory Behavior of

International and Environmental Terrorists

10/01/05 – 09/30/07

Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice

$498,549.

Geospatial and Visualization Support and

Training for the EAST Initiative

07/01/05 - 06/30/06

EAST Initiative

$301,919.

Geo Decision Support Services in the OGC

Web Services Initiative Requirement Set 3

and Demonstration

04/05 – 11/05

U.S. Geological Survey

$87,161.

Improving the Reliability and Performance of

The National Map

10/1/05 - 9/30/06

USGS/NSDI

$74,731.

Streamlined Archaeo-Geophysical Data

Processing and Integration for DoD Field Use

1/06 - 12/09

CERL

$413,773.

CORONA Archaeological Atlas of the Middle

East

3/06 - 2/08

National Endowment for the Humanities

$320,558.

Travel Demand Model Development

07/5/05 - 12/30/05

Arkansas State Highway and Transportation

Department

$15,024.

Joint 3D Reconstruction of Static

Background and Moving Targets Using SFM

STTR Phase I proposal (AF05-T006)

10/01/05 - 09/30/06

Spatial Integrated Systems

$30,325.

Joint 3D Reconstruction of Static

Background and Moving Targets Using SFM

STTR Phase I proposal (AF05-T006)

10/01/05 – 09/30/06

Spatial Integrated Systems

$30,325.

Travel Demand Model Development

05/11/05 – 06/30/05

Arkansas State Highway and Transportation

Department

$4,800.

StateView Program Development and

Operations for the State of Arkansas

AmericaView

07/01/05 – 06/30/06

$89,500.

44 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


Public

Service

CAST staff members are regularly involved in a

variety of activities that directly and indirectly

benefit Arkansans, from its work with Arkansas'

high school students who participate in the

EAST Initiative to making geographic

information data easily available to the general

public through the CAST website and the

GeoStor data warehouse.

CAST staff members respond to hundreds of

requests for assistance or demonstrations each

year from sources ranging from University of

Arkansas students to rural 4H clubs. CAST's

public service mission includes talks,

demonstrations, workshops, meetings,

presentations, and responses to requests for a

variety of types of information. Some of CAST's

major public service efforts for FY 04-05 are

described below.

Cast’s new webpage: www.cast.uark.edu

CAST’S WEBSITE.

Established in 1994, CAST’s website

(www.cast.uark.edu) was designed to provide

access to maps and spatial data, to provide

information on the Center's research projects,

and serve as an informational resource in the

areas of GIS, remote sensing, photogrammetry,

spatial technologies, historic preservation, and

archaeology. This award-winning site was

developed and designed by Snow L. Winters.

With its recent update, CAST’s website better

reflects the variety of the Center’s activities and

provide easy access to frequently requested

data. CAST’s goal to introduce and provide GIS

technologies to the widest audience possible

continues to drive the development of this

website.

The Center's website continues to expand in the

quality and quantity of data it contains and in the

ease of access to that data. While most website

accesses come from the U.S., the site is utilized

by students, the public, and researchers from

around the world. The CAST website has an

average of 32,000 hits per day. This number

has remained consistently high since its

dramatic rise in 2002 from 19,000.

Along with the high number of hits for the

website, the number of other sites with links to

CAST has risen. Currently there are 24,765

other websites that link to CAST. This number

has risen over 18,000 links since 2000. For

example, some of these sites that have links to

CAST are the Center for Global and Regional

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 45


Environmental Research, Universiteit Utrecht,

and the New York State GIS Clearinghouse.

data search and delivery, support for multiple

enterprise applications, and an integrated Oracle

enterprise-class distributed database architecture.

The system currently includes all

publicly available location-based geodata for the

State of Arkansas.

Slide shows are available for some areas of interest

within CAST’s website.

GeoStor can be found via CAST’s webpage at:

www.cast.uark.edu

Google is the top search engine in the U.S.

Having a website that is readily accessible can

make or break a site, so the ultimate goal of any

website is to be ranked within the top 30 search

results. For Google, this is determined by how

many other sites are linked to the site. With this

high number of links (24,765), CAST has

achieved rankings in the top 30 search results.

GEOSTOR.

GeoStor is a comprehensive, enterprise

geospatial geodata system, including web-based

GeoStor is the nation’s first seamless statewide

geospatial database that allows heterogeneous

access to spatial data, so that users can easily

locate, access, and use multiple scales of over

two terabytes of raster and vector spatial data.

Although more than fifteen states have digital

data warehouses, none have the versatility and

relative ease of use, due to the seamless nature

of data representation and underlying

architecture within GeoStor (see the Research

section for more information).

BOARD MEMBERSHIP.

Cast members serve on numerous national,

state, and local boards. Jack Cothren serves on

the Editorial Board of Earth Imaging Journal and

the Board of the American Society of Photogrammetry

and Remote Sensing. Fred Limp

serves on the Boards of the Open Geospatial

Interoperability Institute, the Oracle North

America Spatial Interest Group, the EAST

Board, the Arkansas State Land Information

46 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


Board, and the UA Information Technology

Research Institute.

STATE SERVICE.

The Center provides a range of public service

throughout the state. In the last fiscal years, an

important arena of assistance was to support the

legislature in a variety of initiatives. Special

demonstration efforts were offered to legislators

such as Shane Broadway, Jim Argue, Sue

Madison, and Jan Judy, to the Legislative

Research Bureau as well as help provided to the

Arkansas Geographic Information Office in a

number of areas.

CAST staff are actively supporting Arkansas’

(and other state’s) schools and communities

through the EAST Project and AmericaView

programs, described in detail in the Research

section. Among the Arkansas schools visited by

EAST were: Little Rock, Fayetteville,

Farmington, Gravette, Lincoln, Perryville,

Clinton, Southside, Dumas, Cave, Henderson,

Morrilton, Camden, Lake Village, McGehee,

Smackover, Augusta, Brinkley, Vilonia, and

Greenbrier. Outside the state, schools were

visited or school workshops were offered in

Chicago IL, Eureka CA, Berkeley CA, and

Sacramento CA.

Bruce Gorham provided a wide range of

assistance to groups around the state in the

selection of image product and data, al well as in

acquiring and using GPS data.

Brian Culpepper compiled a statewide

population change report for each eco-region of

Arkansas for the AGFC’s Forest legacy project.

James Sullins and Brian Culpepper published all

of Arkansas’ color IR aerial photography base

data into the USGS National Map program and

continue to maintain this web service for the

State of Arkansas without external support.

Carroll County participants in the LeadAR

program were provided an overview of

geospatial technologies for rural decision

support by CAST staff. Eighteen local

government employees were given professional

short-course training scholarships (worth $450

each) for the Introduction to ArcGIS I shortcourses

taught by John Wilson and Brian

Culpepper.

LOCAL SERVICE.

Cristina Scarlat, Jack Cothren, and Brian

Culpepper provided an extensive amount of

technical assistance to many groups in

Northwest Arkansas, particularly to the

Northwest Arkansas Planning Commission and

to the Northwest Arkansas Image Acquisition

Task Force in their very successful region-wide

image and LIDAR data acquisition effort. As

part of that effort, Culpepper also completed a

horizontal accuracy assessment of the 2004

Washington County ortho-imagery. Scarlat also

aided the Planning Commission in their regional

transportation planning efforts. Cothren served

as a Northwest Arkansas Science Fair Judge.

The online mapping application for Northwest

Arkansas (www.rgis.cast.uark.edu) was

launched in March of 2005, and over 50 new

users register for this application each month to

receive free access to current photography and

base maps of Benton and Washington Counties.

CAST staff provided imagery data and data

formatting assistance to the City of Fayetteville

and Washington County 911 and created a

single-band, black-and-white mosaic of the new

Northwest Arkansas imagery.

CAMPUS SERVICE.

The Center has active service efforts with a wide

range of campus units. John Wilson provides

dozens of units on the campus with ESRI

software technical support. The Center works

closely with the UA Center for Economic

Development, Facilities Management, UA

Extension, and Many other departments.

The Center’s teaching labs are used for 14

different courses by faculty from Crop, Soil and

Environmental Science, Anthropology, Biology,

Ag and Biological Engineering, Classics, Drama,

Geosciences, and Landscape Architecture.

Extensive technical support has been provided

to Dr. Otto Loewer of the UAEDI program.

Assistance was also provided this year to UAMS

Little Rock’s Arkansas Center for Health

Information and UCA’s Department of

Geography.

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 47


TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE.

Under the goals of the National Consortium for

Rural Geospatial Technology, the staff of the

Center provide valuable technical assistance to

a weide range of public and private groups and

individuals with the objective of smoothing the

uptake of geospatial technologies into

(particularly) rural communities. In many

instances, the technologies have not adopted

due to the perceived complexity of the systems.

In many instances, even limited aid can help an

early adopter move more comfortably into the

use of these systems.

The Center’s efforts also assist the commercial

sector by serving as a before you buy

educational resource assisting potential

purchasers of commercial systems to make an

informed and high quality choice. This serves to

reduce the cost to communities but also

increases the readiness with which no-users will

purchase commercial systems. A complete list

of these efforts is provided in Appendix B.

Some private sector examples include

assistance provided to EDS Engineering,

Arkansas Western Gas, McGoodwin, Williams,

and Yates, Marathon Oil, GYN Associates, Sand

Creek Engineering, Inc., Proxix Solutions, Mi

Casa Real Estate, UAP Timberland, Carter &

Burgess, Inc., J. B. Hunt, Watershed Concepts,

and Arkansas CAMA Technologies, Inc.

Community groups that were assisted include:

Bentonville and Fayetteville Public Schools,

Beaver Water District, Central EMS, Paragould

Light, Water and Cable, Western Meadows

Construction, InTime Inc., Coldwell Banker,

Benton County, and Washington County

Assessor, 911, and Planning offices, Carroll

County Lead AR program, UA Cooperative

Extension Service in Little Rock, Carroll

County/Eureka Springs Fire Chief, and Polk

City, Iowa.

Nongovernmental organizations that were

assisted during the last fiscal year by the Center

include The Nature Conservancy, Winrock

International, Arkansas 4-H program, Arkansas

One Call, Sierra Club, Arkansas Kidney

Foundation, and Audubon Arkansas.

GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM BASE

STATION.

CAST maintains a GPS Trimble Reference

Station through a cooperative agreement with

Trimble Navigation Ltd. The base station, in

operation since 1992, is a 12 - channel automated

reference station, collecting L1 carrier

and C/A code for differential GPS (DGPS)

information. This service privdes DGPS data

for GPS users within a 300-mile radius of UA

Fayetteville campus. This covers large portions

of Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri.

One of the known major users of base station

data in 2004-2005 was the Missouri Department

of Transportation (MODOT).

This year, there were over 2,200 requests for

DGPS data, from more than 350 unique users,

from the CAST base station. This community

base network offers those who use GPS

technologies an inexpensive, accurate, and easy

to use tool for improving the positional accuracy

of their GPS data. Access to base station data

files is available via CAST's website: http://web.

cast.uark.edu/local/gps.

CAST provides DGPS data for GPS users within a 300 mile

radius of UA, Fayetteville campus.

CAST VISIBILITY THROUGH PUBLICATIONS.

During FY 04-05, CAST continued to increase

the quality and volume of its public service and

outreach activities. A set of CAST informational

flyers was developed this year and more will be

designed and produced during the next few

months (see appendix D for examples). Much of

this outreach information is available on CAST's

48 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


website at www.cast.uark.edu. CAST’s library

continues to expand and offers access to GIS

technical information, periodicals, software

manuals, and other source materials. All review

software packages are cataloged and made

available for students to access. Newspaper,

magazine, and newsletter articles (see

appendices A and D) written by CAST staff or

written about CAST appeared this year in print in

various media.

DEMONSTRATIONS, TOURS, TALKS, AND

ASSISTANCE TO THE PUBLIC.

CAST staff regularly participate in, sponsor, and

lead demonstrations, tours, talks, workshops,

meetings, etc. in GIS technologies, archaeology,

forestry, biological sciences, architecture, and

many others. Over 500 events occur each year.

CAST staff receive requests for information via

email, phone, and through CAST's website.

Hundreds of requests for information are

honored each year, many from faculty, staff, and

students here on campus. Each of these

requests is handled on a one-on-one basic.

(See appendix B for listings by staff member).

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 49


50 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


Appendix A:

Publications

Books, Chapters, Refereed Articles, Unrefereed

Publications and Proceedings,

Invited Lectures, and Other Lectures,

Papers, and Oral Presentations.

(I) Books.

Scarlat, Cristina

Scarlat, C, J.M. McKimmey, H.D. Scott, and E.

Mersiovsky. 2004 Soils of Arkansas County,

Arkansas. Research Report 972. Arkansas

Agricultural Station. Division of Agriculture.

University of Arkansas.

(II) Chapters.

Limp, W. Fredrick

Limp, W. F. In press “Data curation” in C.

Chippendale and H. Maschner (eds.) Handbook

of Archaeological Method and Theory. Altamira

Press.

Tullis, Jason

Jensen, J.R., J.A. Tullis and Xueqiao Huang,

2005, “Information Extraction Using Artificial

Intelligence”, Introductory Digital Image

Processing (J.R. Jensen), 3 rd Ed., Upper Saddle

River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 526 pages.

Jensen, J.R., M.E. Hodgson, J.A. Tullis and

G.T. Raber, In press. “Remote Sensing of

Impervious Surfaces and Building

Infrastructure”, Using Geospatial Technologies

in Urban Environments (R.R. Jensen, J. Gatrell

and D.D. McLane, editors), New York, NY:

Springer-Verlag, Inc.

(III) Refereed Publications and

Proceeding.

Cothren, Jackson

Cothren, J. and Schaffrin, B. 2005 Reliability

Design for Imagery from Data, International

Cartographic Conference, A Coruña, Spain,

June 9-16, 2005.

Gorham. Bruce

Luscier, J. B. Gorham, and J Wilson. In press.

Using Digital Photographs and GIS Software to

Rapidly Quantify Vegetation around Active

Ground Nests. Journal of Field Ornithology.

Tullis, Jason

Hodgson, M.E., J.R. Jensen, G.T. Raber, J.A.

Tullis, B.A. Davis, G. Thompson and K.

Schuckman, in press “An Evaluation of LIDARderived

Elevation and Terrain Slope in Leaf-off

Conditions”, Photogrammetric Engineering and

Remote Sensing, in press.

Tullis, J.A., J.R. Jensen and M.E. Hodgson,

2005, “Sensitivity of Hurricane Storm Surge

Predictions to DEM Input: LIDAR versus USGS”,

ASPRS 2005 Annual Convention, 7-11 March,

2005, Baltimore, Maryland (American Society for

Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing,

Bethesda, Maryland).

Raber, G.T. and J.A. Tullis, 2005, “The

Combination of Multi-spectral and LIDAR

Statistical Image Data for Mapping Surface

Roughness Coefficients”, ASPRS 2005 Annual

Convention, 7-11 March, 2005, Baltimore,

Maryland (American Society for

Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing,

Bethesda, Maryland).

Cowen, D.J., J.R. Jensen, M.E. Hodgson, E.T.

Bramble, A. Goyal and J.A. Tullis, 2005

“Development and Calibration of a Cellular

Automata Urban Growth Model, Auto-Carto

2005 Research Symposium, 21-23 March, Las

Vegas, Nevada (Cartography and Geographic

Information Society).

Wilson, John

Luscier, J. B. Gorham, and J. Wilson. In press.

Using Digital Photographs and GIS Software to

Rapidly Quantify Vegetation around Active

Ground Nests. Journal of Field Ornithology.

(IV) Unrefereed Articles.

Cothren, Jackson

Cothren, J. 2005 Reliability in Constrained

Gauss-Markov Models: An Analytical and

Differential Approach with Applications in

Photogrammetry. Report #473, Geodetic and

GeoInformation Science, The Ohio State

University. February, 2005.

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 61


Cothren, J. 2005 Lizard Tech GeoExpress 5.0

Extends the Utility of MrSID Generation 3 and

JPEG 2000 Images. Earth Imaging Journal,

May/June issue.

Tullis, J. and Cothren, J., 2005. Review of QT

Modeler. GeoWorld, March issue.

Cothren, J. and Gorham, B. (2005) Automated

Feature Extraction, Software Advances Extract

Impervious Surfaces from Satellite Imagery,

Earth Imaging Journal, P32-34.

Cothren, J. (2005) Digital Mapping Cameras:

Choosing the right tool for the job. Earth Imaging

Journal, March/April issue.

Cothren, J. and Limp, F. (2004) It’s a 3D world

– emerging photogrammetry technologies make

it easier than ever to deliver geospatial

solutions. GeoWorld, January issue.

Cothren, J. and Limp, F. (2004) 3D applications

at the Center for Advanced Spatial

Technologies. POB, May issue.

Cothren, J., 2004. Review of Leica

Photogrammetry Suite. GeoWorld, May issue.

Culpepper, Brian

Culpepper, B. 2004 Planning Support Tools for

Northwest Arkansas Communities Urban and

Regional Information Systems Association

(URISA) Participatory GIS Conference.

Madison, WI.

Culeppper, B. 2004 Urban and Regional

Planning: Decision Support I 2004

Environmental Systems Research Institute,

(ESRI) Educational Users Conference. San

Diego, CA.

Culpepper, B. 2005 Review of GeoExpress 5.0,

LizardTech Inc. - GeoWorld Magazine (April

2005)

Culpepper, B. 2005 Review of GeoRover, SAIC

Inc. - GeoWorld Magazine (March 2005)

Wilson, J and B. Culpepper 2004 ArcGIS 9.0 A

User's Guide to Changes and Added

Functionality. Feature Length Review. GeoWorld

Magazine (August 2004) pp. 38-41.

Gorham, Bruce

Cothren, J. and B. Gorham. 2005. Automated

Feature Extraction: Software Advances Extract

Impervious Surfaces from Satellite Imagery.

Earth Imaging Journal Jan.-Feb.. Pp 32-34.

Gorham, B.E. and J.A. Tullis, 2005,

“ArkansasView Semiannual Report”,

AmericaView Progress Report, USGS: EROS

Data Center, SD, 7 pages.

Limp, W. Fredrick

Cothren, J. and Limp, F.W. (2004) It’s a 3D

world – emerging photogrammetry technologies

make it easier than ever to deliver geospatial

solutions. GeoWorld, January issue.

Cothren, J. and Limp, F.W. (2004) 3D

applications at the Center for Advanced Spatial

Technologies. POB, May issue.

Limp, W. F. 2004 Review of iSmart 4.3.

GeoWorld. August 2004. page 56.

Limp, W. F. 2004 Review of SilverEye 2.0.

GeoWorld. September 2004. page 56-58.

Limp, W. F.2004 Review of KeyHole Pro

GeoWorld. December 2004. page 68.

Limp, W. F. 2004. Review of Map2PDF.

GeoWorld. December 2004. page 68-70.

Roberts, Paxton

Roberts. P 2005 Review of Avenza Systems’

MaPublisher 6.1. GeoWorld. April.

Trewby, Fiona

Trewby, F. 2004 Review of Skyline Software

Systems’ TerraSuite, GeoWorld Oct .

Tullis, Jason

Bramble, E.T. and J.A. Tullis, 2004, “GIS and

Remote Sensing in Support of Smart Growth –

Phase III”, NASA Earth Science Enterprise,

Earth Science Applications Directorate,

University of South Carolina Affiliated Research

Center Final Report, NASA: Stennis Space

Center, MS, 34 pages.

Tullis, J.A., 2004, “Predicted Storm Surge

Inundation Boundaries: SLOSH Modeling with

LIDAR-derived DEMs”, NASA Earth Science

Enterprise, Earth Science Applications

Directorate, University of South Carolina

Affiliated Research Center Final Report, NASA:

Stennis Space Center, MS, 17 pages.

Raber, G.T. and J.A. Tullis, 2004, “LIDAR

Posting Density and Physiography: Effects on

62 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


DTM Accuracy and Flood Zoning”, NASA Earth

Science Enterprise, Earth Science Applications

Directorate, University of South Carolina

Affiliated Research Center Final Report, NASA:

Stennis Space Center, MS, 57 pages.

Jensen, J.R., M.E. Hodgson, J.A. Tullis and

G.T. Raber, “Remote Sensing of Impervious

Surfaces and Building Infrastructure”, Geo-

Spatial Technologies in Urban Environments

(R.R. Jensen, J. Gatrell and D.D. McLane,

editors), New York, NY: Springer-Verlag, Inc.,

176 pages.

Gorham, B.E. and J.A. Tullis, 2005,

“ArkansasView Semiannual Report”,

AmericaView Progress Report, USGS: EROS

Data Center, SD, 7 pages.

Ata, H.A., J.C. Cothren and J.A. Tullis, 2005,

“QT Modeler 3.0”, a review of a LIDAR

visualization and analysis package developed by

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics

Laboratory, GeoWorld Magazine (Mar 2005).

Tullis, J. and Cothren, J., 2005. Software

Review: QT Modeler. GeoWorld, March issue.

Williamson, Malcolm

Williamson, M. 2004 Review of SketchUp 3.1.

GeoWorld. August.

Williamson, M. 2004 review of GeoMedia and

GeoMedia Professional 5.2. GeoWorld,

December.

Wilson, John

Wilson, J. 2004 Review of FME Suite 2004

ICE, Safe Software, Inc. GeoWorld (February

2005)

Wilson, J and B. Culpepper 2004 ArcGIS 9.0 A

User's Guide to Changes and Added

Functionality. Feature Length Review. GeoWorld

Magazine (August 2004) pp. 38-41.

(V) Invited Lectures.

Cothren, Jackson

Cothren, J. LIDAR Quality Assessment in NW

Arkansas using OPUS derived vertical control

points. Arkansas GIS Users Conference, Sep,

2005.

Limp, F., Cothren, J., Smith, A., Ernenwein, E.,

Harmon, D. (2004). Application of Ground-

Based LIDAR and Other Innovative

Photogrammetric Methods to the Documentation

of and Interpretation of Historic Structures and

Archeological Sites. 2004 Partners in

Environmental Technology Technical

Symposium & Workshop “Meeting DoD’s

Environmental Challenges”. Nov 30 – Dec 2,

2004. Washington, D.C.

Cothren, J., (2004) Impervious surface

delineation using high-resolution satellite

imagery and segmentation with contextual

constraints, RGIS Conference, Penn State

University, October 29.

Smith, A. and Cothren, J., (2004) The Narrows

in 3D – A Virtual and Educational Experience,

Innovmetric International PolyWorks User

Meeting, Quebec City, Canada, June 17-18.

Cothren, J., Tullis, J. and Limp, W.F., (2004)

CAST and forest applications: from LIDAR to

SDSS, Arkansas Forestry Association, October

13.

Ernenwein, Eileen

Kvamme, K., E. Ernenwein, F. Limp, D.

Harmon, M. Hargarve and T. Sever 2004 Data

Fusion Of Archaeological Remote Sensing From

Ground-, Air-, and Space-Based Platforms. DoD

Conservation Conference. Savannah. August.

Limp, F., Cothren, J., Smith, A., Ernenwein, E.,

Harmon, D. (2004). Application of Ground-

Based LIDAR and Other Innovative

Photogrammetric Methods to the Documentation

of and Interpretation of Historic Structures and

Archeological Sites. 2004 Partners in

Environmental Technology Technical

Symposium & Workshop “Meeting DoD’s

Environmental Challenges”. Nov 30 – Dec 2,

2004. Washington, D.C.

Harmon, Deborah

Kvamme, K., E. Ernenwein, F. Limp, D.

Harmon, M. Hargarve and T. Sever 2004 Data

Fusion Of Archaeological Remote Sensing From

Ground-, Air-, and Space-Based Platforms. DoD

Conservation Conference. Savannah. August.

Limp, F., Cothren, J., Smith, A., Ernenwein, E.,

Harmon, D. (2004). Application of Ground-

Based LIDAR and Other Innovative

Photogrammetric Methods to the Documentation

of and Interpretation of Historic Structures and

Archeological Sites. 2004 Partners in

Environmental Technology Technical

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 63


Symposium & Workshop “Meeting DoD’s

Environmental Challenges”. Nov 30 – Dec 2,

2004. Washington, D.C.

Limp, W. Fredrick

Kvamme, K., E. Ernenwein, F. Limp, D.

Harmon, M. Hargarve and T. Sever 2004 Data

Fusion Of Archaeological Remote Sensing From

Ground-, Air-, and Space-Based Platforms. DoD

Conservation Conference. Savannah. August.

Limp, F., Cothren, J., Smith, A., Ernenwein, E.,

Harmon, D. (2004). Application of Ground-

Based LIDAR and Other Innovative

Photogrammetric Methods to the Documentation

of and Interpretation of Historic Structures and

Archeological Sites. 2004 Partners in

Environmental Technology Technical

Symposium & Workshop “Meeting DoD’s

Environmental Challenges”. Nov 30 – Dec 2,

2004. Washington, D.C.

Cothren, J., Tullis, J. and Limp, W.F., (2004)

CAST and forest applications: from LIDAR to

SDSS, Arkansas Forestry Association, October

13.

Tullis, Jason

Cothren, J., Tullis, J. and Limp, W.F., (2004)

CAST and forest applications: from LIDAR to

SDSS, Arkansas Forestry Association, October

13.

Gorham, B., J.A. Tullis and L. Farley, 2005,

“Mapping Arkansas’ Ever-changing Landscape;

Arkansas LULC Program: 1992-2004”, ASPRS

2005 Central Region Technical Session, 11

February, 2005, Fayetteville, Arkansas (Central

Region of the American Society for

Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, Rolla,

Missouri).

Tullis, J.A., B. Gorham and L. Farley, 2005,

“Arkansas’ 2004 Land-use / Land-cover

Mapping Using Decision Trees”, ASPRS 2005

Central Region Technical Session, 11 February,

2005, Fayetteville, Arkansas (Central Region of

the American Society for Photogrammetry and

Remote Sensing, Rolla, Missouri).

Smith, Angelina

Smith, A. and Cothren, J., (2004) The Narrows

in 3D – A Virtual and Educational Experience,

Innovmetric International PolyWorks User

Meeting, Quebec City, Canada, June 17-18.

(VI) Other Lectures, Papers,

and Oral Presentations.

Cothren, Jackson

Cothren, J. and Schaffrin, B., (2004). Reliability

Analysis in Linear Models. The Thirteenth

International Workshop on Matrices and

Statistics, Będlewo, Poland. August 18-21,

2004.

Cothren, J. and Ezzaoudi, S. 2004 Quality

Assessment of LIDAR observations for

Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning

Commission. Technical Session, Central Region

of the American Society of Photogrammetry and

Remote Sensing, University of Arkansas, AR

(Feb 2004)

Cothren, J. and Gorham, B. 2004 Advanced

Remote Sensing with Applications in Carbon

Stock Modeling Workshop. NASA SERVIR

Project. Panama City, Panama. (Jul 2004).

Cothren, J. 2005 Demonstration of the ADS40

Processing Chain and its Application to Medium

and Large-scale Mapping and DEM Production.

Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning

Commission, Imagery Committee. Jun 2005.

Culpepper, Brian

Culpepper, B. 2005 GIS Technologies for Rural

Decision-makers. Carroll County Leadership

spring meeting in Green Forest, Arkansas, April

28, 2005

Culpepper, B. Arkansas’ Wetland Resource

Information Management System. Regional

Wetlands Technical Conference in Corpus

Christi, Texas, May 18, 2005

Ernenwein, Eileen

Ernenwein, E., K L. Kvamme, W. F Limp, D L.

Harmon, M L. Hargrave, T L. Sever, 2004

“Archaeo-Geophysical, Panchromatic, and

Multispectral Data Synergy at Four DoD and

DoE Archaeological Sites.” DoD Conservation

Conference, Savanah, GA, August 2004.

Kvamme, K. L., E.G. Ernenwein, W. Fredrick

Limp, D.L. Harmon, 2005 SERDP Annual

Report, CS1263. Submitted to the Strategic

Environmental Research and Development

Program, Department of Defense, Washington,

D.C.

64 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


Ernenwein, E G. and K. Kvamme. 2004

Ground-penetrating Radar at the Landscape

Scale: New Problems and Possible Solutions.

Archaeological Sciences of the Americas

Symposium, University of Arizona, Tucson,

September 2004.

Ernenwein, E G. and K. Kvamme 2005.

Archeo-Geophysical, Panchromatic, and

Multisprectral Data Synergy at Army City,

Kansas. Conference for Underwater

Archaeology, Society for Historical Archaeology,

St. Louis, MO, January 2005.

Markussen, Christine J., E G. Ernenwein,

Stanley A. Ahler, and K. Kvamme 2004 Mapping

Microtopography at Double Ditch State Historic

Site, North Dakota. Plains Anthropological

Conference, Billings, MT, October 2004.

Harmon, Debbie

Ernenwein, E., K L. Kvamme, W. F Limp, D L.

Harmon, M L. Hargrave, T L. Sever, 2004

“Archaeo-Geophysical, Panchromatic, and

Multispectral Data Synergy at Four DoD and

DoE Archaeological Sites.” DoD Conservation

Conference, Savanah, GA, August 2004.

Kvamme, K. L., E.G. Ernenwein, W. Fredrick

Limp, D.L. Harmon, 2005 SERDP Annual

Report, CS1263. Submitted to the Strategic

Environmental Research and Development

Program, DepartSERDP In Progress Review

New Approaches to the Use and Integration of

Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing for Historic

Resource Identification and Evaluation.

Washington, DC.

Kvamme, K. L., E.G. Ernenwein, W. F Limp,

D.L. Harmon, 2004 SERDP Annual Report,

CS1263. Submitted to the Strategic

Environmental Research and Development

Program, Department of Defense, Washington,

D.C.

Komlos, Linda

The Association of American Geographers 2005

Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado, April 5-9,

2005. Diffusion of the West Nile Virus in

Arkansas with a GIS Application Paper Session.

Limp, W. Fredrick

Ernenwein, E G., K L. Kvamme, W. F Limp, D L.

Harmon, M L. Hargrave, T L. Sever, 2004

“Archaeo-Geophysical, Panchromatic, and

Multispectral Data Synergy at Four DoD and

DoE Archaeological Sites.” DoD Conservation

Conference, Savanah, GA, August 2004.

Kvamme, K. L., E.G. Ernenwein, W. F Limp,

D.L. Harmon, 2004 SERDP Annual Report,

CS1263. Submitted to the Strategic

Environmental Research and Development

Program, Department of Defense, Washington,

D.C.

Limp, W. F. 2004 Geospatial opportunities for

research. Southern Universities Research

Association Annual Meeting. Fayetteville AR.

Nov. 2004

Lucio, L.D., W. F. Limp, and F.M. Stephen.

(2004) Comparison of landscape attributes to

level of tree damage determined by a rapid

estimation procedure for red oak borer,

Enaphalodes rufulus (Haldeman) (Coleoptera:

Cerambycidae). ESA Poster. Salt Lake City,

November 14-17, 2004

Roberts, Paxton

Smith, B. and Roberts, P, (2004).

Methodological Issues in the Temporal and

Spatial Analysis of Terrorist's Planning.

American Society of Criminology Annual

Meeting, Nashville, Tennessee. November 17-

19, 2004.

Smith, B. and Roberts, P, (2004).

Empirical Advances in the Social Scientific

Study of Terrorism. Council for American

Science Writers. Fayetteville, Arkansas.

November 7, 2004.

Scarlat, Cristina

Scarlat, C. 2004 Northwest Arkansas

Imagery Project - A Benton and Washington

Counties collaborative effort for acquiring high

resolution aerial photography. Poster for GIS

Day Mullins Library. November.

Trewby, Fiona

Trewby, F. 2004 The CADIS Project. Poster for

GIS day Mullins Library, Nov .

Tullis, Jason

Tullis, J. 2004 Guest lecture for Geology 4413,

Dept. of Geosciences, University of Arkansas,

Fayetteville, AR (Nov 2004).

Tullis, J. 2004 Workshop on 3D visualization of

orthophotography and LIDAR-derived elevation

data to students, faculty, and government

officials at the Mullins Library GIS Day Open

House, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR

(Nov 2004).

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 65


Tullis, J. 2004CAST and Forestry

Applications: From LIDAR to SDSS” with

Jackson Cothren and W. Fredrick Limp to

foresters at the Arkansas Forestry Association

(AFA) 2004 meeting, University of Arkansas,

Fayetteville, AR (Oct 2004).

Tullis, J. 2004 “Expert and Machine Learning

Decision Trees” to Arkansas Soil and Water

Conservation Commission officials, University of

Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (Oct 2004).

Tullis, J. 2004 “Hurricane Storm Surge

Prediction as a Function of DEM Input: Exploring

a LIDAR-derived Alternate” to faculty and

students in the Geosciences Department,

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (Oct

2004).

Tullis, J. 2004 “On the Road to Generic Remote

Sensing-assisted Spatial Decision Support

Systems” to faculty and students in the

Environmental Dynamics PhD Program,

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (Nov

2004).

Tullis, J. 2005 “Exploring LIDAR-derived Inputs

for Hurricane Storm Surge Models” to faculty

and students in the Department of Geography,

University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg,

MS (Feb 2005).

Tullis, J. 2005 “Predicted Storm Surge

Inundation Boundaries: SLOSH Modeling with

LIDAR-derived DEMs – Phase II” to NASA

officials from Applied Sciences Directorate,

Stennis Space Center, MS (Feb 2005).

Tullis, J. 2005 “Potential Remote Sensingassisted

Terrain, Land Cover, and Decision

Support Models within a Grid Computing

Environment” to Dr. Pat Brezonik from NSF and

Central U.S. hydrology researchers at the Great

Plains Network Cyberinfrastructure Workshop,

University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (Feb 2005).

Department of Biological Sciences, University of

Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (Apr 2005).

Tullis, J. 2005 “Optimizing Arkansas’ 2004 Land

Use / Land Cover Map” to students and faculty

in the Environmental Dynamics PhD Program,

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (Apr

2005).

Tullis, J. 2005 “Automating & Optimizing

Intelligent Knowledge-based Extraction of Land

Cover Change” to students and faculty in the

Program in Environmental Science and Regional

Planning, Washington State University, Pullman,

WA (Apr 2005).

Tullis, J. 2005 “Space and Planetary Science:

An Earth Remote Sensing Perspective” to

visiting undergraduate students, graduate

students, and faculty in the Arkansas Center for

Space and Planetary Sciences as part of the

Center’s summer undergraduate research

program (May 2005).

Williamson, Malcolm

Williamson, M. 2004 Upgrade Your Projects

with GIS. EAST Facilitators Summer Seminar,

Lake DeGray, Arkansas. July.

James, T., D. Fields, M. Williamson. 2004

Ethics for EAST facilitators. EAST Phase I

Facilitator Training, Little Rock, Arkansas.

August.

Williamson, M. 2005 Statewide GIS Wetland

Prioritization Methodologies: Accounting for

Different Geomorphic Settings. 2005 Regional

Wetland Technical Conference. Corpus Christi,

Texas. May.

Tullis, J. 2005 “Per-segment Classification and

Machine Learning Decision Trees” to geospatial

community professionals at the eCognition 2005

International User Meeting, Baltimore, MD (Mar

2005).

Tullis, J. 2005 “Automating & Optimizing

Intelligent Knowledge-based Extraction of Land

Cover Change” to students and faculty in the

66 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


Appendix B:

Public

Service

Demonstrations, Conferences, Meetings,

General Presentations, Workshops, and

Assistance to the Public.

COTHREN, JACKSON

Established the Center for Advanced Spatial

Technologies as an Intergraph Registered

Research Laboratory (with Malcolm Williamson)

Editorial Board, Earth Imaging Journal

Key participate in Leica Geosystems Center of

Excellence Agreement with the Center for

Advanced Spatial Technologies (May 2005)

Organized and hosted the Central Region

American Society of Photogrammetry Technical

Session attended by 36 students and faculty

from OU, OSU, and SMSU (Jan 2005)

Attended (by invitation) National Institute of

Standards and Technology (NIST) LADAR

Performance Evaluation Workshop II,

Gaithersburg, MD, March 15-16, 2005.

(National) American Society of Photogrammetry

and Remote Sensing, National Board member

representing ASPRS Central Region (Arkansas,

Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma)

Northwest Arkansas Science Fair Judge, 2005.

Mentored two Geosciences Research and

Education for Undergraduates students,

Summer, 2005.

• Julia Danz worked with CAST personnel

to map land cover in Central America as

part of the NASA funded Carbon

Sequestration project.

• Adam Consentino worked with CAST

personnel to map land cover changes

using a variety of remote sensing data in

the Beaver Watershed in a project

funded by the Beaver Watershed

District.

Mentored one Space and Planetary Science

Center Research and Education for

Undergraduates, Summer, 2005. Lucija

Rakocevic, Digitizating, Cataloging, and

Accessing Historic Optical and Radar Imagery.

CULPEPPER, BRIAN

June 2004

I provided technical support, software, to Kay

Curry, recent graduate, regarding GIS use in

Landscape Architecture.

Set-up an onsite demo for E-Spatial Inc. here at

CAST for local government entities to review

their product. Shirley Sandlin, Amanda Escobar,

Lee Ann Kizzar, Shelby Johnson, Learon Dalby,

Vince Guillett were in attendance.

I traveled to Ferndale, Arkansas to present an

overview of GIS to 35 high school teachers from

Arkansas. Supporting the Nature Mapping

program hosted by the U of A Cooperative

Extension Service.

July 2004

I set up and attended a GeoStor team

presentation to 15 staff members of the

Arkansas Highway and Transportation

Department. This outreach effort was in support

of the AGIO effort of connecting the AHTD to

GeoStor directly

I attended the Public Participation GIS

conference in Madison, Wisconsin and

presented one paper on behalf of RGIS Mid-

South.

I worked with Russell Gibson of the City of Fort

Smith to correct a Geocoding issue he was

having with his city GIS system

I met with Dan Cooper, an Engineer from

Mountain View, Arkansas who was interested in

GIS consulting with local governments. He was

looking to expand his service offerings at his

consulting firm.

August 2004

I attended the ESRI Conference 2004 in San

Diego. Presented one paper.

Assisted Harold Stuart of the Bureau of

Legislative Research with city limit boundaries

contained by Arkansas house and senate

districts. He had a GIS question that I solved

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 57


for him and generated a report to help him

answer his questions.

I hosted two meetings with Ken Brazil of the

Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation

Commission.

I assisted three different students with their GIS

research here in Ozark Hall. Sorry but I didn’t

get their names.

September 2004

I co-hosted (with Jack) two legislative leaders

(Jim Argue and Shane Broadway) and gave

them a 20minute overview of what we do here at

CAST. We also attended a dinner reception

with them at Ella’s Restaurant.

I attended one meeting of the Northwest

Arkansas Imagery Task Force meeting at the

NWA Regional Planning Commission offices in

Springdale.

Peter Smith and I prepared a metadata web

map viewer in support of the $40k FGDC

metadata project.

October 2004

I attended an LIB meeting in Little Rock as proxy

for Fred.

Hosted three teleconference calls with the

Arkansas Game and Fish Commission GIS team

regarding the Satellite Duck Project.

I attended the RGIS Fall conference in State

College, PA and presented one paper.

I co-taught an on-site ArcGIS Short-Course in

Little Rock to the UAMS statisticians with John

Wilson

I set-up and co-hosted a meeting with several

staff of the center for two Arkansas Soil and

Water Conservation Commission program

managers, Ken Brazil and Tony Ramick.

I traveled to Conway for the Arkansas One-Call

Conference. Cristina Scarlat and I hosted a

booth and I presented two 45-minute workshops

to 65 participants that covered the Introduction

to Global Positioning System (GPS).

November 2004

Held four teleconference calls with the Arkansas

Game and Fish Commission GIS team

regarding the Satellite Duck Project.

Presented two powerpoint presentation and

spoke with 12 different visitors to the GIS day

festivities held at the UA Mullins Library.

I traveled to Rolla, MO for the National Map

Technical Meeting held at the USGS Mid-

Continent Mapping Center for 3 days. I provided

an overview to the 30+ participants of our

National Mapping Efforts and Imagery data

partnering project within Northwest Arkansas.

The Satellite Duck Project website went live, as

planned, on November 19, 2004 at 7:30pm.

December 2004

I completed the Horizontal Accuracy

Assessment of the 2004 OrthoImagery Project

for Washington County. I collected the field data

points and generated the summary statistics for

the computation of the NSSDA horizontal

accuracy assessment. This was necessary for

determining whether the photogrammetric

contractor completed their contractual

agreement with Northwest Arkansas Regional

Planning Commission in a satisfactory manner.

I met with representatives from Arkansas

Western Gas regarding their needs for tracking

growth and development within NWA more

accurately and timely.

January 2005

I provided technical support to Andy Feinstein of

EDS engineering in Lowell, AR. He needed help

with GIS and CAD data structures.

I attended a LIB Meeting for Fred in Little Rock,

Arkansas. I presented an Update of GeoStor

usage.

I assisted a staff transportation planner for the

Bentonville Public School district with the

acquisition of data from GeoStor.

I co-taught an ArcGIS Short-Course with John

Wilson in Ozark Hall.

I assisted Zane Lewis and Tom Webb of

McGoodwin, Williams, and Yates engineering

firm with an ArcGIS technical issue they couldn’t

resolve.

58 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


Met with Robert Guadagnini of Fayetteville

Public Schools regarding CommunityViz and his

useage of this tool within the school district.

February 2005

I meet with Jan Dixon, Sara Santos and Stephan

Pollard of the University of Arkansas Library to

determine which ESRI products would be most

useful for their student support efforts in the

Mullins Library.

I helped organize an Optec Scanner

demonstration at the Carlson Terrace Buildings

on the University of Arkansas campus. I invited

several interested parties out to view Angie

Smith, Snow Winters and Malcolm Williamson

as they scanned a section of a creek. This

project was of interest to the UA Facilities

Management (Jay Huneycutt) and the Audubon

Arkansas representatives for Northwest

Arkansas. The data was provided to Dawn

Farver of the UA Engineering department for

use in here masters research project.

John Wilson and I taught an Introduction to

ArcGIS class for county/local government

employees in Benton County. The total number

of students was fifteen.

March 2005

John Wilson and I taught another Introduction to

ArcGIS class for county/local government

employees in Benton County. The total number

of students was twelve.

I assisted six undergraduate students with their

GIS projects within various classes offered

within the GeoSciences department (rm

208/209) within Ozark Hall.

I spent approximately 2.5hrs assisting University

of Arkansas Graduate students with their

geospatial issues in the Ozark GIS classrooms.

Several of these issues were related to their

graduate coursework and involved their use of

GeoStor.

April 2005

I traveled to Little Rock for 4 days to assist the

AGIO’s office during their transition to managing

GeoStor.

I traveled to Green Forest, Arkansas and

presented an overview of how GIS and GPS can

assist rural decision makers. The Carroll County

Leadership organization invited me over to

discuss this topic during their spring meeting.

Approximately 17 local community leaders were

present, and they were all enrolled in the

LeadAR program.

May 2005

I attended the 2005 Regional Wetlands

Technical Conference in Corpus Christi, TX and

presented a paper on the Arkansas Wetland

Resource Management Information System

(AWRIMS) project we have with the Arkansas

Soil and Water Conservation Commission.

I met with John Lewis of the Beaver Water

District Board to discuss the upcoming CADIS

effort for the summer 2005. Fred Limp and

Malcolm Williamson were present too.

June 2005

I attended the 2006 Imagery Task Force Kick-off

planning meeting at the Northwest Arkansas

Regional Planning Commission.

GORHAM, BRUCE

2004-2005 Member of the Arkansas Precision

Agriculture Working Group (ARPAWG)

Yearlong.

2004-2005 Serve on the AmericaView

“Research” and “Remote Sensing Education”

committees. Yearlong.

2004 Brian Haggard (USDA-ARS): Provided

assistance with obtaining digital land-use maps.

July

2004 Greg Thoma (UA Chemical Engineering):

GPS training and checkout. July.

Indrajeet Chaubey (UA Biological & Agricultural

Engineering): provided assistance with the

purchase of 10 Landsat scenes. July.

2004 Daniel Hayes (Oregon State University):

Provided assistance with obtaining MODIS

satellite imagery.

2004 Bret Collier (UA, Arkansas Cooperative

Fish and Wildlife Research Unit): Provided

assistance with using digital land-use maps. July

2004 Susan Henderson Houston, TX, Marathon

Oil) Assistance with accessing data on GeoStor.

August.

2004 Greg Thoma (UA Chemical Engineering):

GPS checkout. August.

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 59


2004 Leesia Marshall-Rosenberger (UA,

Biology): GPS training and checkout. August.

2004 Dawn Browning (University of Arizona,

School of Renewable Natural Resources):

Provided assistance to with GPS technical

issues. August.

2004 John Fohn (Southwest Missouri State

University - West Plains): assisted with

questions on remote sensing education

strategies. September.

2004 Ethan Inlander (The Nature Conservancy,

Ozark Highlands Office): Provided assistance

with using digital land-use maps. September.

2004 Tony Hill (US Army Corps of Engineers):

Provided assistance with using digital land-use

maps. September.

2004 Presented “Mapping Inter and Intra-year

changes in Agricultural Land-use in the

Mississippi Alluvial Valley via Multi-temporal

Landsat TM data.” at the AV annual conference.

Sioux Falls, SD. September.

2004 Presented “Mapping Arkansas’ Ever-

Changing Landscape: 1992-2004.” At the

Geoscience Department’s Homecoming 2004

Open House. October.

2004 Margaret Guccione (UA Geosciences):

Provided assistance with obtaining digital landuse

maps for Midwestern sates. October.

2004 Phillip Massirer (FTN Associates, Little

Rock): Provided assistance with using digital

land-use maps. October.

2004 Falko Fye (UA, Geosciences): GPS

checkout and assistance. October.

2004 Ashish Ratn Mishra (UA, Biological &

Agricultural Engineering) Assistance with

information about graduate degree programs in

remote sensing. October.

2004 Presented “Finding of the Arkansas LULC

Project” at a press conference attended by Sue

Madison and Jan Judy. October.

2004 Presented “2004 Arkansas Land-use

Mapping Project” at University of Arkansas’ GIS

Day. Mullins Library. November.

2004 Ethan Inlander (The Nature Conservancy,

Ozark Highlands Office): provided remote

sensing consultation services. November.

2004 Chad Cooper (UA Biological & Agricultural

Engineering): provided help with remote sensing

technical issues. November.

2004 Vaughn Skinner (U.A. Experimental Farm):

provided assistance with image processing for

land-use mapping. November.

2004 Brandon Wood (Western Meadows

Construction, Jonesboro, AR): provided

consultation on the use of base station data for

GPS mapping. November.

2004 Chris Hobza (UA, Geosciences): GPS

training, checkout and assistance. October.

Kaushik S. Mysorekar (The Nature

Conservancy, Little Rock Office): provided

remote sensing consultation services.

December.

2005 Zola Moon (US, ENDY) Provided

unprocessed satellite imagery from CAST

archives. January.

2005 Presentation to Luis Hernandez (USDA,

NRCS) and Earl Smith (ASWCC). “Soil and

LULC Mapping.” January.

2005 Byron Winston (UA Biology): Assistance

with Impervious surface mapping from satellite

imagery. January.

2005 Presentation to ASPRS Board Meeting.

"Mapping Arkansas' Land-use: 1992-2004."

February.

2005 Eric Osterling (InTime, Inc. Cleveland, MS)

Provided a link to InTime services on the

ArkansasView web site. February.

2005 Clyde Vasey (Rogers, AR) Provided

assistance with obtaining NW Arkansas Aerial

photos on Geostor. February.

2005 John Coger (Coldwell Banker Faucette

Real Estate, Fayetteville) Provided assistance

with obtaining NW Arkansas Aerial photos on

Geostor. February.

2005 Chris Bare (UA, Arkansas Cooperative

Fish and Wildlife Research Unit) Assistance with

GPS data acquisition issues. February.

60 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


2005 Presented “Land-cover and Land-use

Change in Northwest Arkansas 1984-2004” at

the UA Biology Department’s “Ecomunch”

Seminar Series. February.

2005 Ethan Inlander (The Nature Conservancy,

Ozark Highlands Office): Provided remote

sensing consultation services. February.

2005 Ty Johnson (UA, Student) Assistance with

processing digital map data. March.

2005 Lane Patterson (Nature Conservancy,

Little Rock) Assistance with acquiring satellite

data for Upper Saline Watershed. March.

2005 J.B. Sharma (Gainesville College,

Gainesville, GA): Assistance with obtaining

archived satellite imagery for south-central

Arkansas. March.

2005 Dawn Farver (UA, Biological Sciences)

Provided assistance with using digital land-use

maps. April.

2005 Martin Blaney (Arkansas Game and Fish

Commission) Assistance with obtaining and

using US Census Bureau data. April.

2005 Michael A. Crump (Ozark - St. Francis

National Forests, Russellville) Provided

assistance with obtaining digital land-use maps

for Arkansas. April.

2005 Vijay Garg (UA, Biological & Agricultural

Engineering): Assistance with raster data

formatting issues. May

2005 Brianna Mossiman (University of Kansas,

KansasView): provided course outline and

powerpoint slides for a basic remote sensing

course. May.

2005 Aziza Parveen (Winrock International,

Turners Falls, MA): Provided assistance in the

use of eCognition for segmenting forest stands.

May.

2005 Dan Griffin (UA, Geosciences,

Dendrochronology Lab): Provided assistance

with obtaining Landsat satellite images through

ArkansasView. June.

2005 William Baker (ASU, Jonesboro): Provided

satellite imagery for Lower White River Basin.

June.

HARMON, DEBBIE

Demo for Arts folks Larry Swartwood, Mike

Peven

Department of Homeland Security Centers

Program Meeting, UA

More than 100 queries and data requests sent to

CAST through the WWW gateway.

ROBERTS, PAXTON

2004-2005 Provided assistance to students’

issues dealing with geospatial technology via

EAST Support Forums: 28 posts from July

through May.

2005 Provided assistance with conducting

Introductory to SoftImage Training in Chicago, IL

to 23 students (with Angie Smith). January

2005 Conducted Intro to Web Design training in

Chicago, IL to 12 students. January

2005 Provided assistance with Advanced

Vector training to 25 students in Fayetteville,

AR. January

2005 Provided assistance with Geospatial

Workshop to 25 students in Little Rock, AR (with

Malcolm Williamson). January

2005 Provided assistance with conducting

Introductory to SoftImage Training in

Fayetteville, AR to 21 students (with Angie

Smith). February

2005 Conducted Intro to Web Design training in

Little Rock, AR to 25 students. February

2005 Provided assistance with conducting

Introductory to SoftImage Training in Little Rock,

AR to 26 students (with Angie Smith). February

2005 Geospatial School visit to Farmington

High School- 37 students. February

2005 Assisted students in Gravette, Arkansas

with GIS project and provided technical training

to 6 students. February

2005 Conducted Intro to Web Design training in

Fayetteville, AR to 19 students. February

2005 Assisted students in Lincoln, Arkansas

with GIS project and provided technical training

to 10 students. March

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 61


2005 Conducted presentations at the EAST

Partnership Conference- Central Region:

“Cartographic Methods” and “Using ArcGIS

ArcPublisher” to 35 students and teachers.

2005 Geospatial School visit to Perryville High

School- 36 students. April

2005 Provided assistance with Advanced

Vector training to 25 students in Little Rock, AR

(with Fiona Trewby). April

2005 Provided assistance with Advanced

Raster training to 8 students in Little Rock, AR

(with Fiona Trewby). April

2005 Conducted Regional GIS Training to 16

students in Eureka, CA. April

2005 Contributed 2 Articles for EAST

Geospatial newsletter published bi-weekly April

and May.

2003-2004 Provided assistance to students’

issues dealing with geospatial technology via

direct email: > 10 posts from August through

May.

SCARLAT, CRISTINA

2004. Assisted Kathy Deck at the Center for

Business and Economic Research, University of

Arkansas, with data and maps compilation.

August.

2004. UAEDI General Meeting. Presenting the

Crossroads Coalition Atlas project. September.

2004. Assisted Leah Lucio, graduate student in

the Entomology Department on soils data

compilation and poster design. September.

2004. Assisted Dr. Mary Savin’s graduate

student in the Crop, Soils and Environmental

Sciences Department on compiling soil maps for

his research area on the Mud Creek.

September.

2004. Provided support, including maps,

geocoded data and graphics compilation to the

Facilities Planning Department at the University

of Arkansas and the Martin, Alexiou and Bryson

Transportation and Traffic Engineering

Company as part of the Technical Committee for

the University of Arkansas Transportation Plan

(a travel demand management plan for the

University of Arkansas campus). Sept-Dec.

2004. Attended the Arkansas One Call

Conference in Little Rock. Booth presentation of

posters and demonstrations of the GPS

equipment and usage. October.

2004. Helped ENDY student getting geology

map and data. October.

2004. Press Conference for Senator Sue

Madison and Representative Jan Judy about the

funds appropriation for developing the Digital

Soil and Land Use Land Cover datasets.

Presented a short history of the projects

development and the status of the Soils

Digitization Project. November.

2004. GIS Day. Poster presentation: “Northwest

Arkansas Imagery Project – A Benton and

Washington Counties collaborative effort for

acquiring high resolution aerial photography –“.

November.

2004. Assisted Dr. Molly Longstreth with maps

for the University of Arkansas online

Transportation Survey. November-December.

2004. Assisted David McFee, Geosciences

graduate student with soil data compilation.

December.

2004. Assisted and provided support for Vaughn

Skinner at the Agricultural Extension and

scanning historical maps of the University of

Arkansas farm. December.

2004. Updating and maintaining the Arkansas

Soils Information System (ARK-SIS) interactive

online mapping website. Work in progress.

2004. Provided continuous support and

assistance to other faculty and staff who

requested to be part of the UAEDI online

databases follow-up and trouble shooting with

these participants. Work in progress.

2004. Compiled the NRCS certified soil data for

approximately 30 counties to be loaded in

GeoStor.

2005. Soils Digitization project presentation for

Luis Hernandez, Natural Resources

Conservation Service (NRCS), Marcella

Callaghan (NRCS) and Earl Smith, Arkansas

Soils and Water Conservation Commission.

January.

62 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


2005. Assisted undergraduate student in Crop,

Soil, and Environmental Science Department

with soil information. January.

2005. Presentation of the CAST – NRCS

collaboration and projects for the Natural

Resources and Conservation Service

Management Team in Little Rock. February.

2005. Overview and presentation of the

Arkansas Soils Information System (ARK-SIS)

and GIS tools for the students in the

Environmental Science Class (Dr. Duane Wolf’s

class at the Crop, Soils and Environmental

Sciences Department). February and April.

2005. Assisted graduate student in Crop, Soil,

and Environmental Science Department with soil

information. March.

2005. Provided support for the EAST team and

provided demos at the EAST conference in Little

Rock. March.

2005. Presentation at the CAST - Autodesk

meeting. April.

2005. Participated at UAEDI’s discussion group

meeting. April.

2005. Provided assistance with maps and data

to Anne Prichard at the Special Collection,

Mullins Library. May.

TREWBY, FIONA

2004-2005 Provided assistance to students’

issues dealing with geospatial technology via

EAST Support Forums: 151 posts from July

through May.

2004-2005 Published 12 issues of an online

newsletter (EAST GIS News) for geospatial

technology support on a bi-monthly basis to 291

subscribers Contributed 36 articles and 5

tutorials. August 31to April 11

2004 Helped EAST Student at Clinton High

School transfer GPS data from GeoExplorer for

a fire hydrant mapping project July 8

2004 Worked with an EAST student from

Southside High School, Fort Smith to obtain a

license for PCI Geomatica v9.1 to work with

historical aerial photos. September

2004 Conducted Instroductory SoftImage

Training in Little Rock to 20 students (with Angie

Smith). Sep 27-28

2004 Helped an EAST student with differentially

correcting and exporting GPS data. Oct 5

2004 Helped an EAST student from Little Rock

Central with exporting GPS files from GPS

Pathfinder Office to ESRI shapefiles. Oct 7

2004 Conducted Introductory SoftImage

Training in Fayetteville to 17 students (with

Angie Smith). Oct 12-13

2004 Conducted Regional Geospatial Training

in Dumas, AR to 12 students (with Bonnie

Brown). Oct 19-20

2004 Geospatial School visit to Clinton High

School – 20 students. Oct 26

2004 Geospatial School visit to Cave High

School – 17 students. Oct 27

2004 Geospatial School visit to Henderson High

School – 20 students. Oct 28

2004 Geospatial School visit to Hector High

School – 21 students. Oct 29

2004 Conducted Regional Geospatial Training

in Berkeley to 14 students (with Angie Smith).

Nov 1-2

2004 Conducted Introductory SoftImage

Training in Sacramento to 10 students (with

Angie Smith). Nov 3-4

2004 Conducted Regional Geospatial Training

in Morrilton, AR to 15 students (with Bonnie

Brown). Nov 9-10

2004 Assisted an EAST student with Data

Dictionaries on their GPS unit from Conner

Junior High, McGehee. Nov 11

2004 Conducted Introductory Geospatial

Projects in Fayetteville to 7 students (with

Bonnie Brown). Nov 16-18

2004 Assisted an EAST student with project

planning for developing and maintaining a

database of utilities. Nov 29

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 63


2004 Conducted Introductory Geospatial

Projects in Chicago to 7 students (with Malcolm

Williamson). Nov 30-Dec 2

2004 Assisted an EAST student with adding

tabular data to ArcMap. Dec 3

2004 Conducted Regional Training (geospatial

& web design) in Eureka, CA to 30 students

(with Paxton Roberts). Dec 7-8

2004 Assisted an EAST student with using

StreetMap Data Dec 3

2004 Assisted EAST students with adding

shapefiles and exporting GPS data. Dec 12

2005 Conducted Regional Geospatial Training

in Sacramento to 16 students (with Bonnie

Brown). Jan 19-20

2005 Conducted Introductory SoftImage

Training in Little Rock to 14 students (with Angie

Smith). Jan 24-25

2005 Assisted U of Arkansas student with

editing DRGs so they wouldn’t overlap Jan 28

2005 Conducted Regional Geospatial Training

in Camden, AR to 19 students (with Malcolm

Williamson). Jan 31 - Feb 1

2005 Assisted EAST student with downloading

a DEM and using them in ArcScene. Feb 2

2005 Assisted EAST student from Southside

High School, Fort Smith with scanning in aerial

photographs. Feb 4

2005 Assisted student from Southwood,

Louisiana with creating a map of Lousiana

parishes, rivers and roads. Feb 5

2005 Worked with an EAST facilitator from C.K.

Price Intermediate School, California on the

School Mapping Project – creating new

shapefiles and defining projections. Feb 5-20

2005 Provided assistance to an EAST student

at Cave City High School with geocoding

addresses. Feb 8

2005 Conducted Advanced GIS: Image

Processing & Remote Sensing Training in

Fayetteville to 4 students. Feb 9-10

2005 Conducted Geospatial Projects Workshop

in Fayetteville to 8 students (with Angie Smith.

Feb 15-17

2005 Provided assistance to an EAST student

from Southside High School, Louisiana on

obtaining elevation data for Louisiana and using

it in ArcScene. Feb 16

2005 Assisted EAST student with setting data

source in ArcMap Project. Feb 17

2005 Conducted Geospatial Projects Workshop

in Fayetteville to 11 students (with Malcolm

Williamson. Feb 22-24

2005 Helped an EAST facilitator from DeQueen

High School with exporting data from GPS

Pathfinder Office Feb 23

2005 Geospatial School visit to Lake Village

High School – 80 students. Mar 1

2005 Geospatial School visit to McGehee High

School – 60 students. Mar 2

2005 Geospatial School visit to Smackover

High School – 30 students. Mar 3

2005 Geospatial School visit to Augusta High

School – 25 students. Mar 4

2005 Provided assistance to an EAST student

from Southside High School, Louisiana on

geocoding addresses. Mar 7

2005 Assisted EAST student with editing

shapefiles and creating a legend in ArcMap. Mar

7

2005 Attended EAST Partnership Conference –

Central Region. Gave presentations on “Making

3DGIS videos” to 48 students and “Getting

started with ArcGIS to 28 students (with Angie

Smith). Mar 14-16

2005 Assisted EAST student with installing

ArcGIS extensions. Mar 17

2005 Collaborated with John Goddard from the

City of Fayetteville to obtain imagery of

Fayetteville for the Fire Department (with John

Wilson) Mar 20

2005 Geospatial School visit to Monticello High

School – 60 students. Mar 30

64 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


2005 Geospatial School visit to Jessieville High

School – 100 students. Mar 31

2005 Assisted EAST student with registering

ArcGIS software. Apr 1

2005 Assisted EAST Student with geocoding.

Apr 1

2005 Attended EAST Partnership Conference –

Western Region. Gave presentations on

“Making 3DGIS videos” to 10 students, and

“SoftImage Animation” to 20 students (with

Angie Smith). Apr 4-6

2005 Provided geospatial data for EAST

schools. Apr 8

2005 Provided assistance to an EAST student

with creating flyovers in ArcScene and

ArcGlobe. Apr 8

2005 Assisted EAST student with geocoding.

Apr 12

2005 Conducted Advanced GIS Vector Analysis

and Visualization Training in Fayetteville to 7

students (with Paxton Roberts). Apr 12-13

2005 Conducted Advanced GIS Raster Analysis

& Visualization Training in Fayetteville to 4

students (with Paxton Roberts). Apr 14-15

2005 Assisted two EAST students with

organizing & formatting tabular data so that it

could be joined to spatial data. Also assisted

with obtaining the correct spatial data. Apr 18

2005 Assisted EAST student with defining

projection. Apr 20

2005 Assisted EAST student with differentially

correcting GPS data. Apr 20

2005 Assisted EAST student with making a 3D

GIS video for the EAST conference video. Apr

21

2005 Assisted EAST student with finding a base

station to differentially correct their GPS data.

Apr 21

2005 Geospatial School visit to Brinkley Junior

High School – 35 students. Apr 25

2005 Geospatial School visit to Brinkley High

School – 50 students. Apr 26

2005 Assisted EAST student with exporting

GPS data. Apr 27

2005 Geospatial School visit to Vilonia High

School – 40 students. May 4

2005 Geospatial School visit to Greenbrier High

School – 2 students. May 5

2005 Assisted EAST student with mapping

centerlines for their county. May 10

Trewby, F (2005) Help your students achieve

success with the ESRI Community Atlas. EAST

Facilitators Summer Seminar, Hot Springs,

Arkansas. June 2004

TULLIS, JASON

Discussed forestry applications of remote

sensing with Teddy Reynolds and Jackson

Cothren on Timber Talk, a 30 minute live radio

interview broadcast over 59 counties or parishes

in Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas,

from 100.5 FM KZHE, Magnolia, AR (Jan 2005).

Presented “Overview of Remote Sensing

Activities”, posters and graphics featuring

remote sensor data processing, and a 3D flythrough

over Northwest Arkansas to the chief

executives of Leica Geosystems, faculty and

students, local officials, and local media as part

of the inaugural Leica Geosystems Center of

Excellence press conference at University of

Arkansas (May 2005).

WILLIAMSON, MALCOLM

2004 Provided training and support in

visualization and design software to Prof. David

Fredrick and students for Latin 3003. See

http://classics.uark.edu/domus_romana/ for

results. September, October.

2004 Worked with Prof. Michael Riha in

developing curriculum to incorporate

visualization and design software in stage

technology and theater design courses.

September through December.

2005 Presented work to two candidates for new

faculty position, with emphasis on computer

animation, in Fine Arts. March.

2004-2005 Provided assistance to EAST

students’ issues dealing with geospatial

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 65


technology via EAST Support Forums: 256

posts and replies from August through May.

2004-2005 Provided assistance to EAST

facilitators and students through direct e-mail

contact: over 160 e-mails from August through

May.

2004-2005 Provided GIS and GPS training to

approximately 100 EAST students during 10

different workshops. October through March.

2004-2005 Managed the EAST Support Web

pages for support of the 12,000+ students

enrolled in the EAST program. Year-long.

2004-2005 I administered the EAST GIS

Newsletter list server, a support resource for the

209 schools participating in EAST. Year-long

2004 Northwest Arkansas Community Asset

and Development Information System: I

developed, managed, and coordinated projects

with the City of Fayetteville and high school

interns from the EAST program. July through

August.

2004 Participated in focus group for campus

planning at Northwest Arkansas Community

College. July.

2004 Supported a group of six high school

EAST students in Little Rock while they worked

on a summer project for the Arkansas

Department of Education. June through July.

2005 Led support team of 5 CAST staffers at

the Central Region EAST Partnership

Conference. Team provided multiple workshops,

demonstrations, and individual support to an

attending body of some 1500 students. Little

Rock, Arkansas. March.

2005 Led support team of 4 CAST staffers at

the Western Region EAST Partnership

Conference. Team provided multiple workshops,

demonstrations, and individual support to an

attending body of some 300 students.

Sacramento, California. April.

2005 Northwest Arkansas Community Asset

and Development Information System: I

developed, managed, and coordinated projects

with Beaver Water District, Washington County,

the City of Fayetteville, and high school interns

from the EAST program. May through June.

2005 Attended meeting of Arkansas Pre-

Disaster Mitigation Advisory Council and

Arkansas Governor’s Earthquake Advisory

Council, West Memphis, Arkansas. June.

2005 Coordinated a 2-day GIS/GPS workshop

for 15 high school students through the UA

Educational Talent Search Program. June.

2005 Provided hands-on GIS training to 50

EAST facilitators during their annual Summer

Seminar. Hot Springs, Arkansas. June

2004 Provided instruction to approximately 65

new EAST facilitators during four sessions of

EAST Phase I training. July, August, and

September.

2004 Participated in online video demonstration

session for EAST students. September.

2004 Participated in My World GIS workshop,

examining needs of GIS users in K-12

education, at Northwestern University,

Evanston, IL. October.

2004 Presented an online video demonstration

session for EAST students. November.

2005 Worked with staff of Audubon Arkansas to

gather topographic data of the College Branch

creek using 3-D laser scanning technology.

February.

66 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


Appendix C:

CAST

Staff

Christopher Goodmaster - Technical Assistant

II - Hourly - Non-Student - Graduate Assistant

Bruce Gorham - Research Assistant

Michael Griffith - CADIS

Debbie Harmon - Research Assistant

Dr. W. Fredrick Limp - Director and Professor

Husam A. Ata - Technical Assistant II - Hourly -

Non-Student

Adam Barnes - Graduate Assistant - Technical

Assistant II - Hourly -

Student

Samantha Bratton - Technical Assistant II -

Hourly - Non-Student

Bonnie Brown - Research Assistant

Haiyan (Heather) Chen - Research Assistant

Lyndon Colvin - Master Scientific Research

Tech

Shane Covington -Research Associate

Jackson Cothren – Assistant Professor

Brian Culpepper - Research Assistant

Jackson Cothren - Research Assistant

Joshua Dunn- CADIS

Eileen Ernenwein - Research Assistant

Benjamin Farley - Technical Assistant II -

Hourly - Non-Student

Lisa Farley - Technical Assistant II - Hourly-

Student

Heath Gehlhausen - CRATE

Benjamin Gilley - Technical Assistant II -

Hourly - Student

Anne Gisiger - Research Assistant

Robert Harris - Research Associate

William Johnston - Research Associate

Linda Komlos, Graduate Assistant - Technical

Assistant II - Hourly - Student

Sayad Kooshesh - Technical Assistant II -

Hourly-Non Student

Brian Larsen - Technical Assistant I - Hourly -

Non-Student

Edward L. Lee - Technical Assistant II - Hourly -

Non-Student

Aaron Linkous - CRATE

Christopher Lomax - Technical Assistant II -

Hourly - Non-Student

Ryan Love - Technical Assistant II - Hourly -

Non-Student

Douglas Meredith - Research Assistant

David McFee - Graduate Assistant/ Technical

Assistant II - Hourly - Student

Jessica Nichols - Research Assistant

David Reed - Technical Assistant I - Hourly-

Non-Student

Mary Gail Reed - Accountant

Paxton Roberts - Research Assistant

Mohammed Salem - Technical Assistant I -

Hourly - Student

Timothy Sexton - Technical Assistant I - Hourly

- Non student

Cristina Scarlat - Research Specialist

Angelia M. Smith - Research Assistant

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 67


Peter Smith - Technical Assistant II - Hourly -

Student

James Sullins - Master Scientific Research

Tech

Justin Swicegood - CADIS

Shea Tackett - CADIS

Corey Teffetalor - CRATE

Fiona Trewby - Research Assistant

Jason Tullis – Assistant Professor

Karen Wagner - Publicity & Information

Specialist

Kent Walker - CRATE

Tracy Wenzinger - CADIS

Malcolm Williamson - Research Assistant

John Wilson - Research Assistant

Snow Winters - Research Assistant

68 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES


Appendix D:

Grants

List

The following list was provided by UAF

Research and Sponsored Programs and

includes CAST FY 05 awards through the UAF

College of Arts and Sciences.

CAST also received awards through the College

of Agriculture; these are not listed on the

following.

All CAST awards are listed in the Research

section of this report.

Report not available from RSSP at

the time of completion of this

report (July 18, 2005).

CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES 69


70 CENTER FOR ADVANCED SPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES

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