building codes public buildings residential construction

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building codes public buildings residential construction

Cesar Chavez Library, LLC design, photo by Bill TimmermanJames Learning Center, Highlands Center for Natural HistoryArmory Park: John Wesley MillerArmory Park: John Wesley MillerBUILDING CODESA few Arizona municipalities have implemented beyondcodestandards, including Marana, Tucson, Buckeye, PimaCounty, Scottsdale, and Apache Junction. These programsexceed current energy efficiency requirements and arevoluntary Green Building programs or other higher codedevelopment, such as Leadership in Energy andEnvironmental Design (LEED).ScottsdaleIn 1998, The City of Scottsdale introducedthefirst GreenBuilding Programin Arizona – ten years before any otherjurisdiction. Additionally, in 2005, Scottsdale became thefirst U.S. city to require that all new ormajorrenovatedcity buildings meet LEED Gold standards.Scottsdale’s voluntary Green Building Programencourages a whole-systems approach, taking multiplefactors into consideration: energy, site use, indoor airquality, building materials, solid waste, and water.Pima CountyIn Pima County, the Board of Supervisors created a fiveyearSustainable Action Plan requiring the county toreduce water use, save fuel, construct green buildings,use renewable energy, buy sustainable products, practiceconservation and waste reduction.A key component of the plan, the RegionalResidentialGreen Building Council'sRating System,created a guide for builders, developers, and propertyowners to help with the design and construction ofenergy efficient, water-conserving, healthy homes.PUBLIC BUILDINGSAt the state and local level, public buildings provide anopportunity for universities and government to lead byexample. Designing and retrofitting public buildings tobe greener and more energy efficient is a growing trend.James Learning Center, Highlands Center forNatural History, PrescottLocated on the Prescott National Forest, the center is offthe grid with 70% of the building’s heating and coolingload achieved passively. Solar panels on the roof supplythe remaining energy needs for the facility. Landscapinguses harvested rainwater, native plants, and landformsthat control erosion and drainage.The James Learning Center is the first project in Prescottto achieve LEED certification. Awarded LEED Goldcertification by the U.S. Green Building Council in 2008,it is the first Gold project for Yavapai County.Maricopa Community Colleges , ArizonaMaricopa Community College District (MCCD) includesten colleges, two skill centers, and many smaller centers.The Facilities Planning and Development Departmenthas significantly reduced energy use at MCCD throughthe installation of energy efficient windows, highefficiency air handlers, upgraded insulation, occupancysensors for HVAC and lighting, along with numerousother efficiency improvements. In recognition of theirefforts, the Facilities and Development Departmentreceived the Governor’s Energy Conservation Award in1999. Saving money by reducing the cost of energy freedup funds to pay teachers and achieve education goals.RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONMuch of Arizona’s projected electricity use and,therefore, emissions of greenhouse gases and otherpollutants is related to houses that have yet to be built.By 2030, an estimated 50% of the buildings in our statewill have been built after 2000.Architectural design can have a substantial impact onreducing energy use in new home construction.However, there are only a handful of homebuilders inArizona that are building highly efficient homes. As ahigh growth state, Arizona is a crucial place to addressthis issue.Pepper-Viner Homes, TucsonPepper-Viner Homes is bringing High PerformanceBuilding into the mainstream building industry inSouthern Arizona. Pepper-Viner uses the ENERGYSTAR® label because it is a recognizable sign of quality,is measurable, requires third party verification, andoutlines the schedule and direction of the project.The company is building new homes that are innovative,creative, and built to conserve natural resources andlower energy costs. Completed homes save 40-50% ofenergy consumption when measured against a homebuilt to current code in Tucson. Further, the company justcompleted construction of a demonstration HighPerformance Home at the project that saves 80% onenergy and meets the Environmental ProtectionAgency’s Indoor Air Plus level. This house is projected tobe the first home to reach the Emerald (highest level)rating of the Pima County Regional Green BuildingRating System.Armory Park: John Wesley Miller, TucsonJohn Wesley Miller, a Tucson-based home builder andsolar pioneer, is a national leader in green buildingpractices. Miller works with local utilities, buildingdepartments, and universities to develop energy-savingproducts, technologies, and policies. He is one of fourbuilders selected by the U.S. Department of Energy todevelop Net Zero Energy Homes, which usephotovoltaic generation to offset utility-supplied power.One development is the 14-acre Armory Park del Sol,located in downtown Tucson, which includes 99 singlefamilysolar homes designed to blend in withsurrounding neighborhoods. New technology andconstruction methods incorporated into these homesinclude dual-pane windows, efficient HVAC, amongother measures. On average, Armory Park del Sol homesuse half the energy of a typical regional home, and thetwo Net Zero Energy Homes produce more energy thanthey consume.Local Action for Global Impact!Acting locally to reduce energy use through efficiency,will benefit the people of Arizona by lowering energycosts, providing cleaner air to breathe and protectingwater resources.Buildings are responsible for approximately half of allU.S. energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissionsannually. In reducing greenhouse gases produced by thebuilding industry in Arizona we can have an effect onclimate change on a regional, national and global scale.


Utility Demand-Side Management/Utility ProgramsTo assist customers, Arizona’s major utilities offerDemand-Side Management programs for residential,commercial, and industrial construction andremodeling projects.Arizona Public Service (APS) Residential NewConstructionIn APS’s ENERGY STAR® Homes program, homes are15-20% more efficient than 2006 building codes. Theprogram covers new construction elements such asHVAC, windows/thermal envelope, lighting/appliances, performance testing and inspections,builder incentives, training, and sales assistance andinformation for consumers.Tucson Electric Power (TEP) Guarantee HomeProgramTEP guarantees a lower electric bill for homes thatmeet specific energy efficiency constructionrequirements. TEP has an Efficient Home CoolingProgram that provides rebates toward the purchase ofqualifying high-efficiency HVAC systems. TEP workswith local retailers and lighting manufacturers toprovide customers discounted pricing on energyefficientlighting. TEP also provides free informationand opportunities for residents and builders on GreenBuilding practices and sponsors a Trees for Tucsonshade tree programSalt River Project (SRP) Power Wise HomesSRP’s program for residential energy-efficient buildingincludes two tiers of energy efficiency standards. Thefirst tier offers an incentive of 50% of Contribution inAid of Construction (CIAC), which are capital fundspaid by the customer as an up-front payment towarddesign and construction; the second tier offers anadditional incentive of 100% of CIAC. SRP also has abuilder incentive of $400 per home, plus additionalincentives based on CIAC payment.For more information on utility programs offered inyour area, visit the utility websites.Arizona Energy Efficiency ProjectThe Arizona Energy Efficiency Project is a collaborativeventure among five Arizona groups to significantlyincrease energy efficiency in Arizona. Project funding isgenerously provided by the Edwards Mother EarthFoundation. For more information on the groups, thisproject, and what you can do to help improve energyefficiency in our state, please contact the following:Sierra Club – Grand Canyon (Arizona) Chapterarizona.sierraclub.orgSouthwest Energy Efficiency Projectwww.swenergy.orgWestern Resource Advocateswww.westernresourceadvocates.org/index.phpArizona Public Interest Research Groupwww.arizonapirg.orgArizona Center for Law in the Public Interestwww.aclpi.orgAdditional energy efficiency resources can be foundat the following sites:Arizona Department of Commerce, State Energy Officewww.azcommerce.com/EnergyArizona Corporation Commissionwww.cc.state.az.usAmerican Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy(ACEEE) www.aceee.orgAlliance to Save Energywww.ase.orgConsortium for Energy Efficiencywww.cee1.orgU.S. Dept. of Energy’s Energy Efficiency andRenewable Energy Networkwww.eere.energy.govENERGY STAR® Productswww.energystar.govA Clean, Energy Efficient Future for ArizonaWhat if we could reduce energy use and save moneytoo? What if we could build and retrofit more energyefficientbuildings and reduce pollution and water use?We can, and, in some cases, we already are!Arizonans rely primarily on coal, gas, and nuclearpower to generate electricity. The impacts associatedwith generating electricity from these sources, includeair pollution, use of limited water resources, emissionsthat contribute to global climate change and significantimpacts from mining or drilling for conventional fuels.Energy efficiency is a source of energy similar to coal,gas, or nuclear. Instead of drilling using derricks andmines, we can use this clean energy source by doingmore with the energy we already generate. Energyefficiency is the cleanest and lowest cost energyresource. For every kilowatt hour (kWh) that is notused, we actually save more than a kWh with thedecrease in transmission losses.In every home, office, public building, and school, wecan use energy more efficiently by putting to workcurrently available products such as advanced lighting,ENERGY STAR® appliances, better insulation, efficientwindows, and high-efficiency heating, ventilation andair conditioning (HVAC) equipment. Opportunities areendless as new technologies come online.Energy efficiency measures are cost effective and helpprovide some protection against volatile fuel costsassociated with conventional electricity generation. TheWestern Governors’ Association’s Energy EfficiencyTask Force Report indicates that the average cost forenergy efficiency programs is $0.02 to $0.03 per lifetimekWh saved – much lower than the cost of newconventional generation ($0.05 to $0.09/kWh) and lowerthan current electric rates (about $0.10/kWh).Promoting energy efficiency in Arizona will accomplishthe following:• save consumers and businesses money on theirelectricity bills• make homes more affordable• reduce the need for costly and controversial newpower plants• increase the reliability of energy supply systems• reduce dependence on oil and natural gasimports• reduce emissions of air pollutants that areharming public health and contributing to globalwarming• create jobs in the housing and constructionsectorsAlready, we have examples of how Arizona is steppingup to advance energy efficiency – from improvingbuilding codes to building energy-efficient publicbuildings to utility-based demand-side management.In a slumping construction industry, energy efficiencyretrofits and new buildings create jobs for an alreadytrained workforce. Still, more can and must be done toimprove efficiency in our state. That is why severalArizona-based organizations are involved in theArizona Energy Efficiency Project – to ensure that ourhomes, offices, government buildings, and schools areall more efficient in order to better protect our resourcesand our pocketbooks. Your participation in this effortwill ensure a greener future for Arizona.

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