B - Quad-Lock Building Systems

quadlock

B - Quad-Lock Building Systems

PRODUCT MANUAL

July 2009

Version 2.20


Welcome to Quad-Lock!

The most versatile and highest quality Insulating Concrete Forming System.

II

PRODUCT MANUAL

QUAD-LOCK Building Systems Ltd. was established in 1994 in Surrey, British Columbia, Canada. QUAD-LOCK ®

develops, manufactures and distributes its patented Insulating Concrete Form (ICF) system.

The QUAD-LOCK ® System was conceived and engineered to reduce the cost and increase the versatility of cast in place

concrete walls and help our environment by saving energy.

QUAD-LOCK ® is a panel type ICF system consisting of Panels, Ties, Metal Tracks and Metal Brackets. QUAD-LOCK ®

panels are made with high density, fire retardant expanded polystyrene beads (EPS) and contain no formaldehyde,

HFCs, CFCs or other harmful substances. Four panel configurations are currently available, 2¼" [58mm] thick regular

and 4¼" [108mm] thick “Plus” Panels, each available with or without fastening strips molded into each panel. These

panels can be combined allowing 10 different wall configurations and the resulting R-Values range from R-22 to R-38 [U-

0.28 to U-0.15]. Plastic ties ingeniously connect the panels, secure the reinforcing steel in place, while also providing a

means to anchor drywall, siding and temporary bracing. Ties are available in many sizes to form different wall

thicknesses. The Metal Track is used to start and finish the wall and the Metal Brackets eliminate additional outside

bracing at corners and angles. Metal Brackets come in a 90° version and in an adjustable version accommodating almost

any angle.

The revolutionary QUAD-DECK ® floor, roof, and tilt-up forming system is a “pan floor” form designed for both commercial

and residential construction. QUAD-DECK ® panels shape a series of T-beams every 24" [610mm] which integrate with a

concrete slab. The resulting monolithic concrete structure now provides two-way span capacity and a shear plane, for

superior structural performance.

The few components of the QUAD-LOCK ® System ensure simplicity in design, construction and supply. Applications

include load bearing walls, shear walls, fire resistant walls, basement walls, retaining walls, and foundation walls

incorporated in residential, industrial and institutional construction. QUAD-LOCK ® can easily be shaped to form the

design elements of modern buildings – openings, corners, angles, curves and arches.

QUAD-LOCK ® is dedicated to hiring only individuals with extensive, successful construction and sales experience to best

serve your needs.

For assistance with this manual or the QUAD-LOCK ® product, please contact the regional sales representative serving

your area or contact our head office:

QUAD-LOCK Building Systems Ltd. QUAD-LOCK Building Systems GmbH

7398 – 132 nd Street Blumenstr. 1

Surrey, BC V3W 4M7 80331 München

Canada Germany

Tel: +1 604.590.3111 Tel: +49 (0)89 260 3066

Fax: +1 604.590.8412 Fax: +49 (0)89 360 8471

Toll free: 888.711.5625 Toll Free: 0800 7115625

Website: www.quadlock.com Website: www.quadlock.de

Patents:

Canada 2,188,945

China 95,193,961.0

Japan 3570723

Mexico 200,243

USA 5,704,180

QUAD-LOCK Building Systems is constantly reviewing manufacturing and construction methods to ensure a well

engineered, quality product at the lowest cost to customers. QUAD-LOCK Building Systems reserves the right to update

this manual as appropriate and asks that you check online for the most recent version and request a printed copy, if

needed.


PRODUCT MANUAL

DISCLAIMER

QUAD-LOCK Building Systems Ltd. believes the information contained herein to be accurate at the time of preparation.

The information has been compiled using sources believed to be reliable. Neither QUAD-LOCK Building Systems Ltd.

nor its employees or representatives make any representation or warranty, express or implied, whether arising by statute,

operation of law, custom of trade or otherwise, with respect to the accuracy or completeness of information contained in

this document or its fitness for any particular purpose, nor do they assume any liability for damages or injury resulting

from the application of such information.

QUAD-LOCK Building Systems Ltd. assumes no responsibility regarding the use of its products or any other third party

products referred to in this document. It is the responsibility of the user to comply with all applicable regulations

and building code requirements concerning the use of these products. It is further the responsibility of the user

to research and understand safe methods of use and handling of these products.

Warning about corrosion of metal components:

• QUAD-LOCK ® metal parts are galvanized to minimize corrosion, however, please be aware that:

• Metal connectors, anchors, fasteners, and other metal components will corrode and lose load carrying capacity, if

installed in corrosive environments.

• Many new types of treated wood are highly corrosive to metal components, especially lumber treated with ACQ

(alkaline copper quaternary).

• QUAD-LOCK ® recommends that metal components should NOT be used in contact with treated lumber in exterior

applications or anywhere water is likely to be present (unless you ensure compatibility of your treated lumber with

the metal components).

• For exterior applications, the project engineer should specify the type, size and spacing of corrosion resistant bolts,

concrete anchors, and other metal fasteners.

TRADEMARKS

QUAD-LOCK ® , QUAD-DECK ® and any other marks, drawings or symbols identifying products and/or services of

QUAD-LOCK Building Systems Ltd. are trademarks of QUAD-LOCK Building Systems Ltd. All other trademarks are the

property of their respective owners.

LIMITED PRODUCT WARRANTY

QUAD-LOCK Building Systems Ltd. (“Quad-Lock”) warrants that its products are free from manufacturing defects

affecting the products’ intended use as concrete forms (“Defects”). If the customer believes that the products have

Defects, the customer will return samples of the defective products to Quad-Lock and upon Quad-Lock being satisfied

that the products have Defects, Quad-Lock will replace the defective products or refund the purchase price, at Quad-

Lock’s option. No other warranty is applicable or will be implied. The customer hereby irrevocably waives any and all

rights with respect to any implied terms or warranties under the provisions of the Sale of Goods Act or under any law or

legislation of similar effect whether now or hereafter in effect. The customer acknowledges and agrees that except as

provided herein, there are no conditions, warranties or guarantees whatsoever, express or implied, that the products are

of a particular quality or condition, durability, or fit for any particular purpose.

III


Table of Contents

IV

PRODUCT MANUAL

1 Introduction __________________________________________________________ 1

Product Description ______________________________________________________________ 1

Designing with Quad-Lock ________________________________________________________ 13

Advantages, Features and Benefits ________________________________________________ 15

2 Design & Construction Details _________________________________________ 17

Overview _____________________________________________________________________ 17

Pre-Planning __________________________________________________________________ 17

Tools ________________________________________________________________________ 18

Footings ______________________________________________________________________ 21

Metal Track ___________________________________________________________________ 24

Standard Walls ________________________________________________________________ 27

Corners ______________________________________________________________________ 27

Special Wall Elements ___________________________________________________________ 40

Window and Door Openings ______________________________________________________ 62

Floor Connections ______________________________________________________________ 71

Framing Connections ___________________________________________________________ 81

Solid Wall Cap _________________________________________________________________ 87

Connections to Other Walls _______________________________________________________ 87

Electrical _____________________________________________________________________ 89

Plumbing _____________________________________________________________________ 92

Gable Forming _________________________________________________________________ 93

Cabinetry and other Heavy Items __________________________________________________ 94

3 Bracing ____________________________________________________________ 96

Installation ____________________________________________________________________ 96

4 Interior and Exterior Finishes _________________________________________ 100

Finish Descriptions ____________________________________________________________ 100

Drywall / Gypsum _____________________________________________________________ 101

Adhesives and Sealants ________________________________________________________ 102

Acrylic Finishes and Exterior Insulated Finish Systems (EIFS) ___________________________ 103

Siding ______________________________________________________________________ 105

Brick and Stone _______________________________________________________________ 106

5 Water/Damp-Proofing ________________________________________________ 115

6 Concrete and Rebar _________________________________________________ 118

Concrete ____________________________________________________________________ 118

Reinforcing Steel (Rebar) _______________________________________________________ 126

Complimentary Products: _______________________________________________________ 127

7 Quad-Deck Floor and Roof System ____________________________________ 129

Quad-Deck __________________________________________________________________ 129

Quad-Deck Tilt-Up Panels: ______________________________________________________ 131

Green Roof Installation: _________________________________________________________ 132

8 Technical Specifications _____________________________________________ 137

Technical Specifications for Quad-Lock EPS Panels __________________________________ 137

Technical Specifications for Quad-Lock Insulated Concrete Walls ________________________ 138

Findings of Tests Performed on Quad-Lock _________________________________________ 141

Material Safety Data Sheet ______________________________________________________ 145

9 Primer: Air Circulation _______________________________________________ 146


PRODUCT MANUAL

Appendix A - Engineering Design Tables (Canada) & CCMC Evaluation ________ 147

Appendix B - Engineering Design Tables (USA) & ICC Evaluation _____________ 161

Appendix C - Building Code References ___________________________________ 176

USA: _______________________________________________________________________ 176

Canada: _____________________________________________________________________ 177

UK: ________________________________________________________________________ 178

CE (Europe): _________________________________________________________________ 178

Germany: ____________________________________________________________________ 178

South Africa: _________________________________________________________________ 178

Romania: ____________________________________________________________________ 178

Bahamas: ___________________________________________________________________ 178

V


Table of Figures

VI

PRODUCT MANUAL

Please note that the figures contained within this Product Manual can be downloaded from the Quad-Lock web-site at

www.quadlock.com.

Figure 1: Quad-Lock Components ___________________________________________________________________ 2

Figure 2: Regular Quad-Lock Panel __________________________________________________________________ 3

Figure 3: Quad-Lock Plus Panel _____________________________________________________________________ 4

Figure 4: Quad-Lock Plus - Positioning of Ties __________________________________________________________ 4

Figure 5: Quad-Lock FS Panel - Position of Fastening Strips ______________________________________________ 5

Figure 6: Quad-Lock Plus-FS Panel - Position of Fastening Strips __________________________________________ 5

Figure 7: Quad-Lock Standard Ties __________________________________________________________________ 6

Figure 8: Quad-Lock Unit - R-30 [U-0.20] ______________________________________________________________ 6

Figure 9: Quad-Lock Standard Ties - Dimensions _______________________________________________________ 7

Figure 10: Tie Layout – Front View Dimensions _________________________________________________________ 7

Figure 11: Quad-Lock Extender Tie __________________________________________________________________ 8

Figure 12: Wall Transition with Brick Ledge Tie _________________________________________________________ 8

Figure 13: Slab Tie & Slab Bracket ___________________________________________________________________ 9

Figure 14: Slab Tie & Slab Bracket Assembly __________________________________________________________ 9

Figure 15: Corner Brackets ________________________________________________________________________ 10

Figure 16: Assembly of Angle ______________________________________________________________________ 10

Figure 17: Window Bracket ________________________________________________________________________ 11

Figure 18: End Cap Assembly _____________________________________________________________________ 11

Figure 19: Metal Track at Top and Bottom ____________________________________________________________ 12

Figure 20: Wire Top Ties used with Metal Track ________________________________________________________ 12

Figure 21: Flex-C Trac Flex-C Angle Trac (single-side track required for Plus Panels) _______________________ 13

Figure 22: Tools for the project _____________________________________________________________________ 18

Figure 23: Split Tie ______________________________________________________________________________ 19

Figure 24: Cut Flanges ___________________________________________________________________________ 19

Figure 25: Wall Widths and Insulating Values __________________________________________________________ 20

Figure 26: Stepped Footing ________________________________________________________________________ 21

Figure 27: Panel Cuts over Stepped Footing __________________________________________________________ 22

Figure 28: Panels Tapered to Compensate for out-of-level Footing _________________________________________ 23

Figure 29: Footing with Metal Track and Rebar Dowels __________________________________________________ 24

Figure 30: Installation of Hit-Anchors ________________________________________________________________ 25

Figure 31: Plywood Templates fit to Wall Dimension ____________________________________________________ 25

Figure 32: Typical Wall to Footing Connection Detail ____________________________________________________ 26

Figure 33: Thickened Edge Slab on Grade ____________________________________________________________ 27

Figure 34: Full Panels at First Course Outside Corner ___________________________________________________ 28

Figure 35: Inside Panels Cut Back by Cavity Size + 2" [25mm] ____________________________________________ 28

Figure 36: Panel Pairs Cut and Fit at Corner __________________________________________________________ 29

Figure 37: Corner Brackets & Ties Installed at Corner ___________________________________________________ 29

Figure 38: Second Row Full Panels Centered Over Joints ________________________________________________ 29

Figure 39: Corner Assembly – Second Course _________________________________________________________ 30

Figure 40: Corner Assembly with Corner Brackets, 6" [152mm] Wall ________________________________________ 31

Figure 41: Corner Assembly with Corner Brackets, 8" [203mm] Wall ________________________________________ 31

Figure 42: Corner Assembly with Corner Brackets, 10" [250mm] Wall _______________________________________ 32

Figure 43: R-22 Corner ___________________________________________________________________________ 34

Figure 44: R-30 Corner ___________________________________________________________________________ 34

Figure 45: R-38 Corner ___________________________________________________________________________ 35

Figure 46: Corner Rebar Placement (plan view) ________________________________________________________ 36

Figure 47: Corner Assembly Overview _______________________________________________________________ 37

Figure 48: Starter Panels Ripped to Adjust Wall Elevation ________________________________________________ 38

Figure 49: Finishing the Top of Walls with Metal Tracks and Wire Top Ties __________________________________ 39

Figure 50: Assembly of Angles _____________________________________________________________________ 40

Figure 51: Angled Wall Cutting, Bracket & Tie Placement (Imperial) ________________________________________ 42

Figure 52: Angled Wall Cutting, Bracket & Tie Placement (Metric) _________________________________________ 43

Figure 53: T-Wall Panel & Tie Placement _____________________________________________________________ 44

Figure 54: T-Wall Assembly w/ two Outside Corner Brackets (plan view) ____________________________________ 45

Figure 55: T-Wall Assembly with 2 Outside Corner Brackets (3D) __________________________________________ 45

Figure 56: Pilaster Built with Quad-Lock Components ___________________________________________________ 47


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 57: Radius Wall – Panels Cuts _______________________________________________________________ 48

Figure 58: Radius Wall (tight radius) _________________________________________________________________ 49

Figure 59: Radius Wall (wide radius) ________________________________________________________________ 49

Figure 60: Extender Tie Assembly (18" [457mm] cavity shown) ____________________________________________ 55

Figure 61: Wide Walls ____________________________________________________________________________ 56

Figure 62: Typical Monolithic Footing / Wall Set Up _____________________________________________________ 58

Figure 63: Wall Width Transition & Ledger Connection __________________________________________________ 59

Figure 64: Wall Width Transition using Quad-Lock Plus Panels ____________________________________________ 60

Figure 65: Double Wall / Common Wall ______________________________________________________________ 61

Figure 66: Vent Wall Penetration ___________________________________________________________________ 62

Figure 67: Wood Buck-Out and Bracing ______________________________________________________________ 63

Figure 68: Window Attachment Options ______________________________________________________________ 64

Figure 69: Insulated Opening ______________________________________________________________________ 65

Figure 70: Attachment Options of Windows to Concrete _________________________________________________ 65

Figure 71: Attachment of Roll-Up Storm Shutter ________________________________________________________ 66

Figure 72: Window Rough Opening (Internal Buck) _____________________________________________________ 67

Figure 73: Door Rough Opening ____________________________________________________________________ 68

Figure 74: Arched Openings _______________________________________________________________________ 69

Figure 75: Typical Lintel with Stirrups Detail ___________________________________________________________ 70

Figure 76: Installation of Floor Ledger with Bracket System _______________________________________________ 72

Figure 77: Ledger Installation using ICF Ledger Connectors ______________________________________________ 73

Figure 78: Typical Ledger Board Connection w/ Anchor Bolts _____________________________________________ 75

Figure 79: Installation of Floor Ledger with Conventional J-Bolts ___________________________________________ 76

Figure 80: Ledger Placement and Support ____________________________________________________________ 77

Figure 81: Concrete Floor Construction Details ________________________________________________________ 78

Figure 82: Typical Composite Steel Deck Slab Floor Connection with Steel Joists _____________________________ 79

Figure 83: Typical Hambro Composite Floor System Connection __________________________________________ 80

Figure 84: Typical Hollow Core Precast Floor Slab Connection ____________________________________________ 81

Figure 85: Sill Plate Options _______________________________________________________________________ 82

Figure 86: Typical Wall to Floor & Framing Connection __________________________________________________ 83

Figure 87: Typical Roof Rafter or Truss - Low Uplift Connection ___________________________________________ 84

Figure 88: Typical Roof Rafter or Truss - Hurricane/Seismic Strap Connection ________________________________ 85

Figure 89: Cantilevered Joist Connection _____________________________________________________________ 86

Figure 90: Forming for Solid Wall Cap _______________________________________________________________ 87

Figure 91: Typical Interior Partition Wall Connection (plan view) ___________________________________________ 87

Figure 92: Typical Interior Partition Wall Connection, Direct to Concrete (plan view) ___________________________ 88

Figure 93: Typical Interior Partition Wall Connection, Screwed to Tie Flange (plan view) ________________________ 88

Figure 94: Typical Connection to Existing Concrete Wall _________________________________________________ 89

Figure 95: Plumbing / Electrical Wall Penetration _______________________________________________________ 90

Figure 96: Installation of Electrical Boxes and Wiring ____________________________________________________ 92

Figure 97: Plumbing Installation (After-Pour Method) ____________________________________________________ 93

Figure 98: Gable Forming _________________________________________________________________________ 94

Figure 99: Attaching Heavy Items ___________________________________________________________________ 94

Figure 100: Metal Bracing System (Metal Track Ladder Brace at top of wall) _________________________________ 97

Figure 101: Wood Wall Bracing ____________________________________________________________________ 98

Figure 102: Exterior Wood Bulkheads _______________________________________________________________ 99

Figure 103: Drywall Attachment ___________________________________________________________________ 101

Figure 104: Stucco _____________________________________________________________________________ 103

Figure 105: Siding Attachment with external furring strips _______________________________________________ 105

Figure 106: Stone and Brick Veneer ________________________________________________________________ 106

Figure 107: Fiber Cement Siding Applied to Zero-Clearance Walls ________________________________________ 106

Figure 108: Brick Ledge 100% Bearing with Stepped out Plus Panels _____________________________________ 107

Figure 109: Brick Ledge with Steel Angle Support _____________________________________________________ 108

Figure 110: Brick Ledge 100% Bearing with Temporary Plywood Form ____________________________________ 108

Figure 111: Brick Ledge 100% Bearing with Quad-Lock Brick Ledge Tie ___________________________________ 109

Figure 112: Brick Ledge on Top of Wall (Framed Wall above) ____________________________________________ 110

Figure 113: Assembly of Brick Ledge with FAST ____________________________________________________ 111

Figure 114: Fastening Pattern for Drainage Board _____________________________________________________ 117

Figure 115: Internal Concrete Vibrator ______________________________________________________________ 120

Figure 116: Compressive Strength of Continuously Moist Cured Concrete __________________________________ 123

Figure 117: Typical Lap Patterns at Corners & T-Walls _________________________________________________ 126

Figure 118: Rebar Placement _____________________________________________________________________ 127

Figure 119: Typical Quad-Deck & Concrete Cross Section ______________________________________________ 129

VII


VIII

PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 120: Cross Section Showing Continuous Steel Flange Placement ___________________________________ 131

Figure 121: Elements of a Green Roof ______________________________________________________________ 133

Figure 122: Typical Quad-Deck Floor-to-Wall Connection _______________________________________________ 134

Figure 123: Typical Quad-Deck Floor Internal Wall Connection ___________________________________________ 135

Figure 124: Typical Quad-Deck Flat Roof Connection __________________________________________________ 136

Figure 125: Typical “Passive House” Ventilation Systems _______________________________________________ 146


PRODUCT MANUAL

11 IINNTTRROODDUUCCTTIIOONN

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Quad-Lock - The Most Versatile Insulating Concrete Forms

Build nearly unlimited wall widths, 3 different insulation values, corners, angles, T-walls, columns, pilasters, brick ledges,

and radius walls, using just a few standard components.

Panels made of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) and ties made of High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) or Polypropylene (PP)

create a concrete form that will accommodate vertical and horizontal reinforcing steel as required. Temporary bracing is

usually required for vertical and horizontal alignment only. Filling the cavity with concrete will create solid concrete walls

with 2-4 hour Fire Resistance Ratings (FRR). The EPS Forming System will stay in place and turn into the best insulation

available today, saving you energy costs for the lifetime of the building.

Five different wall widths are available (nominal concrete widths of 12" [305mm], 10" [250mm], 8" [200mm], 6" [150mm],

and 4" [100mm]) and can be combined with the Quad-Lock XT Extender Tie to add 12" [305mm] to any standard cavity

size.

Three Insulation Values are possible, giving you the choice of true R-Values of 22, 30 and 38 (h*ft²*°F/BTU) / U-values of

0.28, 0.20 and 0.15 (W/(m²*K)).

The Quad-Lock System encompasses these components:

• Panels made of EPS, available in 2 thicknesses (2¼" and 4¼" [51mm and 108mm])

• Ties made of High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) or Polypropylene (PP)

o 5 standard lengths plus Extender Ties and Brick Ledge Ties

• Corner, Angle and Window Brackets to eliminate bracing at corners

• Metal J-Track, Flex-Track and Wire Top Ties for starting and finishing the wall assembly

These components will allow you to assemble all concrete forming for your walls, including corners, arches, any angles,

columns and pilasters, as well as T–Wall connections. Transport and storage costs of Quad-Lock are substantially lower

compared to pre-assembled block systems. Ordering and keeping track of inventory is easier (you would need at least 45

different parts to do the same with pre-assembled blocks).

The Excel-based Quad-Lock Estimating program makes it quick and easy to calculate all materials needed for your job

and the cost.

July 2009 Chapter 1 – Introduction Page 1


Figure 1: Quad-Lock Components

PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 2 Chapter 1 – Introduction July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Quad-Lock Panels

Regular Quad-Lock Panels are 48" [1219mm] long, 12" [305mm] high, and 2¼" [57mm] thick with interlocks along the

top and bottom of the panels.

Quad-Lock Plus Panels have been developed for walls requiring higher insulation values. Dimensions for Plus Panels

are the same as Regular Panels except for the thickness of 4¼" [108mm].

Quad-Lock Fastening Strip (FS) Panels have the same dimensions as the Regular Panels, but feature 1½" [38mm]

wide plastic fastening strips, molded into the panels every 12" [305mm]. They provide a continuous anchoring point for

exterior cladding/lapped siding (e.g. vinyl or fiber-cement siding) where needed.

Quad-Lock Plus-FS Panels have the same dimensions as the Plus Panels, but feature 1½" [38mm] wide plastic

fastening strips, molded into the panels every 12" [305mm].

Using combinations of Quad-Lock Panels, three different insulation values are possible, giving you the choice of true R-

Values of 22, 30, and 38 (h*ft²*°F/BTU) [U-values of 0.28, 0.20 and 0.15 (W/(m²*K)].

The panels contain molded slots every 2" [51mm] to interlock panels with the Quad-Lock Ties, ensuring every panel will

align with precision. Panels are lightly scored every 2" [51mm] to make measuring and cutting easy. Every 12" [305mm]

panels have a heavier groove to mark the placement of the ties.

All Quad-Lock Panels are molded of fire retardant Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) to a density of 1.9lb/cuft [30g/litre] for the

regular-thickness panels and 1.5lb/cuft [23g/litre] for Quad-Lock Plus Panels. The rigid cellular EPS insulation complies

with ASTM C 578-95 as flows: Regular Panels are Type III in Canada and Type IX in US, and Plus Panels are Type II in

Canada and US. EPS is a foamed insulation that has a zero ozone depletion rating. EPS does not, and never did,

contain CFCs or HCFCs. The Quad-Lock Panel is inert and chemically stable and will not emit any gases into homes or

commercial buildings. In fact, EPS is considered to be world class insulation with qualities that make it impervious to time

and moisture (also see Chapter 8: Technical Specifications for Quad-Lock EPS Panels on Page 137).

Regular Quad-Lock Panel

Figure 2: Regular Quad-Lock Panel

July 2009 Chapter 1 – Introduction Page 3


Quad-Lock Plus Panel

Figure 3: Quad-Lock Plus Panel

Figure 4: Quad-Lock Plus - Positioning of Ties

PRODUCT MANUAL

Building Tip: Use Quad-Lock Plus Panels for:

1. Additional Insulation (usually on exterior of building),

2. Wall Width Transitions (e.g. from 8" to 6" concrete thickness, or

3. A “belly band” (a raised horizontal relief detail between stories) for stucco application in multi-story

applications.

Page 4 Chapter 1 – Introduction July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Quad-Lock FS Panel

The fastenings strips are located 2" [51mm] to the left of all deep grooves in FS

Panels (i.e. every 12" [305mm]) and extend to the panel’s surface in small spots for

easy identification. Plastic ties are locked into the fastening strips to create an

uninterrupted vertical fastening surface 1½" [38mm] wide (no breaks or gaps to

complicate siding installation). The FS Panel can be used on one side or on both

sides of the wall as needed. See “Tips” below for different FS Panel applications.

Figure 5: Quad-Lock FS Panel - Position of Fastening Strips

Quad-Lock Plus-FS Panel

Plus-FS Panels differ from regular FS Panels only in their thickness (2" [51mm] thicker).

Figure 6: Quad-Lock Plus-FS Panel - Position of Fastening Strips

Building Tips: Use Quad-Lock FS Panels for attaching:

1. Lapped Siding or other finish requiring a continuous fastening surface, or

2. Base Boards or Crown Molding using one row of FS Panels at the bottom or top of a wall, or

3. Soffit - Place a row of FS Panels even with the soffit elevation; Snap a line where the soffit joins the

wall; Glue and screw a horizontal 2x4 backer on the FS Panels to support the soffit material where it

intersects the wall. (See Figure 87 or Figure 88)

July 2009 Chapter 1 – Introduction Page 5


Quad-Lock Ties

Quad-Lock Ties secure the Quad-Lock Panels to

form the cavity for the concrete. Quad-Lock Ties:

• Connect the panels in 4 ways: transversely,

vertically, at butt joints, and along horizontal

seams.

• Serve as an attachment point for bracing and

finish materials.

• Serve as a locator for reinforcing steel using

the ties’ molded rebar chairs.

• Help to secure corners, T-Walls, etc.

• Molded water stop assures no migration of

water along ties

PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 7: Quad-Lock Standard Ties

Ties are placed at the intersection of the horizontal and vertical joints of all panels and every 12" [305mm] in-between,

which are marked by the deeper, wider grooves in the panels.

The ties are placed to align every 12" [305mm] vertically and horizontally in every wall.

Two Quad-Lock Panels and four Quad-Lock Ties form one Unit. The ties are recessed from the outside surface of the

panels to prevent thermal bridging and the telegraphing of dissimilar materials when finishing with stucco.

Figure 8: Quad-Lock Unit - R-30 [U-0.20]

Ties are available in five different standard lengths and are color-coded for easy identification. Using ties of different

lengths, five different wall widths are available and can be combined with Extender Ties to add 12" [305mm] to any

standard tie length. Multiple Extender Ties can be joined to make wider cavities.

Quad-Lock Ties are molded of High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) or Polypropylene (PP).

Page 6 Chapter 1 – Introduction July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

5 1 2 " [140mm] 4" [102mm] 11 2

" [38mm]

12" [300mm]

RED TIE

10" [250mm]

GREEN TIE

Figure 9: Quad-Lock Standard Ties - Dimensions

8" [200mm]

YELLOW TIE

6" [250mm]

BLUE TIE

2 1 2

" [63mm]

4" [100mm]

BLACK TIE

The unique Quad-Lock Tie design and placement provides the following benefits:

• Ensures a uniform concrete thickness throughout the wall.

• Prevents the deflection or spreading of all edges of the panels to ensure a smooth, planar surface and prevent

blowouts. This is achieved through the placement of the ties at all horizontal AND vertical joints where panels are

most vulnerable to hydrostatic pressure during concrete placement.

• Provides additional strength at high-pressure areas such as corners, T-walls.

• Allows a single tie to be easily modified for specific tasks by cutting the ties into split ties and tie flanges which are

used near wall junctions and openings.

• Allows almost unlimited wall cavity size by combining Extender Ties with standard ties.

Figure 10: Tie Layout – Front View Dimensions

July 2009 Chapter 1 – Introduction Page 7

7 1 2

" [190mm]

9 1 2

" [241mm]

11 1 2

" [292mm]

13 1 2

" [343mm]

15 1 2

" [394mm]


Extender Tie

PRODUCT MANUAL

The Quad-Lock Extender Tie will allow builders to create walls of almost any desired concrete thickness. Extender Ties

are designed to interlock with regular Full Ties to add 12" [305mm] of concrete cavity. Combine multiple Extender Ties

with Full Ties to create concrete cavities larger than 24" [610mm]. For more details, see Wide Walls and Special

Building Elements - Extender Tie on Page 54.

Figure 11: Quad-Lock Extender Tie

Brick Ledge Tie

Quad-Lock Brick Ledge Tie can be used to create a concrete ledge for brick or stone exterior finishes or as an interior

support for floor joists. It easily transitions the wall from a 12" [305mm] concrete cavity to a 6" [150mm] cavity (when used

with R-22 [U-0.28] panels), leaving a 3¾" [95mm] solid concrete supporting ledge, plus a 2¼" [57mm] high density foam

panel capped by a galvanized Metal Track.

Figure 12: Wall Transition with Brick Ledge Tie

Page 8 Chapter 1 – Introduction July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Slab Tie & Bracket System

Quad-Lock Slab Ties and Slab Brackets provide a solid support for 1 to

2 layers of outside panels during the pour of an interconnecting

concrete slab.

Tie Placement: Slab Ties are placed at 24" [610mm] on center, two

panel layers below top of slab.

Bracket Installation: Slab Brackets are affixed to 5 to 6 ft. [1.5m to

1.8m] lengths of 2x4 [610mm x 1219mm] or 2x6 [610mm x 1829mm],

at a level placing the top of the brace 1½" [38mm] below the top of the

uppermost panel. The Slab Bracket/brace assembly is then positioned

by sliding it over the plastic flange protruding from the face of the wall.

For best results, a horizontal whaler is then screwed to the top of each

vertical brace at slab elevation.

Removal: To remove braces after they have served their purpose, tilt

them sideways using a sharp motion and break the plastic extrusions

off the ties. Reuse the lumber posts with the Slab Brackets on the next

floor or project.

Figure 14: Slab Tie & Slab Bracket Assembly

Figure 13: Slab Tie & Slab Bracket

July 2009 Chapter 1 – Introduction Page 9


Quad-Lock Metal Brackets

Corner Brackets

PRODUCT MANUAL

Quad-Lock Corner Brackets allow for the quick and secure assembly of 90 corners and eliminate the need for any

external corner bracing. They come in two configurations: the Inside Corner Bracket and the Outside Corner Bracket.

• Inside Corner Brackets are used on every row of the inside panels, with the exception of the top row, for 90

corners and on the inside corners of T-walls, columns and pilasters.

• Outside Corner Brackets are used on every row of the outside corner panels, again with the exception of the top

row, as reinforcement for the back wall of T-walls, and for outside corners of pilasters and columns.

Figure 15: Corner Brackets

Corner brackets are made of flat 24-gauge galvanized steel and are designed to fit over Quad-Lock Panels placed at 90°

to one another. The brackets have holes that match the panels’ foam interlock knobs, and slots that allow the ties and tie

flanges to be inserted once the bracket has been placed over the panels.

When installed properly, the Corner Brackets combined with the ties and tie flanges alone will absorb the forces of the

poured concrete at the recommended slump and pour rates, eliminating the need for structural corner bracing. Bracing

may be needed only to assure plumb and alignment in relation to the rest of the wall. For details see Page 27 - Corners.

Corner and Angle Brackets are recessed from the

surface of the EPS panels to minimize thermal bridging

and avoid flashing through stucco.

Angle Brackets

Quad-Lock hinged Angle Brackets allow wall angles of

almost any degree to be easily formed and braced.

Once the panel ends are mitered at the bi-section

degree of the desired angle, the bracket folds out to

match the angle of the wall.

Figure 16: Assembly of Angle

Similar to the 90 Corner Bracket, ties are placed through the Angle Bracket and into the panel. Angle Brackets are only

needed on the outside of the angle and will ensure that the wall is held together plumb and true without the need for extra

bracing. For details see Page 40 - Angles.

Window Brackets

Quad-Lock Window Brackets have been specifically designed to form insulated sides of window and door openings and

insulated wall end caps. With scrap foam pieces, the Window Bracket replaces lumber or plywood forms and leaves no

exposed concrete. The Window Bracket is very similar to an Outside Corner Bracket and can be used for insulated wall

ends ranging from 6" to 12" [150mm to 305mm] nominal cavity size. Each layer of panels require two Window Brackets

Page 10 Chapter 1 – Introduction July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

which overlap each other. Always have the small legs overlap each other. Add ¼" [6mm] when cutting the panels at the

opening or end cap to avoid recesses after the pour. Cut scrap foam to cover the wall cavity width, inside to inside.

Maintain the 2" [51mm] factory layout so the brackets will easily fit. Be sure to secure the bottom panel on each side

where it touches the sill.

Place Full Ties to secure the brackets in place. At least three tie flanges should be in each long leg (more for wider

walls). The brackets are secured into place with two flanges at the end that have to be placed in the center of the

overlap. More flanges can be added to match the position of the attachment surface.

Repeat this process for as many layers as required. There is no need for bracing at the end.

12.97"

[329mm]

8.97"

[228mm]

Figure 17: Window Bracket

Figure 18: End Cap Assembly

Quad-Lock Metal Track and Wire Top Ties

Metal Track & Wire Top Ties are used to start and finish a Quad-Lock wall.

Metal Tracks

Quad-Lock Metal Track is made from 20-gauge galvanized steel and is pre-bent to fit the dimensions of the panels. The

Metal Track is available in 2¼" [57mm] width for use with Regular Panels or in 4¼" [108mm] width for use Quad-Lock

Plus Panels and is pre-punched with marker holes every 2½ ft for fastening to concrete. Metal Track is used:

• On the bottom of the first course of panels to secure the bottom of the wall. They are fastened to the concrete

footing or slab using a minimum of 1¼" [32mm] long fasteners.

• In conjunction with Wire Top Ties as the ladder brace to finish the top of the wall.

• To form bottom sill of window bucks.

• To form brick ledges in conjunction with Brick Ledge Ties (BLT).

Note: The Quad-Lock Estimating program typically calculates Metal Track for the bottom and top of the wall. If

additional track is required, be sure to note the amount in the “Additional Materials” section of the program.

July 2009 Chapter 1 – Introduction Page 11


Figure 19: Metal Track at Top and Bottom

Wire Top Ties

PRODUCT MANUAL

Quad-Lock Wire Top Ties are used in conjunction with the Metal Tracks to easily finish the top of Quad-Lock walls. They

keep the top panels plumb, secure and in position to create a straight wall. They also provide easy placement of

horizontal rebar close to the top of the wall. Wire Top Ties are made from 6 ga. galvanized steel wire and are bent to

securely fit the contours of the panels and into the tie slots in the panel.

Figure 20: Wire Top Ties used with Metal Track

For details see Wire Top Ties and Metal Track on Page 38.

Flex Track

Flex Track is used to secure radius walls for impressive architectural details. Draw the desired radius on the footing or

slab, then use the “drill and pin” method to attach Flex Track to concrete. Flex Track must be used on both sides of the

radius wall, just like regular track, with the taller flange to the outside, away from concrete.

Page 12 Chapter 1 – Introduction July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 21: Flex-C Trac Flex-C Angle Trac (single-side track required for Plus Panels)

DESIGNING WITH QUAD-LOCK

The Quad-Lock wall system can be used for the construction of concrete walls when designed and constructed in

accordance with the Quad-Lock wall system criteria and evaluation reports, ACI 318, and local building code

requirements. Please refer to the Design and Technical specifications for your area (see Chapter 8 and the Appendices).

Quad-Lock Building Systems has developed standard construction details for the assembly of the Quad-Lock wall system

illustrating numerous wall connections, reinforcing and finishing details. Concrete wall reinforcement tables have been

prepared for two-story or one basement and one story residential construction in accordance with Part 9 of the National

Building Code of Canada, and Chapters R404 “Foundations” or R611 “Insulating Concrete Form Wall Construction” of

the International Residential Code to allow builders to easily make reinforcement selections without engineering. Also

refer to “Prescriptive Method for Insulating Concrete Forms in Residential Construction, 2 nd Edition”, by NAHB Research

Center, published by the Portland Cement Association – Document No. EB118. Current IRC standards are based largely

upon specifications and practices spelled out in this study.

Buildings not conforming to the above, constructed using Quad-Lock wall panels, need to have the wall designed /

engineered in accordance with Part 4 of the National Building Code of Canada or Chapter 19 “Concrete” of the

International Building Code.

Guide to Code Compliance

See Appendix C - Building Code References on Page 176.

For findings of some underlying tests see Findings of Tests Performed on Quad-Lock on Page 141.

Best Material Utilization Practices:

Quad-Lock is recognized in the industry as being the most efficient ICF system on the market for, among other items,

control of waste. This has beneficial effects on the overall material cost of the project, the labor and fees spent on waste

disposal, and reducing the life cycle cost of the building from an environmental impact perspective. The design of the

Quad-Lock system allows for later use of scrap produced in the building process.

Panel Scrap:

Quad-Lock panels cut to fashion corners, T-walls, doors, and window openings should have off-cut pieces stored in one

or two central location(s) on the jobsite. When a detail calls for a cut panel, the person in charge of cutting should first

check the scrap pile before reaching for a new panel. In many instances, there will be scrap of adequate length to

fashion the required part. Quad-Lock’s uniform design will allow placement of ties at any 2" [5cm] interval.

July 2009 Chapter 1 – Introduction Page 13


PRODUCT MANUAL

When the job is about 60% complete, the cutter should visit the scrap pile and fashion short panels of 12" [30cm], 24"

[60cm] or 36" [90cm] lengths, and substitute them in appropriate combinations for full 48" [1219mm] panels. Since the

scrap is cut to 12" [30cm] intervals, each seam will be covered by a tie, so the wall does not suffer a loss of strength.

This will utilize the vast majority of scrap.

Pieces shorter than 12" [30cm] should not be used in the wall, because more ties will be required to support them, and

the job may be short of ties at the end. Small panel scraps may be used to fashion window openings using the Quad-

Lock Window Bracket for fully insulated window openings. End caps on wall terminations can also be formed using

Window Brackets and panel scrap.

Finally, small EPS panel pieces not useable in the wall as forms can be placed over water supply lines buried in the earth

to prevent freezing, and to protect from backfill or seismic activity, or placed in attic space as additional insulation. It is

possible, in this fashion, to finish a job with zero panel waste.

Panel Bags:

Full panel bags should be opened only at the ends with a razor knife to access panels. In this fashion, panel bags can be

recycled and used throughout the job as trash bags for removal of light construction waste generated by other trades.

Panel bags should never be opened on the sides, as score marks in the panels within may weaken panels during the

pour. Bags are clearly marked “Do Not Cut” on the sides. Bags not re-used can be recycled wherever grocery bags and

other plastics are accepted.

Plastic Ties:

Plastic ties are easily cut with common pruning shears. Quad-Lock Ties come from the factory in pairs, connected with

two plastic ribs. When cut apart at the ribs, the ties can operate independently as needed in the wall. Single ties are

useable, even if placed in pairs instead of Full Ties. All intact single ties should be collected from the jobsite and used in

the wall.

Tie flanges are also useable at corners and T-walls. Any intact tie flange should be saved for use in building corners and

T-walls. Excess plastic material can be cut away and the flange inserted into Corner Brackets or Window Brackets.

Any cut pieces of ties that are not useable are recyclable at any location that accepts (polypropylene) plastic materials.

Tie Boxes:

Quad-Lock tie boxes are re-useable and/or recyclable. Waxed (winter) boxes make great storage or moving containers.

Un-waxed (summer) boxes can be recycled anywhere cardboard is accepted. If a project is deemed environmentally

sensitive, be sure to specify the un-waxed tie boxes for compliance to recyclability requirements.

Save money and help protect the environment by reusing and recycling Quad-Lock components throughout the

job.

Page 14 Chapter 1 – Introduction July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

ADVANTAGES, FEATURES AND BENEFITS

Environment

• RECYCLE - 100% recyclable

• CFCs - no CFCs used

• NON-TOXIC - panels are non-toxic and inert material

• GREEN - saves energy and resources over the entire life-cycle of the building

• MANUFACTURING - savings in energy and water costs during manufacture compared to lumber and plywood/OSB

• WASTE - less waste than conventional framing and forming methods

Energy

• INSULATION - Rated R-22, R-30 and R-38 [U-values of 0.28, 0.20 and 0.15 (W/(m²*K))].

• EFFICIENT - sharply reduces heating and cooling costs compared to other building methods

• ENVELOPE - continuous thermal envelope of entire structure; keeps walls from becoming a “temperature battery”

• FOREVER - infinite insulation and concrete life

Comfort

• NOISE - sharply reduces noise levels – STC rating of 50 [Rw-50] and higher.

• VALUE - infinite insulation life adds a lifetime of comfort

• CLEAN - sharply reduces or eliminates drafts with continuous insulation and solid wall structure - reduced air and

dust infiltration

• COZY - stable temperatures without cold spots due to the thermal mass of the concrete and continuous insulation

• RELAX - feel the difference - buildings feel warm in winter, cool in summer

Security

• SOLID - solid concrete walls

• FIRE - concrete is fireproof (1, 2, 3 & 4 hour fire rating)

• STRENGTH - strong construction

• PERMANENT - resistant to destructive forces of nature - hurricanes, earthquakes, fires and rot

• INSECTS - provides no food value to insects and is a non-attractant

Design Flexibility

• LIGHT - higher insulation value allows for increased window use and additional light

• ROOM - increased interior floor space makes rooms bigger

• OPEN - fewer interior bearing walls adds to the openness of light and airy rooms

• STYLE - lends itself to the use of EIFS (exterior insulated finishing systems)

• VERSATILE - unlimited wall widths can easily be connected for complex structural details

Costs

• FAST - quicker than most other wall systems

• SAVE - lower insurance costs

• ECONOMICAL - lower heating and cooling costs

• EASY - with common building skills and simple instructions

• ECOLOGICAL - less material waste/disposal costs

• PROFITABLE - stable price/cost structure - unlike lumber and plywood/OSB

• SUPERIOR - dimensional stability and accuracy

• HEADACHES - reduced call-back costs eliminates unnecessary scheduling and corrections

July 2009 Chapter 1 – Introduction Page 15


PRODUCT MANUAL

• TIME SAVINGS - Quad-Lock combines forming, framing, sheathing and insulating stages of construction into one

step

• EVERLASTING - longer structure life means a high resale value

Advantages

Quad-Lock has the following advantages over competing foam systems:

Quad-Lock is highly versatile using only standard parts. Quad-Lock can easily be shaped to form all the design

elements of modern buildings - openings, arches, corners, angles, columns, pilasters and real curves with almost

any radius, for commercial, residential, industrial, or public buildings..

Quad-Lock is ideally suited to adapt to building elements that may not have been designed with ICFs in mind, such

as steel reinforcement cages. No other ICF can make this claim.

Quad-Lock has the highest available insulation. Using combinations of Quad-Lock Panels and Quad-Lock Plus

Panels three different insulation values are possible, giving you the choice of true R-Values of 22, 30 and 38

(h*ft²*°F/BTU) [U-values of 0.28, 0.20 and 0.15 (W/(m²*K))].

Quad-Lock’s unique and patented tie design offers low likelihood of problems by positively connecting the EPS

panels at both the horizontal and vertical seams where the pressure during concrete placement is most likely to

cause failures.

Quad-Lock is manufactured by an ISO 9001:2000 certified company and subject to in-house and third-party testing.

This ensures product quality and Quad-Lock backs it up with a limited product warranty.

Quad-Lock offers great technical and instructional support and material. Your local dealer is equipped to answer

your questions, prepare detailed estimates, and assist at the jobsite. Local Quad-Lock Field Representatives are

also ready to assist with quantity pricing, job site training, product seminars and dealer training. Our Product

Manual, Installation Guide, Installation Training DVD, brochures and other informative promotional literature tells

you exactly how to build with Quad-Lock.

Quad-Lock costs less to ship and store compared to leading block systems because it is a flat panel & tie system.

Up to 100% more wall area can be shipped per truckload. With Quad-Lock, you're not shipping air!

Quad-Lock creates less waste compared to block systems. With Quad-Lock most parts that needed to be cut can

be reused in the same project.

Quad-Lock produces a flat, solid concrete wall providing a constant thickness of concrete throughout the wall (no

thin/thick sections like grid or post-and-beam systems).

Quad-Lock is variable width. Choose from a 12" [305mm], 10" [250mm], 8" [200mm], 6" [150mm], and 4" [100mm]

thick concrete wall (thicker walls are possible with XT Extender Ties).

Quad-Lock is Code approved and independently tested: ICC/ICBO #ER-5188, CCMC #12914-R etc.

Quad-Lock provides a better surface for stucco application. Quad-Lock creates a surface of only EPS compared to

many other systems where the surface consists of foam and the material used for ties, making it tougher to finish it.

Quad-Lock offers job lot quantities in most areas.

Page 16 Chapter 1 – Introduction July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

22 DDEESSIIGGNN && CCOONNSSTTRRUUCCTTIIOONN

DDEETTAAIILLSS

OVERVIEW

The Quad-Lock System enhances the features available in commercial, institutional and residential structures as well as

basements, foundations, sound walls, firewalls and retaining walls. Difficult floor plans, odd angles, tall walls, short walls,

windows, doors, ledgers, columns, pilasters, arches, even radii may be incorporated into Quad-Lock walls. The Quad-

Lock building system opens new options in concrete construction, with a true R-value exceeding R-22 [U-0.28]. The

Quad-Lock building system combines forming, framing, insulating, and sheathing into one step. If synthetic stucco is to

be specified, the Quad-Lock building system eliminates the addition of the required foam board and there is no need for

air barrier around penetrations as is the case with some conventional building methods. Siding choices may be applied to

incorporated or separately attached furring material or directly to the outside of the panel and mechanically fastened

(screwed) to the ties.

Electrical wire or conduit and small diameter plumbing may be installed in chases routed into the EPS panels after the

concrete has set. Conduit may be placed in the empty concrete cavity prior to concrete placement, if so desired and

permitted by Code. Ensure to properly seal around all conduit and fixture boxes to prevent concrete leakage.

Interior living areas must be separated from the EPS foam plastic by an approved 15-minute thermal barrier.

When Quad-Lock walls are used for below grade and water protection is required, membrane type waterproofing is

highly recommended on the exterior below-grade wall surfaces.

The panel units are 48" [1219mm] long, 12" [305mm] high. When establishing steps or drops in slab or footing pad

elevation consider the 12" [305mm] form heights to eliminate wasteful cutting.

PRE-PLANNING

Estimating

Estimating the amount of Quad-Lock product you will need for your construction project has never been easier. From

your plans obtain the following information (for each story separately):

• Length and height of all walls to be formed.

• The specified width of all concrete walls. Make sure to calculate each wall width separately.

• Number of corners, angles and T-walls.

• The number and sizes of all openings in the walls, i.e. doors and windows.

• Specifications of rebar materials, i.e. sizes and frequency of placement.

• The unit costs of all materials and labor.

This information can then be entered into the specially designed Quad-Lock Estimating Program. Your dealer can provide

you with an accurate estimate on the amount and cost of the Quad-Lock product suitable for your construction project.

Getting Started – Plan, Plan, Plan

Knowing how to assemble Quad-Lock is simply not enough to ensure successful project completion. A successful and

productive project comes from careful planning of details at all stages, so the job comes to completion on time and within

budget.

The project manager and job supervisor should carefully review the building plans to determine what needs to be done

before assembly takes place.

• Prepare cut lists and pre-fabricate components wherever possible.

• Rebar should be cut to length, pre-bent, and delivered to where it will be installed.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 17


PRODUCT MANUAL

• Check the plans and determine the spacing that is specified for all rebar. The Quad-Lock system is ideally suited for

even 12" [305mm] increments on the horizontal plane. Vertical rebar can be installed at any spacing. If the spacing

for horizontal bar is other than a 12" [305mm] increment, contact the project engineer and request a change.

• Have 1¼" – 1½" [32mm-38mm] plastic pipe available to secure vertical rebar to stub steel in the footing.

• Window and door bucks should be pre-assembled on- or off-site, and delivered to the site ready for installation.

• Panel measurements that repeat can be pre-cut prior to assembly, particularly for corners. (Watch the wind☺)

• Have materials stocked on the site. Panels, ties, brackets and track should all be placed where they will be

assembled. This minimizes the amount of time spent walking back and forth to retrieve product.

• Pre-plan your site to make sure that everything runs smoothly. Ask these questions:

1. Where will the concrete truck sit? Are there any overhead or adjacent obstacles like wires and trees that might

pose a hazard to the pumping equipment?

2. Where will materials be delivered and off-loaded?

3. What is the best access route on and off the site?

4. Where will waste be deposited?

5. Where can the crew park so they won’t be in the way of delivery vehicles?

It is important for the project manager to ensure that tasks relating to the assembly are allocated properly and that

personnel are trained and have the necessary tools on hand:

• Determine who is going to set the track, the panels and the ties.

• Workers should read assembly instructions on the sides of the tie boxes and also refer to the Quad-Lock Product

Manual if they require more detailed instructions.

• Make sure there is a plan for the bracing system and ensure that all equipment has been ordered and is ready.

Determine who will assemble it. Ensure there is adequate lumber on hand if wood bracing is needed.

• Make sure that the concrete and pump has been ordered and that it will be ready on pour day.

• Determine who will run the pour, and address quality issues like Plumb, Straight, Square and Level. Assign

individual tasks like handling the pump and running the vibrator.

• And finally, if an inspection is needed at any stage ensure that inspectors are scheduled and on site at the

appropriate times.

Attention to these details will save you time and money, and help to ensure a smooth running and high quality job.

Building Tips: The building site must be prepared, clean and well organized. Clear all excess building materials and

debris away from the work area. If you have a below grade basement, make sure that the excavation is

clear and that you have good access all around the perimeter. A minimum clearance of 3 feet [1m] is

recommended. Provisions for a sub-surface drainage system should be made for later installation.

TOOLS

Fully Extendable Utility Knife Keyhole Saw Hand Saw Tape Measure

48" [50-60cm] or Laser Level Chalk-Line String Line

Screw Gun Pruning Shears Rebar Cutter/Bender

Figure 22: Tools for the project

Other Equipment:

• Wire Twister

• Hammer

• Regular Pliers

• Ladders/Scaffolding

• Power Saw

• Gloves/Safety Goggles

Highly Recommended:

• Table/Chop Saw

(to cut panels for

corners, angles etc.)

Page 18 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Cutting Quad-Lock Components

Cutting Panels

To cut Quad-Lock Panels, a fully extendible utility knife, a regular handsaw or keyhole saw can be used.

Table-mounted power saws are a good way to pre-cut panels. When using power saws use extreme caution since the

EPS foam material offers very little resistance to high RPM saws and has a tendency to grab the blade if the cut is not

perfectly straight. Some builders reverse the saw blade when cutting Quad-Lock Panels and report good results.

Building Tip: The quickest way to cut panels individually is to use a fully extended utility knife:

1. Cut the panel about ¾" [20mm] deep along the intended cut

2. Cut the panel a second time in the same location, but this time cut deeper

3. Break the panel apart at the cut line

Cutting Ties

Use pruning shears to cut ties into “Flanges” or “Split Ties”:

• Split ties are used in tight radius walls, near odd wall joints and window and door openings, and bulkheads.

• Flanges are used in conjunction with metal brackets in all corners and angles. Make sure to cut at the point

indicated below.

Figure 24: Cut Flanges

Cutting Metal Components

Figure 23: Split Tie

Cut Metal Track or Corner Brackets with metal snips or a chop saw with appropriate blade (e.g. carborundum).

Safety Note: Always wear gloves when handling metal components!

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 19


Wall Widths

PRODUCT MANUAL

For a table of standard wall dimensions please refer to Wall Widths of Quad-Lock Panel and Tie Combinations on

Page 140. Even wider walls are possible - see Wide Walls on Page 54.

Figure 25: Wall Widths and Insulating Values

Page 20 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

FOOTINGS

When building your footings, ensure they are built level to within a tolerance of ¼" [7mm] and that they are troweled

smooth. If the footings are not level and smooth, it will create unnecessary work later when it is time to plumb the walls. If

your project has stepped footings, try to maintain elevation changes in 12" [305mm] or multiples thereof. This will

minimize waste and speed up construction significantly.

For Quad-Lock walls with nominal concrete thickness of 8" [20cm] or less, the standard footing width of 16" [41cm] is

usually sufficient but check with your local building department. Walls 10" [25cm] and thicker are usually engineered, so

the engineer will specify footing widths.

When placing rebar dowels, take into account the panel thicknesses.

Building Tips: When pouring your footings:

1. Level them to within a tolerance of ¼" [6mm].

2. Trowel footings smooth to prevent rough surfaces.

3. Ensure that all steps are 12" [305mm] or any multiple thereof to match the height of the panel.

Stepped Footing Detail

Figure 26: Stepped Footing

The few extra minutes spent ensuring your footings are level and smooth will save hours in setting up

the wall!

METAL TRACK

OR 2x [38mm WIDE] TOE PLATE

SECURELY FASTENED

FOOTING

Note: Steps heights should be 12" [305mm] or any multiple thereof.

Uneven Footings:

QUAD-LOCK PANELS

If footings are slightly out of level, fasten track to the footings and stretch a string line slightly higher than 1 foot [30cm]

above the highest point of the footing. Use the string line to set the first course level. Shim the panels in the track with

scrap foam or spray foam and/or scribe/cut the bottoms of the panels to level your wall.

If you have a very uneven footing surface, (like a rock surface) connect the Metal Tracks together using rivets and metal

strips (to form a “ladder”). Lay down these ladder tracks and do not attach them to the uneven footings/surface. Build the

Quad-Lock wall to a level of about 3 feet [1m] and then shim the tracks until the top of the panels are perfectly level (a

laser level works best). Use low-expansion polyurethane foam to fill the gaps between the track and footing and then

continue building your wall.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 21


These methods may also be used when forming to bedrock or other areas where footings are not used.

Adjustment to Odd Step Elevations:

PRODUCT MANUAL

If stepped footings have been formed to increments of other than 12" [305mm], as suggested in the Basic Installation

Guide, panels on the lowest level must be ripped to bring succeeding courses into the higher footing steps at the correct

elevation.

Small Variations:

If the height of a panel needs to be increased by ¾" [20mm] or less, then either spray foam or shims may be added into

the track to elevate the panel to the desired height.

Larger Variations:

If the height of a panel needs to be increased by 1" [25mm] or more, then tops and bottoms of full panels must be ripped

and used to start the course. Ties may have to be clipped to fit into rips that are 2½" [64mm] or less.

Panels Too Tall:

If the step in the footing is less than 12" [305mm], then rip the lowest row of panels by the difference between the actual

footing height and 12" [305mm]. Rip the bottom of the panel, not the top.

Maintaining lay-out at succeeding footing steps:

Figure 27: Panel Cuts over Stepped Footing

Maintain your panel lay-out pattern started in lower courses by forming through succeeding incorrect footing elevations

by notching full panels to match the elevation of the footing as it spans the break in footing elevation.

Taper Panels to Correct Out-Of-Level Footings

If footings or slab are out of level to the point where a correction must be made, Quad-Lock panels are easily cut to

compensate for the out-of-level condition. A common condition would be where one corner of a building is lower than the

rest. For example, let’s say that you have one corner that is 1½" [38mm] low. Follow these steps to correct this

condition:

1. As usual, check the level of the footing or slab along wall lines with a laser level. Make note of areas that are

outside of tolerances (usually more than ½" [13mm] high or low).

2. Sweep the footings, mark building corners and strike building lines as you normally would. Fasten Metal Track to

the footing or slab, following instructions in Technical Bulletin No. 1.01.

3. Using a laser level, find the lowest point in the footing or slab along the wall line. This is where you will start

correcting the footing elevation, using ripped pieces of Quad-Lock panels.

4. From the low point, take a laser shot every 4 ft [1219mm], moving away from the low point in either direction, until

you reach the points where the footing or slab has come back into the specified elevation. Mark a note on the

footing with a felt pen at each 4 ft [1219mm] station, indicating how much below the correct elevation that point

happens to be.

5. Starting again at the low corner, cut corner panels per factory instructions.

Page 22 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

6. Make a mark at the top corner of the outside corner panels corresponding to the deepest out-of-specification

measurement, in this case 1½" [38mm]. Make a mark at the other end of the panel corresponding to your first 4

foot [1219mm] station measurement, for example, 1" [25mm]. (See Figure below) Using a straight edge, scribe a

line from one mark to the other. This is the taper cut that will become your first “panel” in the wall. Cut with a

hand saw or circular saw. You should have remaining the top of a Quad-Lock Panel that measures 1½" [38mm]

high at the corner, and 1" [25mm] high at the other end. Slip this into the track to shim the next course. Use the

offcut as a template to mark its companion panel on the other side, or, conserve material by fashioning another

shim with the bottom of the same panel and turning it upside down. The interlock knobs are not critical, and the

slots will reverse.

7. Repeat this process every 4 ft [1219mm], until you reach the point where the footing or slab is back into level.

Your taper cut at this point should be zero.

8. Back at the low point, it may be necessary to brace panels that are shimmed up to the point where the Metal

Track does not sufficiently support them. In this case, fasten lumber or plywood to the outside of full panels using

wire loops laid across the tops of the shims as the full panels are being placed.

Figure 28: Panels Tapered to Compensate for out-of-level Footing

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 23


METAL TRACK

PRODUCT MANUAL

Metal tracks must be securely fastened to the footing on both sides of the Quad-Lock wall. At a minimum, fasten the

track to the footing every 2 to 2½ feet [60-75 cm] and at the ends of each track with Zamac expansion anchors or

common nails set into pre-drilled holes to ensure that the wall stays in proper position and the tracks act as the

necessary brace at this high impact area of the wall. Note the pre-punched holes every 2½ ft [75cm] and at ends of the

track, which indicate the minimum spacing of fasteners. Ensure track is fastened to concrete, and not to the outside of a

form board, as form boards will easily come off the side of the footing.

Figure 29: Footing with Metal Track and Rebar Dowels

Page 24 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009

1.75"

[44mm]

1.75"

[44mm]

2.25"

[57mm]

4.25"

[108mm]

Ø 1 8" [3mm] @ 24" [610mm] O.C.

0.75"

[19mm]

REGULAR J-TRACK

20 Gauge Galvanized Steel = 0.0325" [0.8255mm] Min.

Ø 1 8" [3mm] @ 24" [610mm] O.C.

0.75"

[19mm]

PLUS J-TRACK

20 Gauge Galvanized Steel = 0.0325" [0.8255mm] Min.

Fastening to Concrete Footings, Concrete Slabs, Rock, or Cleats:

Depending on the intended use of the track, there are three main methods of fastening to base material.

1. Nail through track with concrete nails, generally with a Powder Actuated Tool (PAT) into concrete slab or footing.

2. Drill and anchor with fastener of choice (see below) into concrete slab or footing.

3. Screw track to metal or wooden cleats over rock surfaces, or over open footings for a monolithic pour.

Method 1) Nailing:

Quad-Lock Metal Track can be nailed (usually with a PAT) to concrete slabs or footings. This method is generally

recognized as one of the fastest ways to prepare the job for stacking Quad-Lock, but is among the highest cost, due to

the cost of tools, pins, and shots. Single-shot tools are time consuming and drive up labor costs as well. Strip-fed PATs

are faster, but more costly to purchase.

The other issue with PAT nailing is “spalling” of the concrete, where the impact of the nail can crack the edge of a slab,

rendering the nail useless. This issue is not as critical on a footing, where the track is probably not located at the edge of

the concrete. There is, however, the possibility that the 1¼" [32mm] nails can “curl” when they impact large aggregate,

and thereby lose their holding power. In either case, the result is that the track is not properly fastened down, and can

fail against concrete pressure.

Special care should be taken to check the track prior to placing Quad-Lock panels, if the PAT nailing method is used.

Method 2) Drill and Anchor:

Experience has shown us that the “drill and anchor” method can actually be less expensive and time consuming than

nailing with a PAT. Usually a 3/16" or ¼" hole is drilled through the track, after the track is set into position according to

the building lines. Spacing of fasteners should be a minimum 24" [610mm] and maximum 30" [762mm]. Then, a fastener

is inserted into the hole and tapped or screwed into place. These fasteners can include:

• A 3" (16 penny) nail, augmented with a piece of tie wire

• A 1¼" [32mm] long “hit anchor” or “Zamac” (Available from Quad-Lock; see Product Manual)

• A specially designed concrete screw (TapCon, or equivalent)


PRODUCT MANUAL

Any of these fasteners will yield a very secure fastening, and the act of drilling does not result in spalling of the concrete,

or curling of the fasteners. The low cost of these fasteners brings down the average installed cost as well. Concrete drill

bits are relatively low cost, and yield many holes for fastening. Hammer drills are commonly available for sale or rent.

Figure 30: Installation of Hit-Anchors

Method 3) Screw to Metal or Wood Cleats:

In cases where a concrete slab or footing is not available, Metal Track can be screwed to metal or wood cleats to provide

both proper spacing and lateral strength against form pressure. This may be the case with a monolithic pour of stemwalls

and footings. Place Metal Track on top of wood or metal cleats fastened across footing forms at 3 foot (1 m)

maximum intervals. Use self-tapping screws to penetrate Metal Track and into the cleat below.

Note: This method is probably not appropriate when forming over natural rock outcrops because the track will not

conform to the rough surface of the stone. In such cases, scribe the panels to match the profile of the stone,

then spray-foam them into place. Secure 2x bracing on both sides of the forms to resist form pressure

generated by concrete placement.

Flex Track is used for securing radius walls (see Radius Walls on Page 47).

Proper Spacing of Metal Track

Critical to maintaining the shape of the wall is the initial placement of the Metal Track at the bottom of the wall. Usually, a

chalk line is snapped to represent the outside perimeter of the building, or “building line”. Then, the outer row of track is

fastened down by any of the above means. The inside row of track can be located by one of three methods:

• Snap a second set of chalk lines using the outer line as a reference

• Fasten the outer row of track, then cut spacers that represent the inside cavity width of the wall, and use the

spacers to locate the inner track in relation to the outside track

• Fasten the outside row of track, then cut a template from plywood that represents the outside dimension of the

foam panels. Loose lay the inside track, then place the template over both tracks, putting tension against the outer

track. Slide the inside track against the template and fasten.

The third method seems to give the most accurate results. Some builders actually under-size the template by ⅛" [3mm],

to assure that no expansion occurs at the bottom of the wall where the highest concrete pressure exists.

Figure 31: Plywood Templates fit to Wall Dimension

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 25


PRODUCT MANUAL

Building Tips: Locate the outside building line and strike the chalk line. The building line is the outside of the foam.

Remember to account for the 2¼" [57mm] or 4¼" [108mm] of foam on both sides of the wall.

The outside track should be installed first, using the building line struck on the footing. The Metal Track

is then secured to the footing every 2-2½' [60-75cm].

After the outside track has been placed, use a plywood spacer to place the inside track. Cut the spacer

to match the wall cavity size.

To avoid potential problems, the job supervisor should carefully check the attachment of Metal Track to

the footing before walls are built.

If the wall runs off the side of the footing or the footing is not wide enough, strap ties or some other form

of banding material can be used through the wall to connect the Metal Tracks/wood toe plates.

Typical Wall to Footing Connection Detail

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

DAMPPROOFING AND

DRAINAGE BOARD

AS SPECIFIED

FREE DRAINING BACKFILL

AS SPECIFIED

PARGING AS SPECIFIED

DRAINAGE PIPE

QUAD-LOCK TIE

PARGING MINUMUM PER CODE

SLOPE

Figure 32: Typical Wall to Footing Connection Detail

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

QUAD-LOCK PANELS

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

FOUNDATION DOWELS

AT REQUIRED SPACING

METAL J-TRACK

SECURED TO FOOTING

CONCRETE SLAB

REINF. AS REQUIRED

FOOTING REINFORCEMENT

AS REQUIRED

Page 26 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Thickened Edge Slab on Grade

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

MASONARY VENEER AS SPECIFIED

MINUMUM PER CODE

FREE DRAINING BACKFILL

AS SPECIFIED

DRAINAGE PIPE

QUAD-LOCK TIE

BRICK TIES AS SPECIFIED

FLASHING AS SPECIFIED

PARGING AS SPECIFIED

DAMPPROOFING AND

DRAINAGE BOARD

AS SPECIFIED

SLOPE

Figure 33: Thickened Edge Slab on Grade

STANDARD WALLS

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

QUAD-LOCK PANELS

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

FOUNDATION DOWELS

AT REQUIRED SPACING

METAL J-TRACK

SECURED TO FOOTING

CONCRETE SLAB AS REQUIRED

SLAB INSULATION

COMPACTED GRANULAR

FILL AS SPECIFIED

Always start any project by building corners, angles, T-Walls and other special elements first and then work into and

meet in the middle of each wall. Installation of door bucks should take place before any panels are laid.

Stagger the panels from one course to the next with an offset of 24" [60cm] so deep grooves are aligned and the vertical

joints between panels are not aligned. This means that for all odd courses (1 st , 3 rd etc.) you will usually exactly replicate

what you did on the first course and for all even courses what you did on the second course.

Never leave more than 8" [20cm] or 4 knobs between any two ties in straight walls (more ties may be needed for corners,

T-walls, tight radii etc.; see details below).

Building Tips: Minimize waste by cutting left over pieces of panel in 12" or 24" [30 or 60cm] lengths. These can be

distributed throughout the wall in groups adding up to 48" [1219mm], rather than using full panels. When

using smaller scraps, be certain that vertical joints fall between the two flanges of a full tie.

CORNERS

Use the deeper grooves to locate tie placement every 12" [30cm] on center.

Follow suggested stacking pattern to keep grooves and ties aligned for later reference by finish trades.

All corners should be installed first. While other forming methods may call for building into the corners, the design and

precise layout of the Quad-Lock system is best suited for building from the corners to a common seam in the middle of

the wall. When installed correctly on every course, the unique Quad-Lock corner assembly virtually eliminates the need

for additional corner bracing, and makes multi-story construction safe and efficient. Bracing may be needed only to

assure plumb and alignment in relation to the rest of the wall.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 27


PRODUCT MANUAL

Quad-Lock Ties and Panels are designed to allow walls with different thickness to be joined at a corner (e.g. 8" [203mm]

wall joining 6" [152mm] wall).

Corner Installation Instructions

Always work from the inside of the corner, facing out. On the first and all odd numbered courses, place two full 48"

[1219mm] panels in the outside track at 90° to one another, lapping the left panel over the right (as seen from the inside

of the corner).

Figure 34: Full Panels at First Course Outside Corner

For the inner corner panels, cut both panels by a dimension equaling the wall cavity size PLUS 2" [51mm]. Lap the inner

panels the same as the outer panels. Always cut the ends closest to the corner, or the lay-out marks on the panels will

not be correct. Refer to the table and example below for cutting panels to the correct lengths.

Example: 8" [305mm] wall cavity size

+2" [51mm] added to cavity size

10" [356mm] cut from panel

Figure 35: Inside Panels Cut Back by Cavity Size + 2" [25mm]

Place these panels in the inside corner track, making sure that the ends line up with the outer panels. Always lap the

inner panels to the same as the outer panels (left over right as seen from the inside of the corner).

Page 28 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 36: Panel Pairs Cut and Fit at Corner

Figure 37: Corner Brackets & Ties Installed at Corner

Figure 38: Second Row Full Panels Centered Over Joints

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 29


PRODUCT MANUAL

Place Inside and Outside Corner Brackets over the knobs. Place a Full Tie as close to the corner as you can, making

sure that the two flanges are both inserted in the inner corner bracket.

Cut flanges from ties and insert them in the outer corner bracket as shown below, making sure that the slots closest to

the corner have a flange. Then insert a flange every 4" [10cm] (or 6" [15cm] once so it's next to a heavy grove). Extra

flanges can be added around the heavy grooves, if needed for attachment.

Now place ties so they straddle each vertical seam and all deep grooves in the panels (every 12" [30cm]).

Important: The cut tie flanges placed into the corner brackets are critical structural parts. Do not forget.

With Quad-Lock Plus Panels, the Corner Brackets should be placed on the inside row of slots in the panels (close to the

inside wall surface). Always make sure that you insert flanges into the brackets.

With Quad-Lock FS Panels, cut and install the panels in the same manner as Regular Panels paying attention that the

strips will align vertically throughout the wall. Using this method, all the desired fastening strips will be there except the

one close to the corner on the left side (seen from the inside). If needed, install a thin metal strip on that side of the

corner (screw it to the flanges). Ensure that all fastening strips are held by full ties, split ties, or tie flanges combined with

metal brackets.

Figure 39: Corner Assembly – Second Course

Page 30 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 40: Corner Assembly with Corner Brackets, 6" [152mm] Wall

Figure 41: Corner Assembly with Corner Brackets, 8" [203mm] Wall

Building Tip: Flanges for corners can be pre-cut to speed up construction.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 31


Figure 42: Corner Assembly with Corner Brackets, 10" [250mm] Wall

Cutting Panels for Corners

PRODUCT MANUAL

Remember to keep the factory end of inside panels at the end away from the corner for alignment of the deep grooves.

At wall width transitions, be sure to maintain alignment of the deep grooves in the panels.

The table and example below provide easy reference for pre-cutting panels

R-22 [U-0.28] Corner Cut lengths for Inside Panels*

Nominal Concrete Cavity

Width

A

Length

B

Length

(Odd Layers) (Even Layers)

4" [100mm] 42" [1067mm] 18" [458mm]

6" [150mm] 40" [1016mm] 16" [407mm]

8" [200mm] 38" [966mm] 14" [356mm]

10" [250mm] 36" [915mm] 12" [305mm]

12" [305mm] 34" [864mm] 10" [254mm]

* Outside Panels for all Layers will always be Full Panels or 48" [1219mm]

Page 32 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Nominal Concrete Cavity

Width

R-30 [U-0.20] Corner Cut lengths for Inside Panels*

A

Length

B

Length

C

Length

D

Length

(Odd Layers) (Odd Layers) (Even Layers) (Even Layers)

4" [100mm] 40" [1016mm] 42" [1067mm] 16" [407mm] 18" [458mm]

6" [150mm] 38" [966mm] 40" [1016mm] 14" [356mm] 16" [407mm]

8" [200mm] 36" [915mm] 38" [966mm] 12" [305mm] 14" [356mm]

10" [250mm] 34" [864mm] 36" [915mm] 10" [254mm] 12" [305mm]

12" [305mm] 32" [813mm] 34" [864mm] 8" [204mm] 10" [254mm]

* Outside Panels for all Layers will always be Full Panels or 48" [1219mm]

R-38 [U-0.15] Corner Cut lengths for Inside Panels*

Nominal Concrete Cavity

Width

A

Length

B

Length

(Odd Layers) (Even Layers)

4" [100mm] 40" [1016mm] 16" [407mm]

6" [150mm] 38" [966mm] 14" [356mm]

8" [200mm] 36" [915mm] 12" [305mm]

10" [250mm] 34" [864mm] 10" [254mm]

12" [305mm] 32" [813mm] 8" [204mm]

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 33


Example: Cutting Panels for a 8" [20cm] nominal concrete wall

Figure 43: R-22 Corner

Figure 44: R-30 Corner

PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 34 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 45: R-38 Corner

Straight Walls and Common Seams Installation

Working away from the corners and other special wall elements, set additional pairs of panels in each direction, placing

ties at 12" [30cm] on center using the deeper grooves as a guide and straddling vertical joints between panels.

Continue laying out the panels and ties to a common point in the wall. Install panels and ties from the opposing

corner/special wall element, until you are ready to cut the last panel in the middle of the wall. If the layout pattern falls

exactly on the 2" [5cm] increment of the panels, cut the last panel to the required length and place the ties as usual

(straddling the vertical joints). Usually, the seam is not on the 2" [5cm] layout pattern so a common seam /vertical wall

joint is needed. A good place to put this wall joint / common seam is in the middle of a door or window.

To form the common seam:

1. Measure the wall to ensure that your building dimension is correct. Make adjustments, if necessary.

2. Then measure the remaining gap between panels, and cut panels about ¼" [8mm] shorter than the

measurement. Cutting these panels too tightly may increase the wall length, and force the corners out of plumb.

3. Since the seam probably is not on the 2" [5cm] layout pattern, cut the cross braces out of ties to form split ties

that operate independently of one another. Place one split tie on both sides of the common seam.

This seam will continue to the top of the wall and is secured later after plumbing the walls.

Reinforcing Steel (Rebar) Placement

Once the first course has been assembled, pre-cut rebar can be placed. Determine which molded rebar chair in the tie

best suits the building plan and lay the horizontal bars into that position around the entire wall. Make sure to have the

appropriate minimum lap between bars and tie the splices. Horizontal bar can be tied to the plastic ties.

If allowed by local building officials, slip a 4" [10cm] long piece of 1¼" – 1½" [32mm-38mm] plastic pipe over each rebar

dowel jotting out of the footing. This will be used later to secure vertical reinforcing bar that is dropped in from the top.

If vertical rebar is already placed, snip one cross member of the tie so you can work around the bar.

For further details refer to Reinforcing Steel (Rebar) on Page 126.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 35


Corner Rebar Placement (plan view)

CORNER BRACKET

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

QUAD-LOCK TIE

Figure 46: Corner Rebar Placement (plan view)

INSIDE CORNER BRACKET

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY

@ REQUIRED SPACING

Second Course and Rest of Wall Installation

90° BEND BAR

PRODUCT MANUAL

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

@ REUIRED SPACING

Place a pair of panels on the second row so the middle point of both panels line up with the vertical joint in the panels

below. There should be a half panel length (24" [61cm]) offset between the end of the panels in the first and second

rows. Do the same on both sides of the corner.

Measure the spaces remaining to the corners, keeping the lap pattern identical to the bottom row. Cut panels to fit. The

outside panels will always be half panel lengths (24" [61cm]), with the factory ends in the corner. The inside panels’

length will vary, depending on the wall cavity size (refer to Cutting Panels for Corners on Page 32). From a 48"

[122cm] panel, the cut will always be (cavity size) + 26" [66cm].

Place Corner Brackets, Full Ties and tie flanges in the same manner as the first row. Corner Bracket and tie placement

should be exactly the same on every row.

Make note of all cut dimensions and prepare panels for the entire wall height. For instance, in an 8" [25cm] wall, courses

1, 3, 5, and 7 will all be identical. Rows 2, 4, 6, and 8 will also be identical.

Look down the wall cavity and make sure all ties are aligned vertically and none are missing.

Window bucks are placed when the wall gets to sill height (see Window and Door Openings on Page 62).

Repeat the patterns of courses one and two to a height of 4'-5' [120-150cm] when you should stop all construction and

check for Plumb, Straight, Square and Level and install bracing (see Bracing on Page 96).

Check all walls with a level, tape measure, string line and laser level to make sure the building is the specified size and

shape. Make adjustments where needed, and monitor as construction continues.

When dimensions and plumb are checked, secure the common seams by screwing 1x4 strapping or plywood boards

across the seam into the ties.

Use spray foam to fill in the gap of the seam once the wall has been plumbed and secured in place.

Install bracing/scaffolding to continue building up the wall (see Bracing on Page 96).

Page 36 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 47: Corner Assembly Overview

Building Tip: To expedite tie placement, work in pairs with one person placing ties on top of the wall and another

inserting them into the panels.

Adjustment of Top-of-Wall Elevation

While all Quad-Lock Panels come from the factory in convenient 12" [305mm] heights, your plan may call for an elevation

other than an even increment of 12" [305mm].

To make an adjustment to the final elevation of your wall, two methods are suggested:

1. Start the wall with a ripped panel whose height is calculated as follows: From the total wall height, subtract the

largest available increment of 12" [305mm]. For example, if your finished wall height is called out at 9 ft. 4½"

(112½" [2858mm]), subtract the 9 feet (108" [2743mm]), leaving 4½" [114mm]. The 4½" [114mm] remainder will

be the elevation of your first course.

Rip tops and bottoms of full panels to 4½" [114mm] on a table saw and install them in the Metal Track that has

been secured to the footing or slab. Bottoms of panels can be inverted to accept the plastic ties, in order to

conserve panel material. The lack of interlock knobs is of no consequence.

Build the wall to full height using full panels, and the last row should bring the wall to the exact finished elevation.

Remove the interlock knobs and place Wire Top Ties and track, or ladder brace.

2. An alternate method is to start the wall with full 12" [305mm] high panels, and rip the top row of panels to attain

the exact finished wall height. This method will require pushing Wire Top Ties down into the foam, as the top tie

slots will probably have been removed, or omitting top wire ties and just using Metal Track and wood cleats

screwed across the track at 3 to 4 foot [90-120cm] intervals.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 37


QUAD-LOCK PANEL

QUAD-LOCK TIE

REINFORCED

CONCRETE CORE

PANEL CUT DOWN TO 4 1 2"

Figure 48: Starter Panels Ripped to Adjust Wall Elevation

Finishing the Top of Walls

PRODUCT MANUAL

The Quad-Lock Metal Tracks and Wire Top Ties make finishing the top of walls easy when completing the top course of

the wall. The Metal Tracks can also be connected using wood cleats. Another method to finish the top of walls is to use

wood-ladder bracing (without Metal Track or Wire Top Ties).

Building Tip: ALWAYS remove the foam interlock knobs before placing track. Track will not fit properly over knobs

left in place. When cutting foam knobs, be sure to keep them from falling into the wall cavity. Debris at

the bottom of the wall can be called as a code violation.

Wire Top Ties and Metal Track

The combination of Metal Tracks and Wire Top Ties allows builders to save considerable time in both finishing and

bracing of the wall and in troweling the top of the wall without having to work around wood cleats. The Wire Top Ties also

provide a surface that allows for the placement of rebar 3½" [9cm] below the top of the wall. Use a minimum of three

Wire Top Ties per 48” [1219mm] panel pair.

Page 38 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009

4 1 2 "

9'-4 1 2 "


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 49: Finishing the Top of Walls with Metal Tracks and Wire Top Ties

In most areas, the Metal Track and Wire Top Ties can be left in place. However, in cold climates, removing the top Metal

Track can reduce the risk of condensation on the interior of the wall. If the building has proper ventilation / air exchanges,

this is usually not necessary as the excessive moisture is being removed from the structure. If left unaddressed,

excessive condensation combined with organic material such as drywall could result in the development of mold.

Installation Instructions

First remove all the foam interlock knobs from the top panels. A minimum of three Wire Top Ties are placed into

the tie slots in the top of each panel, one at each panel’s ends and one in the middle. Then install the Metal Track over

the panels, after interlock knobs are removed. This combination will act as a spine for the wall and will help remove

any “wave” in the wall. At the vertical wall joints, Wire Top Ties should be placed 4" [10cm] from one another.

Then set the Metal Track over the panels to lock in the Wire Top Ties. It is not necessary to overlap the track along

straight wall sections. At corners/angles/T-Walls etc., cut the Metal Tracks to overlap them and screw them together with

one or two screws. Use a ¾" [2cm] long self tapping sheet metal screw. DO NOT SKIP THIS STEP! This will keep the

corners from spreading apart during the pour.

Place pre-cut pieces of vertical rebar around the outside of the wall, within reach of crew members standing on inside

scaffolding. Slip the vertical steel down the wall and into the plastic pipe hooked on the stub steel. Tie the vertical steel

into position at the top to a Quad-Lock Tie or the horizontal bar.

Vertical rebar should be secured to the Quad-Lock system only after the walls have been plumbed.

Building Tip: When using non-full height panels on the last course, either push the Wire Top Ties directly into the

panels or use wood cleats every 5' [1.5m] instead of the Wire Top Ties to hold the Metal Track together.

Multi-Level Walls

When building the lower levels of multi-level Quad-Lock walls, finish the top of the wall using Metal Track and Wire Top

Ties as described above and stop the pour about 6" [15cm] below the top of the wall. Remove the Metal Track and Wire

Top Ties after curing to continue building (they can be reused for subsequent floors). You may also use regular ties on

the top of the wall but ensure to keep the tops of the panels and ties free of concrete. Either clean them with water right

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 39


PRODUCT MANUAL

after the pour or cover them using lengths of plastic rain guttering and slide them along the top of the wall as the pour

progresses. Stop the concrete pour of the lower levels at about 6" [15cm] below the top of the wall.

SPECIAL WALL ELEMENTS

Angles

Angles of almost any degree can easily be constructed using the Quad-Lock Adjustable Angle Bracket. Once the panel ends

are mitered at half the degree of the desired angle (the “bi-section”), the bracket folds out to match the angle of the wall.

Similar to the 90 Corner Bracket, ties are placed through the Angle Bracket and into the panel. Angle Brackets are only

needed on the outside of the angle and will ensure that the wall is held together plumb and true without the need for

structural bracing (bracing for wall alignment is still needed).

Low-expansion polyurethane foam adhesive (e.g. Enerfoam) may be used to ensure tightness in the vertical seams.

When building bays or angles close to other special wall elements, use a common seam/gap in the middle of the straight

wall section to allow for plumbing of the wall.

As with radius walls, check plumb on each course installation. An out-of-plumb angle wall will not adjust if pushed in,

because the panels have to get shorter to do so. Thus, it is important to monitor plumb during construction.

Metal Angle Brackets need ONLY be placed on the outside row of panels. The inside panels are in compression and

have ties right at the end, near the joint, and therefore require no Metal Angle Bracket. Be sure to place extra flanges in

the outside panels at the joint, as shown below.

Figure 50: Assembly of Angles

Page 40 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Cutting Panels for Angles

Cut each panel by half (the bi-section) of the total desired angle: e.g. ½ of a 45° angle is 22.5°. Cut each side of the

angle at 22.5°.

• ALWAYS cut the panels on the outside through the center of the first knob so the Angle Brackets will fit.

• Cut the “inside” panels to the appropriate length as illustrated in the chart below.

Building Tip: A sliding compound miter saw works best to easily and accurately cut the panels.

First determine the bi-section of the angle (degree of wall angle divided by two), then set your sliding

miter saw to the bi-section angle.

The chart below explains how to cut the “inside” panels to build different angles:

Dimensions in inches: for metric see next page

Nominal Concrete Nominal Concrete Nominal Concrete Nominal Concrete Nominal Concrete

Cnominal 4 inches 6 inches 8 inches 10 inches 12 inches

Cutting

Distance A B A B A B A B A B

Angle a° inches inches inches inches inches inches inches inches inches inches

7.5° 1 4/8 1 3/8 1 5/8 1 4/8 1 6/8 1 5/8 1 7/8 1 6/8 2 1 7/8

15° 2 1 5/8 2 2/8 1 7/8 2 4/8 2 1/8 2 6/8 2 3/8 3 2 6/8

22.5° 2 3/8 2 2 7/8 2 3/8 3 2/8 2 6/8 3 5/8 3 1/8 4 3 4/8

30° 2 7/8 2 2/8 3 4/8 2 7/8 4 3 3/8 4 4/8 3 7/8 5 4 4/8

37.5° 3 3/8 2 5/8 4 1/8 3 3/8 4 6/8 4 5 4/8 4 6/8 6 1/8 5 3/8

45° 4 3 4 6/8 3 7/8 5 5/8 4 5/8 6 3/8 5 4/8 7 2/8 6 3/8

52.5° 4 4/8 3 3/8 5 4/8 4 3/8 6 4/8 5 3/8 7 4/8 6 3/8 8 4/8 7 3/8

60° 5 1/8 3 7/8 6 2/8 5 7 3/8 6 1/8 8 5/8 7 2/8 9 6/8 8 3/8

67.5° 5 6/8 4 2/8 7 1/8 5 5/8 8 3/8 6 7/8 9 6/8 8 2/8 11 1/8 9 5/8

75° 6 4/8 4 6/8 8 6 2/8 9 4/8 7 6/8 11 1/8 9 3/8 12 5/8 10 7/8

82.5° 7 2/8 5 2/8 9 7 10 6/8 8 6/8 12 4/8 10 4/8 14 2/8 12 2/8

90° ** 8 1/8 5 7/8 10 1/8 7 7/8 12 1/8 9 7/8 14 1/8 11 7/8 16 1/8 13 7/8

97.5° 9 1/8 6 4/8 11 3/8 8 7/8 13 5/8 11 1/8 16 13 3/8 18 2/8 15 5/8

105° 10 2/8 7 3/8 12 7/8 10 15 4/8 12 5/8 18 1/8 15 1/8 20 6/8 17 6/8

112.5° 11 5/8 8 2/8 14 5/8 11 2/8 17 5/8 14 2/8 20 5/8 17 2/8 23 5/8 20 2/8

120° 13 3/8 9 4/8 16 6/8 12 7/8 20 2/8 16 3/8 23 6/8 19 7/8 27 2/8 23 2/8

127.5° 15 4/8 10 7/8 19 4/8 15 23 4/8 19 27 5/8 23 31 5/8 27 1/8

135° 18 2/8 12 6/8 23 17 5/8 27 7/8 22 3/8 32 5/8 27 2/8 37 4/8 32 1/8

** use Corner Bracket for a =90° Formula: A = 1+(Cnominal+3.125)*TAN(0.5*a°*PI()/180)

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 41


Cut line through center

of knob on outside panel

9 3 4

" [248mm]

22.5°

A =

B =

1

2 of the turn angle a

5 1 2

" [140mm]

6 3 8

" [163mm]

Place angle brackets on the outside only

on each course

Place Full Tie on

12" [305mm] mark

Figure 51: Angled Wall Cutting, Bracket & Tie Placement (Imperial)

Use one shot of

sprayfoam on each course

PRODUCT MANUAL

Remove this knob

Do not forget tie Tie flanges

How to read the table for our example: You want to mark the Cut- line "A" on the exposed surface (with grooves) of the

panel next to the inside seam of a 45° angle:

1. Look up column A of the "Nominal Concrete" 10" field

2. Go down to 45° row and find 6⅜"

Page 42 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009

a = 45.0°


PRODUCT MANUAL

Metric Dimensions: for imperial see previous page

Nominal Concrete Nominal Concrete Nominal Concrete Nominal Concrete Nominal Concrete

Cnominal 102 mm 152 mm 203 mm 254 mm 305 mm

Cutting

Distance A B A B A B A B A B

Angle a° mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm

7.5° 37 34 41 37 44 40 47 44 51 47

15° 49 42 56 48 63 55 69 62 76 68

22.5° 61 50 72 60 82 70 92 80 102 90

30° 74 59 88 72 101 86 115 99 128 113

37.5° 87 67 104 85 121 102 139 119 156 136

45° 100 77 121 98 142 119 163 140 185 161

52.5° 115 86 140 112 165 137 190 162 215 187

60° 130 97 159 126 189 156 218 185 247 214

67.5° 146 108 180 142 214 176 248 210 282 244

75° 164 120 203 159 242 198 281 237 320 276

82.5° 184 134 229 179 273 223 318 268 362 312

90° ** 206 149 257 200 308 251 359 302 410 352

97.5° 232 167 290 225 348 282 406 340 463 398

105° 261 187 327 253 394 319 460 385 526 452

112.5° 296 211 372 287 448 363 524 439 600 515

120° 339 240 427 328 515 416 603 504 691 592

127.5° 392 276 495 380 598 483 701 586 804 689

135° 462 324 585 447 708 570 830 692 953 815

** use Corner Bracket for a =90° Formula: A = 25.4+(Cnominal+79.4)*TAN(0.5*a°*PI()/180)

Cut line through center

of knob on outside panel

9 3 4

" [248mm]

22.5°

A =

B =

1

2 of the turn angle a

5 1 2

" [140mm]

6 3 8

" [163mm]

Place angle brackets on the outside only

on each course

Place Full Tie on

12" [305mm] mark

Figure 52: Angled Wall Cutting, Bracket & Tie Placement (Metric)

Use one shot of

sprayfoam on each course

Remove this knob

Do not forget tie Tie flanges

How to read the table for our example: You want to mark the Cut- line "A" on the exposed surface (with grooves) of the

panel next to the inside seam of a 45° angle:

1. Look up column A of the "Nominal Concrete" 254mm field

2. Go down to 45° row and find 163mm

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 43

a = 45.0°


T-Walls

Where two perpendicular walls meet,

they form a T-Wall intersection. As

with 90 corners, T-Walls should be

constructed first. Walls of different

concrete thicknesses can be joined at

T-Wall intersections.

Installation

Use a full 4 foot [122cm] panel to

form the back of the T-wall (“the

outside of the wall running through”).

Avoid placing the panel joints in line

with the T, where higher concrete

pressures exist during concrete

placement. Align the end of the

panel/vertical joint with the outside of

the intersecting wall.

Place two panels for the intersecting

wall so intersecting panels will run

into the main wall. Place the smaller

Inside Corner Bracket over the two

90 corners.

PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 53: T-Wall Panel & Tie Placement

Set the inside panels so as to butt into the intersecting wall, and maintain the normal layout with the outer panels,

keeping their ends aligned. To secure the outside wall (see figures below), either install two Outside Corner Brackets so

they span the concrete cavity, flip toward each other and overlap one on top of the other.

Place three Full Ties in the main and intersecting walls, filling the slots as close to the inside corners as possible.

Cut tie flanges and place between Full Ties at the center of the T into the overlapping Outside Corner Brackets, using

one flange at least every 4" [10cm].

Place a Full Tie in the Corner Bracket at the top of the intersecting wall.

Second row panels should follow the normal 2 foot [61cm] offset with the middle of the panels falling on the joints of the

panels below. Cut the last panel to allow for the T intersection. Start the second row of the intersecting wall with 2 foot

[61cm] panels. Repeat the bracket the tie pattern from the first row. If you didn’t use the two Outside Corner Brackets

across the cavity, brace the back side of the T with conventional bracing.

Note: Always pour concrete into the straight wall first and afterwards into the intersecting T-wall.

Page 44 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 54: T-Wall Assembly w/ two Outside Corner Brackets (plan view)

Figure 55: T-Wall Assembly with 2 Outside Corner Brackets (3D)

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 45


PRODUCT MANUAL

Building Tip: Position the panels that form the back of the T-Wall so a vertical seam will not align with the intersecting

wall. Be sure to always brace the back side of any T-Wall intersection when not using the two outside

corner brackets, as the ties are placed further apart at this location. Never direct the flow of the concrete

during the pour into the backside of the T-Wall, i.e. pour the straight wall first then the intersecting wall.

Pilasters and Square Columns

If the building design calls for the support of heavy beams, posts, or other elements, a pilaster or column may be required

at specified points along the wall line. Quad-Lock is the ideal ICF system for these building elements, as the ties can be

threaded through reinforcing bar cages that are commonly used in these instances. Metal corner brackets insure a rigid

corner construction.

From the building plans, determine the center line of the pilaster, and cut back the panels ½ of the total pilaster width + 2"

[51mm] in either direction along the wall line. This will result in a cut out that is 4" [102mm] larger than the pilaster, and

will allow the intersecting panels to lap inside the main wall line. Also, determine whether the pilaster depth must be

centered on the wall or offset, and cut one or two sides accordingly.

Cut a panel piece using the called out pilaster width and rounding up to the nearest even 2" [51mm] increment. This will

serve as the panel that is parallel to the wall line.

Cut two panels to dimension by adding 4" [102mm] to the called out pilaster depth, rounding up to the nearest 2" [51mm]

increment. These will be the sides of the pilaster, and must run inside the main wall line, and lap past the parallel end

panel. (See diagram below.) It is important to lap these panels inside the main wall line to place them in compression

against the main wall to better resist concrete pressure.

Place Inside Corner Brackets at the two inside corners. Place two Outside Corner Brackets on the outside corners of the

pilaster, lapping in the middle. Place two more Outside Corner Brackets in the opposite direction, similar to T-wall

construction and lap toward each other. This will secure the outside panel and reduce the need for bracing. (see T-wall

diagram in the previous section)

If the pilaster is wider than 12" [305mm], connect a standard sized tie to a 12" [305mm] XT-Extender Tie to equal the

width of the pilaster, to the nearest 2" [51mm] increment. In general terms, it is best to cut ties apart into split ties for this

application. This will allow ties to easily fit around rebar cages. Ties will span the width of the column only, and the depth

(transverse to the main wall) of the pilaster will be secured by metal brackets and cut flanges. Two “cross ties” (see

Figure 56) should be placed over the top of transverse ties to support the sides of the pilaster.

Place cut flanges in slots not used by full-width ties to secure the metal brackets together, in at least every other slot.

This will provide the rigidity necessary to resist concrete pressure.

Secure vertical bracing to the outside of the pilaster to insure that it doesn’t shift during the pour.

As with T-walls, pour concrete into the main wall next to the pilaster, and let concrete flow into the pilaster. Vibrate the

steel cage for best results, rather than inserting the vibrator down into the pilaster.

Page 46 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 56: Pilaster Built with Quad-Lock Components

Round Columns:

Round columns can be easily formed by using FAST TUBE (TM) brand fabric column forms, available from Quad-Lock.

Column diameters from 6" to 12" [152-305mm] are available in 65 ft. rolls [19.8m], and are easily cut to length with a

razor knife. The reinforced fabric is unaffected by rain or groundwater, and can be used in any weather condition.

Contact your local Quad-Lock dealer for availability, and visit www.quadlock.com for a link to the FAB FORM website.

Radius Walls

Radius walls with a radius as small as 2½' [75cm] can be built by making saw cuts on the compressive side of the

panels. A sliding radial arm saw with cut depth control is most effective. A Flex Track is used at the bottom of the first

course of panels (see brochure below). Low-expansion polyurethane foam adhesive (e.g. Enerfoam) should be sprayed

in each horizontal panel seam to make the radius rigid and to reduce bracing requirements. Again offset the panels from

one course to the next by 24" [60cm]. Brace the radius more frequently than straight walls (see Chapter 3: Bracing on

Page 96).

Cutting Panels

Make sure to cut the compressive sides of the panels and that the cuts are centered over the knobs between the groves

and NOT over the 2" [5cm] groves in the panels. For radii 7½' [225cm] or less (“tight radius”) always make a cut at both

ends of the panels over the first knob (between the panel’s end and the first groove).

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 47


PRODUCT MANUAL

CUT DEPTH SHOULD BE NOTED TO BE 1⅛" [29mm] FOR REGULAR PANELS AND 3⅜" [86mm] FOR PLUS

PANELS.

Figure 57: Radius Wall – Panels Cuts

Cut Locations

Cuts should be placed 4" [102mm] apart for most radii. The larger the radius, the fewer cuts need to be made. The

smaller the radius, the more cuts need to be made. In some instances, no cuts are needed, and the wall will bend

sufficiently in stock condition.

Cut Depths

1⅛" to 1¼" [29-32mm] is the suggested depth for all cuts in Regular Panels. 3⅛" to 3¼" [79-83mm] is the suggested

depth for all cuts in Plus Panels.

The key is the width of each cut, and how much material is being removed to facilitate the bend on the inside face of

the radius. Wider cuts will allow the panel to bend more. In some cases, a double saw blade can be used.

This is particularly important when making radius walls with the Plus Panel. Plus Panels will require quite wide cuts in

order to bend. (On the order of ¼" [6mm] to ⅜" [9mm] The cut depth on Plus Panels is always 3⅛" to 3¼" [79-83mm].

Note: As the panels are stacked, check plumb at each course. The panels will naturally want to lean “out”. As with

angled walls, and out-of-plumb radius wall cannot easily be pushed “in”, as the panels need to get shorter to do

so. Only glue seams after you are certain of the panel length. Seat the panel on the bottom ties, leaving a 1"

[25mm] gap; apply low-expansion polyurethane spray foam and press the panel down. This will prevent the wall to

“grow” while building up. it will also make bracing redundant in radius walls up to 4' [120cm] high.

Ties for Radius Walls

The ties in radius walls will not always perfectly line up in a uniform fashion because of the different length of the inside

and outside panels. You may have to bend ties a little or split them apart to make them fit. Because of this the resulting

cavity may appear to be a little smaller than specified, however, the pressure of the concrete during concrete placement

will push it back out into place.

Tight Radius

Split ties need to be used instead of Full Ties for radii of 7½' [225cm] or less (“tight radius”). Ensure that no more than 3

knobs or 6" [15cm] are between split ties on the radius’ outside and that all vertical seams of panels have a split tie on

each side of the seam.

Page 48 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 58: Radius Wall (tight radius)

Wide Radius

Full ties can be used for radii of 7½' [225cm] and above. Ensure that no more than 4 knobs or 8" [20cm] are between full

ties and that full ties or split ties straddle all vertical seams of panels.

Figure 59: Radius Wall (wide radius)

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 49


PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 50 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Flex-C Trac ® - Continued

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 51


PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 52 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Flex-C Angle ® - Continued

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 53


Wide Walls and Special Building Elements

PRODUCT MANUAL

Quad-Lock is un-matched in its ability to create walls and special elements of varying cavity sizes. Wall widths of 4"

[102mm], 6" [152mm], 8" [203mm], 10" [254mm] and 12" [305mm] are constructed using the desired Full Tie. For

projects requiring a wall thickness larger than these standard widths, Full Ties may be combined with XT-Extender Ties.

Special building elements that need even wider sizes can be constructed by attaching a second XT-Extender Tie to the

other end of the Full Tie. For example, a Blue (6" [152mm]) Full Tie with two XT-Extender Ties would yield a 30"

[762mm] cavity. (12"+ 12" + 6" = 30" [305mm + 305mm + 152mm = 762mm])

Extender Tie

Quad-Lock Extender Tie allows builders to create walls of almost any desired concrete thickness. Extender Ties are

designed to interlock with regular Full Ties to add exactly 12" (305mm) of concrete cavity size. They are differentiated by

their orange color, and the interlock system on one pair of flanges.

Cavity Size Generated (exact)

Extender Tie + Full Tie R-22 (U-0.28) R-30 (U-0.20) R-38 (U-0.15)

XT + FTB 4 (Black Tie)

XT + FTB 6 (Blue Tie)

XT + FTY 8 (Yellow Tie)

XT + FTG 10 (Green Tie)

XT + FTR 12 (Red Tie)

XT+ XT + FTB 4 (Black Tie)

Etc.

15.75” 13.75” 11.75”

400mm 349mm 298mm

17.75” 15.75” 13.75”

451mm 400mm 349mm

19.75” 17.75” 15.75”

502mm 451mm 400mm

21.75” 19.75” 17.75”

552mm 502mm 451mm

23.75” 21.75” 19.75”

603mm 552mm 502mm

27.75” 25.75” 23.75”

705mm 654mm 603mm

To assemble, simply slide the flanges of a Full Tie into the receiving flanges of an XT-Extender Tie, and tap into place

with a hammer, or tap the assembly against a hard surface. The Full Tie flanges will “click” into place and cannot be

forced out of position by falling concrete during placement. Be sure to seat the Full Tie flanges completely into the XT-

Extender tie receiving flanges.

Once assembled, use the combination ties to form walls with cavities sized according to the chart above. Place at the

normal recommended 12" (305mm) horizontal and vertical spacing. Secure horizontal rebar to vertical rebar with plastic

zip ties to keep added weight off longer ties, which may cause deflection. Wider wall cavities may generate higher

formwork pressure when poured with concrete. Pay close attention to mix design and minimize the amount of water in

the mix. Achieve higher slumps by adding plasticizing agents, not water. Monitor slump carefully during the pour, and do

not exceed the recommended 5 to 6" [127 – 152mm] slump. Vibration should be done carefully and only by experienced

crew members.

Page 54 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 60: Extender Tie Assembly (18" [457mm] cavity shown)

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 55


Figure 61: Wide Walls

PRODUCT MANUAL

Building Tip: Assemble fewer XT-Extender Ties + Full Ties than you think you will need for the job. Toward the end

of the installation, make up the balance of the ties when you have an accurate count of what is required.

Any extra assembled ties will be difficult to disassemble.

Page 56 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Tall Walls

Because accepted standards for concrete placement discourage excessive fall of concrete during the pour, tall walls

generally should be constructed in maximum 10' [3m] increments. Check with the project engineer for specifications on

placement of cold joints.

Bracing

Most commercial grade wall bracing systems have brackets available that will allow the extension of the vertical bracing

members from the first 10' [3m] section. Leave the first level bracing in place, and extend upward into your next pour with

the extension brackets. Extra long lateral turnbuckle braces are also available to allow fine adjustments on taller walls.

Remember that working platforms over 6 feet in height must have guardrails attached. Modern ICF bracing systems are

equipped with railing adaptors that are in compliance with local and national safety standards.

Some systems have adaptors that will fasten the vertical strong-backs laterally to conventional scaffolding which is

erected next to the wall. Other systems are designed to fit on top of conventional scaffold brackets and moved from story

to story as the building progresses. Contact the Quad-Lock Training and Technical Services Dept. for details on bracing

options.

If tall walls must be poured monolithically, Quad-Lock recommends that 6" [15cm] diameter access ports be cut in the

wall at about 6' [1.8m] intervals (make sure to not cut areas that have ties). Pour the wall from the side until the concrete

reaches the level of the cut-outs. Steel should be vibrated from the top of the wall to ensure consolidation of concrete.

Save the foam cut-outs and put them back in the wall, bracing them by screwing plywood over the holes and into ties.

Continue with the pour from the top (or the next set of access ports), as soon as you are able to place concrete without

excessive fall, which may cause segregation of the concrete.

Monolithic Pour

The light weight nature of the Quad-Lock system makes it suitable for the simultaneous monolithic pour of the footing and

wall. A monolithic pour is used to eliminate the need for multiple trips by the pumping equipment and to eliminate the cold

joint between the footing and wall.

• Use 2x material for footing forms, and at least 50% more stakes than normal. If the wall is higher than 4' [1.2m),

make the footing extra wide to allow pouring from each side (between the wall and footing forms). Before the final

grade is set, cut rot resistant 1x4 spreaders and attach them to the 2x footing forms at maximum 3' [1m] intervals.

• Set the footing forms to grade and secure into place with stakes. Strike the building line on top of the 1x4 spreaders

with a chalk line.

• Now fasten the Metal Track to the 1 x 4 spreaders using the chalk line as a guide with screws through the Metal

Track. A self tapping screw works best. Cut wooden spacers to set the inside track, and fasten to the 1 x 4

spreaders.

• Now set the Quad-Lock Panels into the track in the same fashion you would on a pre-poured footing.

• Brace the wall as you normally would by screwing bracing to the ties.

• On walls 4' [1.2m] high and under, fill the footing from the top of the wall. On walls higher than that, fill the footing

first from the sides, pouring through the gap left between the Quad-Lock Panels and the footing forms.

• Space the arrival of concrete trucks to allow a few extra minutes of set time for the footings before pouring the

walls. When the footings begin to set, continue the pour in the walls.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 57


VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

QUAD-LOCK TIE

CONTINOUS STEEL REINF.

AS SPECIFIED

SECURE TO METAL OMEGA-TRACK

Figure 62: Typical Monolithic Footing / Wall Set Up

Wall Width Transitions

PRODUCT MANUAL

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

FOUNDATION DOWELS

AT REQUIRED SPACING

SECURE TO METAL O-TRACK

& QUAD-LOCK TIES

METAL J-TRACK

SECURED TO METAL O-TRACK

METAL OMEGA-TRACK AT 24" O.C.

SECURED TO 2x or PLYWOOD FORMS

STEEL OR WOOD STAKES FOR FORM

SUPPORT

Wall width transitions are easily accomplished using the Quad-Lock Plus Panels on the transition layer. When

incorporating wall width transitions in your project for transitioning from one wall thickness to another, it is important to

follow these suggestions:

• A wall width transition generally occurs where a floor ties into a wall or from one story to the next. A good practice is

to build a maximum of 2' [60cm] above the transition (and accommodate the floor connection). Then, pour a

maximum of 16" [40cm] above the transition, with floor ledger attachment accessories already in place. When the

concrete is sufficiently cured, install the floor system, which can then serve as a platform to build the next story of

concrete walls.

• IMPORTANT: Always cover (protect) ties, slots, and foam interlocks during the pour if you intend on building walls

higher. Concrete spilled on the panels and ties will prevent a proper fit on the next row. Use pieces of Quad-Lock

Metal Track, or plastic rain gutter as a shield. Slide them along the wall under the concrete pump hose as you pour.

• To step out, place a Plus Panel with the inner row of tie slots lined up with the ties below, and place the next larger

tie size in the outer row of slots at the top of the Plus panel. Next, place a Regular Panel on the wider tie and

continue the wall at the new cavity width.

• To ensure good consolidation, cut the bottom inside edge of the Plus Panel at a 45° angle to permit better concrete

flow.

Page 58 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Wall Width Transition using Quad-Lock Plus Panels (w/ Ledger Board Connection)

QUAD-LOCK FS PANEL

QUAD-LOCK TIE

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

SIDING AS SPECIFIED

ATTACHED TO FASTENING STRIP

Figure 63: Wall Width Transition & Ledger Connection

C

W

W-2" [W-51mm]

C-2" [C-51mm]

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

CROP-OUT FOAM AS REQUIRED

SUBFLOOR

WOOD JOISTS AS SPECIFIED

LEDGER BOARD SECURED

TO WALL WITH ANCHOR BOLTS

AT REQUIRED SPACING

QUAD-LOCK PLUS PANEL FOR TRANSITION

(MITER AT BOTTOM TO AVOID VOIDS

UNDERNEATH THE PLUS PANEL)

QUAD-LOCK REGULAR PANEL

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 59


Figure 64: Wall Width Transition using Quad-Lock Plus Panels

PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 60 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Double Walls / Common Walls

Double Walls or Common Walls are easily built using a Quad-Lock Plus Panels in the middle and offsetting the ties for

the two sides of the walls. Fully push down the ties that are seated in the Plus Panel the wrong way.

Figure 65: Double Wall / Common Wall

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 61


Foundation Walls

PRODUCT MANUAL

If the Quad-Lock system is chosen as an alternate or a substitute to a conventionally formed foundation wall, design

professionals should ensure to account for the 2¼" [57mm] or 4¼" [108mm] thickness of the panels at the footing and sill

plate. The structural aspects of the concrete wall design are the same as for conventional cast in place concrete walls.

Note: Building codes in the USA and Canada have prescriptive design specifications which may be

used without the need for site specific engineering. See Appendix C for specific code

references.

Foundation Vents:

Use off-the-shelf plastic foundation vents sized to the outer dimensions of the Quad-Lock wall, and foam into place prior

to pour. Be sure to consolidate concrete under vents.

Some building codes, e.g. USA-IRC, require damp-proofing and/or waterproofing of foundation walls.

Figure 66: Vent Wall Penetration

WINDOW AND DOOR OPENINGS

Window and door rough openings, specified by the window or door manufacturers, are accommodated by installing a

frame in the Quad-Lock wall (referred to as a window buck or door buck). The manner in which window and door

openings in Quad-Lock ICF walls are formed is a function of three issues:

1. The desired architectural detail after the concrete is poured.

2. How the window/door frame is to be attached to the wall.

3. The position in which the window or door is required to remain, in relation to the center line of the wall.

Treated wood or plastic forms may be left in the wall permanently; wood or metal forms may be removed after the pour,

leaving a concrete surface to mount frames to. It may even be the case that a fully insulated window opening may be

desired to minimize the thermal transfer around the opening. Pressure treated lumber can be used in direct contact with

concrete. If pressure treated lumber is not used, some method of protecting the wood from contact with the concrete is

necessary, e.g. peel and stick window flashing. Ask the wood supplier for fasteners which are appropriate for use with

pressure treated material, as the treated wood can be highly corrosive.

Page 62 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 67: Wood Buck-Out and Bracing

Method 1: Internal Wood Bucks

In many areas, it is acceptable to leave pressure treated wood in the wall in contact with the concrete. In this case, wood

members matching the internal cavity dimension of the Quad-Lock wall are fashioned into a “buck-out” or “shuttering” to

create a rough opening for windows and doors.

The inside face of the lumber becomes the rough opening dimension and Quad-Lock Panels are run past the wood

member. The buck should be fastened at 6" [15cm] on center with 3" [75mm] long screws (or 5" [10cm] for Plus Panels)

and Wind-Locks or equivalent fastening plates. Pre-set the screws in Wind-Locks, and fasten through the Quad-Lock

Panels into the wood buck. Pull the Wind-Lock tight into the foam, so the Wind-Lock reverses its shape and is below the

surface of the panel. The EPS foam is later trimmed back to the inside edge of the wood, which remains in place.

Wind-Lock screws must be long enough to penetrate the Quad-Lock Panels plus ¾" [18mm] into the wood member.

Most builders place a number of galvanized nails into the lumber on the concrete side of the buck to remain in the pour

and provide shear value to the entire frame.

Frames should be assembled such that the top member is supported by the side members. All materials used must be

acceptable for use in conjunction with concrete.

Usually, the opening is made large enough to accommodate a second “liner” of 2x material [40mm thick lumber], to which

the window or door flange is attached. This liner may be left flush with the outside of the wall, or recessed to create

different architectural details. Some prefer to simply caulk behind the window flanges and set the window against the

foam, securing the flange through the EPS panel and into the wood member with long screws.

For the bottom, or sill, use two 2x4s on edge to create an opening to pour through, instead of full cavity width lumber.

Fasten the panels to the wood with Wind-Locks and screws. An alternate method for the sill is to use Quad-Lock Wire

Top Ties and Metal Track to form the sill instead of wood. This leaves the sill 100% open for rebar placement and

pouring and consolidation of concrete.

Trim off excess EPS foam from around the opening. Internal bucks larger than 3 feet [1m] in width or height should be

braced so the maximum span vertically or horizontally is 3 feet [1m]. Always check for Plumb, Square and Level.

Drive galvanized nails or screws into the back side of the buck to provide shear value. Refer to the detail drawing below.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 63


Figure 68: Window Attachment Options

PRODUCT MANUAL

Building Tip: Pre-assemble all door and window bucks for the job. Pull cross dimensions to insure that the buck is

square and nail a brace on to hold it in square. Nail two pieces of scrap lumber across the sill to hold the

buck in position when you set it in the wall. Number the bucks and have them available for placement in

the wall when the proper wall height is reached.

Method 2: External Wood Bucks

Window and door bucks that span the wall width (called external bucks) are no longer recommended by Quad-Lock.

This style of buck is (wood) material intensive, and creates a thermal bridge that compromises the integrity of the thermal

envelope. Contact the Quad-Lock Training and Technical Services Dept. for ideas on how to treat window and door

openings.

GREEN BUILDING TIP: Use window buck lumber to form footings, using Fab-Form footing fabric to minimize

jobsite waste, and gain points for recycled materials. Re-use footing forms as window/door buck-out material.

Method 3: Permanent Plastic Frames

Many builders use specially designed plastic frame material that is

fashioned into full wall width frames which both form the concrete and

serve as an attachment point for windows and doors. In this case, the

EPS panels must be cut precisely to size and the plastic frames are fit

over the panel edges, and fastened into place with spray foam adhesive.

Some systems have ‘tie-backs” which reach back into the wall cavity and

are secured to form ties to help resist concrete pressure during the pour,

and keep the frame in place. Care must be taken that the inside of the

frames are adequately braced to resist bowing during the concrete pour.

Always check for Plumb, Square, and Level.

Method 4: Fully Insulated Openings

In areas of extreme cold, it may be desirable to fully wrap the window or door opening with EPS panel material in order to

minimize thermal bridging at window and door locations. In this case, the Quad-Lock Window Bracket is used in pairs at

each level to secure short pieces of panel material into place at each level during assembly. Tie flanges are placed into

the metal brackets on the inside of the window opening to provide points of attachment every 12" [305mm]. While the

Window Brackets are quite sturdy, it is advisable to use a wood brace around the entire interior face of the opening to

assure dimensional stability.

At the header, a full-width wood form is used to support the concrete. Scrap foam is laid on the wood form inside the wall

cavity to provide the thermal break. At the bottom use Quad-Lock Wire Top Ties and Metal Track instead of wood. This

leaves the sill 100% open for concrete pouring and consolidation and provides for rebar placement. Once the sill

consolidates fill in with excess foam panels and fasten with sprayfoam to existing concrete and Quad-Lock Panels.

See Figure 67 for details.

Page 64 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 69: Insulated Opening

Method 5: Exposed Concrete Rough Openings

In some areas and in certain types of construction, it is not customary to leave any material, wood or plastic, in the

window or door rough opening, and only a concrete face is desired. This is easily attained by using the same method as

above in Permanent Internal Wood Frames, but decreasing the size of the buck-out (or shuttering) to make the outside

surface of the wooden form match the desired concrete rough opening size. Quad-Lock Panels are still run past the

wood form and fastened with Wind-Lock plastic plates and screws, but no nails are placed into the concrete side of the

form. The concrete side of the form is treated with a form release agent. The entire form is then braced into position for

the pour. After the pour, screws and Wind-Locks are removed, and the foam is cut with a circular saw back to the edge

of the concrete. The entire form assembly is removed, cleaned, and saved for later use.

REMOVE FORM AND

FOAM AS SHOWN

Figure 70: Attachment Options of Windows to Concrete

Installation of Window Bucks

REMOVE FORM AND

FOAM AS SHOWN

OPTION 1 OPTION 2 OPTION 3

When reaching the level to install the pre-fabricated window bucks, or rough openings, determine the sill height, and

mark it on the inside panels. Center the opening according to the plans, and cut the foam away down to the required

height for your type of buck with a hand saw. Cut the outside panels in a similar fashion. Attach blocks to the sill of

internal bucks to help position them.

Lift the pre-fabricated assembly into position, and have a crew member tack it into place using Wind-Lock style fasteners

and appropriately sized screws.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 65


PRODUCT MANUAL

Check the sill for level and adjust. Now continue on with building the wall around the window bucks. Run panels just past

the inside of the bucks. Place split ties as close to the buck as possible.

Fasten around both sides of the perimeter of the buck, using Wind-Locks and screws at maximum 6" [152mm] centers.

Trim away excess foam with a hand saw. Make sure that you have access to the wall cavity through the sill, to ensure

concrete consolidation. Reduce waste by saving all your leftover pieces that are 12" [305mm] long or more, and using

them on the second to last row at the top of the wall where there is less form pressure.

When window and door openings occur in locations close to corners, the corners may tend to act more like columns and

require additional tie-backs. When an opening is less than 4 feet [1.2m] from a corner, span a 2x from the corner across

the opening and well into the wall beyond at about 3 ft. [90cm] O.C. vertically. Screw through the 2x into the tie flanges

to anchor the corner back to the rest of the wall on the other side of the opening.

Attaching Storm or Typhoon Shutters

Many hurricane-prone coastal or island communities are now requiring storm or

typhoon shutters on the exterior openings of buildings. In this case, it is wise to

have a concrete surface to mount the shutter directly to, rather than reaching

through the EPS panels with long fasteners into the concrete. Long fasteners that

penetrate the foam are subject to a “cantilever” condition that will put large

amounts of shear stress on them, and are therefore not advisable.

A form must be constructed that is a hybrid of the Internal Wood Buck described

above, and an External Wood Buck made from plywood. This hybrid form will

allow the concrete to flow to the outside of the building in a band along the header

and sill of the window or door, to which storm shutters can be properly attached.

External plywood form components should be made large enough to be screwed

to tie flanges above and below the opening. See diagram for suggestions on

construction of a hybrid form.

Windows at Corners:

Figure 71: Attachment of Roll-Up Storm Shutter

IMPORTANT: When window and door openings occur in locations close to corners, the corners may tend to act more

like columns and require additional tie-backs. When an opening is less than 4 ft [120cm] from a corner, span a 2x from

the corner across the opening and well into the wall beyond at about 3 ft. [91cm] o.c. vertically. Screw through the 2x

into the tie flanges to anchor the corner back to the rest of the wall on the other side of the opening.

Page 66 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

WINDOW ROUGH OPENING (INTERNAL BUCK)

GAP FOR PLACEMENT

& VIBRATION/RODDING

OF CONCRETE

Figure 72: Window Rough Opening (Internal Buck)

WINDLOCKS (FASTENERS)

12"

FOR 6" WALL USE 2x6" LUMBER

FOR 8" WALL USE 2x8" LUMBER

FOR 10" WALL USE 2x10" LUMBER

INSET BUCK

LET PANELS RUN BY

AND TRIM

METAL J-TRACK

SECURELY FASTENED @ 24" (610mm) O.C.

BRACE ALL OPENINGS

EXCEEDING 3'0" (915mm)

IN LENGHT/HEIGHT

PRESSURE TREATED 2X LUMBER

ANCHORS AS REQUIRED

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 67

8"


DOOR ROUGH OPENING (INTERNAL BUCK)

Figure 73: Door Rough Opening

WINDLOCKS (FASTENERS)

12"

INSET BUCK (PRESSURE TREATED)

LET PANELS RUN BY

AND TRIM

PRODUCT MANUAL

FOR 6" WALL USE 2x6" LUMBER

FOR 8" WALL USE 2x8" LUMBER

FOR 10" WALL USE 2x10" LUMBER

BRACE ALL OPENINGS

EXCEEDING 3'0" (915mm)

IN LENGHT/HEIGHT

METAL J-TRACK

SECURELY FASTENED @ 24" (610mm) O.C.

Page 68 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

ARCHED WINDOW ROUGH OPENING (INTERNAL BUCK)

Figure 74: Arched Openings

WINDLOCKS (FASTENERS)

12"

INSET BUCK (PRESSURE TREATED)

LET PANELS RUN BY

AND TRIM

FOR 6" WALL USE 2x6" LUMBER

FOR 8" WALL USE 2x8" LUMBER

FOR 10" WALL USE 2x10" LUMBER

PLYWOOD FRAME REINFORCEMENT

PLYWOOD FRAME (PRESSURE TREATED)

METAL J-TRACK

SECURELY FASTENED @ 24" (610mm) O.C.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 69


Typical Lintel with Stirrups Detail

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

QUAD-LOCK TIE

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

CORROSION RESITANT FASTENER

IN STAGGERED PATTERN

TO ATTACH BUCK TO CONCRETE

AIR SPACE / INSULATION

2x6 WOOD SPACER

(MOVE IN FOR RECESSED WINDOW)

P.T. INTERNAL WINDOW BUCK

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

WATERPROOFING

AT REQUIRED SPACING CAULKING

Figure 75: Typical Lintel with Stirrups Detail

PRODUCT MANUAL

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

TOP LINTEL REINFORCEMENT

AS SPECIFIED

STIRRUPS AS SPECIFIED

BOT. LINTEL REINFORCEMENT

AS SPECIFIED

FASTEN WINDOW AS SHOWN

WINDOW FRAME

GLAZING

FLASHING

Page 70 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

WINDOW INSTALLATION:

Windows can be attached to rough openings in Quad-Lock walls in one of several ways:

1. Screw window flanges to stops that are fastened to internal buck-outs. This method will have required oversizing

the rough openings by 2 times the stop material thickness. (Example 1½" + 1½"= 3" [38mm + 38mm = 76mm]) It is

advisable to add a small amount of extra room to insure a fit.

2. Screw windows to “L” metal that has been fastened to bare concrete, left exposed after removal of temporary rough

opening forms. Flangeless windows are generally fastened through the window frame and directly into concrete.

3. Use adhesive and 3¼" [83mm] min. length screws to fasten window flanges to surface of foam, and into internal

buck-out material behind foam panels.

4. Flangeless windows are generally fastened through the window frame and directly into concrete, left exposed after

removal of temporary rough opening forms.

Window Flashing:

When installing windows, Quad-Lock recommends that proper precautions are made to resist the intrusion of water

through the window opening. In addition to adherence to the window manufacturer’s recommendations, Quad-Lock

makes the following recommendations:

• Window rough openings should be flashed with a durable waterproof flashing material which is rated for contact

with Expanded Polystyrene

• Layers of flashing should be “shingled” from the bottom of the window opening to allow moisture to shed away from

the opening. Flash the sill area first, then install the window with caulking, then the side flashing, and lastly the

head flashing.

• “Peel-and-stick” flashing products should only be installed after a compatible primer is applied to the EPS to

promote adhesion and durability.

• If EIFS or cement-based stucco is to be applied as a finish layer, the surface of the flashing material should be

textured to promote adhesion between the flashing and the cladding product. (Suggest: Polyguard “Tile-Guard”

www.polyguardproducts.com)

Consult the window manufacturer’s installation instructions in all cases and call the Quad-Lock Technical Department

with questions.

FLOOR CONNECTIONS

Quad-Lock can accommodate several wall-to-floor connection details, depending on the type of floor system called for by

the building designer, including conventional lumber, engineered wood joist, metal joist, heavy timber, suspended

concrete slab, and concrete T-beam slab construction.

Ledger Connections for Wood Floors

Ledgers may be attached using most generally accepted building practices. Commonly, ledger boards are either pre-set

with bolts or attached using one of several ICF Ledger Connector systems.

ICF Ledger Connectors (ICFLC)

Quad-Lock distributes the ICF Ledger Connector System from Simpson Strong Tie Co. The system provides easy, quick

and versatile installation of ledgers for use with regular thickness Quad-Lock Panels. Ledger brackets can also be used

for the attachment of interior walls, overhead door attachment etc.

Quad-Lock recommends that the ICFLC, ICFLC-W, ICFLC-CW and their associated fasteners should NOT be used in

contact with treated lumber, in exterior applications, or anywhere water is likely to be present (unless you ensure

compatibility of your treated lumber with the metal components).

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 71


Figure 76: Installation of Floor Ledger with Bracket System

Installation

PRODUCT MANUAL

To install the brackets, use a laser level to determine the elevation of the ledger, usually the top of floor or roof joists.

Strike the line with a chalk line on the surface of the panels. Insert the fixed portion of the ledger bracket through the

foam, either at a vertical seam, or through a cut made with a drywall saw at spacing determined by the project engineer.

The ledger bracket is designed to be securely embedded in the concrete inside the wall. After the concrete is poured, recheck

and chalk the elevation of the ledger and the layout pattern of the brackets. Use the chalk line as the guide for

elevation.

Temporarily tack the ledger to the ties while fastening. Transfer that layout pattern to the ledger material, and fasten the

‘J’ shaped portion of the bracket to the ledger board. Fasten the assembled ledger to the fixed brackets using self tapping

screws provided.

Page 72 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Ledger Installation using ICF Ledger Connectors

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

PARGING MIN. PER CODE

WATERPROOFING AND DRAINAGE BOARD

ICFVL FLOOR HANGER BRACKET

AS SPECIFED

OR EQ. CAST INTO CONCRETE

INSTALL TO MANUFACTURER'S RECOMMENDATION

SLOPESIMPSON

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

FREE DRAINING BACKFILL

AS SPECIFIED

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

QUAD-LOCK TIE

Figure 77: Ledger Installation using ICF Ledger Connectors

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

SUBFLOOR

WOOD JOISTS AS SPECIFIED

WOOD LEDGER SUPPORTED BY SIMPSON

ICFVL-W/CW OR EQ.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 73


PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 74 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Pre-Set Ledger Boards with Bolts

Another common method of ledger attachment is to pre-set the ledger and bolts before pouring the concrete. To pre-set

wood or steel ledgers, cut holes in the panel at each anchoring location (avoiding the ties). Each hole in the panel must

be cut to the same height of the ledger. Ledger sizing, bolt pattern and spacing should be determined by a professional

engineer and/or applicable building codes. Brace and level ledgers prior to placement of concrete.

Typical Ledger Board Connection with Anchor Bolts

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

QUAD-LOCK TIE

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

Figure 78: Typical Ledger Board Connection w/ Anchor Bolts

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

SUBFLOOR

WOOD JOISTS AS SPECIFIED

LEDGER BOARD SECURED TO WALL

W/ ANCHOR BOLTS AT REQUIRED SPACING

CROP-OUT FOAM AS REQUIRED

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 75


Typical Ledger Board Connection with Anchor Bolts and Wall Width Transition:

Figure 79: Installation of Floor Ledger with Conventional J-Bolts

PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 76 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

LEDGER PLACEMENT AND SUPPORT

(CAST IN PLACE)

HOLES CUT IN PANELS

TO MATCH ANCHOR BOLTS

AND WIDTH OF LEDGER BOARD

METAL J-TRACK

SECURELY FASTENED @ 24" (610mm) O.C.

NOTE:

LEDGER BOARD TO BE PRESSURE TREATED

OR PROTECTED WITH PEEL& STICK FROM CONCRETE

Figure 80: Ledger Placement and Support

Concrete Floor Connections

ANCHOR BOLTS WITH NUTS

ON BOTH SIDES OF LEDGER BOARD

PREASSEMBELED

FASTEN LEDGER BOARD

INTO QUAD-LOCK PLASTIC TIES

2X4 SPACER TO SUPPORT METAL BRACE

FASTENED TO QUAD-LOCK PLASTIC TIES

When it is necessary to connect a poured-in-place concrete suspended slab to a Quad-Lock wall, the connection must be

planned carefully in advance. The project engineer should be involved in the planning, and must approve final details.

Generally, care must be taken to provide for steel reinforcing to connect the walls and the slab. The elevation of the slab

must be carefully calculated, and provisions made for forming the slab with Quad-Deck, or conventional suspended slab

forming and shoring.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 77


Slab Edge Forms:

PRODUCT MANUAL

Quad-Lock Panels may be used as the “edge form” around the perimeter of the slab area where it intersects the exterior

walls. This can occur at a flat-roof to wall connection, a parapet wall to roof connection, or an intermediate floor to wall

connection (Figure 81).

The best means of stabilizing the Quad-Lock edge-form panels is to install Quad-Lock Slab Ties (at 24" [610mm]

horizontal intervals) two courses down from the top-of-slab elevation, and brace with 2x4s attached to the Slab Ties with

Quad-Lock Slab Brackets (Figure 81). As concrete is poured into the wall and encases the Slab Ties, they form a solid

attachment point for the vertical 2x4 braces, which extend 2 to 3 ft [610-914mm] down, and to the top of the edge-form

panels above (about 2 feet [610mm]). The Slab Tie acts as a fulcrum as concrete pressure is exerted against the edge

form panels, and the 2x4 [610mm x 1219mm] brace is prevented from rotating around that attachment by the solid

concrete wall below. A horizontal whaler is attached at the tops of the 2x4 [610mm x 1219mm] vertical braces, and Metal

Track is placed (temporarily) over the top panel edge to make the edge even more rigid.

If the above method is used, the entire structure can be assembled from platforms on succeeding floors, without having

to work on the outside of the building. This is a major advantage on multi-story construction.

NOTE: Vertical 2x4 [610mm x 1219mm] braces used in conjunction with Quad-Lock Slab Ties and Slab Tie Brackets

have NOT been certified to be in compliance with OSHA or other safety requirements to be used as guardrails

or other fall protection. Guardrails generally must be a minimum height of 39" [991mm] and be able to

withstand 200lbs [91kg] of lateral force. Consult your regional government safety officials for current

requirements on scaffolding, guardrails, and fall protection.

Figure 81: Concrete Floor Construction Details

Page 78 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Other Floor Connections

Typical Composite Steel Deck Slab Floor Connection with Steel Joists

PARGING MIN. PER CODE

WATERPROOFING AND DRAINAGE

BOARD AS SPECIFED

FREE DRAINING BACKFILL

AS SPECIFIED

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

QUAD-LOCK TIE

DOWELS AS SPECIFIED

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

SLOPE

Figure 82: Typical Composite Steel Deck Slab Floor Connection with Steel Joists

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

JOIST POCKET - 3.5" MIN. BEARING

WELDED WIRE MESH AS SPECIFIED

COMPOSITE STEEL

DECK-SLAB AS SPECIFIED

STEEL JOISTS AS SPECIFIED

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 79


Typical Hambro ® Composite Floor System Connection

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

QUAD-LOCK TIE

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

PARGING MIN. PER CODE

WATERPROOFING AND DRAINAGE

BOARD AS SPECIFED

FREE DRAINING BACKFILL

AS SPECIFIED

SLOPE

Figure 83: Typical Hambro Composite Floor System Connection

PRODUCT MANUAL

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

3.5" MIN. BEARING ON CONCRETE

WELDED WIRE MESH AS SPECIFIED

DOWELS AS SPECIFIED

FLOOR IS POURED PRIOR

TO INSTALLING NEXT STORY OF WALL

HAMBRO OWSJ SYSTEM

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

Page 80 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Typical Hollow Core Precast Floor Slab Connection

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

PARGING MIN. PER CODE

WATERPROOFING AND DRAINAGE

BOARD AS SPECIFED

FREE DRAINING BACKFILL

AS SPECIFIED

QUAD-LOCK TIE

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

SLOPE

Figure 84: Typical Hollow Core Precast Floor Slab Connection

FRAMING CONNECTIONS

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

FLOOR IS INSTALLED PRIOR TO INSTALLING

NEXT STORY OF WALL

HOLLOW CORE PRECAST PANEL SYSTEM

SLAB TOPPING AS SPECIFIED

HOLLOW CORE PANEL REINF.

AS SPECIFIED

ALLOW CONCRETE TO INFIL THE CORE

BY BREKING OUT TOP OF HOLOW CORE

SKIN AT EVERY DOWEL LOCATION

MIN. BEARING & BEARING PAD

AS SPECIFIED

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

When Quad-Lock walls are used as a basement or foundation only, with conventional framing above, many design

options are available depending on requirements.

Quad-Lock may be used in conjunction with all conventional building methods. Ledgers, joists, trusses and rafters of

wood or steel may be attached to the Quad-Lock walls. Quad-Lock recommends having an Engineer review specific

applications.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 81


SHEATHING

RIM BOARD

SILL PLATE

SHEATHING

RIM BOARD

SILL PLATE

FLASHING

Figure 85: Sill Plate Options

BLOCKING

SUBFLOOR

FLOOR JOIST

CANTILEVERED PLATE

SUBFLOOR

FLOOR JOIST

100% BEARING

WITH FLASHING

SHEATHING

DOUBLE

RIM BOARD

SILL PLATE

SHEATHING

RIM BOARD

SILL PLATE

PRODUCT MANUAL

SUBFLOOR

FLOOR JOIST

PREPENDICULAR TO WALL

CANTILEVERED PLATE

JOISTS PARALLEL JOISTS PREPENDICULAR

FLASHING

SUBFLOOR

FLOOR JOIST

100% BEARING

WITH FLASHING

Page 82 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Typical Wall to Floor & Framing Connection

TYP. BRICK VENEER OR OTHER

AIR SPACE AS SPECIFIED

SHEATHING AS SPECIFIED

RIM BOARD

SILL PLATE

QUAD-LOCK TIE

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

BRICK TIE

Figure 86: Typical Wall to Floor & Framing Connection

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

INSULATION AS SPECIFIED

SUBFLOOR

BLOCKING AS SPECIFIED

WOOD "I" JOIST

CEILING FINISH

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 83


Typical Roof Rafter or Truss - Low Uplift Connection

ROOF VENT

RAFTER AS SPECIFIED

ROOFING AS SPECIFIED

BLOCKING AS SPECIFIED

ROOF SHEATHING AS SPECIFIED

FS PANEL

EAVE VENT

2x BACKER

GLUE & SCREW TO FS PANEL

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

W/ RATED EXTERIOR SCREW

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

QUAD-LOCK TIE

Figure 87: Typical Roof Rafter or Truss - Low Uplift Connection

PRODUCT MANUAL

CEILING JOIST AS SPECIFIED

CEILING FINISH

INSULATION AS SPECIFIED

P.T. SILL PLATE W/ ANCHOR BOLT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

Page 84 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Typical Roof Rafter or Truss - Hurricane/Seismic Strap Connection

INSULATION AS SPECIFIED

RAFTER AS SPECIFIED

HURRICANE STRAP AS SPECIFIED

ROOFING AS SPECIFIED

BLOCKING AS SPECIFIED

ROOF SHEATHING AS SPECIFIED

FS PANEL

EAVE VENT

2x BACKER

GLUE & SCREW TO FS PANEL

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

W/ RATED EXTERIOR SCREW

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

QUAD-LOCK TIE

Figure 88: Typical Roof Rafter or Truss - Hurricane/Seismic Strap Connection

CEILING JOIST AS SPECIFIED

CEILING FINISH

INSULATION AS SPECIFIED

P.T. SILL PLATE W/ ANCHOR BOLT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 85


Typical Cantilevered Joist Connection

CONT. TIMBER STRAND

RIMBOARD OR APPROVED

EQUAL AS PER ENGINEER

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

REINFORCED CONCRETE CORE

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

PRODUCT MANUAL

CANTILIVERED JOIST

AS PER ENGINEERED PLAN DBL. PLATE W/ ANCHOR BOLT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

QUAD-LOCK TIE

Figure 89: Cantilevered Joist Connection

FRAMED WALL TYP.

INSULATION

HEADER/LINTEL REINFORCEMENT

AS SPECIFIED

I-JOISTS BLOCKING EACH SPACE

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

Page 86 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009

HIGHT OF OPENING


PRODUCT MANUAL

SOLID WALL CAP

In cases where a solid concrete cap is needed on top of a Quad-Lock wall, such as with retaining walls and some

foundation walls, screw plywood strips to the Metal Track as a form and screed line. Brace as needed.

MAX. = 6" [153mm]

MIN. = 3" [77mm]

FASTEN TO QUAD-LOCK TIES

AS SHOWN

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

QUAD-LOCK TIE

Figure 90: Forming for Solid Wall Cap

CONNECTIONS TO OTHER WALLS

Interior Partition Wall Connection

BEVEL EDGE OF CONCRETE

SECOND FORM LAYER

PLYWOOD FORM SPACER LAYER

TO ALLOW FOR EXTERIOR FINISH

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

The methods shown below or the ICF Ledger Connector System (see ICF Ledger Connector on Page 71) can be used

for the attachment of interior walls.

QUAD-LOCK TIE

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

Figure 91: Typical Interior Partition Wall Connection (plan view)

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

INTERIOR PARTITION WALL

MASONARY SCREW OR ANCHOR

AS SPECIFIED

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 87


QUAD-LOCK TIE

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

Figure 92: Typical Interior Partition Wall Connection, Direct to Concrete (plan view)

QUAD-LOCK TIE

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

EXTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

Figure 93: Typical Interior Partition Wall Connection, Screwed to Tie Flange (plan view)

PRODUCT MANUAL

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

INTERIOR PARTITION WALL

MASONARY SCREW OR ANCHOR

AS SPECIFIED

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

INTERIOR PARTITION WALL

GLUE TO QUAD-LOCK PANELS

& SCREW TO QUAD-LOCK TIES

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

Page 88 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Connection to Existing Concrete Wall

IF BLOCK EMPTY PROVIDE HOOKED BARS

AND FILL VOID SOLID W/ GROUT

PROVIDE DOWELS BETWEEN WALLS TO

MATCH HORIZONTAL REBAR

DRILL TO CONCRETE

& SECURE W/ EPOXY GROUT

QUAD-LOCK TIE

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

Figure 94: Typical Connection to Existing Concrete Wall

ELECTRICAL

EXISTING CMU WALL

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

Poured-in-place concrete walls formed and insulated by the Quad-Lock ICF system will accommodate electrical wiring

and fixtures, either in the concrete cavity before the pour using conduit, or after the pour by cutting chases in the foam for

wiring and boxes.

NOTE: CONFIRM THE FOLLOWING WITH LOCAL BUILDING OFFICIALS BEFORE BUILDING

While conduit can be set prior to the pour, field experience has shown that the after-pour method for placement of wiring

runs, boxes, and fixtures allows much more flexibility and is easier and less expensive for most electrical needs.

Recommended Tools

Field experience has also shown that several tools are useful in placement of electrical wiring and boxes in Quad-Lock

forms. These include:

• Hot Knife kit (Wind-Lock, Demand Products, or other)

• Electric chain saw for wiring runs

• Router for wiring runs

• Drywall saw

• Small roto-hammer drill

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 89


Service Access: (Pre-pour and After-pour methods)

PRODUCT MANUAL

Penetrations through walls for service access should be provided prior to pouring concrete by inserting a sleeve in a hole

cut in the Quad-Lock forms which is large enough to accommodate the wire or conduit necessary for service. Usually

this sleeve is a piece of PVC, ABS, or other plastic pipe. Mark the desired location for the service entrance by using the

sleeve for a template and draw the shape of the sleeve on the wall surface. Using a drywall saw, cut a hole to

accommodate the sleeve on both sides of the wall, and insert sleeve material. Use spray foam to secure the sleeve into

place for the concrete pour. MAKE SURE THAT YOUR SLEEVE MATERIAL IS COMPATIBLE WITH OTHER WIRING

OR CONDUIT THAT IS TO PASS THROUGH THE SLEEVE. When wire or conduit is in place, use spray foam to fill the

sleeve and secure wire or conduit.

Figure 95: Plumbing / Electrical Wall Penetration

Building Tip: Cut teeth in one end of a PVC pipe matching the desired hole size and “screw” it through the wall to

create the wall penetration. Reuse that piece for other holes.

Electrical Panel Placement:

Electrical panels can be placed on top of the foam or against concrete after the foam has been removed. It is not

suggested that an electrical panel be placed in the forms prior to pour and cast in place.

If a “surface-mount” of the electrical panel is desired, cut a piece of ½" [13mm] to ¾" [19mm] plywood to match the size

of the panel. Use a compatible adhesive or spray foam to glue the plywood to the surface of the foam, and also screw

the plywood to the flanges of plastic ties. A #8 or #10 screw has about 30 lbs of shear value per fastener, so use a

fastener count that exceeds the load to be placed on it. When the plywood is secured, mount the electrical panel to the

plywood with screws, or as recommended.

For excessively heavy panels, it may be desirable to use anchor bolts to connect directly to the concrete. Support the

box temporarily, and “through-drill” through the box, the foam panel, and into the concrete. Set anchor bolts into the

holes and set nuts as directed.

If a “flush-mount” is desired, pre-planning is required to substitute Quad-Lock Plus Panels at the location where the

electrical panel is to be mounted. The 4¼" [108mm] thick Plus Panels can be cut away from the mounting area to allow

a recessed installation of the panel. Direct connection to the concrete with anchor bolts or concrete screws is

recommended.

Box Placement:

Electrical boxes may be placed either prior to the concrete pour, using conduit inside the wall cavity, or after the pour by

cutting away the EPS insulation and exposing the concrete. Boxes should be sized to accommodate the wiring to be

placed inside, and be deep enough to connect to concrete, and still sit higher than the surface of the foam by the

thickness of the finish material (usually gypsum wallboard or stucco). Example: In the case of a 2¼" [57mm] Regular

Quad-Lock Panel, the box must be 2¾" [70mm] deep to touch the concrete, and remain flush to ½" [13mm] gypsum

wallboard attached to the foam.

Page 90 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Pre-Pour:

Before concrete is poured, have the electrician mark the exact location of all electrical boxes. Use the box as a template,

and use a felt pen to draw the shape of the box on the wall. Use an electric hot knife or hand saw to cut the foam away

to accommodate the box. Place the box in the hole and secure into place with spray foam. Be sure to check that boxes

are securely fastened in order to resist the pressure of a concrete pour. The electrician can now connect conduit to the

backs of the boxes at his discretion. Conduit should be secured into place with wire to the plastic ties. If the box does

not sit higher than the plane of the foam, use a “mud ring” to extend the box.

After-Pour:

Have the electrician mark the exact location of all electrical boxes. Use the box as a template and use a felt pen to draw

the shape of the box on the wall. Use an electric hot knife or hand saw to cut the foam away to accommodate the box.

Place the box in the hole and secure into place by drilling a hole through the box and into concrete with a hammer drill.

Use a concrete screw fastener (TapCon or equivalent) to affix the box firmly to concrete. Inspectors generally

discourage “shooting” boxes onto concrete with P.A.T. fastening devices, and will not approve adhesive caulk or spray

foam as a method to secure boxes. If the box does not sit higher than the plane of the foam, use a “mud ring” to extend

the box.

Wiring Runs:

Pre-Pour:

Conduit is placed in the wall cavity and connected to boxes or fixtures. Quad-Lock recommends that tie wire or plastic

zip ties be used to affix conduit to plastic Quad-Lock ties to avoid shifting during the pour. Double check to be sure that

all runs are complete and secured before pouring concrete. Use spray foam to seal gaps left in foam that might leak

concrete, and to secure boxes in place

Installation of conduit in Quad-Deck can be accomplished by cutting a shallow channel into the surface of the Quad-Deck

panels. Spray foam the conduit into place. It is permissible for conduit runs to pass through the T-beams, so long as it

does not displace reinforcing steel.

After-Pour:

Wiring runs can be made after concrete is poured by removing foam insulation to form a chase way. Conduit, sheathed

cable, or unsheathed cable (such as Type NM, if permitted) can be placed in the chase way and secured either to

concrete or with spray foam insulation. CONSULT LOCAL CODE REQUIREMENTS FOR SET-BACK REQUIREMENTS.

Regular Quad-Lock panels are 2¼" [57mm] thick, and can be cut back to concrete to easily provide a set-back of 1½"

[38mm] or more. Quad-Lock Plus Panels are 4¼" [108mm] thick, and can be cut open to easily accommodate conduit

runs up to 3¾" [95mm] in diameter. Many national codes require a minimum 1½" [38mm] setback from the surface of the

foam. Confirm this requirement in your area with your local electrical inspector.

When placing wire, conduit, or sheathed cable in the chase way, secure into place with daubs of spray foam at 3 ft. [1m]

intervals, allowing the cable to be open for inspection. After inspection, chase ways can be filled with spray foam to

preserve the insulation value of the wall. Spray foam must be rated for contact with polystyrene. Consult the Quad-Lock

list of approved companion products contained in this manual.

Recessed Lighting:

If recessed lighting is used in a Quad-Deck floor or in a Quad-Lock wall, it is recommended that light cans are cut into the

Quad-Deck or Quad-Lock. Low voltage fixtures should be used to minimize heat buildup inside the can.

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 91


Figure 96: Installation of Electrical Boxes and Wiring

Fixtures

Electrical Fixtures:

PRODUCT MANUAL

Small fixtures can be mounted on finished walls using appropriately sized drywall anchors. Use “Grappler” fastening

plates behind drywall for additional holding power. Larger fixtures should be fastened to expansion anchors set through

the foam panels and into the concrete (see Cabinetry and other Heavy Items on Page 94).

PLUMBING

Plumbing pipes and fixtures may be installed in conjunction with Quad-Lock in several ways (similar to Electrical

Installation / previous section):

Pre-Pour Method:

The supply and waste pipes may be installed, if permitted structurally, within the concrete cavity prior to placing concrete.

Ensure all plumbing is protected from direct contact with the concrete. Pressure tests of all cast-in-place plumbing should

be completed prior to placing concrete.

If some minor displacement of concrete is permitted structurally, plumbing chases can also be created by using

oversized plastic pipes cut lengthwise in half. Wire the pipe into place with the cut side along the inside of the wall cavity.

On the outside of the panel, wrap the wire around a small piece of wood to keep the wire from cutting into the foam.

Mark the location of the chase pipe on the outside of the wall with a felt pen for cutting after the concrete pour.

After-Pour Method:

Supply pipe may also be set in grooves or chases routed in the foam after placement of the concrete. Pipe locations

must conform to the minimum setback requirements of applicable building code unless protective measures are utilized.

Anchor plumbing directly to the concrete as required. After inspection, spray foam may be used to refill the grooves.

Anchor plumbing fixtures directly to the concrete or to blocking attached to concrete.

Page 92 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Service Access:

Penetrations through walls for service access should be provided prior to pouring concrete by inserting a sleeve in a hole

cut in the Quad-Lock forms which is large enough to accommodate the supply or drain pipe necessary for service.

Usually this sleeve is a piece of PVC, ABS, or other plastic pipe. Mark the desired location for the service entrance by

using the sleeve for a template and draw the shape of the sleeve on the wall surface. Using a drywall saw, cut a hole to

accommodate the sleeve on both sides of the wall, and insert sleeve material. Use spray foam to secure the sleeve into

place for the concrete pour. MAKE SURE THAT YOUR SLEEVE MATERIAL IS COMPATIBLE WITH OTHER PIPING

THAT IS TO PASS THROUGH THE SLEEVE. When piping is in place, use spray foam to fill the sleeve and secure

piping

Building Tip: Where laundry supply, larger vents, and other deep plumbing fixtures are required, substitute pieces of

Quad-Lock PLUS Panels for Quad-Lock 2¼" [57mm] Regular Panels to create an extra deep (4¼"

[107mm]) chase. Place PLUS Panel pieces flush to the rest of the wall surface, creating a short section

of concrete where the concrete wall section is 2" [51mm] thinner than the rest of the wall. Then, the 4¼"

[107mm] PLUS Panels can be cut away to permit installation of fixtures. This method should not create

structural problems, as long as normal rebar placement is maintained, and the area of thinner cross

section is limited. If there is a question, consult the project engineer for authorization.

Figure 97: Plumbing Installation (After-Pour Method)

GABLE FORMING

Quad-Lock can easily be incorporated into building above grade projects that require gabled roof ends. Stagger forms as

usual, up to the highest point of the roofline. Next determine your roof’s pitch and snap a chalk line on the side of the

panels. Cut panels to form the gable. Ensure to take into account the thickness of the plate/board on the top of the wall.

For low pitch roofs, a simple ladder brace (see detail) may be sufficient and concrete may be troweled to the pitch of the

roof.

For higher pitched roofs, a plywood cap with 2 x 4 rails may need to be secured to the top of the wall to contain the

concrete. Cut holes at 4' [1.2m] on center to fill the wall with concrete. Pour slowly and avoid the use of mechanical

vibration equipment in this case. Rod the concrete by hand or very carefully with a small mechanical pencil vibrator.

Concrete should not exceed the recommended slump of 6" [15cm].

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 93


BUILD OUT PAST DESIRED SLOPE

Figure 98: Gable Forming

CUT ENDS OF PANELS

CABINETRY AND OTHER HEAVY ITEMS

PRODUCT MANUAL

LADDER BRACE WITH

J-TRACK & CLEATS

@ 3'0" [915mm] O.C.

Quad-Lock Ties can support most finish materials quite adequately. However, for heavier items it will be necessary to

fasten directly to the concrete to incorporate more solid attachment surfaces. This can be achieved by replacing the foam

with wood members fastened directly into the concrete. Heavier items like kitchen cabinets can then be fastened directly

to the inserted wood members.

Building Tip: A favorite way to install cabinets is to chalk line the cabinet locations on the EPS foam surface before

the installation of drywall. Fasten ½" [13mm] plywood (or other thickness, depending on the drywall

size) to the wall by using spray foam and screws inside the cabinet area. Butt drywall up to the

plywood, and fasten normally by screwing to the plastic tie flanges. Screws are driven through the

backs of the cabinets into the plywood mounted on the wall. Use an adequate number of screws to hold

the anticipated load

Figure 99: Attaching Heavy Items

2.25" [57mm] QUAD-LOCK PANEL THICKNESS

COUNTERSINK FOR ANCHOR HEAD

ANCHOR BOLTS AS REQUIRED

2"x4" [38mm THICK] LUMBER

1"x4" [19mm THICK] LUMBER OR PLYWOOD

OPTION 1

SIMPSON ICFVL FLOOR HANGER BRACKET

OR EQ. CAST INTO CONCRETE

INSTALL TO MANUFACTURER'S RECOMMENDATION

OPTION 2

Page 94 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Attachment of Accessories to Wall:

Common drywall anchors can be used to hang accessory fixtures, much like cavity wall construction. The depth of the

anchor must be limited to the depth of the EPS panel, however, or concrete will prevent full insertion into the wall.

Examples of common anchors are as follows:

Toggler brand “Snapskru”

Alligator brand Solid Wall Anchor

Toggler brand “TH” Picture Hook Anchor

July 2009 Chapter 2 – Design & Construction Details Page 95


33 BBRRAACCIINNGG

PRODUCT MANUAL

Quad-Lock recommends the use of a pre-fabricated, re-useable metal alignment and scaffolding system. Metal Bracing

systems are available up to 30 feet [9m] high. Most Quad-Lock dealers have these systems for rent or sale. If you do not

have access to a Metal Bracing system you will need to construct bracing out of lumber.

SAFETY NOTE: Most national and regional safety standards require fall protection or guardrails for work platforms over

6 ft. [1.8 m] in height. In addition, guardrails generally must be a minimum 39" [991mm] in height, and be able to

withstand 200 lbs [91kg] of lateral pressure. Consult your regional government safety officials for current regulations, and

be sure your bracing system is constructed with these regulations in mind. Modern ICF wall bracing systems offer guard

rail attachments that are designed to be in compliance with national safety regulations.

INSTALLATION

When you have built as high as you can safely and comfortably reach, bracing can be attached to the wall. Brace only

from one side of the wall, preferably the inside, and screw bracing to the ties.

Start your bracing layout 3' [1m] from all 90° corners, angles, T-Walls etc. Fasten a vertical brace to all the ties using #10

wood screws.

Ensure that the wall is pulled tightly against the vertical brace, but take care not to over-drive and strip the screws in the

plastic.

When installing lateral braces, have one crew member use a level to rough plumb the wall. Remember to adjust

turnbuckles so they will have adequate travel for fine tuning the wall later.

Place braces all the way around walls every 6-7 feet [1.8-2.1m].

Secure the common seams by screwing 1x4 strapping or plywood boards across the seam into the ties. Place a vertical

brace at those seams.

Place your scaffolding and railings, and double check that every component is complete and securely fastened.

Remember these points about bracing a Quad-Lock wall:

• Braces need only be used on one side of the wall

• Vertical braces are there to plum, align, and straighten the wall, not hold concrete in the wall

• Braces are easier to “push” than to “pull” once the concrete is in the wall. Cheat the center of the wall in slightly,

and push it into position immediately after concrete is poured.

• Do not over-span lumber used for platforms. Generally, 6 ft. [2m] is a maximum desired span for 2x lumber.

• Screw braces (metal or wood) into every tie flange on 12" [305mm] centers.

• Remove braces the day following the pour when concrete has had time to set.

If building a stem wall up to 4' [1.2m] high, vertical bracing is not required. Simply place a diagonal brace every 8' [2.4m]

and secure it at the bottom and to the top track/ladder brace.

Radius walls should have additional bracing, depending on the size of the radius. The smaller the radius, the more

bracing should be used. In general, reduce spacing to 4 feet [1.2m] on center or less, if deep cuts have been made for

tighter radii. Where another wall joins a radius wall, use a three part vertical brace with a wire loop joining all braces

together through the wall on every other row of panels.

At angles in the wall use a brace on both sides of the angle at a maximum of 1 foot [30cm] distance from the angle.

At T-Walls, if you’re not using the “two Outside Corner Brackets” method (see T-Walls on Page 44), place a brace at the

backside of the T.

Page 96 Chapter 3 – Bracing July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Adequately brace all Window and Door Bucks (see Window and Door Openings on Page 62).

Building Tip: With Metal Bracing Systems, place screws at the top of the provided slots and do not over tighten. This

will allow the wall to settle evenly when concrete is placed.

Figure 100: Metal Bracing System (Metal Track Ladder Brace at top of wall)

July 2009 Chapter 3 – Bracing Page 97


Figure 101: Wood Wall Bracing

PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 98 Chapter 3 – Bracing July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Wood Bulkheads

Figure 102: Exterior Wood Bulkheads

July 2009 Chapter 3 – Bracing Page 99


44 IINNTTEERRIIOORR AANNDD EEXXTTEERRIIOORR

FFIINNIISSHHEESS

FINISH DESCRIPTIONS

PRODUCT MANUAL

Finish Description in Accordance with National Building Code of Canada

Requirement

“Foamed plastics form part of a wall or ceiling assembly in combustible construction shall be protected from adjacent

space in the building, other than adjacent concealed spaces within attic and roof spaces, crawl spaces, and wall

assemblies, by one of the materials in the chart on the following pages.”

Therefore, the EPS foam insulation (Quad-Lock wall panel) can be protected by plastering, gypsum board finish (taped

joints), plywood finish, hardboard finish, insulating fiberboard finish, particleboard, wafer board or strand board finish, or

other materials having a fire rating of 15 minutes.

The most prevalent foam plastic protection used is the installation of a gypsum board finish. The gypsum board may be

mechanically fastened with drywall / gypsum screws only. Alternatively, to permanently adhere the gypsum board directly

to the Quad-Lock Panel, apply an EPS compatible adhesive to the back of the gypsum board. The adhesive bead shall

be approximately ⅜" [10mm] in diameter to provide a continuous bond between the gypsum board and the wall surface

and applied so that one of the beads is adjacent to each edge of the gypsum board. For temporary support, until the

adhesive has developed a bond, drywall screws can be randomly placed attaching the gypsum board to the plastic ties.

Finish Description in Accordance with I-Code (ICC) Requirements (USA)

Section 1713, Foam Plastic Insulation, (d) Thermal Barrier, requires “The interior of the building shall be separated from

the foam plastic insulation by an approved thermal barrier having an index of 15 when tested in accordance with U.B.C.

Standard No.17-3 (No.26.3 in UBC 1994 Edition). The thermal barrier shall be installed in such a manner that it will

remain in place for the time of its index classification based on approved diversified test.”

The Standard Room Fire Test was performed on a Quad-Lock wall faced on the room interior side with ½" [13mm]

conventional gypsum wallboard fastened to finish anchors at the 7' [213cm] level and to Quad-Lock Ties at additional

locations.

The most prevalent foam plastic protection used is the installation of a gypsum board finish. The gypsum board may be

mechanically fastened with drywall / gypsum screws only. Alternatively, to permanently adhere the gypsum board directly

to the Quad-Lock Panel, apply an EPS compatible adhesive to the back of the gypsum board. The adhesive bead shall

be approximately ⅜" [10mm] in diameter to provide a continuous bond between the gypsum board and the wall surface

and applied so that one of the beads is adjacent to each edge of the gypsum board. For temporary support, until the

adhesive has developed a bond, drywall screws can be randomly placed attaching the gypsum board to the plastic ties.

The gypsum wallboard should be taped and filled to provide a continuous thermal and air barrier. With the application of

a vapor retardant paint, the gypsum wallboard can serve as a vapor barrier.

Page 100 Chapter 4 – Interior and Exterior Finishes July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

DRYWALL / GYPSUM

The following details are minimum requirements for the attachment of drywall. An ICC/ICBO or CCMC recognized EPS

compatible adhesive can be used in conjunction with drywall screws.

Figure 103: Drywall Attachment

QUAD-LOCK J-TRACK

P.T. SILL PLATE

DRYWALL

WOOD I-JOIST

FASTEN TO QUAD-LOCK TIES WITH 1 1 2" [38mm] SCREWS

July 2009 Chapter 4 – Interior & Exterior Finishes Page 101


ADHESIVES AND SEALANTS

PRODUCT MANUAL

Quad-Lock endorses only the use of ICC/ICBO or CCMC approved adhesives. Read the labels on adhesives to ensure

compatibility with EPS (“foam compatible”). If questions arise concerning compatibility, contact the adhesive

manufacturer.

Most distributors of Quad-Lock products sell adhesives that are chemically compatible and ICC/ICBO or CCMC

approved.

LIQUID NAILS

PRODUCT MANUFACTURER USE TYPE

Macco Adhesives

Mississauga, ON L4T 4E5

905-731-9455

MD 200 Macklanberg-Duncan

4041 N. Santa Fe

Oklahoma, City, OK 73118

405-528-4411

MIRACLE

DSA 40

ACE Light Duty

Construction Adhesive

EAGLE GRIP Foamboard

Construction Adhesive

PL 300

Pratt & Lambert Specialty

Products

75 Tonawanda St.

Buffalo, NY 14207

800-876-7005

Private Label by ACE

Hardware

800-347-4583

Marketed by

Palmer G. Lewis Co.

Auburn, WA

Canadian Adhesives

420 Ave. Marien

Montreal, PQ H1B 4V6

TOUCH ‘N SEAL Wind-Lock

1055 Leiscz’s Bridge Rd

Leesport, PA 19533

800-872-5625

FOAM 2 FOAM Wind-Lock

1055 Leiscz’s Bridge Rd

Leesport, PA 19533

Dow ENERFOAM

800-872-5625

Wind-Lock

1055 Leiscz’s Bridge Rd

Leesport, PA 19533

800-872-5625

Dow GREAT STUFF PRO Wind-Lock

1055 Leiscz’s Bridge Rd

Leesport, PA 19533

800-872-5625

Handi-Stick FOMO Products Inc.

Norton, OH

800-321-5565

DRYWALL TO EPS

MASTIC

DRYWALL TO EPS MASTIC

DRYWALL TO EPS MASTIC

DRYWALL TO EPS MASTIC

DRYWALL TO EPS MASTIC

DRYWALL TO EPS MASTIC

EPS to EPS, DRYWALL

TO EPS

EPS to EPS, DRYWALL

TO EPS

EPS to EPS, DRYWALL

TO EPS

EPS to EPS,

WINDOW & DOOR

SEALER

EPS to EPS, DRYWALL

TO EPS

ALL SEASON

SPRAY FOAM

SPRAY FOAM

SPRAY FOAM

SPRAY FOAM

SPRAY FOAM

Note: All adhesives used in conjunction with EPS must be “Foam” compatible. If compatibility is unknown, contact the

adhesive manufacturer.

Page 102 Chapter 4 – Interior and Exterior Finishes July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

ACRYLIC FINISHES AND EXTERIOR INSULATED

FINISH SYSTEMS (EIFS)

The Quad-Lock building system is "stucco ready" for most exterior insulated finish systems (EIFS). The Quad-Lock Panel

is the same material as foam board sheathing, and is installed in accordance with most EIFS manufacturers'

specification. All finish and trim details should be approved by the Stucco/EIFS supplier or manufacturer. Consult the

stucco manufacturer of choice or the Quad-Lock representative for the use of other products.

Figure 104: Stucco

Parging

PRODUCT MANUFACTURER TYPE APPLICATION

FOAMCOAT Quick-Crete Co.

1790 Century Circle NE

Atlanta, GA 30345

404-634-9100

MONCOUCHE Parex, Inc.

1870 Stone Mt / Lithonia Rd.

Atlanta, GA 30074

THORO FIBER BASED

COAT

770-482-7872

Thoro System Products

8570 Phillips Hwy #108

Jacksonville, FL 32256

800-327-1570

WESTERN ONE KOAT Western Stucco Products

PO Box 968 - 6101 N. 53rd

Glendale, AZ 95311

623-937-9141

RUB CRETE CONSPEC

636 S. 66 th Terrace

Kansas City, KS 66111

877-266-7732

Fiberglass Reinforced

Polymer Coating

1 day stucco

2 step polymer

coating

Fiberglass Reinforced

Surface Bonding Mortar

Hand, Hopper, or Air.

User applied

Spray, Trowel

User applied

Hand, Air

User Applied

Acrylic based cement Hand, Air

User applied

Polymer Coating Trowel, Spray

User applied

July 2009 Chapter 4 – Interior & Exterior Finishes Page 103


STO FAST SET DRY

ADHESIVE / BASE

STO Finish Systems Division

PO Box 44609

Atlanta, GA 30336-5609

800-221-2397 | 404-346-3666

WALLEASE BASE COAT El Rey Stucco Company Inc.

3830 Singer Blvd NE, Suite 2020

Albuquerque, NM 87109

505-873-1180 | 505-338-3448

GreatWall Imasco Minerals Inc.

19287 - 98A Avenue

Surrey, BC V4N 4C8

604-888-3848

Acrylic Stucco

PRODUCT MANUAL

Acrylic Based Plaster Trowel

User applied

Cement Based Plaster Trowel

Cementitious, fibre

reinforced base coat

Hand or Machine

User Applied

PRODUCT MANUFACTURER TYPE APPLICATION

CoreFactor Imasco Minerals Inc.

19287 - 98A Avenue

Surrey, BC V4N 4C8

604-888-3848

Dryvit Dryvit Systems Inc.

PO Box 1014

West Warnick, RI 02893

Stucco-O-Flex

series #200

800-556-7752

Perma-Chink Systems Inc.

17635 N.E. 67th Ct.

Redmond, WA 98052

800-548-1231 | 425-885-6050

Preswitt Preswitt Mfg. Ltd.

5721 Production Way

Langley, BC

604-533-3368

STO STO Industries Inc.

PO Box 44609

Atlanta, GA 30336-5609

404-346-3666

Senergy

Senergy Systems Inc.

10245 Centurion Parkway N

Jacksonville, FL 32256

800-221-9255

Uni-Tex 100/200 United Paint & Coatings

E. 19011 Cataldo

Greenacres, WA 99016

800-541-4383 | 509-926-7143

System 3 Parex, Inc.

1870 Stone Mt. Lithonia Rd.

Atlanta, GA 30074

Energex

770-482-7872

E.I.F.S. Inc.

65 Davids Dr.

Hauppauge, NY 11788

800-777-6596 | 631-231-1300

PermaFlex El Rey Stucco Company Inc.

3830 Singer Blvd NE, Suite 2020

Albuquerque, NM 87109

505-873-1180 | 505-338-3448

*E.I.F.S. = Exterior Insulated Finish System

E.I.F.S.* Hand or Machine - 3

year warranty or with an

approved applicator 5 yr

warranty

E.I.F.S.* Hand or Air Proprietary

–Approved Applicators

E.I.F.S.* Hand or Air

Trowel, Roll

E.I.F.S.* Hand or Air

User Applied

E.I.F.S.* Hand or Air

E.I.F.S.* Hand or Air

User Applied

Local Training Available

E.I.F.S.* Hand or Air

User Applied

Local Training Available

E.I.F.S.*

full synthetic or

cementitious

Parex Trained

Applicators

Local Training Available

E.I.F.S.* Hand or Air

Certified Applicators

+ Training Available

E.I.F.S.* Approved Applicator

Page 104 Chapter 4 – Interior and Exterior Finishes July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

SIDING

Various types of sidings can be attached to the Quad-Lock System. The Quad-Lock

FS Panel provides built in Fastening Strips, for a continuous vertical point of

attachment every 12" [30cm] on center. Consult the siding manufacturer’s

specifications for fastener spacing, and wind load requirements. Always be sure to

use an exterior rated screw fastener that complies with the siding manufacturer’s

information.

Nailing into Quad-Lock FS strips is not an acceptable alternative, as the nails do not

generate enough holding power in the FS strips.

Alternatively, vertical or horizontal 1x4 furring material can be screwed to Quad-

Lock Ties every 12" [305mm] or 24" [610mm]. Siding material can then be attached

to these external furring strips.

Figure 105: Siding Attachment with external furring strips

QUAD-LOCK FS PANEL

QUAD-LOCK FASTENING STRIP

QUAD-LOCK TIE

SIDING FINISH AS SPECIFIED

1" [25mm] SIDING LAP

SIDING FINISH SCREWS EXTERIOR RATED

6" [150mm] O.C. VER. & 12" [305mm] O.C. HOR.

OPTION 1

QUADLOCK REGULAR PANEL

1x2 [20mmx40mm] VERTICAL FURRING STRIP

@ 12" [305mm] O.C.

QUAD-LOCK TIE

SIDING FINISH AS SPECIFIED

SIDING FINISH SCREWS EXTERIOR RATED

6" [150mm] O.C. VER. & 12" [305mm] O.C. HOR.

1" SIDING LAP

FASTEN FURRING STRIP TO QUAD-LOCK TIES

@ 12" [305mm] O.C. VERT & HOR.

W/ EXTERIOR RATED SCREWS

OPTION 2

July 2009 Chapter 4 – Interior & Exterior Finishes Page 105


BRICK AND STONE

PRODUCT MANUAL

Metal ties may be inserted through the vertical and/or horizontal joints of the Quad-Lock Panels for proper anchoring of

stone or brick veneer into the concrete wall. The following details illustrate several options for the construction of ledges

for brick and stone.

Figure 106: Stone and Brick Veneer

Covering a Wall in Zero Clearance Condition:

Fiber-Cement siding is applied to Quad-Lock wall as the forms are installed, then poured in place to remain as protection

of building exterior.

Figure 107: Fiber Cement Siding Applied to Zero-Clearance Walls

Page 106 Chapter 4 – Interior and Exterior Finishes July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Brick Ledge

Brick Ledges can be built using 12" [305mm] walls below, as series of wall width transitions, temporary plywood

formwork, or the Fero Angle Support Technology.

Option 1: Multiple Transitions

5.75"

[146mm]

11.75"

[298mm]

9.75"

[248mm]

7.75"

[197mm]

3.75"

[95mm]

6" [150mm] TIE

BRICK AS SPECIFIED

METAL J-TRACK

BRICK LEDGE TIE

REGULAR PANEL

12" [300mm] TIE

PLUS PANEL

10" [250mm] TIE

8" [200mm] TIE

Figure 108: Brick Ledge 100% Bearing with Stepped out Plus Panels

July 2009 Chapter 4 – Interior & Exterior Finishes Page 107


Option 2: Fero-Angle Support

5.75"

[146mm]

7.75"

[197mm]

6" [150mm] TIE

BRICK AS SPECIFIED

FERRO ANGLE

SUPPORT SYSTEM

PLUS PANEL

REGULAR PANEL

8" [200mm] TIE

Figure 109: Brick Ledge with Steel Angle Support

Option 3: Temporary Plywood Form

5.75"

[146mm]

13.62"

[346mm]

11.75"

[298mm]

6" [150mm] TIE

BRICK AS SPECIFIED

5.62"

[143mm]

BRICK LEDGE TIE

TEMP. PLYWOOD FORM

FASTEN FORM

TO PLASTIC TIES

REGULAR PANEL

12" [300mm] TIE

Figure 110: Brick Ledge 100% Bearing with Temporary Plywood Form

PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 108 Chapter 4 – Interior and Exterior Finishes July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Option 4: 10" to 6" [25cm-15cm] One-step Transition

1.75"

[44mm]

QUAD-LOCK TIE

(VARIES)

METAL J-TRACK

WIRE TOP TIE

(VARIES IN LEGTH)

REGULAR PANEL

Figure 111: Brick Ledge 100% Bearing with Quad-Lock Brick Ledge Tie

July 2009 Chapter 4 – Interior & Exterior Finishes Page 109


BRICK TIE

BRICK

SHEATHING

RIM BOARD

SILL PLATE

FLASHING AS REQUIRED

REINF. CONCRETE CORE

PARGING MIN. PER CODE

WATERPROOFING AND DRAINAGE

BOARD AS SPECIFED

FREE DRAINING BACKFILL

AS SPECIFIED

SLOPE

Figure 112: Brick Ledge on Top of Wall (Framed Wall above)

Temporary Plywood Forms

FLOOR JOIST

SUBFLOOR

PRODUCT MANUAL

INTERNAL FINISH AS SPECIFIED

INSULATION

CEILING FINISH

P.T. SILL PLATE W/ ANCHOR BOLT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

INTERNAL FINISH AS SPECIFIED

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

Temporary plywood forms can be used to form a brick ledge by screwing the plywood to the Quad-Lock Ties as shown

below. Stack one additional Quad-Lock Panel on the wall’s other side. Brace that panel with vertical braces and

adequately brace the plywood forms to contain the concrete during the first concrete pour. The first pour stops at the

level of the top of the plywood form. After sufficient curing, Metal Track is secured to the resulting concrete step. The

Quad-Lock Panels need to be ripped horizontally and set into the track to match the height of the opposing panel.

Fero Angle Support Technology

The Fero Angle Support Technology (“FAST” by Fero Corporation) can be used to support masonry veneer of all

types. It can also be used to support granite panels and precast concrete. The system is ideal to accommodate

construction tolerances because it can provide for adjustability in all directions and it is available in a wide range of sizes.

Page 110 Chapter 4 – Interior and Exterior Finishes July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 113: Assembly of Brick Ledge with FAST

July 2009 Chapter 4 – Interior & Exterior Finishes Page 111


FAST Components

PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 112 Chapter 4 – Interior and Exterior Finishes July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

July 2009 Chapter 4 – Interior & Exterior Finishes Page 113


Table 1: FAST Design Information

PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 114 Chapter 4 – Interior and Exterior Finishes July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

55 WWAATTEERR//DDAAMMPP--PPRROOOOFFIINNGG

When the Quad-Lock Building System is used for below grade occupied areas or connected to these areas in soils prone

to water saturation and the presence of hydrostatic pressure, the application of exterior waterproofing is necessary.

In addition, always ensure that below grade Quad-Lock walls are not subject to excessive hydrostatic pressure by

following usual and customary building practices, including but not limited to:

• Proper collection and diversion of rainwater from roofs and surrounding areas.

• Proper construction of footing drains, with rated piping, drainage materials and filter fabric.

• Proper grading of soils away from the building.

• Use of rated free draining backfill material with known flow rates.

• Proper compaction methods during backfill to prevent settling after the fact.

Membrane-type waterproofing products are available as self-adhesive “peel and stick” type (recommended), roll-on, or

spray-on type. Spray-on or roll-on membranes may not adequately bridge joints and other gaps in the foam, unless rated

to do so. Quad-Lock recommends the use of self-adhesive membranes in almost every instance where hydrostatic

pressure is ever likely to occur. In addition, Quad-Lock recommends a drainage/protection board layer to adequately

drain the soil, and to protect the membrane from backfill materials.

For soil conditions that are never prone to saturation by water and the resulting hydrostatic pressure, damp-proofing

measures may be adequate. Quad-Lock recommends the use of a drainage/protection board layer to isolate the wall

from any potential ground water or run off. A spray-on or roll-on water based emulsion can be used in this case, but must

be compatible with EPS foam and adequately bridge joints and other gaps in the foam. No petroleum based

compounds can be used. Consult the manufacturer of the damp-proofing agent to determine its compatibility with EPS

and ICFs.

Below is a list of readily available water- and damp-proofing products. Check for compatibility of the product and warranty

availability with the manufacturer of that product prior to applying it to the Quad-Lock Panels. Quad-Lock Building

Systems does not extend any warranties on the waterproofing abilities of the Quad-Lock system.

Water/Damp-Proofing – Recommended Products

PRODUCT NAME MANUFACTURER TYPE APPLICATION

Blueskin WP-200 BAKOR 604-533-2608

19914 68 th Avenue

Langley, BC

Colphene ICF Soprema Inc. 604-522-3944

450 Derwent Place

New Westminster, BC V3M 5Y9

Jiffy Seal

140/160

Bituthene 4000

Bituthene 3000

Melrol

Melgard

Protecto Wrap Co. 800-759-9727 or

2255 S Delware 383-777-3001

Denver, CO 80223

W.R. Grace & Co. 617-876-1400

62 Whitmore Ave.

Cambridge, MA 02140

W.R. Meadows Co. 708-683-4500

PO Box 543

Legion, IL 60121

Delta-MS Clear Cosella-Dörken Products, Inc.

4655 Delta Way

Beamsville, ON L0R 1B4

888-444-5824

System Platon Big ‘O’ Inc.

Exeter, ON

800-265-7622

Waterproofing

Membrane

Waterproofing

Membrane

Waterproofing

Membrane

Waterproofing

Membrane

Waterproofing

Membrane

Drainage

Board

Damp-proofing

Membrane

Self-Adhesive

Self-Adhesive

Self-Adhesive

Self-Adhesive

Self-Adhesive

Mechanically

Fastened

Mechanically

Fastened

July 2009 Chapter 5 – Water/Damp-Proofing Page 115


Application Instructions for Peel & Stick Membrane

PRODUCT MANUAL

1. All surfaces must be smooth, dry and free of dust, water or any other substance which may hinder adhesion.

2. Concrete (footing) must be cured a minimum of seven (7) days and an adhesion test is recommended before

membrane application. Ensure the footing is clean and dry.

3. For membrane applications at temperatures below -5°C (23°F) contact your local peel & stick representative.

4. It’s not necessary to prime Quad-Lock as long as it is clean and dust free. A water-based primer may be used.

See manufacturer’s recommendations.

5. All penetrations (pipes, etc.) through the waterproofing membrane, should be pre-treated with an application of

liquid membrane/sealant.

6. All inside corners (vertical and horizontal, e.g. along footing) must be pre-stripped with a 6" [152mm] width of

membrane centered on the corner. This membrane must be installed in direct contact with the substrate not

leaving any voids under the membrane strip.

7. All outside corners must be pre-treated with a 6" [15cm] width strip of membrane centered on the corner.

8. For vertical applications, align the first strip of membrane to one of the grooves in the Quad-Lock Panel. At the top

edge of the strip remove approximately 6" [15cm] of the silicone release paper and adhere the membrane to the

surface. Affix the remaining portion of the strip by removing the silicone release paper. During application, pass

hand over the surface to remove any trapped air and wrinkles. Apply pressure with a hand roller over the

membrane to ensure good initial adhesion.

9. Subsequent rolls must be installed in the same way and should be aligned with the preceding roll with a lap of at

least 2½" [65mm]. End laps must overlap at least 6" [152mm]. Avoid wrinkles in the membrane at the overlaps (roll

the seams with laminate or J-roller).

10. Seal all leading edges (e.g. at top and bottom) and all horizontal overlaps with sealant.

11. Protect the membrane to avoid damage from other trades, construction materials, and backfilling. Use a rated

drainage board layer. Consult your Quad-Lock dealer for ideas.

Building Tip: Pre-cut peel-and-stick membrane into desired lengths and attach it vertically. Reach around either side

of the membrane and remove the backing as you install. Avoid removing all of the backing prior to

installation. Always overlap the joints and follow the manufacturer’s recommendations on the use of a

protection board before backfilling.

Page 116 Chapter 5 – Water/Damp-Proofing July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Fastening Dimpled Drainage Board (Typical)

CUT DELTA MS

TO TERMINATE @

QUAD-LOCK TIES

DELTA MS MOLD STRIP

FASTENED TO QUAD-LOCK

TIES @ 4" & 8" O.C.

DELTA MS FASTENER

@ 24" O.C. HOR.

DELTA MS FASTENER

@ 24" O.C. STAGGERED

FROM ROW ABOVE

QUAD-LOCK TIE

SPACING AS PER

DIMENSIONS SHOWN

DELTA MS FASTENER

@ 12" O.C. VER.

AT TERMINATION ONLY

SEAL JOINT WITH

WATER BASED SEALANT

PEEL & STICK MEMBRANE

EXTEND OVER FOOTING PAD

CONCRETE FOOTING

Figure 114: Fastening Pattern for Drainage Board

8"

4"

8"

4"

July 2009 Chapter 5 – Water/Damp-Proofing Page 117

8"

4"

12"

12"


66 CCOONNCCRREETTEE AANNDD RREEBBAARR

Primer:

PRODUCT MANUAL

The reinforced concrete placed into Quad-Lock walls gives the walls their structural strength. It consists of concrete and

steel reinforcing bars, called rebar. Concrete is a mix of Portland cement, water and aggregates (sand & stones of

different sizes) and provides the wall’s compressive strength. Concrete specifications at least include slump (measure of

how easily the concrete flows), compressive strength (strength of concrete after full curing/hardening), and aggregate

size (size of the largest stones). Rebar provides the wall’s tensile strength and specifications include bar width (called

number) and steel strength.

Note: Building codes in the USA and Canada have prescriptive design specifications which may be

used without the need for site specific engineering. See Appendix C for specific code

references.

CONCRETE

Concrete shall be designed, mixed, placed, cured and tested in accordance with applicable codes, e.g. CAN3-A438,

“Concrete Construction for Housing and Small Buildings” (Canada), or ACI 318 “Building Code Requirement for

Reinforced Concrete” (US). The concrete shall be designed to be durable enough to withstand the expected exposure

conditions. In particular, concrete for Quad-Lock walls shall conform to the following:

• Slump: The maximum slump of concrete for foundation walls shall be a maximum 6" [152mm], measured in

accordance with CSA Standard CAN3 - A23.2, Slump of Concrete / ASTM Standard C143 [11], Test Method for

Slump of Hydraulic Cement Concrete.

• Admixtures: To achieve a greater slump, it is recommended to add a super-plasticizing admixture conforming to

ASTM Standard C494.

• Compressive Strength: The minimum strength of reinforced concrete shall be 20 Mpa (Canada) or 2500 psi

(USA) and in accordance with requirements CSA Standard A23.1 / ASTM Standard C-94[13]

• Aggregate: The maximum size of coarse aggregate shall be

o ¾" [20mm] in walls 8" [203mm] and thicker (nominal concrete width) and

o ⅜" [10mm] in walls 6" [152mm] and thinner.

• Placement: Place concrete in continuous ‘lifts’, where the first lift should be approximately 2' to 3' [60-90 cm] in

height. Continue with 2-4' [60-120cm] ‘lifts’. The wall should be filled with concrete in such a manner as to prevent

‘cold joints’.

in ºC

Ambient Temperature in ºF

Maximum Rate of Pour Depending on Temperature

0ºC

32ºF

4.5°C

40ºF

Page 118 Chapter 6 – Concrete & Rebar July 2009

10°C

50ºF

15.5°C

60ºF

Maximum Height of Single Pour (Feet [m]) 3 [1] 3 [1] 3 [1] 3 [1] 3 [1]

Maximum Rate of Pour per Hour (Feet / Hour [cm/hour]) 2 [60] 3 [100] 4 [120] 5 [150] 6 [180]

Waiting Time from Layer to Layer (Minutes) 90 60 45 36 30

This table is based on Hand Spading of Concrete; if mechanical vibration is used, decrease Rate of Pour!

Warning: Most Concrete Form Failures are due to Excessive Rate of Pour or Excessive Vibrating!

Pre-Pour Check List

Before placing concrete you should use the pre-pour checklist found on the outside of the tie box.

• Track securely fastened to footing

Quad-Lock Ties placed every 12" [305mm], both vertically and horizontally.

21°C

70ºF


PRODUCT MANUAL

• Metal Corner Brackets and tie flanges in place.

• Vertical Braces spaced every 6-8' [1.8-2.4m] along the walls depending on the height.

• Angled walls where the Metal Brackets were not installed should be braced and secured with 2x4 and tie wire. (See

Bracing on Page 96 for further details)

• Window and door openings checked for square, braced horizontally and vertically, slots in sills for access and 1x4

or Win-Locks fastened securely around the perimeter.

• Wire Top Ties at each end of top units and at 24" [60cm]. Metal Track secured on top of Wire Top Ties and wall.

• Walls plumb, straight, square and level (PSS&L)

• Extra bracing materials on site and handy.

Building Tip: Important Note on Concrete Slump:

Controlling concrete slump is critical, and excessively high slump will cause problems with ICFs,

especially in cold weather. Order concrete at a 3" [76mm] maximum slump. When the concrete truck

arrives, climb up and look down into the drum while it is turning at idle speed (NOT mixing speed). If the

concrete breaks over the fins in “chunks” or exhibits cracking as it spills over the fins, it is too dry. Add

plasticizer (not water) SPARINGLY and have the driver go to mixing speed for 30 to 40 revolutions.

Now check again, repeating the process if necessary. At the point where the concrete just begins to

“flow” over the fins without cracking, it is ready to pour your ICF job. Depending on the plasticizing

agent, you now have about 45 minutes to offload the concrete; PLENTY of time (if you have installed

the forms right)

Concrete Placement Suggestions:

Concrete may be placed by any conventional method in accordance with national standards and local building codes. If

using a boom type concrete pump, follow these tips:

• Use a 3" [76mm] or smaller diameter hose to control the flow of the concrete as it comes out of the pumping

equipment. (See reducing hose specification to follow)

• Take your time and pour conservatively. A 20 to 30 minute offload of a full load (13 cu. yards [10 cu. meters]) of

concrete is normal. Pouring in an aggressive manner will cause problems.

• Avoid excessive drop of concrete into the wall.Concrete shall be placed as nearly as practical, in its final position, to

avoid segregation due to rehandling or fllowing.

• Avoid use of “S” bend at the end of hose as they are dangerous to handle.

Start in a corner and work around the perimeter. Under normal circumstances, place 2' to 3' [60-100cm] of concrete in the

first lift. Place concrete under the windows from the sills. The second and consecutive lifts should be 3' to 4' [1–1.2m] high.

If you’re continuing up with panels and ties later, make sure to cover the tops of the panels. If not using Metal Track on

the top of the wall, nail two 1 x 4s at a 90° angle, and move them along as you pour. Pour only to the middle of the top

row of panels.

If you’re not continuing up, trowel the top and set the ‘J’ bolts. After pouring the concrete, check the alignment of the wall.

Consolidation / Vibration

You MUST ensure concrete is properly consolidated. A pencil vibrator or rodding with a length of rebar is recommended.

Due to the required 6" [15cm] slump, heavy vibrating of the wall is not necessary. Use these tips:

• Use a small diameter mechanical vibrator (¾" – 1¼" [19mm – 32mm]).

• DO NOT OVER VIBRATE! In most cases, vibrating the steel in the wall can adequately consolidate the concrete

around it, especially if a 5" [125mm] to 6" [152mm] slump is maintained

• Tapping the outside of the wall is not adequate to ensure proper concrete consolidation.

• Do not use the vibrator to move concrete laterally in the wall. This can result in segregation of the concrete

components and negatively impact the compressive strength of the concrete.

• Concrete ‘build up’ on the ties and rebar can be removed using the vibrator or by shaking the vertical rebar.

• External variations of mechanical vibration (hammer, orbital sander, and reciprocating saw) provide limited

consolidation and are not recommended.

July 2009 Chapter 6 – Concrete & Rebar Page 119


Figure 115: Internal Concrete Vibrator

PRODUCT MANUAL

Standard concrete with a maximum slump of 6" [152mm] can be used to make Quad-Lock walls free of voids, especially

if internal vibration is used. Slump loss is expected over time, especially in hot weather. Water added to the mix will

decrease the strength and this should not be done. Re-dosing the mix (once) with plasticizer or water reducer is

permissible.

Building Tip: A good indication that the concrete is properly consolidated is when water from the concrete mix seeps

out from the bottom of the vertical joints.

Page 120 Chapter 6 – Concrete & Rebar July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

July 2009 Chapter 6 – Concrete & Rebar Page 121


PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 122 Chapter 6 – Concrete & Rebar July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Curing

Concrete will attain its initial compressive strength in Quad-Lock walls in the same fashion as older conventional forming

systems. What is different about the cure obtained in Quad-Lock forms is that water does not evaporate as quickly as

with other forming systems; thus, the higher amount of moisture available to complete the hydration process will

ultimately result in 50% to 70% higher compressive strengths, after a period of time.

In terms of bracing removal, 48 to 72 hours is adequate time for the concrete to achieve safe compressive strength

levels. For back filling, the ready-mixed concrete producer’s guidelines should be followed to obtain about an 80% cure

prior to commencement of back-filling. Intermediate floor diaphragms should be installed before back-filling as well.

Stronger Concrete Walls

6 0

continuously moist cured

5 0

4 0

in air after 3 days

3 0

2 0

COMPRE SIVE STRENGTH l b / i n²

1 0

0

28

7

14 3

Figure 116: Compressive Strength of Continuously Moist Cured Concrete

Fly Ash and Blast Slag:

90

AGE IN DAYS

Substitution of fly ash or blast slag in the concrete mix used in Quad-Lock walls is perfectly acceptable, even in relatively

high percentages, and Quad-Lock encourages this practice. This is especially true in instances where the building

owners have to use recycled materials or post-industrial waste as an objective in their building design. The addition of fly

ash or blast slag will affect slump, cure time, and initial compressive strength. Be sure to take this into account when

using these materials as a substitute for cement. Introduction of “pozzolans” to the concrete mix generally makes the mix

more flowable, which is advantageous in ICF construction. This may, however, affect the dosage of plasticizers or other

agents used to improve flow characteristics. Care must be taken not to exceed the recommended 6" [152mm] slump at

the time of pour.

When using fly ash or blast slag in suspended floor applications with Quad-Deck, it is critical that the engineer of record

is aware of the addition of these materials, as rates of cure may be affected.

July 2009 Chapter 6 – Concrete & Rebar Page 123

QUADLOCK

CONVENTIONAL

FORMWORK

180


PRODUCT MANUAL

Answer: You cannot pour! However, if you were using concrete with a cement content of 600 lb/yd³, the

pour will become possible, since the minimum allowable temperature will be lower than the temperature

forecasted (3ºF [-16ºC] versus 5ºF [-15ºC]).

General Cold Weather Concreting Guidelines:

• Use air-entrained concrete when exposure to moisture and freezing and thawing conditions are expected.

• Keep surfaces in contact with concrete free of ice and snow and at a temperature above freezing prior to

placement.

• Place and maintain concrete at the recommended temperature.

• Place concrete at the lowest practical slump.

• Limit rapid temperature changes when protective measures are removed.

• Contact your Ready Mix Producer to discuss heating water and aggregates, or adding an accelerating admixture,

increasing cement content or using Type III Cement.

Hot Weather Concreting:

Hot weather conditions can present challenges when pouring any ICF. “Hot Weather” may include any or all of the

following:

• High ambient temperatures

• Low relative humidity

• Wind velocity

• Solar radiation

Note: The following suggestions when building in sustained hot weather conditions:

Form Deflection - Expanded Polystyrene is a thermoplastic and will become more flexible as temperatures increase. It

is advisable to pour in the coolest conditions available (early in the morning) and/or to spray forms down with a water

mist that will evaporate and carry away some heat from the forms. Concrete pressure may cause undesired deflection in

forms that are too warm.

Hot Reinforcing Bar - If reinforcing bar is allowed to heat up inside the forms, the stored heat will tend to accelerate the

curing of concrete residue that may build up on the bar during the pour. In successive lifts, this residue may become an

obstruction in the wall, and increase the risk of voids. Again, an early-morning pour is suggested to minimize the

temperature of both forms and rebar. Vibration of the bar between lifts is also recommended.

This is another reason to employ the “side-pour” method recommended for tall walls. Many builders cut holes in the side

of the forms to accommodate filling by the pump through the holes, thus by-passing the upper layers of reinforcing bar.

Foam cut-outs are then attached to plywood and placed back into the wall, screwing the plywood onto the tie flanges.

“Hot” Concrete - Concrete that is already beginning to set at the time of delivery is referred to as a “hot load”. Since the

concrete curing process is chemical reaction activated (and accelerated) by heat, it is best not to allow the mix to gain

temperature during transport. This is problematic at more remote sites that are a long distance from the concrete plant,

or routes that may encounter heavy urban traffic. There may be an hour or more of transport time, during which the

concrete will begin its curing process. Add another 30 minutes or more for off-loading, and the concrete may be already

setting during the pour, which will cause many problems.

It may be advisable to keep additional packets of plasticizer or set-retarder on site for emergencies, especially in the

hottest conditions. Some concrete producers are able to add chilled water or ice to the mix to lower initial mix

temperatures.

A solution to this problem is “site-mixed concrete”, wherein all the dry components are delivered in separate bins on a

specialized mix truck and combined with water on site. The mixed concrete is literally seconds old when it is placed in

the pump truck, and the concrete has a much longer life in its plastic (liquid) state, before curing begins. Call your local

concrete producers to find this type of equipment, usually companies that specialize in small “yard-at-a-time” deliveries.

See ACI 305 “Hot Weather Concreting” for more detailed information on hot weather concreting.

July 2009 Chapter 6 – Concrete & Rebar Page 125


General Hot Weather Concreting Guidelines

• Pour early in the morning to take advantage of cooler ambient temperatures.

• Spray a water mist over forms to help dissapate stored heat.

PRODUCT MANUAL

• Avoid build-up of concrete on hot rebar by vibrating rebar between lifts, or bypassing upper rebar by pouring from

side of wall.

• “Site-mix” concrete that must be transported long distances (or in heavy traffic).

• Keep plasticizer or set-retarder on site for emergencies.

• Order chilled water or ice added to the mix at the batch plant, if available.

• Use placement techniques and slump that will allow the fastest practical placement of concrete.

REINFORCING STEEL (REBAR)

The Quad-Lock system has been designed to accommodate horizontal reinforcing steel placement in the molded “rebar

chairs” on the Quad-Lock Ties. The system is ideally suited for even 12" [30cm] increments on the horizontal plane.

Vertical reinforcing steel of almost any spacing can be accommodated in the Quad-Lock System. The design and

placement of reinforcing steel in the Quad-Lock System should be in accordance with acceptable reinforced concrete

standards and/or needs to be designed by a professional structural engineer. Some reinforcing steel design guidelines

can be found in Appendix A and prescriptive reinforcing designs can be found in the IRC (USA), the NBC (Canada) and

other national building codes.

If permitted by the local authorities and engineer of record, a quick and easy method of setting vertical reinforcing steel is

to drop it down within the Quad-Lock Ties and between the staggered horizontal rebar as shown below. If permitted, 1¼"

– 1½" [32mm-38mm] diameter plastic pipe may be used to secure vertical rebar to rebar dowels in the footing.

Figure 117: Typical Lap Patterns at Corners & T-Walls

Building Tips: If the specified spacing for horizontal bar is not a 12" [305mm] increment, contact the project engineer

and request a change.

From the building plans, pre-plan the layout of the horizontal and vertical steel. Pre-cut pieces off-site

and have them delivered. This includes horizontal steel, vertical steel and 90° bends.

To secure vertical rebar (and if permitted by building officials), cut short (4" [102mm]) pieces of plastic

pipe 1¼" to 1½" [32 to 38mm] in diameter and drop them over the rebar stubs that are sticking up out of

the footing. Do not place the vertical steel at this point. Build the Quad-Lock wall, placing horizontal steel

only as you build. When the wall is at the desired height, slip pre-cut vertical rebar into the plastic pipe

next to the stub steel, and secure at the top of the wall.

Page 126 Chapter 6 – Concrete & Rebar July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Do not secure the steel to the plastic ties with tie wire or zip ties. Leave it loose so you can adjust the

wall prior to concrete placement. Steel can be tied to other steel members, but do not attach it to the

wall components (except for laying it on the rebar chairs on the Quad-Lock Ties).

Consult your local Building Official, Engineer and/or Quad-Lock Representative for accepted methods.

REINF. CONCRETE CORE

Figure 118: Rebar Placement

QUAD-LOCK TIE

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

COMPLIMENTARY PRODUCTS:

HORIZONTAL REINFORCEMENT

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT

AT REQUIRED SPACING

Quad-Lock has identified a number of products and services that developers, builders, and homeowners have used

successfully in completion of their ICF projects. They may be products that relate to other phases of construction not

directly involving Quad-Lock products, or services that may simply add value to the project after completion. These

products and services include, but are not limited to, the following listed items:

July 2009 Chapter 6 – Concrete & Rebar Page 127


Product/Service

Name

Icynene Insulation

System

Energy Consumption

Analysis and

Projection

ICF Accessories and

Tools

PRODUCT MANUAL

Manufacturer/Vendor Type Application

ICYNENE

6747 Camppobello Rd

Mississauga, ON

L5N 2L7 Canada

800-758-7325 or 905-363-4040

inquiry@icynene.com

www.icynene.com

Energy Wise Structures

PO Box 2076

Mansfield, TX 76063

817-477-1387

817-473-2349 Fax

Wind-Lock

1055 Leiscz’s Bridge Rd.

Leesport, PA 19533

800-872-5625

800-854-6614 Fax

wlsupport@wind-lock.com

www.wind-lock.com

Engineering Services Various providers in USA,

Canada, and Int’l

(Contact Q/L Tech. Dept.)

Panel Jack Wall

Bracing

Mono-Brace Tall Wall

Bracing System

Shoring and

Scaffolding

KIM 300

Waterproofing

Concrete Admixture

Xypex Waterproofing

Concrete Admixture

888-711-5625

ReechCraft, Inc

PO Box 2426

Fargo, ND 58108

888-600-6160 | 701-232-6666 Fax

info@reechcraft.com

www.reechcraft.com

TAPCO/Mono-Brace

10721 So. Water St. Ext.

Meadville, PA 16335

814-336-6549 | 814-336-2804 Fax

www.mono-brace.com

ThyssenKrupp

Safway Scaffold

(USA and Canada)

www.safway.com

800-558-4772

Kryton International, Inc

1645 E. Kent Ave

Vancouver, BC V5P 2S8

800-267-8280 or 604-324-8280

Xypex Chemical Corp.

13731 Mayfield Place

Richmond, BC V6V 2G9

800-961-4477 or 604-273-5265

info@xypex.com

www.xypex.com

STO Power Rasp Sto Worldwide

#800 Camp Creek Parkway

Building 1400, Suite 120

Atlanta, GA 30331

800-221-2397 | 404-346-3119 Fax

marketingsupport@stocorp.com

www.stocorp.com

Soft foam insulation and air

barrier for moisture and

thermal management in wall,

floor, and roof systems

Plan analysis and consulting

for optimum energy efficiency

design. Annual energy

consumption guarantee

Construction accessories and

specialty tools for ICF

construction and EIFS

installation

Site specific engineering and

consulting services

Panel Jack wall bracing

system for ICF and

conventional concrete forms

Mono-Brace wall bracing

system for ICF and

conventional concrete forms

Complete line of shoring and

scaffold accessories for all

types of construction; sale

and rental

Krystol internal membrane;

crystalline self-sealing

concrete waterproofer

Xypex C-1000 crystalline

self-sealing concrete

waterproofer

Variable speed electric rasp

for ICF and EIFS installations.

Separate vacuum backpack

available to control bead and

dust

Spray formula or Pourfill

for existing

construction

Design consulting and

written guarantee

(USA only)

Retail and wholesale

supply via distribution,

phone, and internet

Site specific

engineering and

consulting services

Retail and wholesale

supply via distribution,

phone, and internet

Retail and wholesale

supply via distribution,

phone, and internet

Retail sales; Rentals

Powder form concrete

admixture added onsite

Powder form concrete

admixture added onsite

Retail supply via

distribution, phone,

and internet

Quad-Lock Building Systems, Ltd. does not warrant any product or service offered by other manufacturers or vendors.

The above information is supplied on a best-efforts basis, and is for the convenience of the buyer only.

Page 128 Chapter 6 – Concrete & Rebar July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

77 QQUUAADD--DDEECCKK FFLLOOOORR AANNDD RROOOOFF

SSYYSSTTEEMM

QUAD-DECK

The revolutionary Quad-Deck forming system is a “pan floor” form designed for both commercial and residential

construction. Quad-Deck panels shape a series of T-beams on 2 ft. [61cm] centers which integrate with a concrete slab.

The resulting monolithic concrete structure now provides 2-way span capacity and a shear plane, for superior structural

performance.

PANEL THICKNESS

7" - 12.5" [178mm - 318mm]

INTEGRATED STEEL BEAMS FOR

SHORING AND ATTACHEMENT

REBAR

Figure 119: Typical Quad-Deck & Concrete Cross Section

Basics:

12" [305mm]

24" [610mm]

WELDED WIRE MESH

HOLLOW CORES FOR

PLUMBING AND ELECTRICAL

SLAB DEPTH = 1 1 2" - 4" [38mm - 102mm]

BEAM DEPTH 5" - 10 1 2" [127mm - 267mm]

INSULATION = 2" - 3" [51mm - 76mm]

The panels interlock with a tongue and groove design at the base of a 5" [125mm] wide cavity that forms the concrete Tbeams.

Quad-Deck comes in several sizes, creating concrete beams between 5" [125mm] and 10½" [280mm] in height.

Rebar is placed in each beam pocket, so the resulting T-beam functions like a conventional floor joist. The thickness of

the Quad-Deck and the depth of the concrete slab will determine the overall beam height, and thus the span capacity of

the entire structure. Quad-Deck T-beam structures can be designed using up to 40% less concrete than full depth

suspended slabs.

R-Values:

Like all insulating concrete forms, Quad-Deck is both forming and insulation. R-values range from 16 to 33, depending

on foam thickness, delivering the best combination of R-value and low air infiltration for energy efficiency. Insulation is

an inherent feature of the Quad-Deck system, and is not dependent on the skill level of the installer to deliver its best

performance.

Designing for Fire Resistive Construction in Quad-Deck Floor and Roof Structures

Structures built with suspended concrete floors and roofs that are formed by Quad-Deck insulating forms can be

designed for fire resistive construction using ACI 216 “Standard Method for Determining Fire Resistance of Concrete and

Masonry Construction Assemblies”. Using components (like concrete and Type X gypsum wallboard) that contribute

known fire resistance ratings, a fire resistive assembly can be specified by the project engineer.

July 2009 Chapter 7 – Quad-Deck Floor & Roof Systems Page 129


Concrete:

PRODUCT MANUAL

ACI 216 (Table 2.1) shows 4 common types of concrete (by aggregate type) and the minimum slab thickness required to

generate fire resistance ranging from 1 hour to 4 hours. (Table also found in IBC 721.2.2.1)

Requirements for calculating the minimum equivalent thickness for floor and roof panels formed with Quad-Deck can be

found in ACI 216, Chapter 2, Section 2.2.4(a). Therefore, because of Quad-Deck’s shape, the required slab thickness is

equal to the minimum equivalent thickness in Table 2.1. If Quad-Deck is used in a roof structure, ACI 216, Section 2.2.6

may permit an additional 10 minute fire resistance credit for certain roofing materials. Note: Typical structural

specifications for Quad-Deck floors/roofs call for minimum slab thickness ranging from 3 to 5" [76mm – 127mm]. Most

engineered designs call for a minimum ¾" to 1" [19mm - 25mm] concrete coverage of reinforcement. Refer to Section 2.3

for minimum concrete coverage of reinforcing bar in fire resistive designs.

Gypsum Drywall:

ACI 216, Chapter 5 contains “Effects of Finish Materials on Fire Resistance”. Here, design professionals will find

methods for calculating the fire resistance of walls and slabs that are finished on one or both sides with different finish

materials, including gypsum drywall. Tables 5.1 and 5.2 display values for materials placed on both the non-fire exposed

and fire exposed side of the structure. The building type and occupancy will determine how the information in these

tables is applied, so each project must be considered individually. Note that in all cases, foam plastic insulation is

required to be covered by a 15 minute thermal barrier; i.e. ½" [13mm] gypsum drywall. ACI 216 is available from the

American Concrete Institute bookstore at www.concrete.org, or call the Quad-Lock Training and Technical Services

Department for more information at 1-888-711-5625.

Shoring Requirements:

Integral moulded-in metal joists add strength to the panels, eliminating the need for secondary shoring members (usually

4 x 4 wood beams and plywood decking). Primary I-beam shores are placed approximately every 6 ft. [2 m] as called

out by the project engineer. At 6 to 8 foot [1.8 to 2 m] spacing, Quad-Deck panels provide a safe and secure platform to

support crews, reinforcement, and concrete. Generally, sufficient concrete strength can be generated in 3 to 7 days,

depending on the mix design and local weather conditions. The local ready mixed concrete supplier will design the right

mix for the desired cure time.

Quad-Lock recommends that an engineered shoring design be used in all cases, and that removal of shoring be done

only with permission from the structural engineer.

Panel Placement:

Once shoring is in place, Quad-Deck panels can be placed by hand in a fraction of the time required for conventional

forms. Forms are laid over the top of shoring members, to form a pan form system of T-beams on 2 foot [61cm] centers.

Place panels with the tongues on one panel edge locking into the groove edge of the preceding panel.

Where walls are parallel to the Quad-Deck panels, rip the bottom flange off the wall side of the panel to permit the panel

to contact the wall form. When all but the last panel is placed, measure the remaining area to be formed and rip the last

panel to fit. If an error has occurred in estimating and material is short, extra shoring and a plywood form can be placed

under the Quad-Deck panels to form a solid concrete beam to infill the gap.

Page 130 Chapter 7 – Quad-Deck Floor & Roof Systems July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Where panel ends butt to a perpendicular wall, no attachment is necessary, and gaps up to 2" [51mm] may be filled with

spray foam if panel cut dimensions do not match the as-built.

T-Beam Reinforcement:

Reinforcing steel, called out by the project engineer, is laid at the bottom of each T-beam, to give the structure its span

capacity. Rebar should never be placed directly on the forms. Use specially designed plastic rebar chairs to maintain the

proper distance between the steel and the forms, generally ¾" to 1" [19mm - 25mm] minimum. Reinforcing steel must

also be tied into the supporting wall structure to provide a solid floor-to-wall connection. Consult the Quad-Lock Product

Manual or web site for different options on making this connection.

Slab Reinforcement:

Welded wire mesh or an additional rebar grid is laid on top of the Quad-Deck, and reinforces the slab that is poured

generally between 3 and 5" [76mm – 127mm] in depth.

Sizing the Panels:

In most cases, Quad-Deck is cut to length in the factory according to precise shop drawings taken from the building

plans. This eliminates labor and waste at the jobsite. However, if necessary, field cuts are easily made using common

construction equipment.

Fastening to Panels:

Fasten drywall or suspended ceilings directly to the metal flanges embedded in the Quad-Deck. Heavier duty fastening

may require the positioning of ICFLC brackets into the T-beams to be embedded in concrete.

CAST IN PLACE SCREWS FASTENED TO METAL

Z-STRIPS BEFORE POUR TO SECURE

CONNECTION OF METAL Z-STRIP TO CONCRETE

IN THE EVENT OF FIRE - SPACING AS SPECIFIED

28 GAUGE STEEL Z-STRIPS

PROVIDE ATTACHMENT

SURFACE FOR CEILING

FINISH (I.E. DRYWALL)

MAXIMUM 75 LB/LIN. FT

Figure 120: Cross Section Showing Continuous Steel Flange Placement

QUAD-DECK TILT-UP PANELS:

12"

Quad-Deck can be used in many applications, like floors, flat roofs, low pitched roofs, or even poured into wall panels on

the ground and lifted into place for insulated tilt-up construction. Tilt-up panels can be formed without the traditional

casting bed, or bond breakers, and consume less reinforcing bar than conventional tilt-up. Quad-Deck tilt-up panels are

furred, insulated, and ready for finishes upon placement, cutting down installation time and material costs.

July 2009 Chapter 7 – Quad-Deck Floor & Roof Systems Page 131

12"


Concrete Finishes:

PRODUCT MANUAL

Architectural finishes can be applied on the ground, since Quad-Deck tilt panels are constructed face up, using

conventional slab finish techniques, like exposed aggregate, stamping, staining, and cutting.

Lifting Quad-Deck Tilt Panels:

Tilt-Up wall panels formed with Quad-Deck require the same lifting hardware as conventional tilt-up panels. A continuous

beam formed at the top of each panel should contain the hardware, or “pick points”, and lifting hardware should not be

installed in the T-beam pockets in the Quad-Deck panels. Single lifts, with two or more pick points in a horizontal row,

can be used because floor, roof and wall sections built with Quad-Deck require far less concrete and therefore reduce

the weight of the structure by up to 40%. This means that smaller, less expensive lift equipment may be used in

panelized construction and supporting structures may be of smaller design for poured-in-place applications, which all

translate into lower cost of installation.

GREEN ROOF INSTALLATION:

Quad-Deck is the ideal product for the construction of “Green Roof” systems, with superior span and load bearing

capacity, and the absence of any elements that are susceptible to damage from moisture. Other structural systems, like

steel and engineered wood generally cannot bring the necessary strength or durability to the green roof application, when

compared to concrete construction. Building designers should consider the loading factor brought to bear by the green

roof system and design the supporting Quad-Deck roof structure accordingly.

When the concrete slab has been placed and properly cured, apply roofing membranes that are rated for contact with

concrete and additional layers for drainage and root blockage as specified by the green roof system manufacturer.

Quad-Deck panels may be installed flat, or on a slight pitch to promote drainage, depending on the desired interior ceiling

configuration.

Please consult Quad-Lock Technical Services Dept. for proper layout and sizing, and always involve a local professional

engineer.

Page 132 Chapter 7 – Quad-Deck Floor & Roof Systems July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Figure 121: Elements of a Green Roof

Quad-Deck provides superior insulating qualities that reduce the noise level not only from the roof and floors but also from

the exterior and the interior. Depending on job requirements, Quad-Deck offers R-Values ranging from R-16 to R-33.

Quad-Deck Estimating Guides and Installation Procedures:

Check the Quad-Lock website www.quadlock.com for the latest installation and estimating procedures for Quad-Deck.

Post-Tension and Non-Post-Tension Estimating Guides have been developed to assist the design and construction

industry. The guides and standard construction details for the assembly of the Quad-Deck Flooring System can be

obtained from the Quad-Lock website or your local dealer.

Quad-Deck Construction Details (Typical):

July 2009 Chapter 7 – Quad-Deck Floor & Roof Systems Page 133


Typical Quad-Deck Floor-to Wall Connection

QUAD-LOCK TIE

VERT. REINF. AS SPECIFIED

REINF. CONCRETE CORE

TOP WHALER

SLAB TIE & SLAB BRACKET

W/ LUMBER POSTS

@ 24" [610mm] O.C.

24" [610mm]

36" [914mm]

Figure 122: Typical Quad-Deck Floor-to-Wall Connection

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

DOWELS AS SPECIFIED

TEMP. SHORING

BEAMS @ 6' O.C. MAX

4'-5' O.C. MAX. FOR TEMP.

SHORING UNDER BEAMS

TO BE SPECIFIED BY

ENGINEER

6" MAX.

PRODUCT MANUAL

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

WWM AS SPECIFIED

CONC. BEAM REINFORCEMENT

QUAD-DECK PANEL

HORIZONTAL REINF.

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

SLAB DEPTH

1 1 2" - 4" [38mm - 102mm]

BEAM DEPTH

5" - 10 1 2" [127mm - 267mm]

INSULATION

2" - 3" [51mm - 76mm]

Page 134 Chapter 7 – Quad-Deck Floor & Roof Systems July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

Typical Quad-Deck Floor Interior Bearing Wall Connection

REINFORCED

CONCRETE CORE

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

SLAB DEPTH

1 1 2" - 4" [38mm - 102mm]

BEAM DEPTH

5" - 10 1 2" [127mm - 267mm]

INSULATION

2" - 3" [51mm - 76mm]

INTERIOR FINISH

AS SPECIFIED

6" MAX.

VERTICAL REINF.

AT REQUIRED SPACING

QUAD-LOCK TIE

Figure 123: Typical Quad-Deck Floor Internal Wall Connection

STIRRUPS AS SPECIFIED

DOWELS AS SPECIFIED

WWM AS SPECIFIED

CONC. BEAM REINFORCEMENT

QUAD-DECK PANEL

TEMP. SHORING

BEAMS @ 6' O.C. MAX

4'-5' O.C. MAX. FOR TEMP.

SHORING UNDER BEAMS

TO BE SPECIFIED BY

ENGINEER

HORIZONTAL REINF.

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

July 2009 Chapter 7 – Quad-Deck Floor & Roof Systems Page 135


Typical Quad-Deck Flat Roof Connection

TOP WHALER

SLAB TIE & SLAB BRACKET

W/ LUMBER POSTS

@ 24" [610mm] O.C.

VERT. REINF. AS SPECIFIED

QUAD-LOCK TIE

REINF. CONCRETE CORE

WATERPROOFING AND

DRAINAGE BOARD AS SPECIFED

FREE DRAINING BACKFILL

AS SPECIFIED

24" [610mm]

36" [914mm]

SLOPE

Figure 124: Typical Quad-Deck Flat Roof Connection

1% SLOPE REQUIRED

TEMP. SHORING

BEAMS @ 6' O.C. MAX

4'-5' O.C. MAX. FOR TEMP.

SHORING UNDER BEAMS

TO BE SPECIFIED BY

ENGINEER

6" MAX.

PRODUCT MANUAL

WATERPROOFING & FINISH MATERIAL

AS PER ARCH. DESIGN

DOWELS AS SPECIFIED

WWM AS SPECIFIED

CONC. BEAM REINFORCEMENT

QUAD-DECK PANEL

HORIZONTAL REINF.

PLACED ALTERNATELY AT

REQUIRED SPACING

QUAD-LOCK PANEL

INTERIOR FINISH AS SPECIFIED

SLAB DEPTH

1 1 2" - 4" [38mm - 102mm]

BEAM DEPTH

5" - 10 1 2" [127mm - 267mm]

INSULATION

2" - 3" [51mm - 76mm]

Page 136 Chapter 7 – Quad-Deck Floor & Roof Systems July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

88 TTEECCHHNNIICCAALL SSPPEECCIIFFIICCAATTIIOONNSS

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR QUAD-LOCK EPS

PANELS

Imperial

Metric

DIMENSIONS*: Regular Panel 48" x 12" x 2¼" 1219 x 305 x 57mm

Plus Panel 48" x 12" x 4¼" 1219 x 305 x 108mm

COLOR*: GRANITE

EPS DENSITY*: Regular Panel 1.9 ± 0.06 lb./cuft 30.4 ± 1.0 g/l

Plus Panel 1.5 ± 0.06 lb./cuft 24.0 ± 1.0 g/l

EPS BEAD TYPE*: FIRE RETARDANT

FLEXURAL STRENGTH*: (ASTM C-203) min. 40 PSI min. 276kPa

COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH*: (ASTM D-1621) 32 PSI 222kPa

SHEAR STRENGTH: (ASTM C-273) 38 PSI 262kPa

TENSILE STRENGTH: (MIL-P-19644) 60 PSI 414kPa

WATER VAPOR PERMEANCE*: (ASTM E-96) 0.25 perm/in 14.3 ng/Pa.sm. 2

WATER ABSORPTION (96hr)*: (ASTM D-2842) 2.7% 2.7%

DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: (ASTM D-2126) 0.26% 0.26%

COEFFICIENT OF EXPANSION # : (ASTM D-696) 3.5 x 10 -5 in/in°F 1.94 x 10 -5 m/m°C

ALLOWABLE DIMENSIONAL

TOLERANCES*:

1/8" 3.3mm

FLASH IGNITION TEMP.: (DIN 54836, Styropor, BASF) 715°F 379°C

SELF-IGNITION TEMP. (ASTM D1929 Expanded Polystyrene, Huntsman)

(EXPANDED): 880°F 471°C

FLAME SPREAD: (ASTM

102.2M)

E84/CAN/UCC-S 25 max 140 – 180

SMOKE DEV.: (ASTM

102.2M)

E84/CAN/UCC-S 450 max over 380

EPS RAW MATERIAL ARCO NER # 236 Dec. 1, 1992

SUPPLIERS: BASF NER # 479 June 1, 1993

HUNTSMAN NER # 384 May 1, 1992

STAREX SAMSUNG ESR-2195 February 1, 2007

NOVA CHEMICALS ESR-1798 October 1, 2006

* tested for Quad-Lock

July 2009 Chapter 8 – Technical Specifications Page 137


PRODUCT MANUAL

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR QUAD-LOCK

INSULATED CONCRETE WALLS

INSULATION VALUES

using the following panels

(insulation thicknesses):

2 Regular Panels

(2¼" [57mm] each)

1 Regular & 1 Plus

Panel (2¼" [57mm]

and 4¼" [108mm])

Imperial (h*ft²*°F/BTU) ABOVE GRADE R = 21.7 R = 32 R = 40

(with ½" gypsum board

on one side)

3½' BELOW GRADE R = 27.8 R = 38 R = 46

Metric (W/(m²*K)) U = 0.28 U = 0.20 U = 0.15

(without gypsum

board)

STC RATING Wall’s Nominal

Concrete Thickness

STC Rating

(ASTM E-90) 4" [10cm] 50

FIRE RESISTANCE

Non-Bearing Walls

ASTM E119 –

Available upon

request.

FIRE RESISTANCE

Bearing Walls

(Please refer to

UL/ULC Fire Resistive

Design BXUV.U934

and BXUVC.W019

respectively)

6" [15cm] 53

8" [20cm] 57

10" [25cm] 58

12" [30cm] 59

6" [15cm]

8" [20cm]

10" [25cm]

12" [30cm]

4" [10cm]

6" [15cm]

8" [20cm]

10" [25cm]

12" [30cm]

4 hours

4 hours

4 hours

4 hours

2 hours

3 hours

4 hours

4 hours

4 hours

4 hours

4 hours

4 hours

4 hours

2 hours

3 hours

4 hours

4 hours

4 hours

2 Plus Panels

(4¼" [108mm] each)

4 hours

4 hours

4 hours

4 hours

2 hours

3 hours

4 hours

4 hours

4 hours

Page 138 Chapter 8 – Technical Specificaitions July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

The following table summarizes the conditions under which Quad-Lock walls were tested for UL/ULC

Fire Resistance Ratings (ASTM E119)

Product Tested Nominal 6inch Quad-Lock Wall Assembly

Test Wall Dimensions (LxHxW)

Wall Reinforcing (at centerline of wall)

10 feet x 10 feet x 5 3/4" (actual concrete width)

[3.05m x 3.05m x 146mm]

10M at 305mm Horizontal

10M at 400mm Vertical

Concrete Compressive Strength 2900 psi (20 MPa)

Factored Axial Resistance

Per A23.3-05 40,283 lbs per ft (596 kN/m)

Per ACI-318-05 41,072 lbs per ft (599 kN/m)

Specified Gravity Test Loading

Per A23.3-05 29,159 lbs per ft (426 kN/m)

Per ACI-318-05 29,373 lbs per ft (428 kN/m)

Specified Gravity Test Loading

(Superimposed)

29,340 lbs per ft (428 kN/m)

July 2009 Chapter 8 – Technical Specifications Page 139


Wall Widths of Quad-Lock Panel and Tie Combinations

Imperial

Wall Type

Nominal

Wall Width /

Concrete width

Metric

Wall

Width

R-

Value

PRODUCT MANUAL

Con-

crete

Width

Page 140 Chapter 8 – Technical Specificaitions July 2009

Con-

crete

Vol-

ume

Weight

Quad-

Lock

Parts

Weight

Con-

crete

W* T* Outside Inside C* per m² per m²

inches

"

h*ft²*°F/

BTU Type

inches

" Type " Type "

inches

" m³/m² kN/m² kN/m²

16 / 12 16 1/4 22 12" Tie red 15.5 Regular 2.25 Regular 2.25 11 3/4 0.299 0.48 6.87

16 / 10 16 1/4 32 12" Tie red 15.5 Plus 4.25 Regular 2.25 9 3/4 0.248 0.64 5.70

16 / 8 16 1/4 40 12" Tie red 15.5 Plus 4.25 Plus 4.25 7 3/4 0.197 0.79 4.53

14 / 10 14 1/4 22 10" Tie green 13.5 Regular 2.25 Regular 2.25 9 3/4 0.248 0.48 5.70

14 / 8 14 1/4 32 10" Tie green 13.5 Plus 4.25 Regular 2.25 7 3/4 0.197 0.64 4.53

14 / 6 14 1/4 40 10" Tie green 13.5 Plus 4.25 Plus 4.25 5 3/4 0.146 0.79 3.36

12 / 8 12 1/4 22 8" Tie yellow 11.5 Regular 2.25 Regular 2.25 7 3/4 0.197 0.48 4.53

12 / 6 12 1/4 32 8" Tie yellow 11.5 Plus 4.25 Regular 2.25 5 3/4 0.146 0.64 3.36

12 / 4 12 1/4 40 8" Tie yellow 11.5 Plus 4.25 Plus 4.25 3 3/4 0.095 0.79 2.19

10 / 6 10 1/4 22 6" Tie blue 9.5 Regular 2.25 Regular 2.25 5 3/4 0.146 0.48 3.36

10 / 4 10 1/4 32 6" Tie blue 9.5 Plus 4.25 Regular 2.25 3 3/4 0.095 0.64 2.19

8 / 4 8 1/4 22 4" Tie black 7.5 Regular 2.25 Regular 2.25 3 3/4 0.096 0.48 2.21

Wall Type

Nominal

Wall Width /

Concrete

Width

Wall

Width U-Value

Con-

crete

Width

Con-

crete

Vol-

ume

Weight

Quad-

Lock

Parts

Weight

Con-

crete

W* T* Outside Inside

C* per m² per m²

mm

Ties

Panels

Ties Panels

W/

(m²*K) Type mm Type mm Type mm mm m³/m² kN/m² kN/m²

16 / 12 413 0.28 12" Tie red 394 Regular 57 Regular 57 299 0.299 0.48 6.88

16 / 10 413 0.20 12" Tie red 394 Plus 108 Regular 57 248 0.248 0.63 5.70

16 / 8 413 0.15 12" Tie red 394 Plus 108 Plus 108 197 0.197 0.79 4.53

14 / 10 362 0.28 10" Tie green 343 Regular 57 Regular 57 248 0.248 0.48 5.70

14 / 8 362 0.20 10" Tie green 343 Plus 108 Regular 57 197 0.197 0.63 4.53

14 / 6 362 0.15 10" Tie green 343 Plus 108 Plus 108 146 0.146 0.79 3.36

12 / 8 311 0.28 8" Tie yellow 292 Regular 57 Regular 57 197 0.197 0.48 4.53

12 / 6 311 0.20 8" Tie yellow 292 Plus 108 Regular 57 146 0.146 0.63 3.36

12 / 4 311 0.15 8" Tie yellow 292 Plus 108 Plus 108 95 0.095 0.79 2.19

10 / 6 260 0.28 6" Tie blue 241 Regular 57 Regular 57 146 0.146 0.48 3.36

10 / 4 260 0.20 6" Tie blue 241 Plus 108 Regular 57 95 0.095 0.63 2.19

8 / 4 210 0.28 4" Tie black 191 Regular 57 Regular 57 96 0.096 0.48 2.21


PRODUCT MANUAL

FINDINGS OF TESTS PERFORMED ON QUAD-LOCK

Product Evaluation #484-2063 (performed by Inchcape Testing Services)

Findings:

'The expanded polystyrene systems (Quad-Lock) identified in this report have met the requirements of ICBO Evaluation

Service AC12 Acceptance Criteria for Foam Plastic Insulation (July 2000) in conjunction with the ASTM C578-95

"Standard Specification for Rigid Cellular Polystyrene Thermal Insulation" for the test reported.'

Screw Pull Out Test #L19214

Findings:

Shear Tests conducted at -40°F [-40°C] using #6 drywall screws is an average maximum shear strength of 190 lb [86kg]

Pull-out Tests conducted at -40°F [-40°C] using #6 drywall screws is an average maximum shear strength of 130lbs

[59kg]

Shear Tests at -31°F (-35°C) using #6 drywall screws is an average maximum withdrawal strength of 160lbs [73kg]

Pull-out Tests at -31°F [-35°C] using #6 drywall screws has an average maximum withdrawal strength of 100lbs [45kg]

NOTE: ICC/ICBO Evaluation has allowed for a safety buffer and reports: Fasteners have an allowable pullout capacity

of 38lbs [17kg] and an allowable lateral capacity of 77lbs [35kg]

Standard Room Fire Test #6807

Findings:

'The Quad-Lock EPS form wall protected by ½" [12.5mm] conventional gypsum wallboard installed as described in this

report met the criteria of acceptance of the Uniform Building Code Standard 26-3 (1994).'

Standard Fire Endurance Test Program #6802

Findings:

'The Quad-Lock EPS form wall protected by a ½" [12.5mm] standard gypsum wallboard thermal barrier installed as

described in this report met the criteria of acceptance of ASTM E 119, CAN/ULC S101, and UBC 7-1 for a four hour fire

resistance rating. The High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) or Polypropylene (PP) bridging ties did not melt out and did not

cause a loss of support for the non-fire side standard ½" [12.5mm] gypsum thermal barrier. As no through openings were

developed in the concrete wall section, no possibility of ignition of cotton waste occurred. There was no occurrence of

burnthrough or through openings in the concrete wall, nor was there flaming of the plastic ties and expanded polystyrene

foam on the unexposed side.

The Quad-Lock expanded polystyrene foam 6" [15cm] concrete wall form system is consequently eligible for a four hour

fire resistance rating.'

Analysis of Thermal Properties of Quad-Lock (performed by Ecotope)

Findings:

'Ecotope's analysis shows that in typical construction, Quad-Lock above-grade walls perform much better than typical R-

19 and R-21 frame walls; the Quad-Lock performance is equivalent to a 2x6 frame wall insulated with 5½" [14cm] of Dow

Blueboard (R-5 per inch). In below-grade applications, Quad-Lock significantly outperforms standard construction (8"

[20cm] concrete wall with R-10 exterior rigid insulation).' The Quad-Lock wall system should out-perform frame walls in

ways that cannot be quantified by a steady-state heat loss analysis. Standard parallel heat flow calculations assume that

the fiberglass insulation is uniformly installed with no voids or compressed batts. This is not what is usually found in the

field. If installed correctly, concrete walls will not settle, bend, sag and crack, as framed walls will do with time. The Quad-

Lock system should also create a wall, which is significantly more airtight than a standard framed wall.

July 2009 Chapter 8 – Technical Specifications Page 141


PRODUCT MANUAL

Fire Resistance Rating – Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. (BXUV.U934) and

Underwriters’ Laboratories of Canada (BXUVC.W109)

Quad-Lock walls have been tested by Underwriters’ Laboratories of Canada under the following testing standards:

ASTM E119-07

CAN/ULC S101-04

ANSI/UL 263 – 13 th edition

EN 1365-1

In accordance with all of the above standards, Quad-Lock walls have been found to have fire resistance as follows:

4" [100mm] cavity 2 hrs

6" [150mm] cavity 3 hrs

8" [200mm] cavity and above 4 hrs

Search for listed fire resistive design (UL Design # U934 and ULC Design # W019) at:

USA: http://database.ul.com/cgi-bin/XYV/template/LISEXT/1FRAME/index.htm

CANADA: http://database.ul.com/cgi-bin/XYV/template/LISCANADA/1FRAME/index.html

Page 142 Chapter 8 – Technical Specificaitions July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

BXUV.U934

Fire Resistance Ratings - ANSI/UL 263

Bearing Wall Rating - 2, 3 or 4 Hr (See item 1)

QUAD-LOCK BUILDING SYSTEMS LTD

Design No. U934

July 24, 2007

1. Insulated Concrete Forms* — Standard form units comprised of two 48" by 12" by 2¼" [mm by mm by mm] thick

expanded polystyrene (EPS) panels linked by High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) ties at 12" on center. Ties are

colour coded for different wall cavity thicknesses and are field installed into EPS panels to create the ICF form.

The min width of the ICF cavity is 3¾" [mm] as shown in the table below. Assembly ratings depend on width of

ICF cavity as shown in table below:

Assembly Rating, (Hr) Min. ICF Cavity Thickness, (in)

2 3.75

3 5.75

4 7.75

2. Reinforcing Steel — No. 4 steel rebar installed horizontally into each ICF course within polypropylene web

notches. No. 4 rebars placed vertically at 16" OC into center of ICFs.

3. Normal Weight Concrete — 145 ± 5 pcf density, 2900 psi nominal compressive strength.

4. Gypsum Wallboard — Min ½" [mm] thick, 1.5 psf min area density, 48" [mm] wide gypsum wallboard fastened to

flanges of HDPE ties with 2" long drywall screws at 12" OC vertically and horizontally. Joints covered with joint

compound, covered with joint tape, and covered with an additional coat of joint compound. Screwheads covered

with joint compound.

*Bearing the UL Classification Mark

Reprinted from the Online Certifications Directory with permission from Underwriters Laboratories Inc.

Copyright © 2007 Underwriters Laboratories Inc.®

July 2009 Chapter 8 – Technical Specifications Page 143


BXUVC.W019

Fire Resistance Ratings

Bearing Wall Rating - 2, 3 or 4 Hr (See item 1)

QUAD-LOCK BUILDING SYSTEMS LTD

Design No. W019

July 24, 2007

PRODUCT MANUAL

1. Insulated Concrete Forms — CDELC (Guide No. 40 U18.45). Standard form units comprised of two 1219mm

by 305mm by 57mm thick expanded polystyrene (EPS) panels linked by High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) ties

at 305mm OC. Ties are colour coded for different wall cavity thicknesses and are field installed into EPS panels

to create the ICF form. The minimum width of the ICF cavity is 96mm as shown in the table below. Assembly

ratings depend on width of ICF cavity as shown in table below:

Assembly Rating, (Hr) Min. ICF Cavity Thickness, (mm)

2 96

3 146

4 197

2. Reinforcing Steel — 10M reinforcing bars installed horizontally into each ICF course within polypropylene web

notches. Reinforcing bars placed vertically at 400mm OC into center of ICFs.

3. Sand-Limestone Concrete — 2300 ± 50 kg/m 3 density, 20 MPa nominal compressive strength.

4. Gypsum Wallboard — 12.7mm thick, 7.5 kg/m 2 minimum, 1220mm wide gypsum wallboard fastened to flanges

of HDPE ties with 50mm long drywall screws at 305mm OC vertically and horizontally. Joints covered with joint

compound, covered with joint tape, and covered with an additional coat of joint compound. Screwheads covered

with joint compound.

Reprinted from the Online Certifications Directory with permission from Underwriters Laboratories' of Canada

Copyright © 2007 Underwriters Laboratories' of Canada®

Page 144 Chapter 8 – Technical Specificaitions July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET

Quad-Lock Building Systems Ltd.

7398 - 132nd Street

Surrey, BC V3W 4M7

Canada

PRODUCT INFORMATION

Product: Quad-Lock Panels moulded EPS – expanded polystyrene

Product Types: ASTM C578 Types: The rigid cellular EPS insulation complies with ASTM C 578-95 as flows:

Regular Panels are Type III in Canada and type IX in US, and Plus Panels are Type II in

Canada and US

Chemical Family: polystyrene thermoplastic

CSA Name: benzene, ethenyl-, homopolymer (9003-53-6)

Chemical Formula: (C8H8)

TSCA Inventory Status: Listed

HAZARD RATING DATA

Health 0

Fire 1 self extinguishing material

Reactivity 0

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET

Effective November 2004

0=minimal 2=moderate 3=serious 4=severe

COMPONENTS DATA

Hazardous Components:

Pentanes (CSA Registry No. 109-66-0)


PRODUCT MANUAL

99 PPRRIIMMEERR:: AAIIRR CCIIRRCCUULLAATTIIOONN

Air circulation in a house

ensures that dampness

can be avoided and thus

mildew does not have a

chance to grow. This is

especially important in an

ICF house, where the

walls themselves are

significantly more air tight

than in a stick-frame

building (which is one of

the reasons for lower

energy costs). Proper air

circulation can be

accomplished by installing

an adequate HVAC

system or, if radiant

heating is used, by installing

a simple air circulation

system. The simplest

method is to open the

windows a few times a

day for short periods.

The illustration shows the

air circulation system of a

“Passive House” (a

building that heats and

cools itself). The house

actually doesn’t consume

energy in the form of oil,

gas, electricity or other

conventional means, but

rather produces all the

energy needed itself using

solar panels, the

orientation of the house

FRESH AIR

FRESH AIR INTO

BEDROOMS

FRESH AIR INTO

LIVING ROOM

FRESH AIR

GROUND IS PREHEATING FRESH AIR

HEAT

EXCHANGER

and windows to the South and heat exchange systems for the recovery of energy.

USED AIR FROM

BATHROOMS

USED AIR FROM

BATHROOMS

Of course this is only possible, if the walls and the roof are insulated to the highest standards (i.e. using Quad-Lock and

Quad-Deck) and if the windows only permit very little heat to escape. But the key to the concept is the introduction of

heat exchangers in the air circulation system. Experiments have shown that heat loss by ventilation accounts for 40% of

all heat loss in a low-energy house. By using heat exchangers, this heat loss can be reduced by 80%.

How can you achieve that? Here are the central points:

• Installation of a heat exchanger. This device transfers the heat from outbound air to inbound air. The heat

exchanger should have an efficiency of more than 80%.

• Inbound air through pipes in the ground. If the inbound air is ducted to the building through pipes that lie

approximately 10ft [3 m] below the ground surface for a distance of 50ft [15.2 m], the air will arrive at the building

already preheated in the Winter and pre-cooled in the Summer.

• The ducts are kept as short as possible and flow rates are kept below 10ft/s. The heating unit and the heat

exchanger is located strategically in the building in order to decrease duct lengths and friction in the system.

• Used air is drawn from the kitchen and the bathrooms and fresh air is ducted into the living areas and bedrooms.

Building with Quad-Lock and Quad-Deck alone will save a lot of energy. To become almost independent from energy

costs and shortages, you have the option to install a heat exchange system and save even more energy and money.

Page 146 Chapter 9 – Technical Specificaitions July 2009

USED AIR

HEAT

PUMP

USED AIR

Figure 125: Typical “Passive House” Ventilation Systems


PRODUCT MANUAL

AAPPPPEENNDDIIXX AA --

EENNGGIINNEEEERRIINNGG DDEESSIIGGNN TTAABBLLEESS

((CCAANNAADDAA)) && CCCCMMCC EEVVAALLUUAATTIIOONN

Introduction

The Quad-Lock Building System results in a solid monolithic concrete wall of the thickness selected. The formwork is

held together with plastic ties which are embedded in the concrete wall after the concrete is poured. The plastic ties are

manufactured to for a 102mm, 152mm, 203mm, or 254mm nominal width for a constructed concrete wall width of 92mm,

143mm, 194mm and 245mm, respectively when using standard panels (for all possible wall widths see Wall Widths of

Quad-Lock Panel and Tie Combinations on Page 140).

Proprietary tables have been prepared for use by qualified designers and structural engineers who are required to

determine the load conditions, combinations and required ultimate resistance and serviceability for a desired concrete

wall.

Structural calculations are available for concrete lintels for a 305mm, 406mm and 607mm deep lintel. Factored uniform

vertical loads are listed for varying lintel/header widths indicating the shear stirrups requirements.

The prepared tables are intended to indicate reinforcing schedule and available strength for a selected concrete wall

section. It is the responsibility of a building designer to determine strength and serviceability requirements and use the

structural tables wherever appropriate. Other lintel reinforcing arrangements and details may be suitable and should be

reviewed by a qualified structural engineer.

Tables for wall reinforcing schedule are calculated based on Seismic Zone 0 to 4 for the out of plane loading of wall

component. Quad-Lock Building System strongly recommends that for application for above grade reinforced concrete

wall in a high wind or seismic zone; a designated professional should be consulted to determine the minimum solid wall

length that will safely transfer the required seismic or wind shear and provides resistance to the overturning moment. The

full engineering report which is the basis for all of the tables, are available to the designers/structural engineers, if

requested.

Prescriptive design tables for residential structures can also be found in Part 9, Subsection 9.15.4.5 and 9.20.17 of the

2005 National Building Code of Canada. Use of these prescriptive designs is permissible in locations where the seismic

spectral response acceleration, Sa(0.2), is not greater than 0.4. (See A-9.20.1.12. in Appendix A.) Otherwise, buildings

must comply with Structural Design Subsection 4.3.2. Consult the 2005 NBC for a list of seismic response ratings.

If a building design falls outside of the parameters of either the Quad-Lock tables or those contained in the 2005 NBC, a

site-specific engineering design may be required by the local building official.

The excerpt of Quad-Lock’s CCMC evaluation below shows that Quad-Lock complies with CCMC’s Technical Guide for

Modular, Expanded Polystyrene or Polyurethane Concrete Forms, MasterFormat number 03131 and provides a level of

performance equivalent to that required in NBC 1995, Article 4.3.3.1., Subsection 9.3.1., Section 9.4., and Subsection

9.15.4 with respect to wall construction.

July 2009 Appendix A Page 147


CCMC Evaluation

PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 148 Appendix A July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

July 2009 Appendix A Page 149


PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 150 Appendix A July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

July 2009 Appendix A Page 151


PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 152 Appendix A July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

July 2009 Appendix A Page 153


PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 154 Appendix A July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

July 2009 Appendix A Page 155


PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 156 Appendix A July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

July 2009 Appendix A Page 157


PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 158 Appendix A July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

July 2009 Appendix A Page 159


PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 160 Appendix A July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

AAPPPPEENNDDIIXX BB --

EENNGGIINNEEEERRIINNGG DDEESSIIGGNN TTAABBLLEESS

((UUSSAA)) && IICCCC EEVVAALLUUAATTIIOONN

Introduction

The Quad-Lock Building System results in a solid monolithic concrete wall of the thickness selected. The formwork is

held together with plastic ties that are embedded in the concrete wall after the concrete is poured. The plastic ties are

manufactured to assemble a 4", 6", 8", 10" and 12" nominal concrete width for a constructed concrete wall width of

3⅝", 5⅝", 7⅝", 9⅝" and 11⅝", respectively when using standard panels (for all possible wall widths Wall Widths of

Quad-Lock Panel and Tie Combinations on Page 140.

The plastic ties occupy a small vertical or horizontal cross-section and are considered negligible in the calculation of the

strength of a conventional concrete wall.

This Section contains calculations for various concrete wall widths, reinforcing steel size, reinforcing placement schedule

and wall loads. Sample calculations are illustrated for particular load conditions and wall configurations. Tables are

prepared listing reinforcement requirements for a range of load conditions and wall configurations. Other concrete wall

reinforcing arrangements and details may be suitable and should be reviewed by a qualified structural engineer.

Tables have been prepared for the use of qualified designers and structural engineers who are required to determine the

load conditions, combinations and required strength for a desired concrete wall.

Structural calculations are available for concrete lintels for a 12", 16" and 24" deep lintel. Maximum allowable clear spans

for lintels are listed for varying lintel widths with or without shear stirrups.

The prepared tables are intended to indicate reinforcing and available strength for a selected concrete wall section. It is

the responsibility of a building designer/structural engineer to determine strength and serviceability requirements and use

the structural tables wherever appropriate. Other lintel reinforcing arrangements and details may be suitable and should

be reviewed by a qualified structural engineer.

According to EB118.02, for all buildings in Seismic Design Categories D1 and D2, the minimum vertical and horizontal

reinforcement shall be one No.5 rebar at maximum spacing of 18" on center, and the minimum concrete compressive

strength shall be 3,000 psi. Quad-Lock Building System strongly recommends that for application for above grade

reinforced concrete wall in a high wind or seismic zone; a designated professional should be consulted to determine the

minimum solid wall length that will safely transfer the required seismic or wind shear and provides resistance to the

overturning moment. All of the requirements for high seismic zone or wind region for one and two family dwellings can be

found in EB 118.02 "Prescriptive Method for Insulating Concrete Forms in Residential Construction, 2 nd Edition".

Note: If the building design exceeds certain conditions and applicability limits outlined in the 2006

IRC (Section R611) or in EB118.0 (Section 1.3 “Scope” and Table 1.1 “Applicability Limits”),

engineering will be required on a job specific basis.

July 2009 Appendix B Page 161


PRODUCT MANUAL

The following tables are provided to assist with the use of USA (ICC) Engineering Tables. The values must be verified

with local building codes and practices. Contact a Quad-Lock Technical Representative for further explanation.

The following tables are excerpts from “Prescriptive Method for Insulating Concrete Forms in Residential Construction,

2 nd Edition”, by NAHB Research Center, published by the Portland Cement Association (www.cement.org) – Document

No. EB118. Reprinted with permission.

TABLE 3.2

PRESUMPTIVE LOAD-BEARING VALUES OF

FOUNDATION MATERIALS a

CLASS OF MATERIAL

MINIMUM VERTICAL WALL REINFORCEMENT FOR ICF CRAWLSPACE WALLS 1,2,3,4,5,6

Shape of

Concrete

Walls

Flat

Wall

Thickness 7

(inches)

3.5 8

5.5

LOAD-BEARING

PRESSURE (pounds

per square foot)

Crystalline bedrock 12,000

Sedimentary and foliated rock 4,000

Sandy gravel and/or gravel (GW

and GP) 3,000

Sand, silty sand, clayey sand, silty

gravel and clayey gravel

(SW, SP, SM, SC, GM and GC)

Clay, sandy clay, silty clay, clayey

silt, silt and sandy silt

(CL, ML, MH and CH)

2000

1500 b

For SI: 1 pound per square foot = 0.0479 kN/m 2

a. When soil tests are required by Section R401.4, the

allowable bearing capacities of the soil shall be part of the

recommendations.

b. When the building official determines that in-place soils with

an allowable bearing capacity of less than 1,500 psf are likely

to be present at the site, the allowable bearing capacity shall

be determined by a soils investigation.

Maximum

Equivalent Fluid

Density

30 pcf

#3@16"

#4@32"

#3@24"

#4@48"

Minimum Vertical Reinforcement

Maximum

Equivalent Fluid

Density

45 pcf

#3@18";

#4@28"; #5@38"

#3@24"

#4@48"

Maximum

Equivalent Fluid

Density

60 pcf

#3@12";

#4@22"; #5@28"

#3@24"

#4@48"

7.5 N/R N/R N/R

For SI: 1 foot = 0.3048 m; 1 inch = 25.4mm; 1 pcf = 16.0179 kg/m 3

1

Table values are based on reinforcing bars with a minimum yield strength of 40,000 psi [276 MPa] and concrete with a minimum

specified compressive strength of 2,500 psi [17.2 MPa].

2

N/R indicates no vertical wall reinforcement is required.

3

Spacing of rebar shall be permitted to be multiplied by 1.5 when reinforcing steel with a minimum yield strength of 60,000 psi [414 MPa]

is used. Reinforcement, when required, shall not be less than one #4 bar at 48" [1.2 m] on center.

4

Applicable only to crawlspace walls 5 feet [1.5 m] or less in height with a maximum unbalanced backfill height of 4 feet [1.2 m].

5

Interpolation shall not be permitted.

6

Walls shall be laterally supported at the top before backfilling.

7

Actual thickness is shown for flat walls while nominal thickness is given for waffle-grid and screen-grid walls. Refer to Section 2.0 for

actual waffle-grid and screen-grid thickness and dimensions.

8

Applicable only to one-story construction with floor bearing on top of crawlspace wall.

Page 162 Appendix B July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

TABLE 3.3

MINIMUM HORIZONTAL WALL REINFORCEMENT FOR ICF BASEMENT WALLS

Maximum Height

of Basement Wall

Location of Horizontal Reinforcement

feet (meters)

One No. 4 bar within 12" [305mm] of the top of the wall story and one No. 4 bar

8 [2.4]

near mid-height of the wall story

One No. 4 bar within 12" [305mm] of the top of the wall story and one No. 4 bar

9 [2.7]

near third points in the wall story

One No. 4 bar within 12" [305mm] of the top of the wall story and one No. 4 bar

10 [3.0]

near third points in the wall story

For SI: 1 foot = 0.3048 m; 1 inch = 25.4mm; 1 pcf = 16.0179 kg/m 3

1 Horizontal reinforcement requirements are for reinforcing bars with a minimum yield strength from 40,000 psi [276 MPa] and concrete

with a minimum concrete compressive strength 2,500 psi [17.2 MPa].

Courtesy Portland Cement Association

July 2009 Appendix B Page 163


TABLE 3.4

PRODUCT MANUAL

MINIMUM VERTICAL WALL REINFORCEMENT FOR 5½" [140mm] THICK FLAT ICF BASEMENT

WALLS

1,2,3,4,5

Max. Wall

Height

(feet)

8

9

10

Maximum

Unbalanced

Backfill Height 6

(feet)

Maximum

Equivalent Fluid

Density

30 pcf

Minimum Vertical Reinforcement

Maximum

Equivalent Fluid

Density

45 pcf

Maximum

Equivalent Fluid

Density

60 pcf

4 #4@48" #4@48" #4@48"

5 #4@48"

#3@12"; #4@22";

#5@32"; #6@40"

#3@8"; #4@14";

#5@20"; #6@26"

6

#3@12"; #4@22";

#5@30"; #6@40"

#3@8"; #4@14";

#5@20"; #6@24"

#3@6"; #4@10";

#5@14"; #6@20"

7

#3@8"; #4@14";

#5@22"; #6@26"

#3@5"; #4@10";

#5@14"; #6@18"

#3@4"; #4@6";

#5@10"; #6@14"

4 #4@48" #4@48" #4@48"

5 #4@48"

#3@12"; #4@20";

#5@28"; #6@36"

#3@8"; #4@14";

#5@20"; #6@22"

6

#3@10"; #4@20";

#5@28"; #6@34"

#3@6"; #4@12";

#5@18"; #6@20"

#4@8";

#5@14"; #6@16"

7

#3@8"; #4@14";

#5@20"; #6@22"

#4@8";

#5@12"; #6@16"

#4@6";

#5@10"; #6@12"

8

#3@6"; #4@10";

#5@14"; #6@16"

#4@6";

#5@10"; #6@12"

#4@4";

#5@6"; #6@8"

4 #4@48" #4@48" #4@48"

5 #4@48"

#3@10"; #4@18";

#5@26"; #6@30"

#3@6"; #4@14";

#5@18"; #6@20"

6

#3@10"; #4@18";

#5@24"; #6@30"

#3@6"; #4@12";

#5@16"; #6@18"

#3@4"; #4@8";

#5@12"; #6@14"

7

#3@6"; #4@12";

#5@16"; #6@18"

#3@4"; #4@8";

#5@12"

#4@6";

#5@8"; #6@10"

8

#3@4"; #4@8";

#5@12"; #6@14"

#4@6";

#5@8"; #6@12"

#4@4";

#5@6"; #6@8"

9

#3@4"; #4@6";

#5@10"; #6@12"

#4@4";

#5@6"; #6@8"

#5@4"; #6@6"

For SI: 1 foot = 0.3048 m; 1 inch = 25.4mm; 1 pcf = 16.0179 kg/m 3

1

Table values are based on reinforcing bars with a minimum yield strength of 40,000 psi [276 MPa] and concrete with a minimum

specified compressive strength of 2,500 psi [17.2 MPa].

2

Spacing of rebar shall be permitted to be multiplied by 1.5 when reinforcing steel with a minimum yield strength of 60,000 psi [414 MPa]

is used. Reinforcement shall not be less than one #4 bar at 48" [1.2 m] on center.

3

Deflection criterion is L/240, where L is the height of the basement wall in inches.

4

Interpolation shall not be permitted.

5

Walls shall be laterally supported at the top before backfilling.

6

Refer to Section 1.0 for the definition of unbalanced backfill height.

Courtesy Portland Cement Association

Page 164 Appendix B July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

TABLE 3.5

MINIMUM VERTICAL WALL REINFORCEMENT FOR 7½" [191mm] THICK FLAT ICF BASEMENT

WALLS

1,2,3,4,5,6

Max. Wall

Height

(feet)

8

9

10

Maximum

Unbalanced

Backfill Height 7

(feet)

Maximum

Equivalent Fluid

Density

30 pcf

Minimum Vertical Reinforcement

Maximum

Equivalent Fluid

Density

45 pcf

Maximum

Equivalent Fluid

Density

60 pcf

4 N/R N/R N/R

5 N/R N/R N/R

6 N/R N/R N/R

7 N/R

#4@14";

#5@20"; #6@28"

#4@10";

#5@16"; #6@20"

4 N/R N/R N/R

5 N/R N/R N/R

6 N/R N/R

#4@14";

#5@20"; #6@28"

7 N/R

#4@12";

#5@18"; #6@26"

#4@8";

#5@14"; #6@18"

8

#4@14";

#5@22"; #6@28"

#4@8";

#5@14"; #6@18"

#4@6";

#5@10"; #6@14"

4 N/R N/R N/R

5 N/R N/R N/R

6 N/R N/R

#4@12";

#5@18"; #6@26"

7 N/R

#4@12";

#5@18"; #6@24"

#4@8";

#5@12"; #6@18"

8

#4@12";

#5@20"; #6@26"

#4@8";

#5@12"; #6@16"

#4@6";

#5@8"; #6@12"

9

#4@10";

#5@14"; #6@20"

#4@6";

#5@10"; #6@12"

#4@4";

#5@6"; #6@10"

For SI: 1 foot = 0.3048 m; 1 inch = 25.4mm; 1 pcf = 16.0179 kg/m 3

1

Table values are based on reinforcing bars with a minimum yield strength of 40,000 psi [276 MPa] and concrete with a minimum

specified compressive strength of 2,500 psi [17.2 MPa].

2

Spacing of rebar shall be permitted to be multiplied by 1.5 when reinforcing steel with a minimum yield strength of 60,000 psi [414 MPa]

is used. Reinforcement, when required, shall not be less than one #4 bar at 48" [1.2 m] on center.

3

N/R indicates no reinforcement is required.

4

Deflection criterion is L/240, where L is the height of the basement wall in inches.

5

Interpolation shall not be permitted.

6

Walls shall be laterally supported at the top before backfilling.

7

Refer to Section 1.0 for the definition of unbalanced backfill height.

Courtesy Portland Cement Association

July 2009 Appendix B Page 165


TABLE 3.6

PRODUCT MANUAL

MINIMUM VERTICAL WALL REINFORCEMENT FOR 9½" [241mm] THICK FLAT ICF BASEMENT

WALLS

1,2,3,4,5,6

Max. Wall

Height

(feet)

Maximum

Unbalanced Backfill

Height 7

(feet)

Maximum

Equivalent Fluid

Density

30 pcf

Minimum Vertical Reinforcement

Maximum

Equivalent Fluid

Density

45 pcf

Maximum

Equivalent Fluid

Density

60 pcf

4 N/R N/R N/R

8 5 N/R N/R N/R

6 N/R N/R N/R

7 N/R N/R N/R

4 N/R N/R N/R

5 N/R N/R N/R

9 6 N/R N/R N/R

7 N/R N/R

#4@12";

#5@18"; #6@26"

8 N/R

#4@12";

#5@18"; #6@26"

#4@8";

#5@14"; #6@18"

4 N/R N/R N/R

5 N/R N/R N/R

6 N/R N/R

#4@18";

#5@26"; #6@36"

10 7 N/R N/R

#4@10";

#5@18"; #6@24"

8 N/R

#4@12";

#5@16"; #6@24"

#4@8";

#5@12"; #6@16"

9 N/R

#4@8";

#5@12"; #6@18"

#4@6";

#5@10"; #6@12"

For SI: 1 foot = 0.3048 m; 1 inch = 25.4mm; 1 pcf = 16.0179 kg/m 3

1

Table values are based on reinforcing bars with a minimum yield strength of 40,000 psi [276 MPa] and concrete with a minimum

specified compressive strength of 2,500 psi [17.2 MPa].

2

Spacing of rebar shall be permitted to be multiplied by 1.5 when reinforcing steel with a minimum yield strength of 60,000 psi [414 MPa]

is used. Reinforcement, when required, shall not be less than one #4 bar at 48" [1.2 m] on center.

3

N/R indicates no reinforcement is required.

4

Deflection criterion is L/240, where L is the height of the basement wall in inches.

5

Interpolation shall not be permitted.

6

Walls shall be laterally supported at the top before backfilling.

7

Refer to Section 1.0 for the definition of unbalanced backfill height.

Courtesy Portland Cement Association

Page 166 Appendix B July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

TABLE 4.2

MINIMUM VERTICAL WALL REINFORCEMENT FOR FLAT ICF ABOVE-GRADE WALLS

1,2,3

Design

Wind

Pressure

(Table 4.1)

(psf)

Maximum

Wall

Height

per Story

(feet)

Supporting Roof or

Non-Load-bearing Wall

Minimum Vertical Reinforcement 4,5

Supporting Light-

Frame Second Story

and Roof

Supporting ICF Second Story and

Light-Frame Roof

Minimum Wall Thickness (inches)

3.5 5.5 3.5 5.5 3.5 5.5

8 #4@48 #4@48 #4@48 #4@48 #4@48 #4@48

20 9 #4@48 #4@48 #4@48 #4@48 #4@48 #4@48

10 #4@38 #4@48 #4@40 #4@48 #4@42 #4@48

8 #4@42 #4@48 #4@46 #4@48 #4@48 #4@48

30 9

#4@32;

#5@48

#4@48

#4@34;

#5@48

#4@48

#4@34;

#5@48

#4@48

10

Design

Required

#4@48

Design

Required

#4@48

Design

Required

#4@48

8

#4@30;

#5@48

#4@48

#4@30;

#5@48

#4@48

#4@32;

#5@48

#4@48

40 9

Design

Required

#4@42

Design

Required

#4@46

Design

Required

#4@48

10

Design

Required

#4@32;

#5@48

Design

Required

#4@34;

#5@48

Design

Required

#4@38

8

#4@20;

#5@30

#4@42

#4@22;

#5@34

#4@46

#4@24;

#5@36

#4@48

50 9

Design

Required

#4@34;

#5@48

Design

Required

#4@34;

#5@48

Design

Required

#4@38

10

Design

Required

#4@26;

#5@38

Design

Required

#4@26;

#5@38

Design

Required

#4@28; #5@46

8

Design

Required

#4@34;

#5@48

Design

Required

#4@36

Design

Required

#4@40

60 9

Design

Required

#4@26;

#5@38

Design

Required

#4@28;

#5@46

Design

Required

#4@34; #5@48

10

Design

Required

#4@22;

#5@34

Design

Required

#4@22;

#5@34

Design

Required

#4@26; #5@38

8

Design

Required

#4@28;

#5@46

Design

Required

#4@30;

#5@48

Design

Required

#4@34; #5@48

70 9

Design

Required

#4@22;

#5@34

Design

Required

#4@22;

#5@34

Design

Required

#4@24; #5@36

10

Design

Required

#4@16;

#5@26

Design

Required

#4@18;

#5@28

Design

Required

#4@20; #5@30

8

Design

Required

#4@26;

#5@38

Design

Required

#4@26;

#5@38

Design

Required

#4@28; #5@46

80 9

Design

Required

#4@20;

#5@30

Design

Required

#4@20;

#5@30

Design

Required

#4@21; #5@34

10

Design

Required

#4@14;

#5@24

Design

Required

#4@14;

#5@24

Design

Required

#4@16; #5@26

For SI: 1 foot = 0.3048 m; 1 inch = 25.4mm; 1 mph = 1.6093 km/hr

1

This table is based on reinforcing bars with a minimum yield strength of 40,000 psi [276 MPa] and concrete with a minimum specified

compressive strength of 2,500 psi [17.2 MPa].

2

Deflection criterion is L/240, where L is the height of the wall story in inches.

3

Interpolation shall not be permitted.

4

Reinforcement spacing for 3½" [88.9mm] walls shall be permitted to be multiplied by 1.6 when reinforcing steel with a minimum yield

strength of 60,000 psi [414 MPa] is used. Reinforcement shall not be less than one #4 bar at 48" [1.2 m] on center.

5

Reinforcement spacing for 5½" [139.7mm] walls shall be permitted to be multiplied by 1.5 when reinforcing steel with a minimum yield

strength of 60,000 psi [414 MPa] is used. Reinforcement shall not be less than one #4 bar at 48" [1.2 m] on center.

July 2009 Appendix B Page 167


TABLE 5.5

PRODUCT MANUAL

MINIMUM PERCENTAGE OF SOLID WALL LENGTH ALONG EXTERIOR WALL LINES FOR SEISMIC

DESIGN CATEGORY C AND D

1,2

ICF Wall Type and Minimum Wall

Thickness

(inches)

One-Story or

Top Story of

Two-Story

Minimum Solid Wall Length (percent)

Wall Supporting Light

Frame Second Story

and Roof

Wall Supporting ICF

Second Story and Roof

Seismic Design Category C 3 20 percent 25 percent 35 percent

Seismic Design Category D1 4 25 percent 30 percent 40 percent

Seismic Design Category D2 4 30 percent 35 percent 45 percent

For SI: 1 inch = 25.4mm; 1 mph = 1.6093 km/hr

1

Base percentages are applicable for maximum unsupported wall height of 10-feet [3.0 m], light-frame gable construction, all ICF wall

types in Seismic Design Category C, and all ICF wall types with a nominal thickness greater than 5½" [140mm] for Seismic Design

Category D1 and D2.

2

For all walls, the minimum required length of solid walls shall be based on the table percent value multiplied by the minimum dimension

of a rectangle inscribing the overall building plan.

3

Walls shall be reinforced with minimum No. 5 rebar (grade 40 or 60) spaced a maximum of 24" [609.6mm] on center each way or No. 4

rebar (Grade 40 or 60) spaced at a maximum of 16" [406.4mm] on center each way.

4

Walls shall be constructed with a minimum concrete compressive strength of 3,000 psi [20.7 MPa] and reinforced with minimum #5

rebar (Grade 60, ASTM A706) spaced a maximum of 18" [457.2mm] on center each way or No. 4 rebar (Grade 60 ASTM A706) spaced

at a maximum of 12" [304.8mm] on center each way.

TABLE 5.6

MINIMUM WALL OPENING REINFORCEMENT REQUIREMENTS IN ICF WALLS

Wall Type and Opening

Width, L

feet (m)

Flat, Waffle-, and

Screen-Grid:

L < 2 (0.61)

Flat, Waffle-, and Screen-

Grid:

L ‡ 2 (0.61)

Courtesy Portland Cement Association

Minimum

Horizontal Opening

Reinforcement

None Required

Provide lintels in accordance with Section

5.3. Top and bottom lintel reinforcement

shall extend a minimum of 24" [610mm]

beyond the limits of the opening.

Provide one No. 4 bar within of 12"

[305mm] from the bottom of the opening.

Each No. 4 bar shall extend 24" [610mm]

beyond the limits of the opening.

Minimum

Vertical Opening

Reinforcement

None Required

In locations with wind speeds less than or

equal to 110 mph [177 km/hr] or in Seismic

Design Categories A and B, provide one No.

4 bar for the full height of the wall story

within 12" [305mm] of each side of the

opening.

In locations with wind speeds greater than

110 mph [177 km/hr] or in Seismic Design

Categories C, D1 and D2, provide two No. 4

bars or one No. 5 bar for the full height of

the wall story within 12" [305mm] of each

side of the opening.

Page 168 Appendix B July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

TABLE 5.7

MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE CLEAR SPANS FOR ICF LINTELS WITHOUT STIRRUPS IN LOAD-BEARING

WALLS (NO. 4 OR NO. 5 BOTTOM BAR SIZE)

1,2,3,4,5,6,7

Minimum

Lintel

Thickness, T

(inches)

Minimum

Lintel

Depth, D

(inches)

Supporting

Light-Frame Roof

Only

Maximum Clear Span (feet – inches)

Supporting

Light-Frame Second

Story and Roof

Supporting ICF

Second Story and

Light-Frame Roof 8

Maximum Ground Snow Load (psf)

30 70 30 70 30 70

Flat ICF Lintel

8 2-6 2-6 2-6 2-4 2-5 2-2

12 4-2 4-2 4-1 3-10 3-10 3-7

3.5 16 4-11 4-8 4-6 4-2 4-2 3-10

20 6-3 5-3 4-11 4-6 4-6 4-3

24 7-7 6-4 6-0 5-6 5-6 5-2

8 2-10 2-6 2-6 2-5 2-6 2-2

12 4-8 4-4 4-3 3-11 3-10 3-7

5.5 16 6-5 5-1 4-8 4-2 4-3 3-10

20 8-2 6-6 6-0 5-4 5-5 5-0

24 9-8 7-11 7-4 6-6 6-7 6-1

8 3-6 2-8 2-7 2-5 2-5 2-2

12 5-9 4-5 4-4 4-0 3-10 3-7

7.5 16 7-9 6-1 5-7 4-10 4-11 4-5

20 8-8 7-2 6-8 5-11 6-0 5-5

24 9-6 7-11 7-4 6-6 6-7 6-0

8 4-2 3-1 2-9 2-5 2-5 2-2

12 6-7 5-1 4-7 3-11 4-0 3-7

9.5 16 7-10 6-4 5-11 5-3 5-4 4-10

20 8-7 7-2 6-8 5-11 6-0 5-5

Waffle-Grid ICF Lintel

24 9-4 7-10 7-3 6-6 6-7 6-0

8 2-6 2-6 2-6 2-4 2-4 2-2

12 4-2 4-2 4-1 3-8 3-9 3-5

6 or 8 16 5-9 5-8 5-7 5-1 5-2 4-8

20 7-6 7-4 6-9 6-0 6-3 5-7

24 9-2 8-1 7-6 6-7 6-10 6-2

For SI: 1 inch = 25.4mm; 1 psf = 0.0479 kN/m 2 ; 1 ft = 0.3 m

1

Table values are based on tensile reinforcement with a minimum yield strength of 40,000 psi [276 MPa], concrete with a minimum

specified compressive strength of 2,500 psi [17.2 MPa], and a building width (floor and roof clear span) of 32 feet [9.8m].

2

Deflection criterion is L/240, where L is the clear span of the lintel in inches.

3

Linear interpolation shall be permitted between ground snow loads and between lintel depths.

4

Lintel depth, D, shall be permitted to include the available height of ICF wall located directly above the lintel, provided that the increased

lintel depth spans the entire length of the opening.

5

Spans located in shaded cells shall be permitted to be multiplied by 1.05 when concrete with a minimum compressive strength of 3,000

psi [20.7 MPa] is used or by 1.1 when concrete with a minimum compressive strength of 4,000 psi [27.6 MPa] is used.

6

Spans shall be permitted to be multiplied by 1.05 for a building width (floor and roof clear span) of 28 feet [8.5 m].

7

Spans shall be permitted to be multiplied by 1.1 for a building width (floor and roof clear span) of 24 feet [7.3 m] or less.

8 3

Supported ICF wall dead load varies based on wall thickness using 150 pcf [2403 kg/m ] concrete density.

Courtesy Portland Cement Association

July 2009 Appendix B Page 169


TABLE 5.8B

PRODUCT MANUAL

MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE CLEAR SPANS FOR FLAT ICF LINTELS WITH STIRRUPS IN LOAD-BEARING

WALLS (NO. 5 BOTTOM BAR SIZE)

1,2,3,4,5,6,7

Minimum Lintel

Thickness, T

(inches)

Minimum

Lintel

Depth, D

(inches)

Supporting

Light-Frame Roof Only

Maximum Clear Span (feet – inches)

Supporting

Light-Frame Second

Story and Roof

Supporting ICF

Second Story and

Light-Frame Roof 8

Maximum Ground Snow Load (psf)

30 70 30 70 30 70

8 4-9 4-2 3-11 3-7 3-7 3-5

12 7-2 6-3 5-11 5-5 5-5 5-0

3.5 16 9-6 8-0 7-4 6-6 6-7 5-11

20 11-1 9-1 8-4 7-5 7-6 6-9

24 12-2 10-0 9-3 8-2 8-4 7-6

8 5-6 4-10 4-7 4-2 4-2 3-10

12 8-3 6-9 6-3 5-6 5-7 5-0

5.5 16 9-9 8-0 7-5 6-6 6-7 6-0

20 10-11 9-0 8-4 7-5 7-6 6-9

24 12-0 9-11 9-3 8-2 8-3 7-6

8 6-1 5-2 4-9 4-3 4-3 3-10

12 8-2 6-9 6-3 5-6 5-7 5-0

7.5 16 9-7 7-11 7-4 6-6 6-7 6-0

20 10-10 8-11 8-4 7-4 7-6 6-9

24 11-10 9-10 9-2 8-1 8-3 7-5

8 6-4 5-2 4-10 4-3 4-4 3-11

12 8-2 6-8 6-2 5-6 5-7 5-0

9.5 16 9-6 7-11 7-4 6-6 6-7 5-11

20 10-8 8-10 8-3 7-4 7-5 6-9

24 11-7 9-9 9-0 8-1 8-2 7-5

For SI: 1 inch = 25.4mm; 1 psf = 0.0479 kN/m 2 ; 1 ft = 0.3 m

1

Table values are based on concrete with a minimum specified compressive strength of 2,500 psi [17.2 MPa], reinforcing steel with a

minimum yield strength of 40,000 psi [276 MPa], and a building width (floor and roof clear span) of 32 feet [9.8m].

2

Deflection criterion is L/240, where L is the clear span of the lintel in inches.

3

Linear interpolation is permitted between ground snow loads and between lintel depths.

4

Lintel depth, D, is permitted to include the available height of ICF wall located directly above the lintel, provided that the increased lintel

depth spans the entire length of the lintel.

5

Spans located in shaded cells shall be permitted to be multiplied by 1.2 when reinforcing steel with a minimum yield strength of 60,000

psi [414 MPa] is used.

6

Spans shall be permitted to be multiplied by 1.05 for a building width (floor and roof clear span) of 28 feet [8.5 m].

7

Spans shall be permitted to be multiplied by 1.1 for a building width (floor and roof clear span) of 24 feet [7.3 m] or less.

8 Supported ICF wall dead load is 69 psf [3.3 kPa].

TABLE C3.2

EQUIVALENT FLUID DENSITY SOIL CLASSIFICATION

Maximum Equivalent

Fluid Density pcf (kg/m 3 ) Classification

Soil

Description

30 [481] GW, GP, SW, SP, GM Well-drained, cohesionless soils such as clean (few

or no fines) sand and gravels

45 [721] GC, SM Well-drained, cohesionless soils such as sand and

gravels containing silt or clay

60 [961] SC, MH, CL, CH, ML-CL Well-drained, inorganic silts and clays that are broken

up into small pieces

1

UCS - Uniform Soil Classification system

UCS 1

Page 170 Appendix B July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

ICC Evaluation

The ICC Evaluation Service, Inc. (www.icc-es.org) combines findings from BOCA, ICBO, SBCCI and CABO Evaluations

to provide national US coverage. Quad-Lock’s report was previously issued as ICBO Report ER-5188.

July 2009 Appendix B Page 171


PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 172 Appendix B July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

July 2009 Appendix B Page 173


PRODUCT MANUAL

Page 174 Appendix B July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

July 2009 Appendix B Page 175


PRODUCT MANUAL

AAPPPPEENNDDIIXX CC -- BBUUIILLDDIINNGG CCOODDEE

RREEFFEERREENNCCEESS

Because of the proliferation of ICF construction around the world, many countries have begun to include building code

references and/or issue product-specific evaluation reports concerning ICFs, especially concerning structural design, fire

characteristics and water and vapor resistance. What follows is a synopsis of some relevant code sections, listed by country.

Note: Check the Quad-Lock web site www.quadlock.com for the latest updates on building code

approvals

USA:

Evaluation Reports:

ICC-ES Legacy Report #5188

o This report specifically deals with Quad-Lock Building Systems, Ltd ICFs and conditions for their use in

all types of construction.

Miami/Dade County, FL

o Notice of Acceptance #06-0408.06

New York City, NY

o Materials and Equipment Acceptance #71-05-M

City of Los Angeles

o General Approval # RR25527

2006 International Residential Code (IRC):

Sections R404.4 to R406.2

These sections contain prescriptive rules for Insulating Concrete Form foundations (max 10 ft. high) built with

flat, waffle-grid, and screen-grid ICFs. Addressed are:

o Applicability limits

o Reinforcing specifications

o Treatment of foam plastic insulation

o Termite hazards

o Foundation height

o Backfill

o Drainage/dampproofing

Sections R611 to 611.9.1

These sections contain prescriptive rules for Insulating Concrete Form above-grade buildings built with flat,

waffle-grid, and screen-grid ICFs in the USA. Addressed are:

o Applicability limits

o Concrete mix characteristics

o Reinforcing steel

o Wall construction

o Openings

o Multi-story homes

o Lintels

o Wall length ratios

o Wall-to-floor connections

Page 176 Appendix C July 2009


PRODUCT MANUAL

o Sill plate attachment

o Ledgers, and roof connections

o Reinforcement schedules for all ICF types are included.

Sections R314.1 to R316

These sections outline the requirements for use of Foam Plastic Insulation in residential structures.

Addressed are:

o Surface Burning Characteristics

o Thermal Barriers

o Use in Attics and Crawlspaces

o Termite Damage

2006 International Building Code (IBC):

Chapter 19 – Concrete

Chapter 14 Exterior Walls, Section 1403.2 (1)

Chapter 26 - Foam Plastics.

Supporting Documents:

CANADA:

o EB 118.02 Prescriptive Method for Insulating Concrete Forms in Residential Construction; NAHB

Research Center, Inc.

o ACI 318-05 Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete

o UL - BXUV.U934 Fire Resistance Ratings - ANSI/UL 263

Quad-Lock Building Systems Ltd.

Design No. U934,, July 24, 2007, Bearing Wall Rating - 2, 3 or 4 Hr

National Research Council of Canada:

CCMC Evaluation Report # 12914-R

o This report specifically deals with Quad-Lock Building Systems, Ltd ICFs and conditions for their use in

all types of construction in Canada.

National Building Code of Canada 2005:

Part 9 – Housing and Small Buildings

o Section 9.3.1.1 (4) Concrete

o Section 9.10.17.10 Protection of Foamed Plastics

o Section 9.13 Dampproofing, Waterproofing, and Soil Gas Control

o Section 9.15.4 Foundation Walls

o Section 9.20.17 Above Ground Flat Insulating Concrete Form Walls

o Section 9.27.2 Minimum Protection from Precipitation Ingress

Part 5 - Environmental Separation and Division A, Appendix A.

Canadian Provincial Building Codes:

Most Canadian provinces have adopted their own building code, generally based on the NBC. Regional

differences may exist, and builders should check with local building officials before construction.

Supporting Documents:

o CSA A23.3 “Design of Concrete Structures”

o ACI 318 Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete

July 2009 Appendix C Page 177


UK:

Evaluation Report:

o ULC - BXUVC.W019 Fire Resistance Ratings

Quad-Lock Building Systems Ltd.

Design No. W019, July 24, 2007, Bearing Wall Rating - 2, 3 or 4 Hr

PRODUCT MANUAL

BBA Agremént Certificate #06/4347

Report outlines the areas of Quad-Lock’s compliance with building regulations in England, Wales, Scotland and

Ireland. Addressed in this report are:

o Practicability of Installation

o Structural Strength and Stability

o Thermal Performance

o Condensation

o Sound Insulation

o Weathertightness

o Dampproofing/Waterproofing

o Behaviour in Relation to Fire

o Proximity of Flues and Appliances

o Maintenance and Repair

o Durability

CE (EUROPE):

ETA-06/0189 & Annex

GERMANY:

Zulassung Z-15.2.205 vom Deutschen Institut für Bautechnik, Berlin (Anlagen)

SOUTH AFRICA:

SABS Report No. 2538/1357/07

ROMANIA:

Aviz Tehnic 1-44/15.07.2004 of CTPC-1; Agrement Tehnic 008-01/049-2004

BAHAMAS:

MOW&U/BC/24/14

Page 178 Appendix C July 2009

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines