Technology Today 2007 Issue 1 - Raytheon

raytheon

Technology Today 2007 Issue 1 - Raytheon

Technology

Today

HIGHLIGHTING RAYTHEON’S TECHNOLOGY

RAYTHEON HOMELAND SECURITY

Keeping our nation strong and our people safe

2007 Issue 1


A Message From Dr. Taylor W. Lawrence

Have a question?

Ask Taylor

at: http://www.ray.com/rayeng

2 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

Vice President of Engineering, Technology and Mission Assurance

With the start of a new year, I thought it was important that I visit as many of you

as possible to share my vision for the future of Engineering, Technology and

Mission Assurance (ET&MA), to hear your feedback, and to address your questions

and concerns. I have almost completed my visits to all of the businesses, where I

have provided an update on the recent changes in ET&MA, and highlighted our

strategy for achieving our goals for customer satisfaction, growth, productivity and

fostering an inclusive, world-class employee community in 2007.

This year also began with a new addition to the ET&MA leadership team. In

January, I announced Heidi Shyu as vice president, Corporate Technology and

Research, reporting to me. In this role, Heidi is responsible for the development and

execution of an integrated enterprise-wide technology and research vision and

strategy, as well as our Enabling Technology Program and emerging disruptive

technology efforts. We are very privileged to have Heidi serving in such a critical

role for the company.

This will be an important year for Raytheon — a year in which we will be looking

to redefine our core markets by leveraging our strengths in technology and innovation

to help us grow in adjacent markets and our Strategic Business Areas (SBAs).

As you know, one of these SBAs is Homeland Security. We live in an uncertain

world where the threat of terrorism is ever present. Therefore, we must continue to

be vigilant.

This issue of Technology Today examines our work in the homeland security arena,

led by IIS President Mike Keebaugh and Homeland Security SBA Vice President

Courtney Banks. Our homeland security technology reach extends both domestically

and around the world. Some of our products and programs include the

Advanced Spectroscopic Portal, Project Athena, Vigilant Eagle and Silent Guardian.

All technologies are being rolled out as comprehensive solutions to evolving

threats. We are also pioneering the way in the international market with SAFETY

Act-style provisions that help protect U.S.-based technology providers who provide

homeland security technologies to other countries.

While we all hope for a more peaceful world, our customers must always be

prepared. They rely on us to make sure they are prepared, and it is our duty to

provide the best products and services to detect, protect against and respond to

threats. Our national security and homeland defense depend on it.

Dr. Taylor W. Lawrence


Technology Today is published

quarterly by the Office of Engineering,

Technology and Mission Assurance

Vice President

Dr. Taylor W. Lawrence

Managing Editors

Mardi Balgochian

Lee Ann Sousa

Editorial Assistant

John Cacciatore

Art Director

Debra Graham

Expert Reviewer

Kevin Marler

Publication Coordinator

Carol Danner

Contributors

Chuck Albert

David Albritton

Carol Blymire

Michael Booen

Jay Dennis

Kristin Patterson Jones

Mary Petryszyn

Kate Pickworth

Larri Rosser

Vanessa Rubino

Scott Slade

Carol Sobel

Jon Spaeth

Sharon Stein

Charlene Wheeless

Dale Wolse

Kevin Wynn

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

A Homeland Security Overview: Insight from

HLS Vice President Courtney Banks 4

Protecting U.S. Borders: Highlighting Two New Products 8

Emergency Patient Tracking System 11

SAFETY Act 12

International Security 14

High-Tech Military Defense Systems Go Commercial:

Raytheon’s Vigilant Eagle and Silent Guardian 16

Leadership Perspective: Mike Keebaugh 19

Eye on Technology

Architecture and Systems Integration 20

Processing 22

EO/Lasers 24

RF Systems 25

Materials and Structures 27

National Guard Information Technology Conference 28

EKV Harness Team Award 29

Col. Kerry Kachejian Wins MOAA Reserve Award

for Leadership Excellence 30

Dr. William Hoke Honored with Innovator Award 31

Future Raytheon Events 32

Raytheon Certified Architect Program 32

MathMovesU to Succeed 33

Patent Recognition 34

EDITOR’S NOTE

The world has changed. All you need do is turn on the television to see that our way of

life is being threatened around the globe and even closer — on our own soil. If 9/11

taught us nothing else, it’s that we cannot be complacent about our national safety.

We at Raytheon take that threat very seriously. As such, we’re committed to developing

the most innovative technologies and delivering NoDoubt TM solutions in order to protect

our most precious resource — our people. Take time to read about some of these

solutions, such as border protection programs, emergency patient tracking systems and

directed energy weapon systems.

As we begin another year of new challenges and opportunities, we must say goodbye

to one of our own: our co-managing editor, Mardi Balgochian. Her relentless dedication

to making Technology Today a best-in-class magazine will be sorely missed. Join me in

wishing her well as she pursues her new career.

We hope you enjoy this issue, whether in hard copy or online at

http://wwwxt.raytheon.com/technology_today/current/index.html.

If you have any ideas or suggestions for future articles, please drop us a note at

techtodayeditor@raytheon.com.

As always, we look forward to your comments. Enjoy!

Lee Ann Sousa

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 3


Feature

A Homeland Security Overview:

Growing and Diversifying

Raytheon’s HLS Offerings

to the Global Marketplace

4 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY


Raytheon’s Homeland Security Strategic Business Area Vice President

Courtney Banks Shares Her Vision

Following the terrorist attacks in 2001,

the federal government created the

Department of Homeland Security to

address the needs and challenges of the

world in which we live. Now, more than

five years later, more than 30 agencies

comprise the federal homeland security

arena, and it continues to grow to the tune

of a $27.8 billion budget in 2007. With

increasing competition in the marketplace,

Raytheon must establish and maintain

a leadership position in this field and

continue to grow its business in the most

strategic way.

In this endeavor, Raytheon brought on

board Courtney Banks, the company’s vice

president for Homeland Security (HLS), in

2005 to help grow and diversify Raytheon’s

homeland security offerings to the marketplace.

Banks brings a wealth of national

security experience from both the private

and public sectors and comes to Raytheon

from Lockheed Martin where she was the

director for Homeland Security Solutions.

Her public-sector experience includes a

Clinton administration political appointee

position where she served as the assistant

in charge of global terrorism issues in the

Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense

for Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict.

“There is a world of opportunity for

Raytheon in homeland security and homeland

defense,” said Banks. “In the past, the

company’s approach was very tactical in

this arena, and we’ve had to step up and

be more strategic to bring Raytheon’s full

force to bear.”

“Our group — the Homeland Security

SBA — is a strategic business area and not

a business unit,” explained Banks. “While

we are accountable for driving new business,

we do not design, produce or maintain

a product line. As such, we can

succeed only by working within and across

the various Raytheon businesses to help

them be successful in the accomplishment

of their missions.”

According to Banks, the company’s vision

with regard to homeland security is to

become the preferred worldwide total

systems national security solutions provider.

“This vision, while ambitious, is entirely

within our grasp, provided we remain

committed to and tirelessly pursue each

component of our business strategy.”

Those components are:

• Integrate and expand Raytheon’s

capability and resource portfolio to

include elements that are relevant and

necessary to this market and reflect

the same high standard of quality and

technological leadership that characterizes

Raytheon products

• Develop and strengthen relationships

with both traditional and emerging

homeland security and homeland

defense customers

• Leverage the expanded portfolio and

relationships to secure key wins throughout

the market, creating a platform on

which we can grow market share in both

the short and long term

• Adapt to this new and very different

market Raytheon’s institutional

capacity to service the needs of the

customers, allowing us the opportunity

to maintain our position and achieve

even greater growth

“I cannot underscore enough the One

Company approach when it comes to

homeland security,” said Banks. “This

customer base is different from the

traditional defense customer in that

they increasingly demand more complete

and integrated solutions. That very element

is a key advantage we have over our

competitors — the ability to join forces

across company lines to develop and deliver

what the customer needs all in one place.

We must continue to leverage our core

brand of Raytheon as a national security

solutions provider and continue our

successful horizontal collaboration across

the company to do so.”

Homeland Security Markets

The recognition of both the subtle differences

of this market and the need to

understand and remain close to the customer

led Banks to form market segments

within Raytheon’s Homeland Security SBA:

• Transportation & Border Security

• Law Enforcement and Security Solutions

• Infrastructure Protection and Energy

Security

• Preparedness and Response

• Homeland Defense and Intelligence

Programs Support

• Combating Terrorism and Special

Operations Support

To bring credibility and horsepower to

these segments, Banks recruited and

retained a leadership team that leverages

a great depth of experience in the U.S.

Secret Service, the U.S. Coast Guard,

the first-responder community, the

Transportation Security Administration

(TSA), military and special operations, and a

wealth of industry and market experience.

Continued on page 6

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 5


Feature

Continued from page 5

Banks also increased the technological

expertise within the SBA, and says that

Raytheon’s rich history in technological

innovation will continue to serve the company

well as it reaches out in new ways to

current customers and emerging prospects.

“From a technological standpoint, we

absolutely must continue to be innovative,

forward-thinking and intuitive in our

approach to homeland security, and do so

against a bar that continues to be set ever

higher by our competitors and the

demands of the market,” said Banks.

Raytheon’s technological leadership has

opened many doors for us, but it has also

established an expectation by the marketplace.

We must continue to innovate if we

are to succeed.”

Raytheon’s technological heritage and

prowess are the foundations upon which

the company continues to build, and we

P R O F I L E : R A Y T H E O N ’ S H O M E L A N D S E C U R I T Y T E A M

Andrew Cheney

Chief Technology Officer

Homeland Security

A Naval Academy graduate and Dartmouth

MBA alum, Andrew Cheney joined

Raytheon in 2006 as chief technology officer

(CTO) for the Homeland Security (HLS)

Strategic Business Area (SBA). “I saw a

great opportunity to help bring Raytheon’s

impressive technology portfolio and people

to address the nation’s homeland security

6 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

know that there are extensive opportunities

that will go to companies that are willing

to provide services of various kinds.

“Increasingly, homeland security-related

spending is being targeted at services —

from airport screeners and baggage handlers

to seaport security and equipment

maintenance and operations,” explained

Banks. “Our customers are looking for

someone to step in and deliver these

services in a professional, cost-effective

way. Raytheon’s demonstrated expertise as

a world-class provider of technical services

must be leveraged for success here as well.”

Top Priorities for HLS in 2007

One key area in which Banks plans to be

more active is in the Chemical, Biological,

Radiological/Nuclear Explosives (CBRNE)

threat market. “The CBRNE threat is at the

forefront of everyone’s mind. But the

technology that allows us to deal with it is

phenomenal, and Raytheon is highly competitive.

We want to expand on what was

challenges,” explained Cheney. “My role

as CTO for the SBA blends my passion for

technology with my business education

and background.”

Cheney’s experience comprises work in

financial services, telecom/hi-tech, petroleum

and media business management and

operations. Coupled with his engineering

experiences in the Navy and time doing

business development at Lockheed, he also

brings an interesting breadth and depth to

his new position.

By overseeing the HLS SBA’s endeavors

in new technology development and

deployment, Cheney examines how

existing technology can be leveraged or

integrated across multiple organizations

to meet evolving customer needs.

“For 2007, we will expand the direct connections

between Raytheon engineers and

HLS customers, both in the field and in the

federal Department of Homeland Security

Homeland Security Overview

accomplished with Advanced Spectroscopic

Portal (ASP) and continue to be a lead

systems integrator. This area is of critical

strategic importance to the nation and to

the company; as such, it is a high priority

for Raytheon in 2007.”

With the accelerated use of improvised

explosive devices (IEDs) by our enemies in

Iraq and elsewhere, Banks believes that the

company’s counter-IED work is vital to build

upon by continuing to provide technology

expertise and development. Raytheon is

trying to stay one step ahead of any enemy

bringing threats to the United States.

On the international front, there continues

to be opportunity for growth. With plans

to grow the business in border security, visitor

management, crisis management and

response, coastal surveillance, special event

security, and counter-proliferation, Banks

sees the next few years as a critical time to

expand Raytheon’s international presence

and capitalize on the multi-billion dollar

market opportunity outside U.S. borders.

(DHS) Science & Technology Directorate.

Further, we will turn those relationships into

successful product offerings and contracts

that meet the DHS customers’ needs.”

One of Cheney’s strengths is his ability

to develop and provide integrated

solutions that are cost-effective and

readily deployable.

“Whether I was testing Tomahawk missiles

or leading successful business captures, I

believe my career experience has prepared

me well for this role, and I’m energized by

what we’re setting out to accomplish

here at Raytheon. I can’t imagine being

anywhere else at such an important time

in our nation’s history,” Cheney added.

Raytheon has the ability to not only

bring technology innovation to homeland

security, but to marry that with the Mission

Systems Integration capability that will

ensure the end product works fine and

lasts a long time.”


“One of the things that sets Raytheon

apart from the competition is our long

history of supporting allied governments

overseas with innovative solutions, and our

ability and proven track record in developing,

deploying and supporting our technology

and services on all seven continents.

For these reasons, Raytheon has spent the

past years getting close to these markets,

understanding their needs and their interest

in pursuing solutions.”

Even with the changing political landscape

in Washington, Banks says that homeland

security will continue to be one of the

highest priorities of our nation’s lawmakers.

She believes that no matter what political

party is in power in any of our branches of

government, our elected officials truly

understand that, as a nation, we have a

responsibility to keep our citizenry safe.

“There will always be a threat to our world.

The changing nature of that threat, cou-

P R O F I L E : R A Y T H E O N ’ S H O M E L A N D S E C U R I T Y T E A M

Rudy Cohen, Director, Combating

Terrorism and Special Operations

Homeland Security

When reading Rudy Cohen’s resume, you

wonder when he had the time to become

a licensed commercial helicopter pilot.

With an impressive background of 26

years of leadership experience in federal

service and multiple joint duty tours at

the strategic and interagency level, Cohen

brings to Raytheon extensive experience in

pled with the complex world that we live

in, means that we must always be prepared

to address things we hadn’t even thought

of before,” said Banks. “I’m often asked to

talk about what I see as the upcoming

trends in this field, and I always respond

that there is no crystal ball for such things.

If you had asked me on September 10,

2001, if I thought that later in the year

there would be a U.S. Transportation

Security Administration, I probably would

have said no. That’s because it was as hard

then as it is now to predict what might

happen — which is why we must continue

to recruit and hire the very best people in

our subject matter areas, and evolve and

lead our customers and our company to

become even more nimble, fast-moving

and innovative to address any possibility

that might come our way.”

Banks has long felt a sense of duty in serving

her nation in this field of work. The

notion of serving a purpose larger than

foreign/national security policy development,

analysis, coordination and integration, as

well as cross-agency collaboration, strategiclevel

crisis/deliberate planning and response

management.

Prior to joining Raytheon a year ago, Cohen

spent a decade focusing on initiatives related

to counterterrorism, international security

cooperation, antiterrorism, homeland

defense, consequence management of

weapons of mass destruction, counter

narcotics and intelligence operations.

“With increased worldwide focus on security

in the Middle East and Southwest Asia in

recent years, I think my background as chief

of staff in the Office for the Near East and

South Asian Affairs in the Department of

Defense (DoD), as well as the director for

Domestic Counterterrorism will be helpful to

the company as it pursues its homeland

security business strategy,” explained Cohen.

In his capacity with DoD, he provided country

and regional expertise on key strategy,

oneself and ultimately to be protective of

others is something that has always been

important to her, whether it is in her everyday

work responsibilities or in her volunteer

work with the National Center for Missing

and Exploited Children.

Technology and, more specifically,

Raytheon technology plays such an important

role in security — something we often

take for granted until that safety is threatened

in some way,” said Banks. “Whatever

impact my team and I can have that leverages

this company’s amazing technology

and services to make a positive difference

in this world — whether to help protect a

nation under threat or a family whose child

has gone missing — is what motivates me.”

Ultimately, she and her team believe there

is no company better positioned than

Raytheon to deliver on the promise to help

customers do their jobs most effectively

and keep America safe. •

planning, programming, budgeting and

policy matters related to Iran, Iraq,

Afghanistan and the Middle East. Cohen

also ensured security cooperation issues

were coordinated and resolved among

affected departments, commands, other

federal agencies and foreign governments.

“In addition to my international policy

experience, I also have a background in crisis

management and planning, which I

hope will be valuable to the team here at

Raytheon,” Cohen said. “I was the team

leader in the DoD crisis center during several

major international incidents, including

the September 11th terrorist attacks and

the USS Cole bombing.”

Cohen also was the sole DoD representative

on the Congressionally mandated National

Commission on Terrorism, and the lead

DoD representative for numerous national

special security events such as the

presidential inauguration, NATO 50th

Summit, millennium activities, and the

Sydney and Salt Lake City Olympics.

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 7


Feature

8 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

Protecting

U.S. Borders


Highlighting Two New Major

Raytheon HLS Projects

Each day, more than 360,000 vehicles,

5,100 trucks and containers, 2,600

aircraft and 600 vessels cross into the

United States at more than 600 points of

entry. These kinds of numbers add up to

big risk for our nation’s existing border

security systems.

Raytheon is working with the Department

of Homeland Security (DHS) and other federal

and local agencies on two new major

projects developed to help keep our borders

secure and our citizens safe from harm.

Advanced Spectroscopic Portal

The safety of our nation depends upon the

ability to design and field systems to mitigate

the threat of covert nuclear attacks.

Raytheon’s Advanced Spectroscopic Portal

(ASP) is an advanced screening portal system

designed to identify and prevent the illegal

entry of nuclear devices and materials into

the United States. By improving early detection

capabilities at U.S. border checkpoints,

ASP detectors greatly reduce the threat of

radiological dispersal devices, improvised

nuclear devices or smuggled weapons.

ASP is capable of screening trucks, cars,

cargo containers and mail, and is composed

of a series of compatible panels that can

easily be combined into a multitude of

different configurations based on the

specifics of the venue where the search

is being conducted.

Its modular architecture allows the

system to be mounted in several different

configurations and its multiple detector

types ensure high gamma and neutron

sensitivity over a full range of usage

conditions. ASP is designed to minimize

false alarms that would unnecessarily

impede the flow of border traffic and

commerce, and it incorporates advanced

threat-identification algorithms.

As prime contractor to DHS on this

program, Raytheon provides program

management, engineering development,

manufacturing and field support for this

next-generation screening portal. Raytheon

has teamed with Bubble Technology

Industries (BTI), a company specializing in

nuclear physics and radiation detection

technology, on ASP. The companies will

work together to conduct research and development

for future systems improvements.

“ASP is moving us forward into a deeper

relationship with DHS,” said Mary

Petryszyn, Raytheon vice president for Joint

Battlespace Integration. “The feedback

from the customer has been positive. I am

especially pleased that we were able to get

the DHS contract and, within four months,

deliver complete design, construction and

testing. This is new and innovative technology

for Raytheon, and it was exciting to see

how many different business units within

the company were able to work together to

make this happen in such a timely manner.”

Raytheon is still in testing mode and

expects to complete full rollout in the first

half of 2007. Then, full rate production is

planned for early summer 2007, at which

time Petryszyn and her team expects to

deploy ASP at nearly 300 points of entry

into the United States.

Project Athena Multi-Domain Awareness System

Advanced Spectroscopic Portal (ASP)

Project Athena Multi-Domain

Awareness System

Project Athena is a network-centric, multidomain

command, control, communications,

computers, intelligence, surveillance

and reconnaissance (C4ISR) system for highperformance

situational awareness, fusion,

analysis and knowledge management. It

provides seamless coverage across domains

and operational commands, integrates

multiple sensors and ISR data sources, and

supports rapid integration of new types.

Athena is scalable from local to worldwide

applications and its distribution architecture

supports unlimited scalability.

Continued on page 10

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 9


Feature

Continued from page 9

“Athena is a fusion center of information,”

said Petryszyn. “It takes surveillance

information from multiple sources and

cross-checks it with other information

sources and databases. Its architecture is

designed to bring together dissimilar and

disparate information to enable smart

decision making.”

Athena is currently in operation in classified

locations around the world and being used

in the United States in a maritime border

protection project to monitor vessel traffic

and transportation patterns on the water.

Since its deployment with a particular

U.S.-based customer in 2006, Athena has

already uncovered illicit activity that the cus-

tomer suspected along one of our maritime

borders. Working with local law enforce-

ment, Athena provided surveillance that

enabled the customer to make monitoring

changes and deploy a mobile sensor to

detect changes in illicit trafficking patterns.

10 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

“Project Athena is an interesting business

development story because it was devel-

oped by evaluating existing hardware, and

putting it all together to create what has

now become a $2 billion niche market,”

said Scott Slade, Science & Technology IPT

lead, Raytheon IED Defeat Task Force.

“Athena was less a case of technology

development and more a case of technolo-

gy integration. Projects like Athena and ASP

have begun to change the way Raytheon

looks at a problem, because they force us

to figure out what questions we haven’t

asked yet because the customer didn’t know

they had a particular challenge to address.”

Moving forward, Petryszyn’s team at

Raytheon is working on ways to have

Athena address surveillance monitoring

and decision-making around protecting

U.S. core infrastructure, including

power systems, communications systems

and water supplies.

Future Capabilities

ASP and Athena aren’t the only projects

in the works as part of Raytheon’s border

protection plans. According to Dale Wolfe,

director of Homeland Security for Raytheon

Space and Airborne Systems, Raytheon is

also developing new unmanned border sur-

veillance capabilities and sensors for border

security and emergency response support.

“The same sensors and surveillance tools

we give customers for their discrete security

needs can also be used to monitor emer-

gency conditions including forest fires, hur-

ricane rescue and recovery, as well as post-

event damage assessments,” said Wolfe.

White it’s still too early to divulge the details

of his team’s work, Wolfe says a priority will

be to continue to look into the broader

technology applications of unmanned

systems and sensors as well as airborne

emergency response systems to determine

how they can be used and integrated with

other Raytheon technology in new ways to

support homeland security needs. •

P R O F I L E : R A Y T H E O N ’ S H O M E L A N D S E C U R I T Y T E A M

Rocklin E. Gmeiner Jr., Director,

Federal/Civil Information Technology

Capability Team, Business

Development, Homeland Security

Just as the U.S. Department of Homeland

Security represents a broad range of government

agencies and working groups,

Raytheon’s Homeland Security Strategic

Business Area (SBA) encompasses more

than just products and services related to

Department of Defense (DoD) needs and

applications. This SBA reach includes national,

global, state and local initiatives, as well

as many other non-DoD business areas.

Rocky Gmeiner and his team are a great

example of Raytheon’s business focus

extending far beyond the realm of DoD

support. As director of the Homeland

Security Federal/Civil Information

Technology Capability team, Gmeiner is

responsible for marketing and business

development of Raytheon’s products and

services in non-DoD federal departments

and agencies, as well as Raytheon’s

commercial products and services, and also

works with the HLS SBA.

Responsible for air traffic control, information

technology, homeland security and

Raytheon services for the federal government,

Gmeiner also serves as the focal point

for communications between government

Protecting U.S. Borders

and Raytheon representatives in this $4 billion

federal/civil segment of the company.

“A prime example of what we hope to do

more of in the next five to 10 years in this

arena has been our work with Charlie

Blaich in providing the New York Fire

Department with Raytheon technology as

part of our Electronic Incident Command

System,” said Gmeiner.

Prior to joining Raytheon in September

1994, Gmeiner served in the U.S. Navy

for 27 years, most recently as the U.S. Navy

program manager for Air Traffic Control,

Identification and Landing Systems.

“Nearly 30 years in the Navy prepared me

for the many challenges and opportunities

that come across my desk every day here at

Raytheon,” said Gmeiner. “It’s an honor for

me and my entire team to support the

important role Raytheon is playing in the

homeland security field.


Emergency Patient Tracking System

National agencies, state and local

governments, and medical professionals

are realizing the potential of

Raytheon’s Emergency Patient Tracking

System (EPTS) to manage critical information

during mass casualty incidents (MCI).

EPTS is a technical solution that increases

MCI survival rates by facilitating the triage,

treatment and transport of victims. The

system automates the collection and

dissemination of patient information and

status through use of patient medical

identification tags containing bar codes

with the patient’s location, medical status

and personal records. Personal Digital

Assistants (PDAs) transfer this information

through wireless communication to a

Web-enabled, secure database. The database

provides the patient’s information to

hospitals and emergency personnel.

Centralized patient information allows

authorities to balance resources and

minimize hospital overcrowding.

Immediate Casualty Information

Casualty scene information, stored in a

central database, is disseminated to

command centers, hospitals and support

agencies over the Internet. Various users

and agencies have the ability to search

the database for detailed information

about the incident and patients. Logging

onto a secure website, the Emergency

Command Center determines the number

and condition of casualties at the scene,

which enables users to make informed

Feature

decisions on the dispatch of emergency

response units. Using the EPTS, the

Emergency Information Center and other

support agencies are able to provide

immediate relatives and friends with

patient location and status through the

use of a central phone number established

by the incident call center.

Enhanced Hospital Response

Hospitals monitor the crisis through EPTS

and are immediately aware of the number

and condition of patients en route to their

locations. They are also provided with

patient medical condition, initial assessments

and personal records before the

patient arrives to facilitate triage,

admissions and staffing.

For more information, visit

http://www.raytheon.com/products/epts. •

P R O F I L E : R A Y T H E O N ’ S H O M E L A N D S E C U R I T Y T E A M

Timothy Josiah, Senior Director,

Border, Transportation and Energy

Security, Homeland Security

After retiring as the chief of staff for the

U.S. Coast Guard, Tim Josiah joined

Raytheon in August 2002 as senior director,

Global Homeland Security and deputy to

Courtney Banks, Raytheon’s vice president

of Homeland Security.

Josiah’s career in the Coast Guard

spanned 33 years, with jobs ranging from

shipboard engineer and marine safety and

security expert to CFO of the Service. As

chief of staff he was responsible for all

policy decisions and for the development

and execution of the Coast Guard’s $4.5

billion budget.

Josiah says that the terrorist attacks on

September 11 challenged the men and

women in the Coast Guard to put a greater

emphasis on port and coastal security.

“Not only did the terrorist attacks in

2001 require the Coast Guard to rethink

everything it was doing, it also forced a

rapid reevaluation of force structure,” said

Josiah. “The post-9/11 demands on the

Coast Guard to continue to perform traditional

missions like search and rescue and

yet to provide significantly greater security

in our ports and along our coasts challenged

people across the Coast Guard

to live up to the Service’s motto “Semper

Paratus — Always Ready” in new and very

expanded ways.”

As a member of the senior HLS team at

Raytheon, Josiah provides integrated security

solutions to national and international

homeland security challenges, including

border, visitor management, critical infrastructure

protection, transportation and

energy issues. This includes maritime ports,

passenger, oil, chemical and other transportation

facilities, as well as countermeasures

to protect commercial airliners from

the threat of shoulder-fired missiles.

“Our mission at Raytheon is one that I am

proud to be a part of, and I look forward to

helping lead the homeland security team in

its endeavors to keep our nation strong and

our people safe, no matter where we are in

the world.”

.

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 11


Feature

Pioneering SAFETY Act Protection Overseas

The SAFETY Act was passed in

response to the events of September

11, 2001. The catastrophic losses

from those events made potential providers

of anti-terrorism technology reluctant to

pursue homeland security contracting

opportunities without a liability regime that

mitigated the risk of third-party claims.

Formally named the Support Anti-Terrorism

by Fostering Effective Technologies Act of

2002 (SAFETY Act), this legislation sets

forth certain circumstances under which

providers of anti-terrorism technology and

services can limit their liability exposure in

the event of an act of terrorism.

By all accounts, the SAFETY Act has succeeded

in stimulating the flow of anti-terrorism

technology and services. Raytheon is

continuing to make active use of the SAFE-

TY Act. Coverage under the act has been

awarded to Raytheon for the Perimeter

12 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

Intrusion Detection System (PIDS) and

Secure Border System and Services and,

as part of the procurement process, has

presumptively been awarded for Advanced

Spectroscopic Portal (ASP).

Additionally, as a subcontractor and

teaming partner, respectively, Raytheon is

entitled to the benefits of SAFETY Act

coverage awarded to Accenture (US-VISIT)

and McNeill (Screening Partnership Program

(SPP)). Other programs for which Raytheon

has applied or is in the process of applying

for SAFETY Act coverage include SEI,

DRM, SPP, Silent Guardian, EAGLE and

vulnerability assessments.

Jonathan S. Spaeth, Raytheon’s senior

counsel for Washington Operations, is

responsible for ensuring that the company

takes full advantage of the benefits afforded

by the SAFETY Act. “At its core,” Spaeth

said, “the SAFETY Act is intended to

encourage companies like Raytheon to provide

technology and services that protect

the homeland without fear that by doing so

they are putting the company at risk.”

The SAFETY Act applies to any act of terrorism

that “causes harm to a person, property

or entity in the United States.” As interpreted

by the U.S. Department of

Homeland Security, which administers the

SAFETY Act, this language encompasses

acts of terrorism that occur outside the

United States. For example, suppose a

provider of anti-terrorism technology or

services is covered by the SAFETY Act and

supplies technology or services to an airport

in the European Union. If sued in the

United States on the theory that its technology

or services failed to deter an act of terrorism

at that E.U. airport, the U.S. provider

would be able to limit its liability.

P R O F I L E : R A Y T H E O N ’ S H O M E L A N D S E C U R I T Y T E A M

Frank Larkin, Director, Public Safety

Operations, Network Centric Systems

After a 20-year career with the U.S.

Secret Service (USSS), Frank Larkin joined

Raytheon in June 2006 as director for

Public Safety Operations for Network

Centric Systems. In this role, he will help

the company develop strategic plans and a

course of action for the public safety component

of the company’s Homeland

Security (HLS) Strategic Business Area (SBA).

Just prior to joining Raytheon, Larkin was

the USSS’ deputy assistant director leading

more than 700 operational, technical and

support personnel. He worked with the

USSS civil communications program to pro-

vide support for public safety operations

supporting VIP protection and national spe-

cial security events. While deputy assistant

director, he also concurrently served as the

USSS chief technology officer responsible

for $70 million in technology investments.

“I’m excited to be part of Raytheon’s mis-

sion to offer full-scale systems, technology

and support solutions to ensure greater

public safety,” said Larkin. “Having worked

with police, fire departments, EMS teams

and others in the field, I believe I have a

strong sense of what their needs and priori-

ties are, and how Raytheon can help them

do their jobs as homeland security initiatives

continue to evolve. I have come to know

from personal front-line experience that

communications interoperability, informa-

tion sharing and relationship building is the

hallmark for successful resolution of any

critical incident management challenge.”

In addition to his time with the Secret

Service, Larkin also served as a Maryland

State trooper-flight paramedic,

Montgomery County (Penn.) homicide

detective and a Norristown (Penn.) uni-

formed patrol officer. He also has an exten-

sive tactical medical and special operations

background as a U.S. Navy SEAL special

warfare operations corpsman and a tactical

law enforcement medic.

“This new role is important as Raytheon’s

HLS SBA continues to extend its reach

beyond traditional Department of

Defense business and go after a wide

range of homeland security business,”

said Larkin. “The public safety element is

critical to any global homeland security

strategy, and I’m glad to be part of such

an important team.”


There are, of course, practical limitations on

the reach of the SAFETY Act, the most obvious

of which is that its liability protections

are only applicable in lawsuits brought in

the United States. By 2010, it is projected

that more than 60 percent of the market

for homeland security products and services

will be outside the United States by 2010.

Given the global reach of terrorism, the

increasing worldwide focus on homeland

security along with the shrinking or elimination

of international commercial borders,

and the ingenuity of plaintiffs’ lawyers, it is

only a matter of time before a provider of

anti-terrorism technology is sued outside

the United States in connection with an act

of terrorism.

The fastest-growing, easily addressable

international market is the European Union,

represented by U.K. e-borders. The

European Union is “ground zero” in the

war on terror. The E.U. has a long history of

being subject to terrorist attacks, and 19 of

the 21 “major” acts of terrorism since

September 11 have taken place on

European soil.

That is why Raytheon Homeland Security

Vice President Courtney Banks, with

Spaeth’s help, is leading a team to institute

SAFETY Act-style legislation in the European

Union. Banks and Spaeth have already

begun meeting with industry partners,

thought leaders and experts on both sides

of the Atlantic to raise awareness of the

need for such legislation and to determine

the best course for attempting to see that it

is implemented.

“Combating terrorism worldwide is a noble

and worthwhile pursuit,” said Spaeth.

“That said, we need to do everything we

can to ensure that our provision of

homeland security technology and services

overseas does not jeopardize our business. I

am proud to be part of a company that has

taken the lead in promoting SAFETY Actstyle

legislation in the European Union and

will continue to push for what we know is

the right thing, not only for our business

but for the industry as a whole.”

For more information on the SAFETY Act,

go to www.safetyact.gov. •

P R O F I L E : R A Y T H E O N ’ S H O M E L A N D S E C U R I T Y T E A M

Mary Petryszyn

Vice President, Joint Battlespace

Integration (JBI)

Integrated Defense Systems

As vice president of Raytheon Joint

Battlespace Integration (JBI) in Colorado

Springs, Colo., Mary Petryszyn leads a

business area that positions Integrated

Defense Systems as the global mission

integrator of choice in the areas of surveillance

and maritime domain awareness.

A native of New York, Petryszyn received

her master’s degree in computer engineer-

ing from Syracuse University. Soon after

graduation, Petryszyn began work for Link

Flight Simulations, where she was engaged

in all the different phases of engineering

design. It was at Link where she also

learned the importance of meeting

customer requirements.

Petryszyn, who has now been with the

company for more than 20 years, started

working with Homeland Security (HLS) in

2005. At that point, she looked strategically

at the business we had and where the gaps

in the industry were. Once identified,

Petryszyn evaluated Raytheon’s capabilities

and how our technology could further

defend our country.

Some of the homeland security capabilities

that JBI offers include multi-domain aware-

ness, the Advanced Spectroscopic Portal

(ASP), space situational awareness and

Jonathan Spaeth

Senior Counsel

for Washington

Operations

critical infrastructure protection. “We strive

to leverage the systems that we have tradi-

tionally developed for the Department of

Defense and transition them into capabili-

ties that will protect our homeland and our

way of life,” said Petryszyn.

Petryszyn doesn’t envy the position are

leaders are in, having to face new and

ever-changing threats. “They are respond-

ing in a fairly agile way to reshape and

remake where they are headed and what

they are doing to respond to global threats.”

But it’s her future at Raytheon — not the

past — that has Petryszyn excited. “We

will continue our push of addressing the

global war on terror. And we will continue

to leverage our domain knowledge and

expertise into these new areas for us,

so we can help our customers achieve

their missions.”

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 13


Feature

International Security:

Raytheon’s Global

Marketplace

Industry analysts predict that, by the year 2011, 60 percent of

the world’s homeland security budgets will be in the international,

non-U.S. marketplace. Because of the continuing evolution of types

of threats and the need for countries around the world to protect

themselves and their citizens, Raytheon is well positioned to capture

market share in this arena and see significant revenue growth in the

next seven to 10 years.

“Some companies are ‘global’ and sell

the exact same service to many different

countries through U.S. conduits like the

State Department and U.S. Agency for

International Development (USAID),” said

Darryle Conway, director of strategic plan-

ning for Raytheon’s Homeland Security

(HLS) Strategic Business Area (SBA). “But I

believe Raytheon is different and better

positioned because we are truly an interna-

tional company that has built long-stand-

ing, direct working relationships with busi-

nesses and governments outside the United

States. We don’t simply sell products or

services to these countries; we have an

operating business presence there. This

allows us to better understand our cus-

tomers’ requirements and deliver products

and services that are customized and

scalable to their needs.”

14 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

Raytheon is known worldwide as a trusted

company that can build technology and

systems for a client. That reputation is evolv-

ing into a company recognized and lauded

as a total solutions provider and lead sys-

tems integrator. Foreign companies increas-

ingly seek out Raytheon as a partner

because they want to work with a company

that is willing to understand their national

issues and deliver total solution systems.

Raytheon International’s mature infrastruc-

ture is now being leveraged by the HLS SBA

to highlight the homeland security capabili-

ties of Raytheon businesses. What will keep

Raytheon at the top of the pack is getting

the word out to our international partners

of the incredible depth of experience the

company has in supporting homeland pro-

grams,” said Daniel Snow, director of Law

Enforcement and Global Security Solutions

for Raytheon’s HLS SBA. “Raytheon’s

long-standing reputation in the defense

business helps open doors to new business

outside U.S. borders, but the company’s

products, capabilities and integrity have

enabled the company to pursue homeland

security business in top markets like

Europe, the U.K., the Middle East and Asia,

as well as in emerging markets such as

Romania and Bulgaria.”

Experts agree that U.S. policy continues

to drive international homeland security ini-

tiatives, with two recent examples being

container screening and air/rail transporta-

tion security. These hot-button issues are

business areas in which Raytheon already

has strong technology and services success,

and where the international homeland

security team plans to have a significant

impact in 2007.


Other areas in which the HLS SBA’s interna-

tional team plans to focus in 2007 include

border security, counter-proliferation, and

command and control systems. Other areas

of projected business growth in the next

few years include training, interoperable

communications, immigration/border man-

agement, coastal surveillance, disaster

management and recovery services.

Raytheon’s technology and innovation are

critical to driving strategy on the interna-

tional front. Conway and Snow believe

that already-successful components of

offerings such as Perimeter Intrusion

Detection System (PIDS), System for the

Vigilance of the Amazon (SIVAM), Vigilant

Eagle, Silent Guardian, United States Visitor

and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology

P R O F I L E : R A Y T H E O N ’ S H O M E L A N D S E C U R I T Y T E A M

Daniel Snow, Director, Law

Enforcement and Global Security

Solutions, Homeland Security

Dan Snow joined Raytheon in September

2006 from Lockheed Martin, where he

managed post-9/11 government homeland

security contracts to include weapons of

mass destruction (WMD) defense programs,

threat and vulnerability assessments of

transportation hubs and classified govern-

(US-VISIT), and the Defense Threat

Reduction Agency (DTRA) work in the for-

mer Soviet Union can be customized,

repackaged and deployed elsewhere

around the globe.

One challenge that remains in this market-

place is the need for liability protection.

Because U.S. SAFETY Act provisions do not

necessarily protect Raytheon outside U.S.

borders, Conway says one of his biggest

strategic hurdles is being able to identify,

go after and win business that already has

liability protections in place, and determine

how those protections differ, country by

country. Homeland Security Vice President

Courtney Banks is leading a delegation that

is meeting with international companies to

address this issue.

ment facilities, and physical security

engineering programs. Snow also served for

more than two decades in the U.S. Secret

Service where he was special agent in

charge of the Department of the Treasury’s

worldwide anti-counterfeiting division and a

supervisor for the Service’s Presidential

Candidate Protection program.

With more than 25 years of experience in

commercial and government security programs,

complex criminal investigations,

executive protection and logistical planning,

Snow says that his top priorities for

Raytheon Homeland Security in 2007 focus

on identifying opportunities both domestically

and abroad in which the company can

lend its expertise in supporting global law

enforcement efforts in command and control,

emergency operations centers, and

border surveillance and security.

“Law enforcement on its own is a niche

market,” said Snow, “but there are law

“Homeland security outside the United

States offers unlimited opportunity for

Raytheon to shine,” said Conway. “The

strength of our One Company approach,

combined with Raytheon’s powerful one-

two punch of technology and services

means that we are well armed with the

right tools and solutions to have a positive

impact on the safety and security of billions

of people around the world. That’s an envi-

able position to be in. It is with a great

sense of responsibility that my colleagues

and I look forward to doing what is right

for our customers around the world so that

we can continue to further Raytheon’s

brand as a technology innovator and total

solutions provider.” •

enforcement components to many of the

broader-based domestic and international

homeland security programs we’re going to

go after. I see my role here as highlighting

Raytheon’s technology and service capabilities

within the law enforcement community,

and demonstrating how we can assist law

enforcement in its support of land and

maritime border security, command and

control, transportation security and

emergency operations.

A renowned expert in his field, Snow’s

background in global security, law

enforcement and budget management —

with an understanding of the variety of

tactical and strategic approaches employed

by law enforcement agencies throughout

the world — will offer Raytheon a new

way of looking at this component of its

homeland security business opportunities.

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 15


Feature

Raytheon’s Proven

High-Tech Military

Defense Systems

Go Commercial

16 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

Vigilant Eagle:

Protection from terrorist

surface-to-air missiles

Silent Guardian:

A new directed-energy

protection system


Raytheon has worked

for decades with the

Department of Defense

(DoD) to develop and deploy

technology for military operations

around the world. Now, the

company is working to identify

which of these technologies have

commercial applications and can

be tested, integrated with other

Raytheon products and services,

and rolled out for homeland

security purposes. Two particular

technologies being examined are

Vigilant Eagle and Silent Guardian.

Vigilant Eagle

Vigilant Eagle provides an invisible dome

of protection around airports or airfields,

offering all aircraft — international and

domestic commercial flights, as well as

military and private planes — protection

from terrorist surface-to-air missiles

including the Man-Portable Air Defense

System (MANPADS).

“We’ve been working with the DoD on

Vigilant Eagle’s technology for a little over

10 years,” said Michael Booen, Raytheon’s

vice president of Advanced Missile Defense

and Directed Energy Weapons. “In 2003,

the Department of Homeland Security

(DHS) notified us that they were looking for

a counter-MANPADS solution and we knew

we had the right product ready to go. It’s

taken a few years to get most of the appro-

priate approvals and tests completed, but

we knew this was the right solution for

DHS, since Vigilant Eagle had already been

proven against real missiles in field tests.”

In 2006, Raytheon was awarded a $4.1

million DHS contract to demonstrate the

suitability of the Vigilant Eagle airport

protection system to function in a civilian

environment and its ability to protect

aircraft from the threat of shoulder-fired

missiles. Vigilant Eagle uses a simple tech-

nique of illuminating the missile body with

electromagnetic energy tailored to divert

the missile. It aims a focused, precisely

steered beam of electromagnetic energy at

a terrorist’s missile, diverting the threat

away from the targeted aircraft.

Vigilant Eagle is installed at airports, rather

than on individual aircraft, and consists of

three interconnected primary components:

a distributed missile detect and track sub-

system (MDT), a command and control (C2)

system, and the Active Electronically

Scanned Array (AESA), which consists of a

billboard-size array of highly efficient

antennae linked to solid-state amplifiers.

The MDT is a pre-positioned grid of passive

infrared sensors mounted on cell phone

towers or buildings to cover the required

detection space. At least two sensors in an

overlapping grid, yielding an extremely low

false-alarm rate, confirm missile detection.

The Control Center provides pointing com-

mands and connects to the airport security

interface. The Control Center capability also

includes determination of the launch point

to notify security forces, enabling capture of

the terrorists who fired the missile. The

electromagnetic waveforms disrupt the mis-

sile and deflect it away from the aircraft.

Created electromagnetic fields are well

within the Occupational Safety and Health

Administration (OSHA) standards for per-

sonnel exposure limits.

Raytheon’s Vigilant Eagle defeats man-

portable missiles in seconds without any

alteration to or involvement by the aircraft

using the airport,” said Mike Booen, “Not

only has Vigilant Eagle proven effective, it

can be rapidly deployed at a cost 10 times

less than equipping each individual aircraft.”

Industry experts predict it would cost

upward of $40 billion to equip individual

aircraft with technology that can provide

the same protections provided by Vigilant

Eagle. Moreover, as a comparison,

outfitting every airport in the U.S. with

Vigilant Eagle would only cost an estimated

$2-3 billion.

“Vigilant Eagle is yet another great example

of why Raytheon is so well positioned in

Continued on page 18

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 17


Feature

Continued from page 17

the homeland security arena,” said Scott

Slade, Science & Technology IPT lead,

Raytheon IED Defeat Task Force. “Anybody

can try to make and sell widgets, but we

have an advantage because we have people

who think long-term and across the board

to repurpose technologies that already have

a proven track record. In addition, we have

the teams in place that can find ways to

integrate and deploy those products and

services in a homeland security capacity and

support them over the long term. It’s smart

business, plain and simple.”

Silent Guardian

Another new application of military-proven

technology is Raytheon’s directed-energy

protection system called Silent Guardian

that employs millimeter-wave energy to

stop, delay, deter and turn back violent

aggressors.

18 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

Silent Guardian can be utilized from up to

250 meters away against would-be attackers,

while enabling the operator to distinguish

friend from foe in real-time without

having to use lethal force. Potential applications

include facility and critical asset protection,

riot control, home and perimeter

security, and counter-terrorism.

The system emits a focused beam of millimeter-wave

energy to repel individuals

without causing any physical damage. The

beam heats the water molecules around

the skin’s pain and heat receptors (located

1/64 of an inch under the skin), creating a

burning sensation intended to get the

aggressors’ attention and repel them.

“Silent Guardian provides a revolutionary

non-lethal alternative for law enforcement

agencies and security forces that will save

lives,” said Booen. “It has been proven

effective for protecting people and critical

sites, and extensive government testing has

revealed no adverse health effects. We have

been working with the Air Force on this

technology for over 15 years because we

wanted to make sure this was safe for use

in all the applications we had intended it

to be used.”

Vigilant Eagle/Silent Guardian

Silent Guardian emits a focused beam that heats the water molecules around the skin’s pain

and heat receptors (located 1/64 of an inch under the skin), creating a burning sensation

intended to get the aggressors’ attention and repel them.

Booen also says that Silent Guardian gives

law enforcement and other protection

entities an effective alternative between

shouting and shooting. “Imagine being

in a crowded marketplace in which a

group of terrorists was reported to be

infiltrating with rocket-propelled grenades.

You could use Silent Guardian to deflect

and detect to determine a group or

individual’s true intentions. In using

technology like Silent Guardian in large

crowd environments, the potential for

collateral damage is greatly reduced.”

“There are legislative and policy questions

we must answer before DHS is able to

implement this technology in the ways

we envision, but it’s all about continuing

to build trust and provide data and results

that this product is important and needed,”

said Slade.

“Ten years ago, we didn’t have chemical

trace or liquid explosive detection at airports,

nor did we have some of the X-ray

screening technology we take for granted

today because we didn’t know we needed

it. New technology like Silent Guardian

gives us an opportunity to help our customers

identify their needs, and allows

Raytheon to provide solutions that a

Mission Systems Integrator should to keep

our nation safe.” •


L E A D E R S H I P P E R S P E C T I V E

Mike Keebaugh

Vice President, Raytheon Company

President, Intelligence and Information Systems

These first few years of the 21st

century have proven to be a

dangerous time for peace-loving,

freedom-loving people throughout the

world. None of us will ever forget where

we were and what we were doing on the

terrible morning of Sept. 11, 2001, when

terrorists struck the World Trade Center in

New York City and the Pentagon. In pursuit

of their evil vision for the world, the

terrorists wantonly murdered thousands of

innocent men and women — Americans

and foreign nationals who came to our

shores to live and work, or just to visit.

Much has been said about how our world

has changed in the days, months and

years since then. For those of us in the

defense industry, that day also signaled

the beginning of the next evolutionary

step in our business.

Raytheon’s history, like that of many of

our competitors, has been one of

responding to the changes brought on by

shifting tides of global conflict. Our business

has been to develop and bring to

market technologies that allow America

and its allies to protect and defend our

interests around the world. As the nature

of the threat and the nature of the fight

have changed, so too have we.

Obviously, traditional conflicts still exist.

Nations pit themselves against other

nations, and their uniformed armies face

off against each other on battlefields

around the world. Just as obviously,

America needs to be always ready to

defend itself against such traditional

assault. However, the new threat

addressed today under the banner of

“homeland security” is quite different.

Today, we and our allies are faced with a

growing threat from fanatics around the

globe who target civilians and their institutions,

with the sole mission of creating terror

and disrupting a way of life.

Terrorists pursue their missions as “virtual

nations,” without respect to geographic

borders or citizenship. They don’t adhere

to traditional command and control struc-

tures. Their organizations and tactics are

constantly evolving, morphing, adapting

rapidly to changing circumstances. And

because they live undercover among their

victims, these new adversaries are more

difficult to identify, find and defend against.

To succeed against this enemy, America

must adjust and rapidly adapt its capabilities

to wage war against them. Our military

and intelligence services need the defense

and contracting community to have a deep

and profound understanding of their mission,

anticipate the evolving threat, and

continually push the technological boundaries

to produce systems, services and

products that help to identify and nullify the

enemy. Further, we need to develop systems

that give our nation the ability to contain

damage and facilitate rapid recovery.

As has been our history, Raytheon will

continue to grow its capabilities, to remain

an essential partner with our customers in

the global war on terror. In fact, we are

already well on our way. We have successfully

developed industry-leading expertise

in this area and have secured the commitment

to preserve and build on it.

As an example, Raytheon developed

Vigilant Eagle, an airfield-based directed

electro-magnetic energy system that

detects and tracks missiles to protect commercial

aircraft from shoulder-fired missiles.

A counter Man-Portable Air Defense

System, Vigilant Eagle can be an important

tool in the war on terror. Raytheon also

helps manage a national visitor system

known as US-VISIT — an automated system

to track pre-entry, entry, status management

and exit of foreign travelers at air,

land and sea ports. We also have the

Advanced Spectroscopic Portal, which is

an automated system to detect radioactive

metallic chemical elements. These are just a

few examples of the many ways Raytheon

is using its domain expertise and technology

know-how to protect our nation and

build the homeland security business.

That business segment is expected to

grow markedly over the next several years,

both in the U.S. and internationally. In

addition, there is a compelling business

case for focusing significant time and

resources on the international homeland

security market.

The total global market for homeland

security in 2007 is around $58 billion. The

U.S. will account for nearly half of that

total, or $28 billion this year. Based on

research published by Homeland Security

Research Corp., we now expect that total

global market to increase to nearly $132

billion in 2012. Between now and then,

the U.S. share of that market is expected

to decrease by 7 percent, while European

and Asian markets continue to expand.

With Raytheon’s resources strategically

located around the globe, we are in position

to offer state-of-the-art systems to

international customers. This strategic

positioning of our resources, combined

with our in-depth understanding of the

homeland security mission and our experience

in developing border security, coastal

surveillance and visitor management systems,

as well as secure information technology

networks, uniquely qualifies us to

serve the international market’s growing

homeland security needs.

Clearly, there are myriad opportunities for

Raytheon to play an integral role in the

global homeland security market in 2007

and beyond. We are well positioned to

serve both the U.S. and the international

markets, and I believe that even with

increasing competition, Raytheon will be a

leader in this field.

The attacks of 9/11 illustrated that the war

on terrorism is not being fought only in

distant lands — it has come to our shores.

Continuing to do our work well is not only

important to our business, it’s important

to our families and those of every

American and American ally. •

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 19


Raytheon’s Modeling & Simulation Approach

Applies to Homeland Security

Border security is dominating the

headlines both domestically and abroad.

Not surprisingly, understanding the

customer’s problem in this domain has

several challenges.

First, the customer may not know exactly

what they want or understand the conse-

quences of particular decisions. Second,

Raytheon may not be able to differentiate

between the “hard” requirements and the

“nice to haves.” To address these concerns,

Raytheon has developed a comprehensive

modeling and simulation (M&S) toolset to

demonstrate mission effectiveness and

affordability to the customer prior to com-

mitting resources to major development

efforts. With these tools, Raytheon employs

a proven, metrics-based system engineering

process to provide agile, flexible solutions

for border security needs.

In effect, Raytheon’s M&S approach pro-

vides a collaborative mechanism for the cus-

tomer to rapidly review proposed solutions,

assess requirements and understand the

consequences of any design decision before

it’s made. Our M&S process is highly itera-

tive, enabling a quick and flexible response.

Typically, it includes the following:

• Gap analysis

• Identification of standard regional

configurations

• Sensor selection and placement analysis

• Communications

• Operational analysis

• Cost as an Independent

Variable (CAIV) analysis

onTechnology

20 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

ARCHITECTURE & SYSTEMS INTEGRATION

The first step is the gap analysis. The purpose

of a gap analysis is to identify current

areas of vulnerability. The as-is configuration

is defined and modeled to determine the

current level of performance. The current

level of performance is compared to the

desired or required level of performance to

identify areas of vulnerability and opportunities

for improvement. Gaps and opportunities

are identified and used to focus the

analysis and develop and refine the solution.

The second step is to develop a set of

standard regional configurations. A border

often consists of multiple terrain types

(mountains, coastline, desert, etc.) and the

“best value” solution for one terrain may

be cost-prohibitive or ineffective in another

terrain. Sensor line-of-sight coverage, threat

types and speeds, and responder types and

speeds can vary significantly with the terrain

type, therefore directly impacting the

responder’s time to react. For each region,

computer simulations apply a set of alternatives

to expose trends and to provide evidence

to develop sensor requirements. The

simulation results determine recommendations

for a standard configuration for each

terrain type.

The next step, sensor selection and placement

analysis, requires an understanding of

the following:

• The level of discrimination required

(see Table 1)

• Sensor system performance

• Threat types and speeds

• Terrain and possible weather conditions

• The infrastructure of the area

• Political, cultural, environmental or other

restrictions on sensor locations

Discrimination Level Meaning

Detection An object is present

Classification Object class (e.g., human,

vehicle) is determined

Recognition The specific class (adult,

child) to which an object

belongs is determined

Identification The object is discerned

with sufficient clarity to

specify the type.

Table 1. Discrimination Definitions

Sensor models and computer simulations

are used to evaluate a sensor network’s

effectiveness — given a discrimination

task — against specific threats in terrain

and weather conditions. Simulation results

provide insight into the sensor types (radar,

infrared, acoustic, etc.), required sensor

range, number of sensors, tower locations

and heights, and the mix of ground vs.

airborne sensors.

Communications analysis — how to get

information from point A to point B — is

cross-coupled with the other trades and

decisions. The range, bandwidth, quality of

service, security and power requirements all

drive the solution design. A communications

model is used to explore tradeoffs,

and when combined with an understanding

of the infrastructure cost, networking

issues, and total life-cycle cost, recommendations

can be made for communications

architecture to support the sensor network.

Operational models incorporate the system

performance characteristics and apply them

to an entity-level simulation to evaluate the

systems in the context of a mission-level

scenario. For example, the border security

mission is to detect, identify, classify,

Y E S T E R D A Y … T O D A Y … T O M O R R O W


Sensor network modeling identifies coverage gaps.

respond and resolve illegal border crossings

by illegal immigrants, criminals, smugglers

and terrorists. To accomplish that mission,

agents must aggressively patrol land and

sea areas of responsibility while maintaining

contact with their assigned post and sector.

Monte Carlo Simulations depicting this

behavior provide analysis of the patrol

characteristics, surveillance characteristics

and the people processes that lead to a

CAIV analysis identifies best-value solutions.

successful interdiction and resolution.

Variables include responder numbers and

maneuverability, target location errors,

terrain trafficability, decision times and

detainee processing times. The assessment

provides recommendations for refining

the sensors, sensor platforms and response

platforms, as well as operational guidelines

and procedures, to significantly improve

the probability of mission success.

Y E S T E R D A Y … T O D A Y … T O M O R R O W

The system by itself does not equal a solution.

The following is a set of common

constraints faced in border security:

• Infrastructure – The cost of power,

communications, towers and other

infrastructure can make some

locations infeasible.

• Land/cultural restrictions – Protected

areas, such as sacred ground, wetlands

or national parks may not be used.

Cost as an Independent Variable (CAIV)

analysis is used to identify the best-value

solution. This is accomplished through a

comparison of system performance with

cost. Specifically, we consider life-cycle

cost, which includes RDT&E, Acquisition,

O&S, government infrastructure and

disposal. When these costs are considered,

the solution with the best system-level

performance may be cost-prohibitive,

while the lowest-cost solution may provide

unacceptable performance. CAIV aids in

finding a balance between mission

effectiveness and life-cycle cost.

Agility, flexibility and repeatability are keys

to our systems engineering and design

approach. Our M&S capabilities have been

applied and refined on border security

projects over the last five years and are

part of our systems engineering life cycle

to facilitate low-risk and effective program

execution. We apply these repeatable

processes in partnership with the customer

to ensure “best value” and “lowest risk”

solutions for cost-effective border

control capabilities. •

Julie Kamm

j-kamm@raytheon.com

Nick Coombs

nickolia_s_coombs@raytheon.com

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 21


onTechnology

Integrated Communications and Navigation

for Next-Gen Astronauts

In September 2006, Raytheon joined a

team of NASA scientists and engineers in

the Arizona desert near Meteor Crater to

test the next generation of astronaut suits

and robots. Raytheon partnered with

Hamilton Sundstrand to provide a non-GPS

aided navigation capability demonstration at

this year’s Desert-RATS (Research and

Technology Studies) demos. Each year NASA

tests incremental design improvements to

these extravehicular activities (EVA) systems

in the harsh desert environment. With

minor modifications, Raytheon used the

DoD-developed technology imbedded in the

MicroLight TM radio for the demonstration.

In 2004, President Bush proposed a bold

new vision for space exploration. Congress

then passed the NASA Authorization Act of

2005, which directed NASA’s administrator

to “establish a program to develop a sus-

tained human presence on the moon,

including a robust precursor program to

promote exploration, science, commerce

and U.S. preeminence in space, and as a

stepping stone to future exploration of

Mars and other destinations.” This led to

the establishment of the Constellation

Program within NASA.

The first return to the moon is currently

scheduled for 2020. When astronauts set

foot on the moon for the seventh time,

they will have at their disposal a wide

variety of modern systems to assist them

with their mission. These systems will

include the Lander — also used as a habitat

for the mission — various pre-deployed

assets and multiple robots. The astronauts

will engage in exploration far from their

habitat using a Rover. They will begin

building the infrastructure for a permanent

presence on the moon. These activities will

22 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

Figure 1. Video screen capture of

astronauts preparing for a test run at Arizona’s

Meteor Crater with SCOUT Rover, and showing the MicroLight

mounted to the PLSS next to the CAIpack

require a navigation and position location

system, a communications system and a

wireless network. Because it is too expen-

sive to develop a GPS-like system of satel-

lites for lunar navigation, the system used

on the moon must employ a non-GPS aided

navigation system.

Raytheon’s second-generation MicroLight

radios were used for the demonstration.

The MicroLight is a software-defined radio

(SDR) that has Internet protocol (IP) based

interfaces, and can provide a voice-over IP

(VoIP) capability. This allows the radio to be

easily used in a wireless network using stan-

dard interfaces. The radio operates at UHF,

which is an advantage for the environment

in which the astronauts will be operating.

The radio weighs less than one pound and

is 7.0 x 3.3 x 1.8 inches in size. The output

power is adjustable from 0.1 to 5 watts.

The MicroLight can use any one of 18 mili-

tary waveforms that provide networking

and non-GPS aided position locations. This

list of capabilities matches perfectly with the

size, weight, power, frequency, networking,

voice plus data messaging, and non-GPS

P R O C E S S I N G

aided position location requirements for the

Raytheon Desert-RATS demonstration.

The experimental spacesuit subsystem that

currently provides the position location and

communications function is the

Communication, Avionics and Informetrics

pack (CAIpack). This unit can be seen in

Figure 1, where it is mounted on the back

of the Primary Life Support Subsystem

(PLSS) unit of the astronaut’s suit. Also seen

in the picture is the positioning of the

MicroLight radio. The radio is mounted on a

plate and bracket assembly that is attached

to a support bar of the PLSS. Inside the

CAIpack are a laptop computer, GPS receiv-

er, Tropos WiFi access point, Ethernet hub

and batteries. The CAIpack interfaces to the

spacesuit to provide a heads-up display

function and voice control function. It

receives telemetry from the suit as well as

voice. Input and output messages are

processed using software running on the

laptop that is connected to a wireless wide-

area network via the Tropos unit. The

CAIpack was modified to allow MicroLight

position information to be used, as well as

Y E S T E R D A Y … T O D A Y … T O M O R R O W


Figure 2. Performance of the MicroLight

Position Estimator

the GPS information. This was easily done

using the MicroLight’s Ethernet connection,

and the fact the MicroLight interfaces with

simple TCP/IP protocols. Minor modifica-

tions were made to the software that dis-

tributes position messages to the resident

programs. The software logs, plots and dis-

plays the astronaut’s movements during a

suit run. The only modification made to the

MicroLight was to change the message for-

mat of position data from JVMF (a military

joint variable message format) to NEMA

0183 (a GPS format).

Raytheon’s main goal at this year’s

Desert-RATS was to demonstrate that the

MicroLight waveform could provide suffi-

ciently accurate position locations over a

wide area. In 2007, features to be tested

will include incorporating the MicroLight’s

VoIP and ad-hoc networking capabilities.

Figures 2 and 3 illustrate the performance

achieved at the 2006 demonstration. Figure

2 shows the suit camp in relation to

Meteor Crater and the reference units. It

also depicts the route taken during a suit

run by two astronauts riding in the Science

Crew Operations and Utility Testbed

(SCOUT) Rover robot. Figure 3 shows the

MicroLight track relative to the GPS track.

The activity near the top of the figure

occurred when the astronauts donned their

suits and walked to the SCOUT. Once on

SCOUT, the astronauts traveled away from

the suit camp into the desert about half a

mile, where they stopped and performed

experiments, including voice commanding

the SCOUT to follow them, turn right, stop,

etc. After about an hour, the astronauts

returned to the donning tent on SCOUT.

If the GPS track is assumed to be truth, the

MicroLight maintained the correct track to

within about 20 meters most of the time.

This performance is acceptable for a typical

moon exploration mission where the astro-

naut might be searching for rocks far from

the habitat. When working closely with

robots, an accuracy of less than a meter

will be required for safety reasons.

In 2007, Raytheon would like to incorpo-

rate the networking and voice features into

the demonstration, and improve on the

Y E S T E R D A Y … T O D A Y … T O M O R R O W

Figure 3. Performance of the Suit GPS Figure 4. The SCOUT Rover (Source Crew

Operations and Utility Testbed). Photo

courtesy of NASA.

position location performance. The

communications system currently used

by the astronauts and the support team

is based on land mobile commercial radios.

There are also multiple systems that rely

on the GPS data from the astronauts. To

incorporate the MicroLight more deeply

into the demonstration, the effects on the

current communications system and loca-

tion data users must be studied and

accounted for. •

Rich Crowley

rich_d_crowley@raytheon.com

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 23


onTechnology

Using Multi-Biometrics Fusion Technology

to Protect Our Nation

Criminal justice investigation and civil

screening using biometric technology has

increased dramatically since Sept. 11, 2001.

Biometrics is the technology of applying

measures of a person’s unique biological

attributes to determine identity. The most

commonly used biometrics modality is the

fingerprint, which has been used in criminal

forensics for over 100 years. Other biometric

measures that can be used to distinguish

individuals include face imaging, iris imaging,

retina scans, hand geometry, palm prints,

electrocardiogram and voice analysis. FBI IAFIS

and DHS IDENT are examples of very large

automatic fingerprint identification systems

for criminal justice and civilian applications.

There is a significant challenge with the

current single biometrics-based systems.

Biometric matching calculations attempt to

discriminate a match from a non-match,

and the result is a statistical probability with

errors. Borderline probabilities require manual

intervention to determine the correct

decision. Optimizing performance is a tradeoff

between keeping the False Reject Rate

(FRR)/False Accept Rate (FAR) low and the

True Accept Rate (TAR)/True Reject Rate

(TRR) high. The challenge has been that any

single biometrics-based identification system

has a limit to how low an FAR/FRR can be

achieved. The number of manual interventions

increases significantly when larger

populations of subjects need to be processed.

The cost increases could be unsustainable.

Figure 1. Typical steps for single biometric process

Raytheon’s solution is to build biometric

systems using multi-biometrics fusion technology.

Multi-biometrics systems are those

capable of using more than one biometric

24 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

aspect (modality, sensor,

instance and/or algorithm)

in some form of combined

use for making a specific

identity match. This is generally

referred to as multibiometrics

fusion. The

fusion techniques can be

categorized as follows:

Multi-modal – Biometric

systems take input from

single or multiple sensors

measuring two or more different

biometric attributes

like face and fingerprint.

Multi-algorithmic –

Biometric systems receive a

single sample from a single

sensor and process that sample with two or

more distinctly different methods (for example,

different vendors’ matching algorithms).

Multi-instance – Biometric systems use

one sensor (or possibly multiple sensors) to

capture samples of two or more different

instances of the same biometric attributes.

Multi-sensorial – Biometric systems sample

the same instance of a biometric trait with

two or more distinctly different sensors.

A typical single biometric process includes

these steps: sample acquisition, feature

extraction, matching and decision (see

Figure 1). Multi-biometrics fusion can happen

at different levels; the commonly used

fusion options are:

Decision level – Each biometric process

makes its own recognition decision. The

fusion process fuses them together with

combination algorithms to make the final

decision.

Feature extraction level – Each biometric

process extracts its features for its modalities

(finger or face). The fusion processes

fuses the collection features into one feature

set to make the final decision.

E O / L A S E R S

Figure 2. The illustrative ROC curves of a multi-biometrics system

Matching score – Each biometric matcher

provides a match score indicating match

probability. These scores can be combined

to a single score for matching decision.

The key benefit of biometric fusion technology

is to improve the overall system accuracy

and reduce manual processes. Shown in

Figure 2 is an example of Receiver

Operating Characteristics (ROC) of the biometrics

systems before and after the multimodal

fusion. The Genuine Accept Rate of

the multi-modal-based system with hand

geometry, fingerprint and face represents a

substantial improvement compared to individual

biometrics-based systems.

Other benefits of a multi-biometrics system

include the fact that it’s more technically

challenging and costly to fool a multi-biometrics

system. It can also help with people

unable to enroll in one biometrics (e.g.,

because of physical limitations or cultural

concerns). For example, iris can be used in

some countries in Europe where fingerprint

collection is considered to be for criminals.

However, biometric systems with fusion

technologies cost more to build, with

Y E S T E R D A Y … T O D A Y … T O M O R R O W


additional biometric acquisition devices,

extra data storage space and complex software

system development. It can also have

a detrimental impact on the capture speed

and system performance. The challenge of

designing a biometrics fusion system is to

balance desired accuracy while achieving

high system performance.

As a Mission System Integrator, Raytheon is

working with several customers to design

and develop mission-critical biometric systems.

For example, Raytheon is working on

the design and implementation of a multiinstance

and multi-algorithmic fingerprint

fusion system for verification and identification

by fusing up to 10 fingerprints. Scorelevel

fusion, which can potentially increase

accuracy up several-fold depending on

performance needs, can be used. This

approach has been validated by National

Institute Standard and Technology studies.

Raytheon is also working to explore options

to improve facial image capture quality.

This will enable future multi-modal fusion

applications to combine fingerprint and

face biometrics to achieve improved system

performance. In addition, Raytheon has

provided design solutions to customers

using multiple biometrics, including face,

finger and iris, to work with very large

galleries of low-quality data and with

challenging response time requirements.

As an industry leader in biometrics system

integration, Raytheon is also investing

internal corporate funds to develop system

options with fusion technology. Raytheon

has partnered with other industry leaders in

biometric technology and identity management,

including L1, Motorola, ImageWare,

Daon, Cross Match, NEC, Cogent, SAGEM

Morpho and many other biometrics vendors.

Raytheon is poised to provide solutions using

multi-biometrics fusion technology for the

criminal justice, border control and management,

and intelligence and defense communities

in order to protect our nation. •

Charles Y Li

charles_li@raytheon.com

Skip Linehan

skip_linehan@raytheon.com

onTechnology

Raytheon SAS Advanced

Product Center’s

Microwave Automated Factories

Space and Airborne System’s (SAS)

Advanced Product Center’s (APC)

Microwave Automated Factory (MAF),

located in Dallas, is the most highly automated

facility for the production of defense

and aerospace (including space) microwave

products in the world. It offers a unique

combination of high-volume, high-mix production

and state-of-the-art prototyping

and product development. The recent

history of the MAF and its capabilities to

support both production and development

are as follows.

History

The facility has produced over one million

complex microwave modules since its inception

in 1993, with production rates exceeding

20,000 modules per month. It has also

produced over 45,000 next-higher-level

transmit/receive integrated microwave module

type assemblies (TRIMMs), or “slats.”

Assembly complexity has ranged from hermetic

modules with 20 components and

100 wires to assemblies containing over

100 devices and 350 wires. The most complex

non-hermetic RF assembly produced to

date contained 1,024 channels, approximately

7,400 die and 16,000 wires — all

designed, assembled and tested in the

factory within seven months.

Philosophy of Execution

The most prevalent philosophy of execution

is concurrent engineering with integrated

product teams using IPDS. Early engagement

of APC product engineers ensures

that both the program and factory arrive

with a winning solution for Raytheon

customers. This is coupled with a heavy

emphasis on design-to-cost manufacturing

using cutting-edge automated assembly

and tests to produce the most consistent

assemblies with minimal tuning and

maximum yield.

Y E S T E R D A Y … T O D A Y … T O M O R R O W

R F S Y S T E M S

Detailed design guidelines and producibility

reviews ensure low cost, high yields and

high reliability for all products produced in

the facility. The factory’s focus on continuous

improvement is fueled by a team-based

operation with joint responsibility from both

Operations and Engineering for program and

factory performance. More than 85 percent

of factory personnel and engineer team

members are Raytheon Six Sigma certified.

APC’s excellence in quality and technology

has been recognized by awards at the SAS

and corporate levels in 2004 and 2005.

Key Statistics

The MAF is a certified ISO 9001 facility containing

both design and fabrication capabilities.

Production is housed in a 25,000 sq.

ft., Class 100K clean room and a 8,500 sq.

ft. clean area. The production areas are

complimented by a 900 sq. ft. process/

product development area, a 570 sq. ft.

prototyping area and a 570 sq. ft. process

support lab.

Production takes place on nine fully automated

assembly lines and test stations. The

assembly lines produce conventional upright

chip-and-wire and flip-chip assembly using

the industry’s most current equipment.

Automated processes include component

attach, wire/ribbon interconnects, hermetic

sealing, inspection, conformal coating systems

and symbolization. Statistical process

control is maintained over all processes with

current process capabilities ranging from

4.5–6 sigma. A paperless computer-based

manufacturing control system is used for

statistical process monitoring, labor entry,

graphically aided work instructions and

assembly travelers. It is also used for realtime

control and reporting of throughput,

yields and process control parameters. Part

pedigree is maintained through bar code

Continued on page 26

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 25


R F S Y S T E M S ( c o n t i n u e d )

Continued from page 25

tracking for all assemblies, allowing a complete

part and build history to be retrieved

for any assembly (part numbers, vendor, lot

numbers, wafer numbers, etc.). This highlevel

of automation ensures consistent

assembly tolerances, repeatable microwave

performance and high reliability for

increased Mission Assurance.

Product development occurs in two distinct

areas: The first is the MAF Prototype Area;

the second is the MAF Process/Product

Development Area. These areas, as well as

the main factory, are supported by APC

Engineering Labs and the APC Process

Support Lab. See the key principles and

capabilities of each area below.

MAF Prototype Area

Key Principle — Dedicated to quick turns

to prove out design concepts that do not

require the accuracy of full automation to

achieve electrical performance with minimum

tooling and documentation. Engineers can

walk in with a sketch and a bag of parts

and leave with an assembly to test. This area

does not produce any production hardware.

Efforts are not part of the NRE associated

with transition into the automated factory.

Capabilities — Manual assembly, manual

die attach (solder and epoxy), manual wire

bond, manual wedge bond, split tip weld,

chisel bond and mini-autoclave.

MAF Process/Product Development Area

Key Principle — This area, operated by the

APC’s RF Packaging Processes Engineering

group, utilizes the same equipment and

engineering resources to develop products

and processes for APC’s microwave factories.

It is the designated area to develop new

products that require the precision of automated

assembly. It also serves as the testbed

to evaluate new equipment, processes and

improvements before transition to production.

Personnel responsible for implementation of

new developments are also responsible for

their performance in production.

26 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

Capabilities — Automated dispense, pick

and place, cure, reflow, interconnect (ball

bond, wedge bond and ribbon bond), optical

measuring system, laser profilometry,

conformal coating and vacuum lamination.

MAF Process Support Lab

Key Principle — An analytic lab to support

development of new processes and materials

for new products. Additionally supports

resolution of process and product issues

with current products within the MAF.

Capabilities

• Imaging – scanning electron microscopy,

sonic acoustic microscopy, digital high-res

metallurgical microscopy, IR microscopy,

low-mag digital cameras, real-time X-ray

• Elemental identification and metallization

thickness – ESD and XRF

• Mechanical testing – Instron mechanical

testers (2), Sebastian pull tester, wire pull

testers (3), die shear tester

• Environmental testing – temp/humidity

chambers (4), HAST chambers (3)

• Other – viscosity, analytical scales, contact

angle, DC probe station

Engineering Labs

Key Principle — Dedicated engineering

areas with equipment and resources to

support product and device design and

development, test set design and development,

and test procedure development.

Capabilities

• 14 labs; configured test benches available

for use via sign-up

• S-Parm/Power/TOI/NF Testing

• Special testing needs (phase noise,

load pull)

• Pulsed and CW capabilities, anechoic

chambers

• Frequencies up to 95 GHz

• Digital IC lab, advanced power supply lab

and microelectronics lab

Recent efforts produced in the development

area include a T/R module and a recent

panel array. The module, containing 19

MMIC components, 6 ICs, 48 caps and

300 wire bonds, was designed and

bread-boarded; 32 units were produced

and delivered to the customer in six

months. Another example was a prototype

panel containing 128 channels, 3,200

die and 18,000 wires — all designed,

assembled and tested in the factory in

seven months. •

Karl L. Worthen

kworthen@raytheon.com

Y E S T E R D A Y … T O D A Y … T O M O R R O W


onTechnology

Microfluidic

Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems

Advanced Thermal Management

The microelectronics industry is unlike any

other. Those who work in it are confronted

with the uniquely daunting challenge of

having to leap forward with rapid perform-

ance improvements for each new generation

device, while at the same time reducing cost

and size to make the product competitive.

While those involved with RF electronics at

Raytheon do not quite confront the same

problem as our commercial counterparts,

the theme remains the same. We want bet-

ter performance at lower cost, weight and

size. When it comes to radar systems, one

proposed approach involves increasing

power density at the chip level to utilize

fewer devices, ultimately leading to a sys-

tem, which, in theory, should be smaller,

lighter and less costly. This does not come

without challenges, however.

More powerful devices present thermal

engineers with unprecedented challenges

in device cooling, with dissipated power

densities in the hundreds to thousands of

watts per centimeter squared. One pro-

posed approach to solving this problem

takes advantage of modern Micro Electro-

Mechanical Systems (MEMS) fabrication

processes to implement microfluidic cooling

solutions at the device level.

Microfluidics is the study of transport phe-

nomena and fluid-based devices at micro-

scopic length scales. It’s a multi-disciplinary

science, primarily focused on taking advan-

tage of scaling behavior of fluid systems for

improved performance. By miniaturizing

Y E S T E R D A Y … T O D A Y … T O M O R R O W

M A T E R I A L S & S T R U C T U R E S

Scanning electron micrograph of MEMS

micro-cooler with parallel channels less

than .001″ wide

cooling devices, thermal engineers are able-

to place their cooling solutions “closer” to

the device being cooled. They’re also able

to take advantage of scaling laws beneficial

to improved heat transfer, such as the large

surface-area-to-volume ratios present in

micro scale devices. These MEMS cooling

devices are fabricated with similar processes

and in a similar fashion to the microelec-

tronics devices they are typically used to

cool. This leads to economical production

and affords the opportunity to build these

micro-coolers directly in the microelectronic

device, providing a higher level of integra-

tion than was previously achievable.

Many types of heat transfer can be imple-

mented within these micro-coolers including

single phase (convection), change of phase

(boiling), spray evaporation and jet impinge-

ment. Many challenges still must be

overcome to fully realize the potential of

micro-cooler technology.

MEMS micro-cooler next to a penny

Along with the unique benefits afforded

with fluid system behavior on the

microscale, come many challenges typically

not encountered in macro-scale devices.

Studying these devices frequently requires

specialized instrumentation and techniques.

Fabrication processes must be adapted

for specialized materials and optimized

for consistency. Much basic research has

been completed on these micro-cooler

devices with universities such as Stanford,

MIT, Purdue and Rensselaer leading

the charge. Commercial thermal

management solutions featuring this

technology are now available.

As we move toward next-generation

radar systems, many technologies will be

considered to solve the thermal problem.

MEMS micro-coolers are one option with

a potentially bright future. •

David Altman

david_h_altman@raytheon.com

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 27


Events

National Guard Information Technology Conference:

Meeting the Joint C4 Challenge

Approximately 1,800 attendees joined nearly

180 exhibitors and speakers at the

National Guard Information Technology

Conference, held Dec 3–8, 2006, in Las

Vegas. Raytheon responded to “Meeting

the Joint C4 Challenge” by displaying capabilities

for emergency situational awareness.

More than 20 Network Centric Systems

(NCS) employees were on hand to staff the

exhibit and speak with customers, business

partners and potential first responders.

Raytheon’s Total Solutions Package

When crises arise — whether it be from

natural disasters or man-made threats —

incident management teams rely on effective

coordination between disparate agencies,

each with its own protocol, applications

and networks. Raytheon’s answer to

this challenge is an integrated solution that

links first responders with local, state and

federal professionals.

Demonstrating a sampling of these applications,

Raytheon presented an infrastructure

that included technologies in both the

wired and wireless domains. Raytheon’s

exhibit paired with three other exhibitors —

Nortel Networks, Segovia and Fortress

Technologies — to simulate an emergency

operations center capable of big-picture

emergency situational awareness. “The

intent of the applications and services is

to allow public safety and first responder

individuals to perform their jobs more

safely, more efficiently and with more

knowledge,” said Bill Iannacci, director

of ICS Strategic Initiatives at NCS in

Marlborough, Mass.

Partner companies — JPS Communications,

DropFire, NexPort Solutions and Eagle

Project — joined with Raytheon to

showcase the total package with the

companies’ staff on hand representing a

unified Raytheon team. “We are taking

a true agnostic view in partnering with

28 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

potential customers in order to reduce

their capital expenditure and maximize the

efficiency of their operational forecast,”

explained Iannacci.

The demonstration included the Emergency

Patient Tracking System (EPTS), which facilitates

triage and transport of victims during

mass casualty incidents; Mobile Enhanced

Situational Awareness (MESA), which disseminates

the Common Operational Picture

for Public Safety and Civil Support forces;

and voice interoperability solutions and the

MicroLight TM radio to ensure communications

interoperability and information sharing.

Partner companies provided additional

applications and software to enhance situational

awareness.

Why the National Guard?

“We have been asked to start up a

business focused on servicing the federal,

state and local level needs for public safety

and first response,” said Iannacci. “The

National Guard is a big player in this

market space.” •

Upcoming Engineering and

Technology External Events

2007 Systems and Software

Technology Conference (SSTC)

Enabling the Global Mission

June 18–21, 2007

Tampa, Florida

http://www.sstc-online.org

International Council on Systems

Engineering (INCOSE) 2007

Systems Engineering:

Key to Intelligent Enterprises

June 24–28, 2007

San Diego, California

http://www.incose.org/symp2007

American Institute of Aeronautics

and Astronautics (AIAA) Space 2007

Conference and Exposition

Sept. 18–20, 2007

Long Beach, California

http://www.aiaa.org


People

NCS Team Wins

Prestigious

Defense

Manufacturing

Award

Raytheon is pleased to announce that its

Network Centric Systems’ Exoatmospheric

Kill Vehicle (EKV) Harnessing team has

received the 2006 Defense Manufacturing

Excellence Award. The team was nominated

by Dan Heinemeier, president of the

Government Electronics and Information

Technology Association.

The award is presented by the National

Center for Advanced Technologies (NCAT)

at the Defense Manufacturing Conference

and recognizes outstanding cooperative

efforts on technology development between

government, industry and academia.

The EKV Harness team developed a

predictable and sustainable manufacturing

program for high reliability space applica-

P R O F I L E : P E R F O R M A N C E

Matt Gilligan

Deputy Vice President,

Command and Control

Systems, Network

Centric Systems

Matt Gilligan oversees the

System for the Vigilance of

the Amazon (SIVAM) program,

the largest wide-area surveillance and

management system in the world. This $1.4 billion

Raytheon-led surveillance and monitoring

program supports the Brazilian government in

carrying out its Amazon protection policy.

Prior to being named deputy vice president of

Command and Control Systems (C2S), Gilligan

served as SIVAM’s program manager and was

responsible for leading the project’s development

and implementation. Due to the dedication

of that team and the system’s overall performance,

SIVAM was delivered to the Brazilian

government in 2004 with great success.

Pictured from left: John Douglass, president and CEO of the American Aerospace

Association; Dan Heinemeir; John Enns; Greg Stevens, business area manager; Dan Farmer;

Brock Partee; Lynn Krueger; and John Kubricky, Deputy Under Secretary of Defense.

tion harnessing in a Micro D M83513

interconnect environment. This process was

also recognized by a Missile Defense

Agency audit team in April 2006 as a

“benchmark for the harnessing industry.”

The success of this strategic missile defense

program was achieved through the development

of manufacturing concepts in

accordance with Mission Assurance performance

objectives. The results provided

highly technically superior harnessing and

With a wide-area network of sensors, communi-

cation systems and coordination centers moni-

toring the two million square mile Amazon

region and the airspace above it, SIVAM provides

reliable and actionable information on conditions

in the Amazon area to government agencies,

research institutions and other users, filling a

gap that in the past had exposed Brazil’s borders

to international crime, drug running, illegal

logging and mining, as well as rebel activity.

SIVAM combines data generated by space-

based, airborne and surface sensors and support

systems, tied together by an innovative satellite

and terrestrial telecommunications infrastruc-

ture. Some of the key sensors include fixed and

mobile radars, airborne synthetic aperture radars,

multi-spectral scanners, optical infrared sensors,

high-frequency direction-finding equipment,

weather monitoring, and communications and

non-communications exploitation gear.

predictable throughput to support aggressive

end-item deliverables requirements.

EKV team members include John Enns,

value stream leader, Missile Systems

Products; Lynn Krueger, advanced

manufacturing engineer; Dan Farmer,

design engineer; George Young, value

stream leader; Tim Houser, EKV project

engineer; and Brock Partee, product

development engineer. •

ET&MA

Professionals

Exemplify

Raytheon’s

CFM Strategy

“SIVAM is an incredible asset for the Brazilian

government,” said Gilligan. “The system has

already played an integral role in controlling the

region’s airspace, helping locate downed aircraft,

monitoring drought and flood conditions, and

improving compliance monitoring when it comes

to illegal logging and reducing drug trafficking.”

What’s next for SIVAM? Gilligan is working to

expand SIVAM into neighboring Peru, as well as

other potential South American countries.

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 29


People

Raytheon Army Reservist Wins

Prestigious Award

Col. Kerry Kachejian, an active

member of the U.S. Army Reserve and also

Raytheon’s director of Homeland Defense

and Intelligence Programs Support for IIS in

the Homeland Security Strategic Business

Area, recently received one of the most

prestigious honors awarded annually by the

Military Officers Association of America

(MOAA), the nation’s largest association of

military officers.

The MOAA Reserve Award for Leadership

Excellence in a Troop Program Unit recognizes

members of the Army Reserve who

have demonstrated outstanding performance

and leadership abilities in their daily

lives, both in and out of uniform.

As the deputy commander of the Army

Reserve’s Contingency Response Unit,

Kachejian led his unit’s successful deployment

to Joint Task Force Katrina in New

Orleans, where it was tasked with debris

removal throughout the area. His unit also

P R O F I L E : R E L AT I O N S H I P S

Ian MacTaggart

Business Development

Manager, Raytheon

Canada Limited

When the International

Olympics Committee

awarded the 2010 Winter

Games to the city of Vancouver, Ian MacTaggart

knew he wanted to use a Customer Focused

Marketing approach to win some Olympics

security business.

Focusing on integrated security operations and

an expertise in command and control, Raytheon

Canada reached out to the Royal Canadian

Mounted Police (RCMP) to develop a relationship

that they hoped would lead to future business,

including a potential Olympic contract.

When Vancouver was awarded the Games,

MacTaggart and his team immediately began

30 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

deployed to the Gulf Region Division (GRD)

in Iraq, where he served as the deputy chief

of staff for Operations. The GRD’s mission

was to rebuild the Iraqi infrastructure and,

during the performance of his duties, he

was engaged numerous times by hostile

direct and indirect enemy fire. He also survived

a targeted attack on his vehicle by an

improvised explosive device. Additionally,

when one of his unit’s vehicles plunged into

the Tigris River and was submerged and

entangled in concertina wire, he risked his

life to help save an American civilian

trapped in the wreckage.

A 1982 West Point graduate, Kachejian’s

personal military decorations include the

Army Combat Action Badge, the Bronze

Star Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal

and the prestigious Army Ranger tab. Most

recently, while employed at Raytheon, he

attended the Industrial College of the

Armed Forces and was selected as a “distinguished

graduate.”

conversations with the RCMP and at the

same time began to pursue multiple paths of

communication at different levels to expand the

company’s reach toward securing this potential

business opportunity.

“It’s all about relationships,” said MacTaggart.

“We’ve pushed ourselves harder than ever

before to build this connection with the RCMP

from the ground up and, at the same time have

begun talks with not only the Vancouver organizing

committee, but also the more than 100

different stakeholders involved in security with

regard to the Olympics. We’re on the right path

and we’re positioned well.”

MacTaggart continues to focus on keeping the

lines of communication open and has great

expectations that Raytheon will play an integral

role in the XXI Winter Olympics. “To win this

business, we have to continue to prove that

“I am so thankful to Raytheon for providing

an environment where employees can serve

their country in uniform and out,” said

Kachejian. “By being able to live both lives

simultaneously, I’m able to understand the

real world challenges our military personnel

are facing in the field and return to

Raytheon to translate them into technology

terms our engineers can understand. In the

end, this helps both Raytheon and the uniformed

services since our team is able to

create better solutions to real problems that

we face in the global war on terror.” •

ET&MA

Professionals

Exemplify

Raytheon’s

CFM Strategy

we’re worthy of their trust and their business;

we’ve got to be sincere and helpful; and we

have to convince the RCMP that we’re going to

deliver on our commitments.”

The security contract decisions won’t be made

until late 2007, but MacTaggart is optimistic.

“We will do everything within our power to win

this business because it’s a great opportunity to

showcase our expertise to a global market that

might not otherwise get to see how we operate

in real time.”


Dr. William E. Hoke, a senior

engineering fellow at Raytheon Integrated

Defense Systems (IDS), was presented the

2006 Innovator Award at the North

American Molecular Beam Epitaxy (NAMBE)

Conference and Workshop held last fall at

Duke University in Durham, N.C.

The NAMBE conference is devoted to fundamental

and applied research in the field

of MBE crystal growth. Dr. Hoke, who

works at the Raytheon Radio Frequency

Components (RRFC) facility in Andover,

Mass., was honored for his research and

development of metamorphic growth of

semiconductor device structures that have

P R O F I L E : S O L U T I O N S

Andy Zogg

Vice President,

Airspace Management

and Homeland Security

More than 100 million

passengers travel through

the four Port Authority

airports of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ)

each year. With passenger safety and security a

top priority, this still-growing volume carries with

it the potential for increased risk. Under the

leadership of Andy Zogg, Raytheon is bringing its

Perimeter Intrusion Detection System (PIDS) to

the PANYNJ to manage perimeter security at

LaGuardia, Kennedy, Newark and Teterboro airports.

“PIDS provides a perimeter security solution

built from proven integrated systems used to

protect everything from borders to battlefields

around the world,” said Zogg.

Dr. William Hoke Honored with

Innovator Award

Dr. William Hoke (center) receives the NAMBE’s 2006 Innovator Award from Jeff Hohn (right),

Veeco vice president and general manager, and Prof. Charles Tu, NAMBE chairman and assistant

dean at the University of San Diego.

advanced capabilities and reduced costs

compared to conventional semiconductor

technology.

“The MBE Innovator Award is not an individual

award,” Dr. Hoke said. “It recognizes

the success of a team of people in material

growth and characterization, device processing,

and device design. I have been fortunate

to be part of an excellent team in

the RRFC’s advanced technology group for

many years.”

Since joining Raytheon in 1978, Dr. Hoke

has worked on the material development of

a variety of advanced semiconductor device

PIDS is the first fully integrated system in which

all sensors, thermal cameras, video motion

detectors, access control and alarm annunciation

systems are brought into a common display system.

These features, along with CCTV and

“smart fences,” provide superior, layered intrusion

detection customized for each airport. It

leverages the airports’ existing communications

and power infrastructures, and provides 24/7

all-weather capabilities with an easy-to-use

interface to monitor the perimeter of the airport,

detect what crosses the perimeter, perform an

assessment, secure the perimeter, and send a

dispatch to address the encroachment.

“What makes PIDS unique is Raytheon’s ability

to perform computer modeling of the topography

of each airport, enabling us to optimize a

suite of sensors to provide a redundant, highly

available, highly reliable system,” said Zogg.

“Our integrated PIDS approach saves money

structures. He initiated Raytheon’s MBE

program in 1981 for the growth of

semiconductor films. Since then, he has

supervised the material development of

several structures that have advanced the

power, efficiency and noise performance of

semiconductors used in radars, communications

and electronic warfare systems.

“Dr. Hoke’s knowledge, dedication and

contributions have helped Raytheon be a

leader in advancing the technology of

semiconductors,” said Mark Russell, vice

president, IDS Engineering. “We are indeed

fortunate to have Bill on the Raytheon IDS

Engineering team.” •

ET&MA

Professionals

Exemplify

Raytheon’s

CFM Strategy

over camera-dominant systems and yields a

more cost-effective solution.”

How else can PIDS be used to solve other

transportation security concerns? In addition to

enabling PIDS to address rail security concerns,

international expansion plans are also underway.

“As transportation volume growth increases in

the Middle East and the Far East, solutions like

PIDS will have to be considered by those transportation

ministries, and that can open up an

additional market,” explained Zogg.

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 31


Future Events

Raytheon’s Enterprise Process

Group Workshop

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

April 17–18, 2007

Tucson, Arizona

* * *

Raytheon’s 6th Annual

Software Symposium

Technical Excellence via Innovation

and Revolution

April 30–May 4, 2007

Richardson, Texas

* * *

Raytheon’s 9th Annual Electro-

Optical Systems Symposium

Innovative EO Technology for Integrated

Mission Systems Solutions

May 14–17, 2007

Richardson, Texas

* * *

Raytheon’s 11th Annual

Processing Systems Symposium

Roadmaps: Flight Path to the Future

May 21–23, 2007

El Segundo, California

* * *

Raytheon’s 9th Annual

RF Systems Symposium

Sustaining and Disruptive RF Systems –

Leading the Way for Today and Tomorrow

June 18–21, 2007

Tucson, Arizona

* * *

Raytheon’s Systems

Engineering Symposium

Customer Solutions Through Innovative

Technology Integration

August 6–9, 2007

Anaheim, California

* * *

Raytheon’s Mechanical and

Materials Systems Symposium

October 8–10, 2007

El Segundo, California

* * *

For more information on any of

the above Raytheon events, visit:

http://home.ray.com/rayeng/

technetworks/tab6/tab6.htm.

32 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

Resources

Raytheon Certified Architect Program

The Raytheon Certified Architect Program

(RCAP) is the culmination of Raytheon’s

systems architecting learning curriculum.

RCAP focuses on providing our customers

with the expertise needed to support their

long-term transformational goals.

According to Mike Borky, Raytheon’s

architecture champion, there is a critical

need for systems architects. “Our markets

are changing rapidly toward net-centric,

integrated mission-based solutions,” said

Borky. “In this environment, it’s all about

information. Our radar systems must act as

information appliances, our missiles as

nodes in the network. This is a whole

Laurel Gutierrez

Program Area Chief

Engineer,

Space and Airborne

Systems

As a chief engineer for many SAS technology

pursuits, I must quickly evaluate the proposed

technology and help define system

concepts that deliver the right solutions to

the customer’s problems. In most cases, the

timelines are short, but sometimes we have

only a few days to formulate the system

approach. The RCAP training provided me

with valuable tools and concepts for developing

architectures that are vital to my

current assignment.

I joined Raytheon in 1989, and in 1993

graduated from the University of Southern

California with a master’s degree in systems

architecting and engineering. At that time,

most of my colleagues thought I was

changing careers and planning to start

designing libraries and housing tracts. I had

to explain the concept of systems architecting

so often that I occasionally just shortened

the degree title to systems engineering.

Everyone understood that — no need

for lengthy, philosophical explanations. So,

it has been with great pleasure that I have

observed over the years the emergence of

different way of thinking about systems,

and first-class architecting is the path to

success in this new world.”

RCAP EXPERIENCES – Engineer Profile

To provide the world-class architects needed

to meet this challenge head on, RCAP

begins with senior systems architects who

are hand-picked by business leadership, and

exposes them to a series of workshops,

which highlight key standards, frameworks

and architecting practices from across the

industry and customer base. The

Information Architecture’s series of eight

courses, attended over a period of six

months, introduces students to the

Zachman framework, The Open Group

the field of systems architecting into a

mainstream practice.

I entered the first wave of the RCAP program

with over 20 years of experience in

system engineering and architecting,

design, development, and operations of

USAF, NASA, MDA, and national and commercial

space and ground systems. As one

of the founding members of the Raytheon

Architecture Review Board, I was not only a

student, but a sponsor and evaluator of the

course. The first wave was filled with seasoned

architects who unilaterally gave the

instructors and each other a hard time, and

generally groused our way through the pain

of simultaneously creating and attending a

brand new course. We made quite a few

course adjustments along the way, but I

came to realize that there was much I didn’t

know about systems architecting, and probably

a lot I would never be completely at

ease doing myself. It was both enlightening

and disheartening.

Today I have a much better awareness of

the broader spectrum of architecting

approaches, theories and tools. This has

helped me make much better decisions

about how to approach each particular

architecting challenge.


P r o v i d e s C u s t o m e r s

W i t h M u c h - N e e d e d E x p e r t i s e

Architecture Framework (TOGAF), the

Department of Defense Architecture

Framework (DoDAF), the Federal Enterprise

Architecture Framework (FEAF), as well as

best practices for software architecting and

the evaluation of architectures from the

Software Engineering Institute (SEI). The

Raytheon Enterprise Architecture Process

(REAP) unifies these various perspectives on

architecting and provides the opening and

capstone courses for RCAP.

The first wave of RCAP began in April 2004.

At the end of 2006, the program contained

162 participating architects in six waves.

Eighty-three participants have completed

RCAP EXPERIENCES – Architect Profile

Glenn Martin

NTx Systems Engineering

Technical Director and

Senior Engineering Fellow

While attending the inaugural wave of the

Raytheon Certified Architect Program

(RCAP), it became apparent that I was

indeed an architect — and had unknowingly

been one for some time. As is common

with many architects, my earliest architecting

was done at the product level and

expanded over time to include systems,

product lines and large-scale enterprise-level

systems of systems.

In the mid-1980s, I participated on a team

that architected a communications system.

We focused on the goals of reusable software,

common hardware components and

minimal support elements. The resulting

design had well-defined functional boundaries

with common hardware and software

structures. That system remains in operation

today, and while in production for decades,

very few systems were produced with the

same hardware or software. The architecture

that we developed was successful in allowing

the components to evolve and improve over

time. Since then, my endeavors have

migrated from architecting products against

specifications to architecting system

approaches against operational needs.

training and 18 have been certified by

Raytheon’s Architecture Review Board.

Raytheon’s goal is to reach a steady state of

100 Raytheon Certified Architects, which

will likely require the training of approximately

500 people from across the company.

In addition to RCAP, Raytheon’s Leadership

and Innovative Learning organization offers

a number of beginning and intermediate

architecting courses. Contact Larri Ann

Rosser at larri_rosser@raytheon.com for

more information on these programs.

For information about RCAP, contact Randy

Case at randy_r_case@raytheon.com. •

The RCAP experience provided me with a

greater academic understanding of the

process of architecting and an improved

understanding of the standard frameworks

and products used to document architectures.

I also came to understand that, while

most architecture publications focus on IT

systems, the architecture practices are

directly applicable to the solutions that we

provide our customer base.

My RCAP experience became invaluable

while working on the Homeland Security

Enterprise Campaign. As the lead architect

on a small team, we created the Intelligent

Border Architecture (IBA). The IBA was the

first reference architecture defended before

the Raytheon Architecture Review Board

(ARB), and subsequently the first formally

approved Raytheon reference architecture.

As a Raytheon Certified Architect, a member

of the NCS ARB and a frequent participant

in the Raytheon ARB, I believe we face

several current challenges in the realm of

architecting. One is the continued refinement

of our architectures to increase the

value provided to our design teams to

improve speed to market and improve our

productivity. However, perhaps the greatest

challenge right now is to find the right balance

between “strategic” and “tactical”

architecting to enable both near-term business

gains and long-term growth.

Do you know a middle or high school

student looking ahead to college? Or

perhaps you’ve seen a teacher or volunteer

who has inspired students to study

mathematics? If so, you may be interested

in Raytheon’s MathMovesU grants

and scholarship program — a $1 million

fund to support middle and high school

students, teachers and schools.

Middle School and High School Grants

Students don’t have to be math whizzes

to apply for a college scholarship and a

grant for their school. By writing a short

essay, students can share their creative

and innovative ideas about how to make

learning and teaching math fun and

exciting. Students can garner a $1,000

scholarship with a matching $1,000

grant to his or her school. In the first

year, more than 1,500 middle and high

school students applied, submitting ideas

ranging from providing graphing calculators

in classrooms to developing a

MathMovesU board game.

Math Hero Awards

to Succeed

Teachers, coaches and volunteers who

inspire students to learn and enjoy math

are eligible to receive individual Math

Hero grants of $2,500. In addition, a

grant of $2,500 is awarded to their

school or the local MATHCOUNTS ®

program. Thirty-three Math Heroes were

recognized for their efforts in 2006.

One innovative teacher helped inspire

her students by doing a cartwheel if the

class could catch her making a mistake

on a math problem.

Since the program’s inception, Raytheon

has awarded more than $1 million.

To learn more about MathMovesU

and to apply for a scholarship, visit

www.mathmovesu.com. •

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 33


U.S. Patents

Issued to Raytheon

At Raytheon, we encourage people

to work on technological challenges

that keep America strong and develop

innovative commercial products. Part

of that process is identifying and

protecting our intellectual property.

Once again, the U.S. Patent Office

has recognized our engineers and

technologists for their contributions

in their fields of interest. We

compliment our inventors who

were awarded patents from

September 2006 through January 2007.

JOHN S. ANDERSON

JAMES B. ANDREW

ROBERT K. DODDS

ANDREW B. FACCIANO

STEPHEN D. HAIGHT

LARRY G. KRAUSE

TODD E. SESSLER

DMITRY B. SHMOYS

DAVID VAN LUE

7110602 System and method for detection of image edges

using a polar algorithm process

KENN S. BATES

DAVID B. CHANG

KENNETH M. KUNZ

BARTON H. ROWLETT

7114384 Acoustic adiabatic liquid quantity sensor

LOUIS LUH

7116260 Mismatch shaped analog-to-digital converter

CYNTHIA E. DANIELL

DAVID B. SHU

7116265 Recognition algorithm for the unknown target

rejection based on shape statistics obtained from orthogonal

distance function

PAUL M. INGRAM JR

ARCHIE H. MUSE

7117132 Sensitivity of iterative spectrally smooth

temperature/emissivity separation to instrument noise

JUAN F. LAM

THEOFANIS MAVROMATIS

7119732 Bistatic and multistatic system for space

situational awareness

KEVIN L. BALCH

TUNNEY A. DONG

JEFFREY K. FIELDS

H. HUTCHINGS IV

WILLIAM W. KAAKE

ROSEMARIE SPENCER

7120013 System and method for transferring large amounts

of stored data

FRANK N. CHEUNG

RICHARD CHIN

7120814 System and method for aligning signals in multiple

clock systems

JAMES FLORENCE

CLAY E. TOWERY

7121036 Method and apparatus for safe operation of an

electronic firearm sight depending upon the detection of a

selected color

KAPRIEL V. KRIKORIAN

ROBERT A. ROSEN

7121502 Pseudo GPS aided multiple projectile

bistatic guidance

34 2007 ISSUE 1 RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY

MARK A. GOHLKE

HUMPHREY W. HA

CHARLES M. HANSON

ROGER KNOTT

ROBERT A. OWEN

VICKI D. PAUL

7122788 Adaptively reducing offset in a thermal

imaging cameras

JOHN R. SELIN

7123096 Quadrature offset power amplifier

GARY A. FRAZIER

7123882 Digital phased array architecture and associated

method

JAMES FLORENCE

CLAY E. TOWERY

7124531 Method and apparatus for safe operation of an

electronic firearm sight

JOHN R. ARCHER

ROY P. MCMAHON

7126445 Arc-fault detecting circuit-breaker system with

status indicator structure

ANDREW K. BROWN

KENNETH W. BROWN

JAMES R. GALLIVAN

PHILIP D. STARBUCK

7126477 Millimeter-wave area-protection system and method

CHARLES T. HANSEN

MICHAEL E. LAWRENCE

7126524 Motion compensation for convolutional

SAR algorithms

KENNETH W. BROWN

7126530 Non-coherent high-power directed-energy system

and method

CRAIG R. RIGGS

7127576 Method and system for data duplication

ROBERT C. EARL

JOHN R. GUARINO

ROBERT M. OLSON

7128017 A corrosion resistant connection system

LE T. PHAM

7129489 Method and apparatus providing single bump,

multi-color pixel architecture

ANDREW J. GABURA

GEOFFREY G. HARRIS

7130062 Rapid-response electron-beam deposition system

having a controller using leading and trailing deposition indicators

GARY SCHWARTZ

WILLIAM G. WYATT

7130189 Method and apparatus for cooling a portable computer

RONALD T. AZUMA

7131060 System and method for automatic placement of

labels for interactive graphics applications

ELI E. GORDON

MICHAEL D. JACK

7132655 Improved passive millimeter wave sensor using

high temperature superconducting leads

ROBERT C. ALLISON

RON K. NAKAHIRA

JOON PARK

7132723 Micro electro-mechanical system device with

piezoelectric thin film actuator

JAMES R. WHITTY

7133219 Telescopic sighting device with variable exit pupil

IAN B. KERFOOT

JAMES G. KOSALOS

7133326 Method and system for synthetic aperture sonar

ALEXANDER A. BETIN

ROBERT W. BYREN

ROBIN A. REEDER

7133427 Phase conjugate laser and method with

improved fidelity

YURI OWECHKO

DAVID B. SHU

7133699 System and method for separating signals received

by an overloaded antenna array

RICHARD L. SITZMANN

GREGORY A. WILKINSON

7137599 Launcher with dual mode electronics

PERRY MACDONALD

7138937 Radar system having low-profile circulator

DANIEL T. MCGRATH

TIMOTHY H. SHIVELY

7138952 Array antenna with dual polarization and method

CORNELL DRENTEA

7139545 Ultra-wideband fully synthesized high-resolution

receiver and method

JOE A. ORTIZ

7141940 Method and control circuitry for providing

average current mode control in a power converter and an

active power filter

LEVEN H. GOREE

7142054 Amplifying signals using a quadrature coupled

amplifier

CHARLES T. HANSEN

7142149 Mensuration for the conformal range migration

algorithm

VINH N. ADAMS

WESLEY H. DWELLY

7142153 Short pulse/stepped frequency radar system

GABOR DEVENYI

7143661 Leadscrew mechanical drive with differential

leadscrew follower structure and brake

RICHARD M. LLOYD

7143698 Tandem warhead

GEORGE BARBASTATHIS

DELMAR L. BARKER

DENNIS J. GARROOD

JOHN D. JOANNOPOULOS

SANG-GOOK KIM

NITESH N. SHAH

HARRY A. SCHMITT

7145124 Multispectral imaging chip using photonic crystals

TAMRAT AKALE

ALLEN WANG

7145418 Bandpass filter

DOUGLAS M. KAVNER

7145475 Predictive automatic incident detection using

automatic vehicle identification

KWANG M. CHO

LEO H. HUI

7145496 Autofocus method based on successive parameter

adjustments for contrast optimization

KAPRIEL V. KRIKORIAN

ROBERT A. ROSEN

7145497 Robust detection technique of fixed and moving

ground targets using a common waveform

KWANG M. CHO

LEO H. HUI

7145498 Efficient autofocus method for swath SAR

GARIN S. BIRCSAK

JONATHAN D. GORDON

JOHN K. KEIGHARN

IRWIN L. NEWBERG

7145504 Arbitrary radar target synthesizer (ARTS)

SCOTT W. SPARROLD

7145734 Windowed optical system having a tilted optical

element to correct aberrations

PILEIH CHEN

7148839 Operational bistatic radar system synchronization

MOHAMED K. NEZAMI

7151405 Estimating power amplifier on-linearity in

accordance with memory depth


VINH N. ADAMS

DENNIS C. BRAUNREITER

WESLEY H. DWELLY

7151478 Pseudo-orthogonal waveforms radar system,

quadratic polyphase waveforms radar, and methods for locating

targets

REZA M. DIZAJI

RICK MCKERRACHER

ANTHONY M. PONSFORD

7151483 System and method for concurrent operation

of multiple radar or active sonar systems on a common

frequency

KENNETH W. BROWN

JAMES R. GALLIVAN

7151494 Reflective and transmissive mode monolithic

millimeter wave array system and oscillator using same

SCOTT M. HESTON

7154337 Amplifying a signal using a control modulator

that provides a bias resistance

TONY C. CHIANG

DOUGLAS W. DIETZ

MARK R. FRANKLIN

LOUIS C. MOE

DOMINIC S. NUCCITELLI

LEAH O. VALMIDIANO

7154369 Passive thermal switch

ALBERT E. COSAND

7158062 Clocked dac current switch

WILLIAM D. AUTERY

MARISSA BARNARD

ALLAN L. BUEHLER

DONALD B. CHRISTIAN

ATHANASIOS J. SYLLAIOS

GREGORY S. TYBER

ROBERT D. WALKER

7159419 System and methof for vapor pressure

controlled growth of infrared chalcogenide glasses

WILLIAM D. AUTERY

MARISSA BARNARD

DONALD B. CHRISTIAN

GREGORY S. TYBER

7159420 System and method for forming infrared glass

optical components

KEVIN W. CHEN

RICHARD M. WEBER

7161802 Thermal management system having porous

fluid transfer element

CHAD E. BOYACK

JON N. LEONARD

THOMAS H. LIND

STEPHEN E. MATTINGLY

WILLIAM R. OWENS

7162285 Detector and method for detecting telephoneactivated

devices in idle state

GEORGE A. BLAHA

RICHARD DRYER

CHRIS E. GESWENDER

ANDREW J. HINSDALE

7163176 2-D projectile trajectory correction system

and method

RUSSELL B. CLINE

DONALD E. CROFT

CHARLES M. DE LAIR

CHRISTOPHER P. OWAN

SHANE P. STILSON

7165465 Dynamic load fixture for application of torsion

loads for rotary mechanical systems

I n t e r n a t i o n a l P a t e n t s I s s u e d

t o R a y t h e o n

Congratulations to Raytheon technologists

from all over the world. We would

like to acknowledge international patents

issued from October 2006 through

January 2007. These inventors are

responsible for keeping the company on

the cutting edge, and we salute their

innovation and contributions.

Titles are those on the U.S.-filed patents;

actual titles on foreign counterparts are

sometimes modified and not recorded.

While we strive to list current international

patents, many foreign patents

issue much later than the corresponding

U.S. patents and may not yet be reflected.

AUSTRIA

JAMES L. LANGSTON

1422680 Method and apparatus for providing an aircraft

emergency safety control system

CANADA

ANTHONY S. CARRARA

PAUL A. DANELLO

2461559 Wedgelock system

R.D. BREEN

2462690 Pin straightening tool

JAMES G. SMALL

2381265 Optical magnetron for high efficiency production of

optical radiation, and 1/2 lambda induced Pi-mode operation

MICHAEL RAY

2417924 Advanced high speed, multi-level uncooled

bolometer and method for fabricating same

ERNEST C. FACCINI

RICHARD M. LLOYD

2433805 Warhead with aligned projectiles

BRUCE F. KAROFFA

ALBERT D. SCALO

2172095 Precision time of day counter

ROY P. MCMAHON

2381266 Arc-fault detecting circuit breaker system

CHINA

DAVID D. CROUCH

WILLIAM E. DOLASH

03802075.0 Optically transparent millimeter wave reflector

DENMARK, FINLAND, GERMANY, GREAT

BRITAIN, ITALY, SWEDEN

SHAHROKH HASHEMI-YEGANEH

1055264 Broadband microstrip to parallel-plate-waveguide

transition

FRANCE, GERMANY, GREAT BRITAIN, ITALY,

NETHERLANDS, SPAIN, SWEDEN

RICHARD E. HODGES

JAMES M. IRION II

NICHOLAS. SCHUNEMAN

1425822 Balun and groundplanes for decade band tapered

slot antenna and method of making same

MICHAEL J. DELCHECCOLO

JAMES T. HANSON

MARK E. RUSSELL

HBARTELD B. VANREES

WALTER G. WOODINGTON

1422533 Video amplifier for a radar receiver (automotive)

FRANCE, GERMANY, GREAT BRITAIN, SWEDEN

CLAUDIO S. HOWARD

CLIFTON QUAN

DAVID T. WINSLOW

1082789 Threaded double sided compressed wire bundle

connector

FRANCE, GERMANY, GREAT BRITAIN

DAVID D. CROUCH

WILLIAM E. DOLASH

1419553 Quasi-optical variable beamsplitter

ROBERT W. BYREN

WILLIAM S. GRIFFIN

1514332 Laser cooling apparatus and method

RICHARD M. DAVIS

BRUNO A. MARTINEZ

0707380 Parallel cascaded integrator/comb filter

CHENG-CHIH TSAI

1279051 Shaping optic for diode light sheets

ALFRED SORVINO

1305564 Fin lock system

CHUNGTE W. CHEN

RONALD G. HEGG

WILLIAM B. KING

1377864 External pupil lens systems

THOMAS A. DRAKE

JOHN L. VAMPOLA

RICHARD H. WYLES

1543617 Analog load driver

GERMANY

JAMES L. LANGSTON

1422680 Method and apparatus for providing an aircraft

emergency safety control system

ISRAEL

DAVID B. COHN

149035 Laser pulse slicer and dual wavelength converter

for chemical sensing

MARY D. ONEILL

149831 Method and apparatus for aircraft protection

against missile threats

NICHOLAS B. SACCKETTI

ANTHONY V. HEWITT

151461 Pseudo-randomized infrared blurring array

KENNETH W. BROWN

THOMAS A. DRAKE

151464 Common aperture reflector antenna with improved

feed design

G. V. ANDREWS

GARY A. FRAZIER

152591 Phased array antenna data re-alignment

JOHN M. TROMBETTA

154682 Glass reaction via liquid encapsulation

MARY D. ONEILL

WILLIAM H. WELLMAN

1384734 Multicolor staring missile sensor system

SOUTH KOREA

ARYEH PLATZKER

634645 Transistor amplifier having reduced

parastitic oscillations

MARLIN C. SMITH JR

635404 Radio frequency clamping circuit

ROBERT C. ALLISON

JAR J. LEE

CLIFTON QUAN

655823 Wideband 2-D electronically scanned array with

compact CTS feed and MEMs phase shifters

KURT S. KETOLA

ALAN L. KOVACS

JACQUES F. LINDER

668014 Dielectric interconnect frame incorporating

EMI shield and hydrogen absorber for tile T/R modules

TAIWAN

COLIN S. WHELAN

I264129 Sulfide encapsulation passivation technique

RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGY TODAY 2007 ISSUE 1 35


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