BELLFLOWER HIGH SCHOOL Curriculum Handbook 2011 - 2012

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BELLFLOWER HIGH SCHOOL Curriculum Handbook 2011 - 2012

BELLFLOWER HIGH SCHOOLCurriculum Handbook2011 - 2012“A COMMIITMENT TOACADEMIICEXCELLENCE”


CURRICULUMHANDBOOK2011-2012The mission of the Bellflower Unified School District is to open thedoors for all students to acquire the knowledge and develop theskills and attitudes that will empower them to: become lifelongactive learners; demonstrate respect for themselves and others in adynamic, diverse, and global society; become responsible, informed,productive, independent, and contributing citizens; and performsuccessfully in their chosen field and in society.Revised by the Board of Education,July 8, 2006BOARD OF EDUCATIONJerry Cleveland - PresidentBill Ste. Marie - Vice PresidentPaul Helzer, D.C., PhD. – ClerkDonald McMackin - MemberLaura Sanchez-Ramirez - MemberSUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLSRick KemppainenBELLFLOWER UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT16703 South Clark AvenueBellflower, California 90706(562) 866-9011BELLFLOWER HIGH SCHOOL15301 South McNab AvenueBellflower, California 90706(562) 920-1801


Dear Bellflower Parents and Students,A strong academic foundation opens doors to future achievements and personal success.Bellflower High School is committed to providing a rich academic education by offering a broadrange of courses for students who will pursue further academic endeavors and those whodesire to enter the work force upon graduation.It is important for all students not only to have a strong basic educational foundation that willenable them to learn and perform in a changing world, but also to learn higher-order skills tocommunicate effectively, use technology and develop a healthy lifestyle. Bellflower’s rigorousstandards-based curriculum and our school-wide expected learning results are designed tobuild upon the basic concepts and skills, as well as to stimulate challenging learning so thatstudents will achieve their “educational purpose” and prepare themselves to be responsible,contributing members of society.As our students plan their high school courses of study, they need to explore all avenues: theirinterests, abilities, talents, and desired career choices. The Curriculum Handbook 2011-2012 isdesigned to help students and parents gather the necessary information for making criticalselections to complete an individual educational plan. Careful study of this handbook willprovide course descriptions of both required and elective classes, as well as requirements forhigh school graduation, college entrance requirements and career preparation.In addition to course descriptions, this handbook includes district goals, a four-year planningchart, college and university entrance requirements, special programs, and extra-curricularactivities. This information enables parents and students to decide collaboratively on a course ofstudy that will accomplish goals for graduation and beyond. Parents and students areencouraged to plan a four-year course of study based on college and university entrancerequirements and co-curricular activities. Assistance in determining what courses to select canbe obtained from our high school counselors.Choices made now will have a direct impact on the direction and the career options availableafter high school and graduation. Judiciously planning courses in high school will assist inachievement of academic goals and an auspicious future.Sincerely,Joseph A. PerryPrincipal3


TABLE OF CONTENTSDISTRICT AND SCHOOL GOALS ………………………………………………………………………………..5DISTRICT MISSION STATEMENT ………………………………………………………………………………. 6BELLFLOWER HIGH SCHOOL MISSION AND VISION STATEMENT……………………….……………..7BELLFLOWER HIGH SCHOOL ESLRs……………………………………………………………………………8ACADEMIC FOUNDATION …………………………..……………………………………………..……..…. ..10PLANNING SHEETS …………………………………………………………………………………………..… 19GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS ………………………………………………………………………………21TESTING PROGRAMS …………………………...………………………………………………………………..22BELLFLOWER UC/CSU APPROVED COURSE LIST...………………………………………………………..23UC ELIGIBILITY INDEX …………………………………………………………………………………………. 25GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICES…………………………………………………………………..27COURSE DESCRIPTIONSARTS: VISUAL AND PERFORMING ……………………………………………………………….....29ENGLISH-LANGUAGE ARTS…………………………………………………………………………..33ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT …………………………………………………………… 35MATHEMATICS ………………………………………………………………………………………….36HISTORY/SOCIAL SCIENCE .………………………………………………………………………….37SCIENCE………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 39FOREIGN LANGUAGE………………………………………………………………………………… 41PHYSICAL EDUCATION ……………………………………………………………………………… 43PRACTICAL ARTS ………………………………………………………………………………….… ..44BUSINESS………………………………………………………………………………………………….47NON-DEPARTMENTAL ………………………………………………………………………………. 47REGIONAL OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM (ROP)…………………………………………………..49SPECIAL SERVICES ………………………………………………………………………………………………55CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAMS ………………………………………………………………………………...574


DISTRICT AND SCHOOL GOALSBellflower Unified School District Philosophy of EducationThe Board of Education of the Bellflower Unified School District believes education is vital to the future of a freesociety and that it is the obligation of this district to graduate literate, responsible citizens. We define education as thepresentation of a deliberate, systematic program of instruction based upon the needs of students and society asexpressed in the District’s goals. We advocate the belief that all students are entitled to equal educationalopportunities, to the fundamental rights of human dignity, and to be treated individually on the basis of theirabilities.We acknowledge that educators, families, students, and the community share responsibilities in the learning process.To advance our beliefs, the Board commits the total resources of the district including time, space and personnel toattain our goals.Adopted by the Board of Education, February 14, 1982; updated January, 1990Bellflower Unified School District Educational GoalsThe Bellflower Unified School District commits itself to providing a curriculum and instructional program for students that willmaximize their potential and enable them to:1. Develop mastery of skills in the use of words and numbers in:• Speaking, reading, writing, spelling and listening in the English language and, if appropriate, in a different language• Understanding and using the number system and utilizing basic arithmetical operations2. Develop critical thinking skills in:• Thinking, reasoning, and problem solving independently and in groups, while maintaining an attitude of openness insolutions or alternatives• Thinking in concrete, experimental, and formal terms of logic in order to analyze, evaluate, and interpret data3. Acquire an appreciation for and develop skills in creative self-expression by:• Appreciating the artistic expressions of others in a wide range of human endeavor• Learning to express oneself in creative endeavors, including the practical and fine arts4. Develop a moral and ethical value system consistent with life in a free society and consistent with personal values in:• Developing standards for appraising societal and personal values in determining one’s own ethical behavior• Exercising the courage of one’s convictions• Developing competencies in projecting the effect of one’s moral and ethical decisions5. Develop human relationship skills in:• Understanding and respecting the rights of others• Communicating ideas and feelings effectively• Understanding or empathizing in interpersonal relationships6. Develop skills required for responsible citizenship in:• Appreciating the value of and participating in the democratic process• Evaluating and considering the expression of conflicting ideas, beliefs, and values• Comprehending the reasons for laws and demonstrating law abiding behavior• Understanding and appreciating our American heritage• Acquiring knowledge and understanding of ethnic and cultural diversities in American society7. Develop skills to achieve and maintain optimum physical and mental growth and to use knowledge, practices, andresources necessary to protect one’s health and that of the community.8. Master the skills and attitudes necessary to make appropriate career choices in:• Developing the insight and knowledge of skills necessary to meet requirements of various careers• Developing the ability to realistically assess one’s potential in relationship to career choice9. Developing an understanding of environmental and economic influences on American life in:• Developing an awareness of the interdependence of conserving natural resources and providing for economic needsin society• Anticipating and adapting to the need for conservation of natural resources• Developing a working knowledge of economic systems• Planning and managing one’s own life by maintaining a balance between economic and other values• Developing consumer skills such as purchasing, financing, and investing10. Prepare for lifelong learning and development by:• Engaging in self-directed learning activities• Evaluating societal changes and adapting to them in a positive, healthy manner• Learning how to integrate the past and present for future growth11. Facilitate the development of a positive self-image by:• Encouraging realistic assessment and evaluation of personal strengths and weaknesses in order to set and achievegoals• Providing opportunities for feeling successful in academic, personal, and social accomplishmentsTo assist each student in the achievement of these goals, the Board commits the total resources of the school district and directsschool personnel to continually examine school district programs and services, to develop new and/or modify existing programsand services, and to make other school district decisions based upon a direct linkage with these district goals.Adopted by the Board of Education, February 14, 1982; updated January, 19905


-4-BELLFLOWER UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICTMISSION STATEMENTThe mission of the Bellflower Unified School Districtis to open the doors for all students to acquire theknowledge and develop the skills and attitudes thatwill empower them to:• become lifelong active learners• demonstrate respect for themselves and others in adynamic, diverse, and global society• become responsible, informed, productive,independent, and contributing citizens• perform successfully in their chosen field and insocietyRevised by the Board of Education, July 8, 20066


Bellflower Middle-High School Mission StatementThe mission of Bellflower High and Middle School is to provide a quality educationincluding academic, fine arts, career, and technology courses that enable students tomake contributions to community and society as life-long learners who workcollaboratively, communicate effectively, think critically, behave responsibly, andare able to meet the demands of our changing society in order to achieve personalgoals.Bellflower Middle-High School Vision StatementThe vision of Bellflower Middle-High School is to create a place where all studentscan learn in a safe, clean, and supportive environment.• All students will participate in an academic foundation of courses whilehaving access to a variety of quality curricular and co-curricular programs asproficiency levels allow.• The learning community will reflect a high degree of ethics, integrity, andresponsibility, and will take full advantage of the diversity and talents of thestaff, student population, and the community.• Students who have challenges in their learning will receive support servicesthrough school and community resources.• All students will develop personal learning plans connected to goals beyondhigh school.• All students will be prepared, upon graduation, to pursue post-secondaryeducation and/or to enter the skilled workforce as responsible andproductive citizens.7


Bellflower High School Expected School-wide Learning ResultsIn order to better meet the demands of the future, students at Bellflower High/MiddleSchool will:1. DEMONSTRATE PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITYMeasurable Indicators:• Respect for individuals and the learning environment• Adherence to dress code policy• Regular attendance and participation in classes• Materials brought to class• Focus on daily agenda in each class• Use of an organizational system to track assignments and due dates• Timely completion of class assignments2. USE HIGHER ORDER THINKING SKILLSMeasurable Indicators:• Use of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation skills to solve complex problems• Comprehension and transfer of subject matter and skills across the curriculum toreal-life experience3. COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELYMeasurable Indicators:• Proficient reading and reading comprehension, writing, listening, and speakingskills• Ability to integrate cross-curricular concepts and technology as modes ofcommunication to show understanding and growth4. WORK COLLABORATIVELYMeasurable Indicators:• Harmonious relations with others of diverse backgrounds and various points ofview• Participation in partner and small group learning activities5. PRODUCE HIGH QUALITY WORKMeasurable Indicators:• Access to, appreciation of, and accountability for a common core of knowledge(content standards)• Assignments completed that meet teachers’ specifications and/or rubric criteria• Ability to become contributing, competitive, productive members of society8


Bellflower High School Expected School-wide Learning ResultsStudent assessment and evaluation of the Expected School-wide Learning Results (ESLRs) willbe based on the following:Classroom Assessments• Performance-based tasks• Portfolios• Student interviews• Exhibits and projects• Essays• Rubrics• Individual and group activities• Assessments• Final exams• Semester grades• P.E. fitness tests• Sports assessmentsSchool-wideandSelected Standardized Tests• STAR Testing Program• CST/CAT6/CAPA• STAR Writing Assessments• Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations• SAT and ACT• CAHSEE• CELDT/SABE (for ELL students)• California Fitness TestDistrict Assessments• District Science Benchmark Assessments(Grades 7-12)• District Mathematics BenchmarkAssessments (Grades 7-12)• District Writing Assessment (Grades 7-12)• District English-Language ArtsBenchmark Assessments (Grades 7-12)9


BELLFLOWER HIGH SCHOOLACADEMIC FOUNDATIONRequired 9 th Grade CoursesEnglish 9World Geography (1 semester)Health (1 semester)MathematicsSciencePhysical EducationElective* Students who are English learners will be placed in EnglishLanguage Development (Beg/Int/Adv) as their elective.Required 11 th Grade CoursesEnglish 11US HistoryMathematicsScience2 Electives* Students who are English learners will be placed inEnglish Language Development (Beg/Int/Adv) astheir elective.* Students who have not passed the math or Englishportion of the CAHSEE will be placed in mandatoryCAHSEE support classes as their elective.Juniors should enroll in six periods. If a student enrolls in ROPand has a job after school, his/her ROP class can substitute forone of the elective periods.Required 10 th Grade CoursesEnglish 10World HistoryMathematicsSciencePhysical EducationElective* Students who are English learners will be placed in EnglishLanguage Development (Beg/Int/Adv) as their elective.Required 12 th Grade CoursesEnglish 12GovernmentEconomics (1 sem) or AP Economics (1 year)Mathematics or ScienceElectives as needed* Students who are English learners will be placed inEnglish Language Development (Beg/Int/Adv) astheir elective.* Students who have not passed the math or Englishportion of the CAHSEE will be placed in mandatoryCAHSEE support classes as their elective.A free period is available if seniors have successfully earned atleast 175 credits and passed the CAHSEE. Seniors should planon successfully completing at least five periods the first semester.If a student enrolls in ROP and has a job after school, his/herROP class can substitute for one of the elective periods.COURSE WITHDRAWALSOnce school begins, students will have two weeks to submit a request for an elective or academic course change.After the deadline, no class changes will be made. For year-long courses, students will be expected to remain in thecourse for the duration of the year, regardless of grade earned.HOMEWORKHomework is considered an extension of the classroom learning process. Homework is a valuable component of theeducational process, providing constructive exercises to reinforce concepts learned. The goals of homework are toassist students in mastering the concepts learned in the classroom, to extend the curriculum when desirable, and todevelop good study habits and responsible attitudes. Students at each grade level are assigned homework on aregular basis. Homework has direct application to what is being studied in the classroom and is designed to becompleted outside the classroom setting. Teachers make sure that all students understand the expectations andpurpose for the assignment and that it is relevant to the class work. Parents are encouraged to provide theopportunity for their children to complete homework assignments by providing a quiet, well-lit space for them to dotheir homework and regularly monitoring their children to see that homework is completed. Parent involvementensures the success of all our students.- 10 -


\ACADEMIC FOUNDATION – 9 TH GRADEHistory-Social Science• Geography 9• World Geography HonorsEnglish-Language Arts• English 9• English 9 HonorsMathematics• Algebra Readiness• Algebra 1• Geometry• Geometry Honors• Algebra 2• Algebra 2 Honors• Math Analysis• Math Analysis HonorsScience• Earth Science• Biology• Biology HonorsPhysical Education• PE 9• AthleticsPreparedness Education • Health- 11 -


ACADEMIC FOUNDATION – 9 TH GRADEElectivesVisual/Performing Arts• Acting for the Camera – (f)• Advanced Strings• Angels - (f)• AP Music Theory – (f)• Beginning Strings – (f)• Ceramics A – (f)• Choir -(f)• Commercial Art• Concert Band - (f)• Drama - (f)• Drama Workshop- (f)• Drawing/Painting A - (f)• Drill Team/Banner & Flag• Ensemble- (f)• Film Studies- (f)• Graphic Arts 1 – (f)• Graphic Arts 2 – (f)• Guitar 1 – (f)• Jazz Band- (f)• Marching Band (f)• Men’s or Women’s Chorus- (f)• Musical Theatre• Percussion Ensemble• Photography I- (f)• Photography Fundamentals – (f)• Printmaking 1- (f)• Shakespearean Theatre -(b)• Theatre ProductionEnglish Electives• Journalism – (g)Foreign Language• Spanish I – (e)• Spanish II– (e)• Spanish for Spanish Speakers I– (e)• Spanish for Spanish Speakers II– (e)• French I– (e)Practical Arts• Construction Skills• Discovering Foods• Electronics 1• Introduction to Auto Technology• Technology Core/Manufacturing AcademyBusiness• Business Skills• Word ProcessingNon-Departmental• Yearbook• ASB Leadership• AVID - (g)• Pep Squad* The letter following elective courses indicates the applicable a-g category for UC/CSU systems.- 12 -


ACADEMIC FOUNDATION – 10 th GRADEHistory-Social Science• Modern World History• Academy Modern World History• Advanced Placement (AP) World HistoryEnglish-Language Arts• English 10• Academy English 10• English 10 HonorsMathematics• Algebra 1• Geometry• Geometry Honors• Algebra 2• Algebra 2 Honors• Math Analysis• Math Analysis Honors• Calculus• Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus A/B• Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus B/CScience• Survey of Biology• Biology• Biology Honors• Advanced Placement (AP) Biology• Chemistry• Chemistry HonorsPhysical Education • Athletics• PE 10- 13 -


ACADEMIC FOUNDATION – 10 th GRADEVisual/Performing Arts• Acting for the Camera – (f)• Advanced Strings/Orchestra• Angels– (f)• AP Music Theory– (f)• Beginning Strings/Orchestra (f)• Ceramics A or B– (f)• Choir– (f)• Commercial Art• Concert Band - (f)• Drama – (f)• Drama Workshop– (f)• Drawing/Painting A or B– (f)• Drill Team/Banner & Flag• Ensemble– (f)• Film Studies– (f)• Graphic Arts 1 – (f)• Graphic Arts 2 – (f)• Guitar 1 – (f)• Jazz Band– (f)• Marching Band – (f)• Men’s or Women’s Chorus– (f)• Multimedia CD Art• Musical TheatreElectives• Percussion Ensemble• Photography I– (f)• Photography Fundamentals– (f)• Printmaking 1– (f)• ROP Computer Animation• ROP UC Graphic Design –(f)• ROP UC Digital Photography – (f)• Shakespearean Theatre – (b)• Theatre ProductionEnglish Electives• Journalism –(g)Foreign Language• Spanish I- (e)• Spanish II – (e)• Spanish III– (e)• Spanish for Spanish Speakers I– (e)• Spanish for Spanish Speakers II– (e)• AP Spanish IV– (e)• French I– (e)• French II– (e)Practical Arts• Construction Skills• Discovering Foods• Electronics 1 or Electronics 2• Introduction to Auto Technology• ROP Auto• ROP Computer-Assisted Drafting (CAD)• ROP Construction Technology• ROP TV/Video Production (BUC TV)• Technology Core/Manufacturing AcademyBusiness• Business Skills• Word Processing or Word Processing 2• ROP Desktop Publishing• ROP Computer ApplicationsNon-Departmental• Academic Tutor• Yearbook• ASB Leadership• AVID - (g)• Driver Education• Library Aide• Pep SquadROP Courses* (not during regular school day)The letter following elective courses indicates the applicable a-g category for UC/CSU systems* Students must be at least 16 years old to enroll in ROP courses.- 14 -


ACADEMIC FOUNDATION – 11 TH GRADEHistory-Social Science• US History• Academy US History• Advanced Placement (AP) US HistoryEnglish-Language Arts • English 11• Academy English 11• Advanced Placement (AP) English 11Mathematics• Algebra 1• Geometry• Geometry Honors• Algebra 2• Algebra 2 Honors• Math Analysis• Math Analysis Honors• Calculus• Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus A/B• Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus B/C• Business MathematicsScience• Advanced Placement (AP) Biology• Advanced Placement (AP) EnvironmentalScience• Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry• Anatomy & Physiology• Anatomy & Physiology Honors• Biology Honors• Biology• Chemistry Honors• Chemistry• Criminalistics• Environmental Science• Forensic Science• Oceanography• Physics Honors• PhysicsPhysical EducationIf needed:• Aerobics• Athletics• Fitness and Conditioning• PE• Weight Training 10-12- 15 -


ACADEMIC FOUNDATION – 11 th GRADEElectivesVisual/Performing Arts• Acting for the Camera- (f)• Advanced Strings/Orchestra• Angels- (f)• AP Music Theory- (f)• Beginning Strings/Orchestra• Ceramics A or B- (f)• Choir- (f)• Commercial Art• Concert Band - (f)• Drama - (f)• Drama Workshop- (f)• Drawing/Painting A or B- (f)• Drill Team/Banner & Flag• Ensemble- (f)• Film Studies- (f)• Graphic Arts 1 or Graphic Arts 2 – (f)• Guitar 1 – (f)• Jazz Band- (f)• Marching Band• Men’s or Women’s Chorus- (f)• Multimedia CD Art• Musical Theatre• Percussion Ensemble• Photography I- (f)• Photography Fundamentals- (f)• Printmaking 1- (f)• ROP Computer Animation• ROP Digital Photography• ROP UC Graphic Design – (f)• Shakespearean Theatre - (b)• Theatre ProductionEnglish Electives• Journalism - (g)Foreign Language• Spanish I –(e)• Spanish II–(e)• Spanish III–(e)• Spanish for Spanish Speakers I–(e)• Spanish for Spanish Speakers II–(e)• AP Spanish IV–(e)• French I–(e)• French II–(e)• French III–(e)• AP French IV–(e)Practical Arts• Construction Skills or ROP Construction Technology• Discovering Foods• Electronics 1 or Electronics 2• Introduction to Auto Technology• ROP Auto (Year)• ROP Computer-Assisted Drafting (CAD)• ROP TV/Video Production (BUC TV)• Technology Core/Manufacturing AcademyBusiness• Business Skills• Word Processing or Word Processing 2• ROP Desktop Publishing• ROP Computer ApplicationsNon-Departmental• Academic Tutor• Yearbook• ASB Leadership• AVID - (g)• Driver Education• Library Aide• Office Aide• Pep Squad• Psychology - (g)• ROP Courses* (not during the regular school day)The letter following elective courses indicates the applicable a-g category for UC/CSU systems*Students who are 16 years or older, may enroll in R.O.P. courses. The R.O.P. class can substitute for one of the elective periods.- 16 -


ACADEMIC FOUNDATION – 12 TH GRADEHistory-Social Science• American Government/Political Systems• Academy American Government/Political Systems• AP American Government/Political SystemsAND• Economics• Advanced Placement (AP) EconomicsEnglish-Language Arts• English 12• Academy English 12• Advanced Placement (AP) English 12Mathematics• Algebra 1• Geometry• Geometry Honors• Algebra 2• Algebra 2 Honors• Math Analysis• Math Analysis Honors• Calculus• Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus A/B• Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus B/C• Business MathematicsScience• Oceanography• Environmental Science• Advanced Placement (AP) Environmental Science• Forensic Science• Criminalistics• Biology• Advanced Placement (AP) Biology• Biology Honors• Chemistry• Chemistry Honors• Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry• Anatomy & Physiology• Physics• Physics HonorsPhysical EducationIf needed:• Aerobics• Athletics• Fitness and Conditioning• PE• Weight Training 10-12- 17 -


ACADEMIC FOUNDATION – 12 TH GRADEVisual/Performing Arts• Acting for the Camera – (f)• Advanced Strings/Orchestra• Angels– (f)• AP Music Theory– (f)• Beginning Strings/Orchestra• Ceramics A or B– (f)• Choir– (f)• Commercial Art• Concert Band - (f)• Drama– (f)• Drama Workshop– (f)• Drawing/Painting A or B– (f)• Drill Team/Banner & Flag• Ensemble– (f)• Film Studies– (f)• Graphic Arts 1 or Graphic Arts 2 – (f)• Guitar 1 – (f)• Jazz Band• Marching Band• Men’s or Women’s Chorus– (f)• Multimedia CD Art• Musical Theatre• Percussion Ensemble• Photography I– (f)• Photography Fundamentals– (f)Electives• Printmaking 1– (f)• ROP Computer Animation• ROP UC Digital Photography• ROP UC Graphic Design –(f)• Shakespearean Theatre - (b)• Theatre ProductionEnglish Electives• Journalism - (g)• Creative Writing - (g)Foreign Language• Spanish I –(e)• Spanish II–(e)• Spanish III–(e)• Spanish for Spanish Speakers I–(e)• Spanish for Spanish Speakers II–(e)• AP Spanish IV–(e)• French I–(e)• French II–(e)• French III–(e)• AP French IV–(e)Practical Arts• Construction Skills or ROP Construction Technology• Discovering Foods• Electronics 1 or Electronics 2• Introduction to Auto Technology• ROP Auto• ROP Computer-Assisted Drafting (CAD)• ROP TV/Video Production (BUC TV)• Technology Core/Manufacturing AcademyBusiness• Business Skills• Word Processing or Word Processing 2• ROP Desktop Publishing• ROP Computer ApplicationsNon-Departmental• Academic Tutor• Annual (Yearbook)• ASB Leadership• AVID - (g)• Driver Education• Library Aide• Office Aide• Pep Squad• Psychology – (g)ROP Courses** (not during regular school day)The letter following elective courses indicates the applicable a-g category for UC/CSU systems*Students who are 16 years or older, may enroll in R.O.P. courses. The R.O.P. class can substitute for one of the elective periods.- 18 -


FOUR-YEAR PLANNING SHEETEnglish 99 th Grade1 stSemesterGrade2 ndSemesterGradeSummerGradeMeets a – gRequirementsGeography/HealthPEScienceMathElective:English 1010 th Grade1 stSemesterGrade2 ndSemesterGradeSummerGradeMeets a – gRequirementsWorld HistoryPEScienceMathElective:English 1111 th Grade1 stSemesterGrade2 ndSemesterGradeSummerGradeMeets a – gRequirementsUS HistoryScienceMathElective:Elective:English 1212 th Grade1 stSemesterGrade2 ndSemesterGradeSummerGradeMeets a – gRequirementsGovernmentEconomics (1 semester)Math or Science:Elective:- 19 -


a - g COURSE CHECKLISTFreshmen applicants must complete a specific set of 15 college prep courses (known as a-g) to be eligiblefor admission to the California State University and the University of California. A unit is equal to oneacademic year or two semesters. Each course needs to be completed with a grade of C or better. Thecourses are as follows:THE a – g SUBJECTREQUIREMENTSa. Social Science – Two YearsOne year of US History or US History andAmerican Government, and one year of socialscience.b. English – Four YearsComposition and literature designated as collegepreparatory.Years Required1 year 2 years 3 years 4 yearsc. Mathematics – Three YearsAlgebra 1, Geometry, Algebra II, and advancedmath. Courses taken in 7 th and 8 th grades may beconsidered.d. Laboratory Science – Two YearsAt least one biological science and one physicalscience.e. Language other than English –Two Years in the same languageCollege prep language courses taken in 7 th and8 th grade may be included.f. Visual and Performing Arts – One YearArt, dance, theater/drama, music.*see UC a-g course listg. College-preparatory Electives – One YearAny additional courses (not previously listed)that are included in the UC a – g list.Although the shaded boxes denote courses that are not required, additional years arerecommended.*Bellflower High School’s approved a-g course lists can be viewed athttps://doorways.ucop.edu/list .- 20 -


The a – g Subject RequirementsUC/CSU COURSE REQUIREMENTSCourses must be completed with a grade of C or better.Bellflower High SchoolGRADUATION REQUIREMENTSStudent must earn a passing grade in both fall and spring semestersa. HISTORY/SOCIAL SCIENCE2 YEARS REQUIRED• One year of World History, Cultures or Geography• One year of US History or one-half year of US History andone-half year of American Government/Civics.b. ENGLISH 4 YEARS REQUIREDSUBJECT AREAHISTORY/SOCIAL SCIENCE• Geography (1 semester)• Modern World History• U.S. History• Government • Economics (1 semester)4 YEARSCREDITS40• Four years of college preparatory English• Students may only use 1 year of ESL/ELDc. MATHEMATICS 3 YEARS REQUIRED4 YEARS RECOMMENDED• Algebra 1• Geometry• Algebra 2• Math Analysis/Honors Math Analysis• Statistics/AP Statistics• AP Calculus (AB) or (BC)**Courses taken in 7 th and 8 th grade may be considered(Algebra 1 or higher )d. LABORATORY SCIENCE• Biology• Chemistry• Physics2 YEARS REQUIRED3 YEARS RECOMMENDEDe. LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH2 YEARS REQUIRED3 YEARS RECOMMENDED• Two years of the same foreign languagef. VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS (VPA)1 YEAR REQUIRED• A yearlong approved arts course from a single VPA discipline:• See Bellflower’s a - g approved course list.g. ELECTIVES 1 YEAR REQUIRED• One year (two semesters), in addition to those required in a-fabove.• See Bellflower’s a - g approved course list.BELLFLOWER HIGH SCHOOL’S APPROVED a – g COURSELISTS CAN BE VIEWED AT: https://doorways.ucop.edu/list• CSU website: http://calstate.edu/• UC Website: http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/• Course requirements may differ for privatecolleges/universities: http://www.californiacolleges.edu/STUDENTS WILL ALSO NEED TO TAKE APPROPRIATECOLLEGE TESTS:• SAT information: http://www.collegeboard.com/• ACT information: http://actstudent.org/ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS4 YEARS• English 9, English 9 Honors or Academy English 9• English 10, English 10 Honors or Academy English 10• English 11 or AP English 11• English 12, ERW English 12, or AP English 12MATHEMATICS*2 YEARS*At least one mathematics course must meet or exceed the rigorof the content standards for Algebra I.• Algebra Readiness • Business Math• Algebra 1 • Geometry• Algebra 2 • Honors Algebra 2 • Statistics• Math Analysis • Honors Math Analysis• AP Statistics • AP Calculus (AB) or (BC)SCIENCE: BIOLOGICAL• Survey of Biology• Biology (lab) or Honors Biology (lab)SCIENCE: PHYSICAL• Earth Science• Chemistry (lab)1 YEAR1 YEARADDITIONAL YEAR OF MATH OR SCIENCE• Forensics• See Math Section Above• Environmental Science• Anatomy & Physiology (lab)• Physics (lab)• Chemistry (lab).• Biology (lab)/AP Bio.FINE ARTS OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE 1 YEAR 10PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 YEARS 20PRACTICAL ARTS**1 SEMESTER• Business or Industrial Technology Courses• **May be waived if the student passes an additional yearof the same foreign language.HEALTH (STATE REQUIREMENT) 1 SEMESTER 5ADDITIONAL ELECTIVE CREDITS 50TOTAL CREDITSStudents must also pass the California High School Exit Exam(CAHSEE) in English-Language Arts and Mathematics to be eligiblefor the Bellflower High School diploma40201010105220- 21 -


TESTING PROGRAMSTesting is an essential element of accountability in education. Bellflower students are taught how to take tests they will encounterthroughout their education, careers, and professions. Whether it is the California High School Exit Exam, a driving test, a collegeentrance exam, a test to reach the next level in a career, or a licensing examination, Bellflower students are taught test-takingstrategies as well as the content within the exam. The following is a list of required and voluntary tests students take during highschool:REQUIRED TESTING PROGRAMSCalifornia STAR TestingAll students in grades seven through eleven are required to participate in the annual California STAR Testing program. This statemandatedstandardized testing program is used to compare achievement levels of students and their schools throughout the state.It consists of tests of general achievement levels that measure mastery of state standards. Results from these tests are used tocompare and evaluate schools and, because every student in the state takes them, to compare and evaluate individual studentprogress.California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE)Current state legislation requires that all students pass this examination in order to receive a diploma. The test measuresreading/language arts and mathematics achievement based on state standards. All tenth grade students are required to take theexamination. Students have opportunities each year to take the test. If students do not pass either the English or math portion ofthe test, they take only those parts of the examination they did not pass.FITNESSGRAM®The California State Board of Education has designated FITNESSGRAM® as the Physical Fitness Test (PFT) for students inCalifornia public schools. The FITNESSGRAM® is a comprehensive, health-related fitness battery and its primary goal is to assiststudents in establishing lifetime habits of regular physical activity. The FITNESSGRAM® uses criterion-referenced standards toevaluate performance for each fitness area (e.g. body composition, abdominal strength, and endurance). All ninth grade studentswill be required to take the FITNESSGRAM®; students who do not pass the FITNESSGRAM® will be required to take P.E. for eachconsecutive year thereafter until successful completion of the test.VOLUNTARY TESTING PROGRAMSAdvanced Placement Exams (http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/about.html)The Advanced Placement program is an opportunity for students to pursue college-level studies while still in secondary schooland to receive college credit for the class if they pass the AP exam. Taking an AP examination in one or more of the availablesubject areas enables students to compare their knowledge and understanding of a college-level subject with the high academicstandards established by college faculty. Students who take AP courses are able to learn a subject in depth, develop analyticalreasoning skills, and form disciplined study habits that contribute to continued success at the college level. Successful performancein a college-level AP course is, therefore, a great advantage to a student who wishes to attend highly selective colleges anduniversities. There is a fee for each AP test taken; however, fee waivers are available.PSAT (http://www.collegeboard.com)The PSAT is most useful to junior students, although it is available for freshmen and sophomores as well. It is designed to preparestudents to take the SAT, a nationally recognized college entrance exam. It is structured like the SAT, testing verbal, mathematics,and writing skills. In addition to providing preparation for taking the SAT, the PSAT scores are used by the National MeritScholarship Test Service to determine scholarship winners (student eligibility for scholarships is determined based on PSAT scoresearned in the junior year only).ACT (www.actstudent.org)The ACT, like the SAT, is used for college entrance purposes. It assesses students’ skills in English usage, reading comprehension,and math. Most colleges will require either the ACT test or the SAT for admission. There is a fee to take this examination, but itmay be waived if necessary. Guidance counselors can assist students in determining whether to take the SAT or the ACT, when totake it, and how to apply for a fee waiver if needed. Students generally take this test during the spring semester of their junior yearand, if necessary, repeat it to raise their scores during their senior year.SAT REASONING TEST (www.collegeboard.com)The Scholastic Aptitude Test is part of the College Board’s testing program. It is designed to assess aptitude for college-level workand provides verbal, math and writing scores. Most universities will require either the SAT the ACT for admission. There is a feeto take this examination, but it may be waived if necessary. Guidance counselors can assist students in determining whether totake the SAT or the ACT, when to take it, and how to apply for a fee waiver if needed. Students generally take this test during thespring semester of their junior year and, if necessary, repeat it to raise their scores during their senior year.SAT SUBJECT TESTS (www.collegeboard.com)SAT Subject Tests are used to determine student levels of competency in specific subject areas, including foreign language,mathematics, English, history and science. All UC campuses require that students take two SAT subject tests in two different areas,chosen from the following: history, literature, mathematics (level 2 only), science or language other than English. Many otheruniversities require or recommend that students take one or more of these tests for admission as well as placement purposes. Thereis a fee to take this examination, but it may be waived if necessary. Guidance counselors can assist students in determining whichtests to take. The University of California system requires that all applicants take the writing and math tests, plus an additional testin another academic area.22


BELLFLOWER UC/CSU a-g APPROVED COURSE LISTThe following courses meet the requirements for admission to the University of Californiaschool system. Underlined courses denote extra honors credit. A=5, B=4, and C=3. Star (*)denotes courses that cannot be used to fulfill the g elective requirement.a. HISTORY /SOCIAL SCIENCE• United States Government/Political Systems• Academy United States Government/Political Systems• Government/Political Systems (AP)• Modern World History• Academy Modern World History• Modern World History (AP)• United States History• Academy United States History• United States History (AP)• Geography• World Geography Honorsb. ENGLISH –LANGUAGE ARTS• English 9, English 9 (H)• English 10, Academy English 10, English 10 (H)• English 11, Academy English 11, English 11 (AP)• English 12, Academy English 12, English 12 (AP)• Shakespearean Theatre• Advanced ELDc. MATHEMATICS• *Algebra 1, *Algebra 1 (H)• *Algebra 2, *Algebra 2 (H)• Calculus, Calculus A/B (AP), Calculus B/C (AP)• *Geometry, *Geometry (H)• Math Analysis, Math Analysis (H)d. LABORATORYSCIENCE• Anatomy and Physiology, Anatomy and Physiology (H)• Biology, Biology (H), Biology (AP)• Chemistry, Chemistry (H)• Environmental Science (AP)• Physics, Physics (H)23


BELLFLOWER UC/CSU “a-g” APPROVED COURSE LISTe. FOREIGNLANGUAGE• *French I• French II• French III• French IV (AP)• *Spanish for Spanish Speakers I• Spanish for Spanish Speakers II• *Spanish I• Spanish II• Spanish III• Spanish IV (AP)f. VISUALANDPERFORMINGARTSg. ELECTIVES• *Animation (ROP)• Angels• Beginning Strings• *Ceramics A• *Choir• *Concert Band• *Digital Photography (ROP)• *Drama• *Drama Workshop• *Drawing and Painting A• *Ensemble• *Film Studies• *Graphic Arts 1 & 2• *Graphic Design (ROP)• *Guitar 1• *Jazz Band• *Marching Band• *Men’s Chorus• *Photo Fundamentals• *Photography 1• *Printmaking 1• Shakespearean Theatre• *Women’s Chorus• ROP UC Film and Video Productions 1 and 2• AVID• Ceramics B• Criminalistics• Earth Science• Economics• Economics (AP)• Forensic Science• Journalism• Oceanography• Psychology24


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (UC) ELIGIBILITY INDEXTo determine whether a student has met the Scholarship Requirement, calculate his or her test score totalaccording to the instructions below, then find where the student’s GPA falls in the ranges listed in theEligibility Index. If the student’s test score total meets or exceeds the minimum score shown for his or herGPA, the student is eligible for admission. Eligibility is considered preliminary until a student’s testscores and coursework are verified by the University. Note: The University no longer double-weights theSAT Subject Tests as it has in the past.CALCULATE THE TEST SCORES AS FOLLOWS:Example 1: The SAT Reasoning TestFor Students who took the SAT Reasoning Test, the University uses the highest combined scores incritical reading, math and writing from a single sitting and adds them to the two highest SAT Subject Testscores from two different subject areas. The total of all five exam components (critical reading + math +writing + subject test 1 + subject test 2) equals the test score total.Example: Amelia’s highest scores on the SAT Reasoning Test are 540 in critical reading, 500 in math and 590 inwriting. Her highest scores on the SAT Subject Tests (in two different areas) are 510 in math (level 2) and 490 inchemistry.Her test score total is: 540 + 500 + 590 + 510 + 490 + = 2630Amelia’s GPA is 2.90, which requires a minimum test score total of 2548. With a test score total of 2630, Ameliahas met the Scholarship Requirement.Example 2: The ACT plus its writing examFor students who took the ACT plus its writing exam, the University takes the highest math, reading,science and combined English/writing score from a single sitting and converts them to equivalent SATscores (see translation table). To give the ACT writing component equal weight to the SAT writing exam,the University multiplies the sum of the converted math, reading and science scores by two-thirds, thenadds the converted English/writing score. This subtotal is then added to the two highest SAT SubjectTest scores from two different subject areas to reach the test score total ([math + reading + science] x 0.667+ English/writing + subject test 1 + subject test 2.Example: Alejandro’s highest ACT scores are 21 in math, 21 in reading, 20 in science and 22 in English/writing.His translated scores are 500 (math), 500 (reading), 480 (science) and 520 (English/writing). In addition, he earneda 580 on the SAT Subject Test in math (level 2) and 490 on the SAT Subject Test in biology.His translated scores are: (500 + 500 + 480) x 0.667 + 520 + 580 + 490 = 2577.16With his GPA of 2.95, Alejandro needs a minimum test score total of 2440. His test score total of 2577 meets theScholarship Requirement.An interactive Eligibility Calculator is available online atwww.universityofcalifornia.edu/admissions/scholarshipsreq.25


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (UC) ELIGIBILITY INDEXAre you eligible for UC?To be eligible at attend the University of California, you must:• Complete a specific set of 15 college prep courses (known asthe a-g courses) with at least a 3.0 GPA• Take either the new SAT Reasoning Test OR the ACT withits writing exam, AND 2 SAT Subject Tests in two differentsubject areas (e.g. science and literature)UC Eligibility Index for 2007a-g GPA3.00-3.043.05-3.093.10-3.143.15-3.193.20-3.243.25-3.293.30-3.343.35-3.393.40-3.443.45 & aboveMinimum GPA = 3.0California ResidentsUC Total Score223210198187175165157152147143Non-California Residentsa-g GPA3.40-3.443.45 & aboveUC Total Score147143From UC Counselors Guide26


GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICESIt is the goal of each counselor in the Bellflower Unified School District to provide students with a positive andproductive high school experience and preparation for a fulfilling lifelong career. We encourage our students andparents to make an appointment and get to know us.BELLFLOWER HIGH SCHOOL COUNSELORSMr. Paul Aleman A-GeMrs. Dana Kidd Gf-OroMrs. Anna Fujimoto Ort-ZWHO IS YOUR COUNSELOR?• A credentialed, specially trained, caring professional who is a good listener• A student advocate available to help students with educational, personal, social, and career life-planning needs• A coordinator for educational programs• A consultant for community resource people: physicians, nurses, speech therapists, psychologists, and otherprofessionals• A personal contact for representatives from colleges and universities, military and armed services personnel and tradeand technical school staff• A professional who aids parents, educators and community in understanding young peopleWHAT DOES YOUR COUNSELOR DO?• Recognizes and makes the best use of student potential• Recognizes, understands and works through students’ personal and educational problems• Skilled in understanding student interests, values and aptitudes in planning for life goals and careers• Develops student life skills and their understanding of the decision-making process• Builds self-confidence and self-esteem• Creates respect for cultural diversity• Enables students to accept responsibility for their actions for success at school• Enables students to manage anger and resolve conflict peacefully• Enables students to learn to communicate effectively• Enables students to set goalsYOUR COUNSELOR COUNSELS STUDENTS ABOUT . . .• School, college, job, career and personal plans• Getting along with and relating to others• Attendance, discipline and emotional, social and personal problems, and the challenges of adolescenceYOUR COUNSELOR ALSO . . .• Listens to students, parents, teachers, administrators, and community members• Maintains student confidences• Acts as a bridge between home, school and the community• Aids teachers and parents in helping young people obtain a sound education• Promotes understanding through observation and participation in the classroom• Coordinates educational programs and efforts with other school specialist and outside agencies• Monitors student progress including attendance, grades, and behaviorHOW AND WHEN DOES A STUDENT SEE THE COUNSELOR?* Individually and in groups * Parent request * Referral by a friend* Student request * Teacher, administrator, or staff referral * Before, during, and after school* Counselor requestWHERE CAN THE STUDENTS SEE THE SCHOOL COUNSELOR?* In the High School Office * At snack and lunch supervisions * In the community* In the classroom * At student activities * At athletic supervision27


COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE SERVICESDuring the two years of middle school and the four years of high school, student and parentsare encouraged to seek counselor assistance on an individual basis:• To request counseling follow-up for personal, social, and class/school problems and concerns• To request parent conferences• To attend and participate in counseling and guidance programs• To use the counseling and guidance servicesCOMPREHENSIVE SERVICESThe Bellflower Unified School District counselors are committed to providing comprehensive guidance services. Each studentand parent can expect these services to be provided through classroom, group, and one-on-one counseling.MAJOR COUNSELING SERVICE AREASGUIDANCE CURRICULUM - addressing academic, career, and personal/social needs of students.RESPONSIVE SERVICES - Assistance and referral information for special needs.GOAL DEVELOPMENT - Individual and group goals for college, career, self-actualization, and decision-making skills. As aresult of the grade level guidance services, the student will:Ninth GradeTenth GradeEleventh GradeTwelfth Grade• Identify interests and abilities and relate these to future plans• Develop a tentative four-year educational plan, including diploma requirements• Investigate post high-school plan, including college admission requirements and financial aid• Assist students in acquiring study skills• Explore decision-making process• Continue to learn about colleges/financial aid and develop post high school plans• Be encouraged to take college recommended testing• Continue to update four year plan and review progress toward diploma requirements• Evaluate college information, financial aid, and/or occupational programs• Have opportunity to take community college courses• Formulate a tentative post high school plan• Be encouraged to take college recommended testing• Review diploma status, college requirements, vocational job skills, and research post high schoolalternatives• Apply decision-making skills to educational and career plans• Investigate specific information on colleges, scholarships, financial aid, and employmentopportunities• Be encouraged to take college recommended testing• Be encourage to participate in R.O.P services• Have the opportunity to take community college coursesSERVICES STUDENTS AND PARENTS CAN EXPECTStudents and parents can also expect the following services:• Orientation for students• Parent, teacher, and/or student conferences• Registration, scheduling, program adjustments• Parents and students may request weekly progress reports• Parents and students will be invited to college and financial aid information nights• Parents and students will be informed of students’ progress toward diploma requirements, credit deficiencies, andsubject-area credit statusWHAT STUDENTS WILL RECEIVE• Financial aid information• Chance to meet college representatives• College admission testing information• Assistance with applications for colleges andscholarships• Additional options outlined to students: ROP,trade, technical, and direct work placement28


COURSE DESCRIPTIONSARTS: VISUAL and PERFORMINGThe goal of the Visual and Performing Arts Department is to develop and enhance an appreciation for art, design,music and drama. Students have an opportunity to create and to have their work displayed and/or performed. Thesecourses meet the Fine Arts/Foreign Language graduation requirement when taken in grades 9-12.VISUAL ARTSDRAWING AND PAINTING A1120 YearThis course introduces students to the elements of art and the principles of design with a focus on drawing andpainting. Students learn basic shading techniques to create depth and learn to develop eye-to-hand coordination.Students draw natural and artificial forms from observation, emphasizing composition and proportion, using line,texture, value and various methods of shading. This course takes the student from the basics of drawing and paintingthrough finished work, utilizing a variety of media including pencil, ink, charcoal, oil pastel, colored pencil andtempera paint. This class is geared toward the serious career artist and is the prerequisite for Art B. This course meetsthe UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.Materials fee for projects taken home.DRAWING AND PAINTING B1123 YearThis intermediate course focuses on drawing principles emphasizing composition, value and technical application ofdiverse drawing materials and techniques, with particular emphasis on charcoal, pencil, colored pencil, ink andcolored media, including further comprehensive study in painting, emphasizing acrylic and watercolor painting.Images will be naturalistic and abstract, with discussions of historical and contemporary techniques. Studentscompile a portfolio. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual and PerformingArts.Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting AMaterials fee for projects taken home.CERAMICS A1110 YearCeramics A is a beginning course introducing basic hand-building techniques, decoration methods, molds, andcasting. Sculpting techniques are introduced through the creation of a realistic human head. The course coversgeneral art concepts, vocabulary, historical implications and aesthetics. It reinforces skills and knowledge throughapplication, exploration, and practice in a sequenced program of projects and class work. Commercial molds are usedas a basis for modification and decoration of castings. Two-piece molds are designed and created. Wheel-throwingand expressive sculpting are culminating activities. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the followingcategory: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.Materials fee for projects taken home.CERAMICS B1113 YearCeramics B is the level at which students interested in continuing Ceramics begin to specialize. After a basic technicalreview, they select areas they wish to explore further. Students write project proposals, experiment with materials,and act as resource specialists for students in Ceramics A. Ceramics B students experiment with glazes and othermaterials and may learn procedures necessary for firing a kiln.Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of Ceramics A or teacher permission.Materials fee for projects taken home.PHOTOGRAPHY FUNDAMENTALS1410 SemesterThis is a semester course offering students an overview of photography and photographic techniques. Whilethoroughly studying the camera and its processes, students photograph assigned subjects and process their own film,make contact good quality prints and evaluate their own performance to discover their aptitude and interest beforegoing to more advanced photography. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) -Visual and Performing Arts.Materials fee for projects taken home.29


PHOTOGRAPHY 11413 YearThrough the completion of specific projects, the student safely performs and explains the operational manipulation ofthe contact printer, enlarger and cameras and film black and white photographic materials. This course meets theUC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.Materials fee for projects taken home.ROP UC DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY2756 YearThis course trains students for entry-level employment in the photography field. Students learn types and operationsof cameras and accessories common to the photography industry. This course will include black and white filmprocessing, proper printing techniques, studio lighting, lighting equipment, exposure meters, print finishing, andportfolio presentations. See also ROP section. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f)- Visual and Performing Arts.Materials fee for projects taken home.PRINTMAKING 11012 YearThis course is designed to provide students with a foundation to Printmaking as a fine art. Students will createoriginal print projects using linoleum block, intaglio/etching, screen printing, nature prints, monoprints, lithography,papermaking & handmade bookbinding. Students will explore the personal styles and cultural heritage of famousPrintmaking Artists, art movements, and participate in art critiques. Computers & internet is used throughout theyear for art image ideas and museum research. Second semester will emphasize students’ advanced skills, multicolorprinting and multi-plate techniques, professional art display and presentation, digital computer techniques, andthe historical aspects of printmaking. Students are required to keep a current portfolio of their print samples andclass progress. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.Materials fee for projects taken home.GRAPHIC ARTS 15950 SemesterThis class is designed to provide students with a foundation in graphic design fundamentals. The course will coverthe principles and elements of art, design, pencil technology, drawing techniques, thumbnail sketches, layout, storyboardsand cartooning) color theory, topography, advertising and marketing, product design, editorial cartooning,and forensic arts. Students will be trained in the development of design concepts and art production techniquesusing Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator & InDesign software, in addition to completing computer/digital art projects.Students will discover the impact of effective visual communication used in advertising and print production.Participation in individual and group projects is required. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in thefollowing category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.GRAPHIC ARTS 25953 SemesterStudents in Graphic Arts 2 will continue to advance their personal technical skills, terminology and creative problemsolving for graphic design. Advanced tutorial studies of Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign will be providedand students will have the opportunity to display their skills at our schools Art Show and by designing/producingwork for school events, clubs and approved non-profit community service organizations. Other topics will include:the study of the printing industry; fundamentals of prepress production; offset printing; bindery; screen printing; andairbrushing. Students will research industry career opportunities, college, resumes, and job search techniques.Students are required to keep a current portfolio of design samples and class progress. See also IndustrialTechnology. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.Materials fee for projects taken home.PERFORMING ARTSDRAMA1940 YearThis course is the beginning level for high school students with no previous theatre experience. It is an in-depthstudy of theatre arts in which students will learn about the different areas of theatre, with emphasis on actingtechnique. Students will develop performance skills in speaking, oral interpretation, memorization, characterization,pantomime, and audience awareness through performance of individual and small group exercises leading toperformance of multiple character scenes. The development of theatre through history and technical theatre will alsobe examined. This course is also for those students who need time to further develop skills acquired in previoustheatre courses. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.Materials fee for projects taken home.30


DRAMA WORKSHOP1950 YearStudents will maintain and extend the skills, knowledge, and appreciation developed in previous theatre courses.Students will work on Classical Theatre as well as Contemporary Theatre. They will attend conferences, festivals andcompetitions. This may involve work during some nights, weekends and holidays. Participation at selected playfestivals may be required. This course may be repeated for credit. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in thefollowing category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.ACTING FOR THE CAMERA1905 YearThis course is designed for the acting student to adapt stage-acting techniques for the video/film camera. Emphasiswill be placed on gaining an understanding of camera shots, angles, the shooting process, auditioning, and actorbehavior in front of the camera. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual andPerforming Arts.Course Prerequisite: Drama 1 or Theatre 7/8.FILM STUDIES5952 YearThis course is a study of film as both an art and a means of communication. The course will focus on film history,criticism, and film analysis. Students will learn to read a film, analyzing its narrative structure, genre conventions,subtext, technical and artistic elements, and purpose. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the followingcategory: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.Open to grades 10-12.THEATRE PRODUCTIONS1932 QuarterAfter auditioning and being cast, students will develop characters through memorization and rehearsal, finallyperforming roles in a major production. Students will also complete technical theatre assignments given related tothe individual production. This class is for actors, technicians, and musicians. Grades and credits will be based onparticipation. This course is offered during 7 th period.Course Prerequisite: Audition onlyMUSICAL THEATRE PRODUCTION1933 QuarterAfter auditioning and being cast, students will rehearse and perform a major musical theatre production. This class isfor actors, technicians, and musicians. Grades and credits will be based on participation. This course is offered during7 th period.Course Prerequisite: Audition onlySHAKESPEAREAN THEATRE HONORS1935 QuarterThis class will cast, rehearse, build and produce a Shakespeare play for school and community performance.Students will research and study the language and theatrical conventions of Shakespeare. This course is offered during7 th period.(One year of same course required) It has been approved as an honors level course and is awarded an extra point in the student’sGPA calculations for UC application purposes.Course Prerequisite: Audition onlyWOMEN’S CHORUS1531 YearThis is a beginning chorus for women. Vocal music instruction will introduce basic music theory while students gainconfidence and skill in singing with a group. Students will learn to sing in harmony. Basic skills of singing arestressed, as well as personal enjoyment of music. Music reading is included in the curriculum. Public performancesare a part of this course. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual andPerforming Arts.MEN’S CHORUS1532 YearThis is a beginning chorus for men. Vocal music instruction will introduce basic music theory while students gainconfidence and skill in singing with a group. Students will learn to sing in harmony. Basic skills of singing arestressed, as well as personal enjoyment of music. Music reading is included in the curriculum. Public performancesare a part of this course. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual andPerforming Arts.CHOIR1535 YearThis class is for outstanding vocal music students. Students will sing four-part music and solos. They will developchoral/vocal techniques as well as music reading skills. They will sing music from a variety of cultures and timeperiods. Students will have the opportunity to perform in a variety of venues and to hear other groups perform.Choir members will also work individually to prepare solos and small group projects. This course may be repeatedfor credit with teacher permission. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visualand Performing Arts.31


Course Prerequisite: Previous choral experience and auditionANGELS1530 YearThis class is for advanced female vocal music students. It will provide opportunities for learning advanced readingtechniques, advanced music theory concepts, and music from a variety of time periods, cultures, and choral styles.Students will also work individually to prepare solos and small group projects. The group will perform throughoutthe community and in a wide variety of venues including concerts, festivals and competitions. The course stressespersonal enjoyment of music as well as performance skills. Students will be financially responsible for theirperformance outfits. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual and PerformingArts.ENSEMBLE1545 YearThis is a year-long course designed for advanced choral students. Students will learn advanced music theoryconcepts and sing music from a variety of time periods and cultures. Singers will also work individually to preparesolos and small group projects. The Ensemble will perform throughout the community and in a wide variety ofvenues including concerts, festivals and competitions. In addition, the group takes a tour each year. This coursestresses personal understanding and enjoyment of music as well as performance skills. This course meets the UC/CSUa-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.Course Prerequisite: One year choral experience and auditionGUITAR 11520 YearIntroduction to acoustic and classical guitar techniques employed in contemporary guitar finger style and chordalstructured music playing, including basic music theory and note reading. This course meets the UC/CSU a-grequirements in the following category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.Must own or rent your own guitar.BANNER AND FLAG1522 YearDRILL TEAM8257 YearBanner and Flag/Drill Team develops dance, flag, and rifle skills needed to compliment the marching band, and theWinterguard performs at indoor competitions 2nd semester. Students will gain knowledge of the fundamentals ofdance, flag, rifle and saber while studying historical/social implications and performance practices of their genre.Students will enhance their cardiovascular fitness and endurance, including the use of marching and dynamic,rhythmic dance. Students will perform at a level that reflects understanding of the mechanical aspects of theirmovement as well as artistic interpretation. Many public performances are required, and are not an optional part ofthis course. Drill Team is a 7 th period course.Course Prerequisite: Students must attend workshops, then audition.Course Co-requisite: Banner/Flag students must also be enrolled in Drill Team.BEGINNING STRINGS/ORCHESTRA1513 YearA course in string instruments designed for the new music student who wishes to learn to play an instrument or tolearn a second instrument. Students will learn music fundamentals and the mechanics of the chosen instrument.Students will gain necessary skills to audition for other instrumental ensembles.No audition necessary.ADVANCED STRINGS/ORCHESTRA1514 YearIntermediate and advanced musicians will perform in various settings including orchestra competitions, communityevents, and school functions. Students will enhance knowledge of music foundations including music theory, andhistorical/social implications and performance practices of various genres. Students will perform at a level thatreflects understanding of the mechanical aspects of their instruments. Many public performances are required, andare not an optional part of this course.Course Prerequisite: Teacher recommendationJAZZ BAND1515 YearThis advanced ensemble explores improvisation and various styles of Jazz and Latin music. Students will perform invarious settings including jazz festivals, concerts, community events, and school functions. Students will enhanceknowledge of music fundamentals and study historical/social implications and performances practices variousgenres. Students will learn to demonstrate basic improvisation. Students will perform at a level that reflectsunderstanding of the mechanical aspects of their instruments as well as artistic interpretation. Many publicperformances are required, and are not an optional part of this course. One to two years of concert band isrecommended as a prerequisite. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual andPerforming Arts.Course Prerequisite: Students must audition or receive teacher recommendation32


MARCHING BAND1521 Semester(Students must enroll in 1508)Intermediate and advanced musicians will perform in various settings including competitions, community events,and school functions. Students will perform at a level that reflects understanding of the mechanical aspects of theirinstruments, and the understanding needed to perform while in motion. Marching Band develops the ideas andconcepts learned in Concert Band, and integrates them with body movement and drill formations. Many publicperformances are required, and are not an optional part of this course.This course is offered first semester during 7th period and earns elective credit.Course Prerequisite: Teacher recommendationCONCERT BAND1508 Year(Students must enroll in 1521)Intermediate and Advanced musicians will perform in various settings including concert festivals, communityevents, and school functions. Students will enhance knowledge of music fundamentals including music theory, andhistorical/social implications and performances practices of various genres. Students will perform at a level thatreflects understanding of the mechanical aspects of their instruments. Many public performances are required, andare not an optional part of this course.Course Prerequisite: Teacher recommendationPERCUSSION ENSEMBLE1549 SemesterPercussion Ensemble develops musicianship skills, developing repertoire for indoor productions 2 nd semester,combining theatrical skills with percussion. Students will enhance knowledge of music fundamentals and studyhistorical/social implications and performances practices of their genre. Students will enhance their cardiovascularfitness and endurance, including the use of marching and dynamic, rhythmic dance. Students will perform at a levelthat reflects understanding of the mechanical aspects of their instruments as well as artistic interpretation. Manypublic performances are required, and are not an optional part of this course.Course Prerequisite: Students must audition or receive teacher recommendation.Course Co-requisite: Percussionists must also be enrolled in Concert Band (Course # 1508) or Jazz Band (Course #1515).ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) MUSIC THEORY1550 YearThis course is designed for the serious music student. It will explore advanced concepts in music theory. Studentswill study chord structure, harmonic progressions and musical form. Students will also compose and analyze music.Students enrolled in this class will take the Advanced Placement Examination in Music Theory.Recommended: Students who pass the AP Music Theory class may receive college credit. Therefore, this coursemodels college level work in both content and pacing. It is recommended for students who are proficient on the CSTin English/Language Arts.Course Prerequisite: Teacher recommendationENGLISH-LANGUAGE ARTSAll classes provide experience and training in reading, writing, speaking, thinking and listening skills. All studentswill experience a core of literature at each grade level.9 TH GRADEENGLISH 93250 YearENGLISH 9 HONORS3261 YearThese courses will include a survey of world literature. Students will read and interact with fiction, non-fiction, anddrama selections, while developing critical reading comprehension skills. Descriptive, expository and narrativewriting skills are honed as students use the writing process in a variety of genres. This course will also developvocabulary, grammar, and spelling usage.Prerequisite for Honors: Students must have a grade of B or better in Advanced English 8, or a grade of A in English8 and teacher recommendation. Summer reading will be required.33


10 TH GRADEENGLISH 103420 YearACADEMY ENGLISH 103421 YearENGLISH 10 HONORS3431 YearThese courses will include a survey of world literature. Emphasis is placed on a reading list that includes both fictionand non-fiction selections written by foreign and American authors to focus on a more sophisticated level of readingliterature. Emphasis will be placed on formal grammar instruction within the writing process. Descriptive,expository, persuasive and narrative writing skills are honed as students use the writing process in a variety ofgenres. Students will also be expected to develop speaking and listening skills and to learn new vocabulary.Academy Requirement: Students must complete integrated mastery projects that are developed between the English,history, social science, and industrial technology classes.Honors Prerequisite: Students must have a grade of B or better in English 9 Honors, or grade of A in English 9 andteacher recommendation. Students must also complete a summer reading assignment prior to the fall of their 10 thgrade year. Students must also attend an informational meeting during the Spring of their 9 th grade year, prior to theFall they will be in the class. Attendance at Summer Camp is strongly encouraged.11 TH GRADEENGLISH 113510 YearACADEMY ENGLISH 113511 YearThese are courses in the critical reading of American literature and effective writing of a variety of types ofcomposition. The reflective essay is emphasized. Students study literary texts, both fiction and nonfiction, focusingon The American Experience. They evaluate how authors express their ideas and, in their own writing, try to emulatethese models as they work through the writing process. They are encouraged to integrate their learning withAmerican history, a parallel course. Major core works may include non-fiction books, fiction novels, and dramaselections.Academy Requirement: Students must complete integrated mastery projects that are developed between the English,history, social science, and industrial technology classes.AP ENGLISH 11 - Language and Composition3530 YearThe focus of this course is on nonfiction prose, rhetorical analysis, argumentation, and synthesis. Students readwidely about a topic before crafting a position of their own. Arguments and language are deconstructed so that theelements of effective communication become transparent, accessible, and replicable. Students are expected to readindependently, conduct research, and write both informal and formal responses to class readings and to currentissues. Formal essays are both on demand timed quick writes and multi-draft essays ranging between 500 and 3500words in length. In addition to the study of rhetoric, students read works of American literature and consider theissues raised by these texts from an argumentative stance. Successful completion of class requirements will preparestudents for the AP Language and Composition exam administered by the College Board in May. Because thiscourse often serves as a substitute for the first year composition course in many colleges and universities, it modelscollege work in both content and pacing. Students passing the AP Language Composition exam may earn collegecredit.Recommended: Students who pass the AP English 11 class may receive college credit. Therefore, this course modelscollege level work in both content and pacing. It is recommended for students who are proficient on the CST inEnglish/Language Arts, earn a grade of B or better in English 10 Honors, and/or obtain a teacher recommendation.Prerequisite: Attendance at informational meeting in June of student’s sophomore year and completion of summerhomework.12 TH GRADEENGLISH 123610 YearACADEMY ENGLISH 123611 YearThis course focuses on British literature studied through the theme of The Individual and Society. Major core worksstudied include non-fiction books, fiction novels, and drama selections. Students study a variety of the extendedworks of British literature. This course focuses on close reading, careful analysis, and extensive writing. Instructionin the writing process will enable students to write coherent multi-paragraph compositions at a post secondary level.Academy Requirement: Students must complete integrated mastery projects that are developed between English,history, social science, and industrial technology classes.34


AP ENGLISH 12- Literature and Composition3630 YearThis college level course will prepare students to take the AP English Literature and Composition examination.Students in this course will learn techniques for the analysis of prose, poetry, and drama, including rhetoricaldevices, literary elements, literary devices, (such as metaphor and metonymy), sound devices, and literary modes ofexpression. The course will focus on analysis of style and thematic connections in major novels and poetry through avariety of genres including drama, fiction, narratives, nonfiction and persuasive essays, epics, and sonnets. Studentswrite using a variety of prompts to hone upper level writing skills including thesis statements, organization, pacing,and mechanics. This course may serve as a substitute for first year college literature in some universities; therefore, itmodels a college course in both content and pacing.Recommended: Students who pass the AP English 12 class may receive college credit. Therefore, this course modelscollege level work in both content and pacing. It is recommended for students who are proficient on the CST inEnglish/Language Arts, successfully pass AP English 11, and/or obtain a teacher recommendation. .Prerequisite: Attendance at informational meeting in June of student’s junior year and completion of summerhomework are required. Attendance at Summer Camp is strongly encouraged.ENGLISH ELECTIVESJOURNALISM3840 YearStudents will learn the fundamentals of journalism. They will be able to recognize a news story, feature story, andeditorial. They will master interviewing and reporting skills. They will learn the ethics, etiquette, and rules governingjournalistic procedures. Students will help in the writing and producing of Bellflower's student newspaper. Theywill learn the production side of journalism by proofreading, editing, writing headlines, and designing pages. Thiscourse meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (g) - Electives.Course Prerequisite: English teacher recommendation and Journalism Advisor’s approval.CREATIVE WRITING3820 YearStudents in this course will explore and produce short stories, drama, poetry, and screenplays. Students will keep aportfolio of their original work and participate in the publication of a creative writing portfolio.Course Prerequisite: Grade 12; C or better in EnglishCAHSEE ENGLISH ACADEMY3271 YearThis course offers students who have not passed the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) additionalsupport in reading for comprehension and language arts skills. This class reviews the key concepts and skills coveredon the test and provides extensive practice on questions in the testing format to reinforce learning. In addition,students focus on test-taking tips and strategies. Course may be repeated for credit with permission.ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT (ELD)ELD NEWCOMER3137 YearELD Newcomer is an introductory English class that is designed for the recent arrival of an English learner. Thiscourse aligns the California Standards for Language Arts and the English Language Development standards to meetthe needs of preproduction and beginning level English learners in mastering the English-Language Arts contentstandards. This course is carefully designed for English learners to accelerate both their growth in language andliteracy. Emphasis will be placed on vocabulary development, reading fluency, and writing conventions.Students will receive elective credit for this course.BEGINNING ELD3140 YearThe Beginning English Language Development class is designed to offer support to beginning and early intermediateEnglish learners in mastering the English-Language Arts content standards. It is also designed to for English learnersto accelerate their growth in language and literacy. This course aligns the California Standards for English-LanguageArts and the English Language Development standards. Students are enrolled in Beginning ELD, in addition to,their grade level English class.Students receive elective credit for this course.INTERMEDIATE ELD3145 YearThe Intermediate ELD class is carefully designed for intermediate English learners to accelerate their growth in bothlanguage and literacy. This course aligns the California standards for English-Language Arts and the EnglishLanguage Development standards to meet the developmental needs of the intermediate English learners. Emphasisis placed on reading comprehension and fluency. Students are concurrently enrolled in their grade level Englishclass. Students receive elective credit for this course.35


ADVANCED ELD3150 YearThe Advanced ELD class aligns the California English-Language Arts standards and the English LanguageDevelopment standards to meet the needs of the early advanced and advanced English learners. This course hasbeen carefully designed for English learners to accelerate both their growth in language and literacy. It has also beendesigned to assist the English learner master the English-Language Arts content standards. Students are concurrentlyenrolled in their grade level English class.Students may either receive English (1 year maximum) or elective credit for this course.MATHEMATICSThe Mathematics Department courses provide a sound analytical foundation for citizenship, college and the work place. TheMath Department provides the skills and experiences necessary for students to be computationally competent andmathematically powerful.ALGEBRA READINESS7022 YearThis class falls between Pre-Algebra and Algebra I in the sequence of math classes and is a 9 th grade course. Itsfocus is to help prepare students who need extra support and review before entering Algebra I. The course includesnumber sense, fractions, decimals, and other basic math skills and facts necessary to be successful in Algebra I.ALGEBRA 17460 YearStudents will learn the algebraic concepts of mathematics including variables, rational and irrational numbers,equations and inequalities, polynomials, special products and factoring, fractions, variations, quadratic equations,and graphing. Some of the concepts of geometry and trigonometry are introduced.Prerequisite: 9 th Grade: C or better second semester of Algebra Readiness or Pre-AlgebraMinimum Course Requirement for 10 th Grade StudentsGEOMETRY7480 YearGEOMETRY HONORS7487 YearStudents will apply algebra to the study of geometry. Emphasis is placed on inductive and deductive reasoning,angle relationships, parallelism, congruency, similarity, circles, arcs, loci, construction, triangles and transformations.The methods and proofs of coordinate geometry are covered as are the areas and volumes of geometric solids. Thereis an introduction to trigonometric ratios and application of trigonometric ratios.Geometry Prerequisite: C or better second semester of AlgebraHonors Geometry Prerequisite: B or better second semester of Algebra and teacher recommendationALGEBRA 27465 YearALGEBRA 2 HONORS*7470 YearThis discipline complements and expands the mathematical content and concepts of Algebra I and Geometry.Students who master Algebra II will gain experience with algebraic solutions of problems in various content areasincluding the solution of systems, quadratic equations, the binomial theorem, the complex number system,polynomial functions, conics, matrices, logarithmic and exponential functions.Algebra 2 Prerequisite: C or better second semester of GeometryHonors Algebra 2 Prerequisite: B or better second semester of Geometry and teacher recommendationMATH ANALYSIS7495 YearStudents will study circular and right triangle trigonometry, as well as be introduced to new concepts in numberfield, analytic geometry, functions, sequences, series, inverse relations and polar coordinates. Students will broadentheir basic knowledge of trigonometry by working with more advanced identities, law of sines and cosines, andtrigonometric equations.Prerequisite: C or better second semester of Geometry and Algebra IIGraphing calculators are strongly recommended.MATH ANALYSIS HONORS7496 YearThis course will take the Math Analysis curriculum and explore it at a much greater breadth and depth, moving at amuch faster pace. In addition to the regular Math Analysis curriculum, students will learn some Calculus topicsincluding finding limits graphically and numerically, continuity, one sided limits, infinite limits, derivatives, tangentline problems, differential rules, and the chain rule.Prerequisite: B or better both semesters of Algebra 2 recommendedA TI-84 Graphing Calculator is required36


ADVANCED PLACMENT (AP) CALCULUS A/B7500 YearStudents will study important concepts in calculus, including differentiation, exponential and logarithmic functions,applications, differential equations, functions of several variables and circular functions. Successful completion ofthis course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam for college credit.Prerequisite: B or better second semester of Math Analysis Honors, or teacher recommendationGraphing calculator required.ADVANCED PLACMENT (AP) CALCULUS B/C7501 YearStudents will study important concepts in Calculus, including differentiation, integration, exponential andlogarithmic functions, applications, differential equations, functions of several variables, circular functions, infiniteseries, and parametric, vector, and polar functions. Successful completion of this course prepares students to take theAP Calculus BC exam.Prerequisite: A score of 3 or better on the AP Calculus AB exam.BUSINESS MATHEMATICS7201 YearThis class covers personal finance and business math. In personal finance the following topics are covered: grossincome, net income, checking and savings accounts, cash and credit accounts, loans, transportation costs, housingcosts, insurance and investments. Business math covers the following topics: personnel, production, purchasing,sales, marketing, warehousing, and distributing, services, accounting, financial management and corporate planning.Prerequisite: Students must have completed Algebra 1CAHSEE MATH ACADEMY7606 YearThis course is mandatory for 11 th and 12 th grade students who have not passed the math portion of the CaliforniaHigh School Exit Exam (CAHSEE). This class reviews the key concepts and standards covered on the test andprovides extensive practice on questions in the testing format to reinforce learning. In addition, students focus ontest-taking tips and strategies. This class is listed with the Mathematics Department; however, it does not receivemath credit. Students receive elective credit with successful completion of the course.HISTORY/SOCIAL SCIENCEThe goals of the History-Social Science curriculum are to develop cultural understanding, civic values, anunderstanding of the democratic process, and to promote critical thinking and participation skills that are essentialfor effective citizenship.9 TH GRADEWORLD GEOGRAPHY4140 SemesterWORLD GEOGRAPHY HONORS4175 SemesterWorld Geography is a semester class dedicated to the study of the five geographic themes of location, place,interaction, movement and regions. This course includes rigorous assignments and special projects.Honors Prerequisite: Students must earn a B+ or better in United States History 8 and obtain a recommendationfrom 8 th grade Social Science teacher.10 TH GRADEMODERN WORLD HISTORY4120 YearThis is a 10 th grade course, and deals with the significant developments throughout the world from the late 18 thCentury to the present. It will emphasize the political, cultural and social events that have shaped moderncivilizations. Geography will be studied as it relates to the content of the course.37


ACADEMY MODERN WORLD HISTORY4117 YearAcademy Modern World History is a rigorous social science class which incorporates all the elements of previousacademy social science classes. Additionally, integrated mastery projects are developed with the English,mathematics, and technology components. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the production of high qualityproducts.ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) WORLD HISTORY4211 YearThe purpose of the AP World History course is to develop a greater understanding of the evolution of globalprocesses and contacts, in interaction with different types of societies. The course highlights the nature of changes ininternational structures and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. Thecourse builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geographyset the human stage. Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms an organizing principle for dealing with change andcontinuity throughout the course. Specific themes provide further organization to this Course.Recommended: Students who pass the AP World History exam may receive college credit. Therefore, the coursemodels college level work in both content and pacing. It is recommended for students who are proficient on the CSTin English/Language Arts. Students must also complete a summer assignment.11 TH GRADEUNITED STATES HISTORY4300 YearThe year begins with a selective review of United States History with an emphasis on two major themes: the nation'sbeginnings and the industrial transformation of the new nation. The remainder of the course emphasizes the majorturning point in American history in the twentieth century.ACADEMY UNITED STATES HISTORY4299 YearAcademy United States History is a rigorous social science class which incorporates all the elements of previousacademy social science classes. Additionally, integrated mastery projects are developed with the English,mathematics, and technology components. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the production of high qualityproducts.ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) UNITED STATES HISTORY4360 YearThis college level course for 11 th and 12 th graders is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factualknowledge necessary to assess critically the problems and issues in American history, including the analysis ofprimary documents. This course covers various social, cultural, intellectual and political aspects of the historicalgrowth of the United States in world perspective from early exploration in the 1400's to the present. This courseguides students in preparation for the AP exam in American History.Recommended: Students who pass the AP US History exam may receive college credit. Therefore, the course modelscollege level work in both content and pacing. It is recommended for students who are proficient on the CST inEnglish/Language Arts. Students must also complete a summer assignment.12 TH GRADEUNITED STATES GOVERNMENT/POLITICAL SYSTEMS4415 YearThis course will provide students with an overview of the general principles, concepts, theories and actual operationsof the American political system and contemporary issues. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of Americangovernment and its interactions with the global community. Successful completion of this course satisfies stategraduation requirements and prepares college-bound students for an introductory course in political scienceincluding general principles of micro-economic and macro-economic concepts and theories. Emphasis will be placedon the United States economy and its interaction with the global community as well as practical problems in the fieldof finance. Successful completion of this course will prepare students for a better understanding of their economicneeds in society.ACADEMY UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT/POLITICAL SYSTEMS4479 YearAcademy American Government/Political Systems is a rigorous social science class which incorporates all theelements of previous academy social science classes. Additionally, integrated mastery projects are developed withthe English, mathematics, and technology components. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the production of highquality products.38


ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) GOVERNMENT/POLITICAL SYSTEMS4430 YearThis is an introductory college course in American government and politics designed to assist students in theirunderstanding of U.S. Constitutional underpinnings, political beliefs and behavior, political parties and interestgroups, institutions (Congress, Presidency, Courts and the Federal Bureaucracy) and policy processes of the federaland state governments, civil rights and liberties and foreign policy. This course also guides students in preparationfor the AP exam in American Government.ECONOMICS4500 SemesterThis course will provide students with an overview of the general principles of micro-economic and macro-economicconcepts and theories. Emphasis will be placed on the United States economy and its interaction with the globalcommunity. This course is designed to help students develop critical-thinking skills through the understanding,application and analysis of fundamental economic concepts. Students will apply quantitative and mathematicalskills to economics. Also, students will be expected to apply economic logic to a wide variety of real-world andhypothetical situations.ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ECONOMICS4499 YearThis college level course will prepare students for both the Advanced Placement Examination in Microeconomics andthe Advanced Placement Examination in Macroeconomics. This course has been designed to help students developcritical-thinking skills through the understanding, application, and analysis of fundamental economic concepts.Recommended: Students who pass the AP Micro/Macro Economics exams may receive college credit. Therefore, thecourse models college level work in both content and pacing. It is recommended for 12 th grade students who areproficient on the CST in English/Language Arts, and have successfully completed Algebra II or higher. Studentsmust also complete a summer assignment.SCIENCEThe science department offerings are designed to meet the needs of all students with the primary goal of teachingscientific literacy, so that students learn basic concepts, facts, and processes of science, develop an appreciation forscience in everyday life, and use thinking skills for lifelong learning.OCEANOGRAPHY6370 SemesterThis course includes an introduction to ecology (living things and their environment, food and energy in theenvironment, and cycles in nature), an exploration of human impact on the environment, and a community serviceproject in an area of environmental concern. Half the year will emphasize life forms found in the ocean and theirrelationship to their physical environment. This course may be used for either life or physical science credit.Course Prerequisite: Grades 11 and 12ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE6380 SemesterThe course combines general life science and general physical science, with emphasis on the environment. Studentswill observe nature in an attempt to better understand the relationships and interactions between organisms and theenvironment. Emphasis will be placed on current topics pertaining to the environment such as energy use, pollution,and human impact. Environmental science provides useful information which will allow students to make educateddecisions for our community, country, and the planet.This course does not satisfy college lab-science requirementsbut meets graduation requirements as an additional year of science or for elective credit.Prerequisite: Grade 11 or 12ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE6383 YearThis course is a college level science course that prepares students for the Advanced Placement Exam inEnvironmental Science. The goal of this course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, andmethodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyzeenvironmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems,and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Writing and math skills are critical. There arenumerous laboratory activities that require extended commitments beyond the normal school day. Extensive study isrequired.Course Prerequisite: Grade 11 or 12; It is recommended that students earn a grade of B or better in Biology and/orChemistry and obtain teacher recommendation. Students must also complete a summer assignment.39


EARTH SCIENCE6249 YearThis course includes Earth's place in the universe, its dynamic processes, the role of energy in Earth's system,biochemical cycles, the structure and origin of the atmosphere and the connections to California's geology. Thescientific method is used and science careers are discussed.Prerequisite: Eighth grade Physical ScienceFORENSIC SCIENCE6280 YearThis course is designed to follow the history of forensic science from the simplest crime solving techniques to today’sDNA technology. The class will require students to act as investigators, engaging in many of the processes necessaryfor a Science-as-Inquiry approach. At various points, students must gather data, think critically and logically aboutrelationships between evidence and explanations, construct and analyze alternative explanations, and communicatescientific arguments. This course does not satisfy college lab-science requirements but meets graduationrequirements as an additional year of science or for elective credit.CRIMINALISTICS/FORENSIC SCIENCE6281/6280 YearThis course builds upon academic themes in Physics, Chemistry, and Biology. Students will be exposed to lecture,demonstrations, problem-solving, experiments, and research in order to develop a better understanding of ForensicScience - the application of hard science and technology to the solution and prosecution of crime. The course isdesigned to follow the history of Forensic Science from the simplest crime solving techniques to today's DNAtechnology.Course Prerequisite: Grade 11 and 12SURVEY OF BIOLOGY6202 YearThis course includes Earth's place in the universe, its dynamic processes, the role of energy in Earth's system,biochemical cycles, the structure and origin of the atmosphere and the connections to California's geology. Thescientific method is used and science careers are discussed.Prerequisite: Eighth grade Physical ScienceBIOLOGY6200 YearHONORS BIOLOGY6215 YearThis course is designed to prepare students for college level biology. The areas of study include: cells, biochemistry,genetics, microbiology, evolution, classification, comparative anatomy and physiology of the systems, zoology,ecology and botany. Students will utilize basic tools of biology including dissecting equipment, microscopes, labequipment and chemical agents. Students will learn to apply the scientific method to their studies. This coursecounts toward life science graduation requirements.Biology Prerequisite: Grade 10 pre-requisites: must pass Algebra I with a grade of C or better or be concurrentlyenrolled in Algebra 1 having passed the previous course with a B or better. Have a 9 th grade science teacherrecommendation. Grade 9 pre-requisites: must be concurrently enrolled in Algebra I or high mathematics, must earna B or better in 8 th grade science and have an 8 th grade science teacher recommendation.Honors Biology Prerequisite: This course is primarily intended for advanced 9th grade science students, withteacher recommendation and completion of Algebra 1 with a C or better. Grade 10 students may be permitted withthe recommendation of previous science teacher and C or better in Algebra 1 or higher math course.ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) BIOLOGY6210 YearThis course is a college level biology course that prepares students for the Advanced Placement Exam. The topicsstudied are evolution, energy transformation, genetics, unity and diversity and ecological interactions. This classstresses the themes that unite these topics. Essay writing skills are critical. There are numerous laboratory activitiesthat require extended commitments beyond the normal school day. Extensive study is required.Prerequisite: Grade 11 and 12, a B average in Biology, a B average in Chemistry, and teacher recommendation.Summer Reading: Students will be tested on chapter readings on the first day of school. All assignments will also bedue at that time. See instructor for details.CHEMISTRY6300 YearCHEMISTRY HONORS6305 YearThis course introduces the basic principles of chemistry: atomic structure, chemical nomenclature, the mole concept,chemical reactions, states of matter, the periodic table, chemical bonds, solution chemistry and reaction rates.Mathematical problem-solving and laboratory experimentation are emphasized. A strong background in algebra isimportant. This course counts toward physical science graduation requirements.Prerequisite: Biology and Algebra I, each with a grade of C or better, and recommendation of Biology teacher.Concurrent enrollment in Geometry or a higher math class is recommended.Honors Course Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra with a grade of B or better recommended;completion of Biology or Honors Biology with a grade of B or better and/or recommendation from the Biology orHonors Biology teacher recommended.40


ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CHEMISTRY6330 YearThis course is for students interested in deepening their background in the physical sciences and prepares students totake the AP exam in Chemistry. The course presents an extension of some topics studied in Chemistry and introducesadvanced topics in Chemistry.The course challenges students with learning activities equivalent to those of a firstyearcollege Chemistry class. Lectures, demonstrations, and student-performed laboratory exercises are used todeepen students’ understanding of advanced topics. Successful students will attain an in depth understanding ofchemical concepts, laboratory experience and some knowledge of current directions in chemical research. This coursewill include laboratory classes outside of normal school hours to be scheduled after school or at other suitable times.Course Prerequisite: Grade 11 or 12; Algebra with B or better; 1 year chemistry with B or better; Physics with a gradeof B or better (or current enrollment in Physics) strongly recommended; teacher recommendation.A summer assignment is required for students enrolled in this course.PHYSICS6350 YearPHYSICS HONORS6355 YearIn this course science students study major areas that make up physics: mechanics, electricity and magnetism,light/options, sound and fluid dynamics. An emphasis on laboratory work helps the student study and understandnatural phenomena combined with quarter projects that require applying physics.Honors Course Prerequisite: Completion of Geometry and Algebra II with a grade of B or better. Concurrentenrollment in Math Analysis or AP Calculus is also required.ANATOMY/PHYSIOLOGY6170 YearANATOMY/PHYSIOLOGY HONORS6171 YearThis is an advanced course designed to study the structure and function of the human body. Students will gain an indepth knowledge of cells, tissues, organs, organ system design and the diseases associated with each. We will usecurrent research to analyze articles and explore careers that involve the human body. Dissection specimens are usedto model anatomical structures. Students perform intensive study and thorough examination of the eleven systemsof the body including the integument, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory,digestive, excretory, and reproductive system and the disease associated with each one. Key anatomical andphysiological concepts are emphasized during organ system analysis. In addition, lab activity summaries andresearch projects are also required.Honors Prerequisite: Biology with a B or better and Chemistry with a C or better and recommendation of previousscience teacher. Concurrent enrollment in Physics is acceptable.FOREIGN LANGUAGEThe focus of the Foreign Language program is on meaningful and useful communication in the language. Eachlanguage is taught within the contemporary cultural context of countries where the language is spoken. Thecultures and customs are explored along with learning to speak the language. Foreign Language classes meet theForeign Language/Fine Arts graduation requirement when taken in grades 9-12.SPANISHSPANISH I9000 YearThe purpose of this class is to give students the ability to function in real-life situations that they might encounter in aSpanish-speaking environment. Students will learn to talk about themselves, their families, and their friends; theywill learn how to get around in towns, use public transportation, and give directions; they will learn how to makepurchases in stores; and they will learn to use the appropriate language in a variety of social interactions. Studentswill be exposed to the various cultures of Spanish-speaking people, including geography, history, traditions, anddaily life. Students will acquire a basic living vocabulary. This course is not intended for students whose firstlanguage is Spanish. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (e) – Foreign Language.Course Prerequisite: C or better in EnglishSPANISH FOR SPANISH SPEAKERS I9045 YearThis course is for students whose first language is Spanish or for those bilingual students whose dominant languageis Spanish. This course is taught entirely in Spanish dealing with grammar, reading and writing as its main focus.Students will read work by Hispanic authors, analyze the reading by critical analysis and write essays based uponthe reading or discussion. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (e) – Foreign Language.Course Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor approval41


SPANISH II9010 YearStudents will further develop their abilities to function in situations they might encounter in a Spanish-speakingenvironment. Students will learn to appreciate Latino customs and history. Students will be expected to participatein class activities using Spanish. This course is not intended for students whose first language is Spanish. This coursemeets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (e) – Foreign Language.Course Prerequisite: C or better in Spanish I.SPANISH FOR SPANISH SPEAKERS II9050 YearThis course is a continuation of the content covered in Spanish for Spanish Speakers I. Students will review grammarfrom the previous year. Students will continue with grammar dealing with all tenses, read short essays of Spanishauthors, analyze the reading by critical analysis and write essays based upon the reading or discussion. This coursemeets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (e) – Foreign Language.Course Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Spanish for Spanish Speakers I.SPANISH III9020 YearStudents will further develop their abilities to function in situations they might encounter in a Spanish-speakingenvironment. Students will learn to speak of the past and future and express desires, emotions, and beliefs. Theywill learn to order food and to express their tastes in food; they will learn to travel on public transportation inSpanish speaking countries. They will expand their knowledge and vocabulary of fashion and clothing. Studentswill study art and art history of the Spanish-speaking world. Students’ cultural knowledge will expand as they learncustoms, art and points of interest in the Spanish-speaking world. Students will be expected to participate in classusing the Spanish language. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (e) – ForeignLanguage.Course Prerequisite: C or better in Spanish II and/or teacher recommendationADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) SPANISH IV - LANGUAGE9030 YearThe purpose of this course is to give students a continuing opportunity to refine their speaking, listening, and writingskills. Students will use Spanish in real-life situations. Students will participate in all activities using the Spanishlanguage. Students will be expected to take the A.P. examination. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in thefollowing category: (e) – Foreign Language.Course Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Spanish IIIFRENCHFRENCH I9100 YearThe purpose of this class is to give students the ability to function in real-life situations that they might encounter in aFrench-speaking environment. Students will learn to talk about themselves, their families, and their friends; theywill learn how to get around in towns, use public transportation in Paris, and give directions; they will learn how tomake purchases in stores; they will be able to talk about the city of Paris and its attractions; and they will learn to usethe appropriate language in a variety of social interactions. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in thefollowing category: (e) – Foreign Language.Course Prerequisite: C or better in EnglishFRENCH II9110 YearStudents will further develop their abilities to function in situations they might encounter in a French-speakingenvironment. Students will learn to describe people and things, how to talk about their residence and be able to getlodging (hotel), interact with others about their leisure-time and vacation activities, and talk about health concerns.The students’ cultural knowledge will expand to include all of France and its varied customs, traditions, landscapes,and points of interest. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (e) – Foreign Language.Course Prerequisite: C or better in French I42


FRENCH I9100 YearThe purpose of this class is to give students the ability to function in real-life situations that they might encounter in aFrench-speaking environment. Students will learn to talk about themselves, their families, and their friends; theywill learn how to get around in towns, use public transportation in Paris, and give directions; they will learn how tomake purchases in stores; they will be able to talk about the city of Paris and its attractions; and they will learn to usethe appropriate language in a variety of social interactions. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in thefollowing category: (e) – Foreign Language.Course Prerequisite: C or better in EnglishFRENCH II9110 YearStudents will further develop their abilities to function in situations they might encounter in a French-speakingenvironment. Students will learn to describe people and things, how to talk about their residence and be able to getlodging (hotel), interact with others about their leisure-time and vacation activities, and talk about health concerns.The students’ cultural knowledge will expand to include all of France and its varied customs, traditions, landscapes,and points of interest. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (e) – Foreign Language.Course Prerequisite: C or better in French IFRENCH III9120 YearThe purpose of French III is to further develop the students’ abilities to function in situations they might encounter ina French-speaking environment. Students will learn to discuss jobs and the workplace; they will learn to talk aboutand to purchase clothing; they will learn to make travel plans using trains, planes, and cars; they will learn moreabout French food and how to act appropriately both in a restaurant and at a family dining table. Students’ culturalknowledge will expand to include the Francophone world with its varied customs and points of interest as well assome aspects of France’s cultural past. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (e) –Foreign Language.Course Prerequisite: C or better in French IIADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) FRENCH IV –LANGUAGE9130 YearThe primary goals of French IV are: (1) the refinement of communicative skills in the four skill areas (listening,speaking, reading, writing); (2) the enhancement of strategic competence (communicative strategies); (3) theenhancement of grammatical competence (review of previously learned structures and acquisition of new structuresand uses); (4) the refinement in understanding of French and Francophone culture. French IV builds on themes,structures, vocabulary, and skills learned in French I-III; however, the course aims at moving the student to a moreabstract level of language usage at which they learn to work with more extended discourse and cultural andsociological (as well as the practical) aspects of the topics studied. A major emphasis in French IV is the preparationof the students to take the A.P. examination. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (e)– Foreign Language.Course Prerequisite: A grade of A or B in French III and/or teacher approval recommended43


PHYSICAL EDUCATIONPhysical Education is an integral part of the educational process. Students will gain a variety of competencies and knowledge,which will contribute to their health and well being. The courses are comprehensive, co-instructional programs which aredesigned to meet the fitness needs of today's youth.PHYSICAL EDUCATION 98110(Fall)/8115(Spring)Physical Education for grade nine will teach students health-related benefits of regular physical activity and the skillsto adopt a physically active, healthful lifestyle. Students will be asked to demonstrate their knowledge of andcompetency in motor skills, movement patterns, and strategies needed to perform a variety of physical activities.Students will be asked to achieve a level of physical fitness for health and performance while demonstratingknowledge of fitness concepts, principles, and strategies. All ninth grade students will be required to take theFITNESSGRAM, a state mandated physical fitness test..PHYSICAL EDUCATION 108140(Fall)/8145(Spring)Physical Education for grade ten will allow students to become confident, independent, self-controlled, and resilient.Students will develop positive social skills, set and strive for personal, achievable goals. Students will also learn toassume leadership, cooperate with others, accept responsibility for their own behavior, and ultimately, improve theiracademic performance. Students will add to the standards learned and achieved in grade nine and will be asked todemonstrate knowledge of psychological and sociological concepts, principles, and strategies that apply to thelearning and performance of physical activity. Students may be placed in classes that have both 9th and 10th gradersdepending on availability.FITNESS AND CONDITIONING8210 (Fall)/ 8536 (Spring)This course, which meets P.E. graduation requirements, features a variety of activities designed to increase the fitnesslevels of all students. This course will teach students through classroom and physical activity, the components offitness and the impact of fitness for life-long health. The course features cardiovascular conditioning throughpowerwalking, running, jumping rope, dance aerobics, and various fitness activities designed to increase strength,flexibility, muscular endurance, and overall health.Course Prerequisite: Students must be in grades 10, 11 or 12.WEIGHT TRAINING 10-128536 SemesterThis course is offered to provide students with the opportunity to explore weight training as an intensive experiencein an activity that they wish to participate in for years to come. Students will be asked to explain the principles ofbiomechanics of first-, second-, and third-class levers and apply those principles to a variety of lifting techniques.Demonstrate proper spotting techniques for all lifts and exercises that require spotting. Identify and apply theprinciples of biomechanics necessary for the safe and successful performance of weight training. Establish a set ofpersonal physical fitness goals, using the principles of training, and create a strength-training and conditioningprogram.Course Prerequisite: Students must pass P.E. in both grades 9 and 10.ATHLETICS /TEAM SPORTS8550 SemesterThe goal of the athletic program is to provide training in sports as an integral part of the educational offerings forsecondary students. Each area of athletics is organized to provide students with experiences which fulfill physicaland mental training, provide for leadership opportunities, develop cooperation, sportsmanship and fair play, andteach the skills related to each sport.Course Prerequisite: Academic eligibility, coach approval, and Athletic Director approval.AEROBICS8202 SemesterThis course is offered to provide students with the opportunity to explore aerobics as an activity they wish toparticipate in for years to come. In this course, students will learn to demonstrate a physically active lifestyle thatprovides enjoyment and challenge through aerobic activity. Students will also be able to identify the qualities ofaerobic activity that enhance personal enjoyment, evaluate changes in self-responsibility as skills in aerobic activitiesimprove, set personal goals for improved performance and enjoyment of aerobic activities. Students will also be ableto perform and evaluate planned and spontaneous leadership assignments and roles in high-level aerobic activities.44


PRACTICAL ARTSIndustrial Technology and Family and Consumer Science classes are open to all students. The classesconsist of survey, introductory and advanced levels. Two years of a foreign language also meets thePractical Arts requirement. Students have the opportunity to learn about and receive skill training in avariety of areas. Each class provides general consumer information, safety information and related technicalknowledge. The advanced courses offer training at the job entry level. Industrial Technology and HomeEconomics classes meet the Practical Arts graduation requirement.FAMILY CONSUMER SCIENCEDISCOVER FOODS5120 SemesterStudents will learn the principles of basic nutrition for use in the selection and preparation of food. Asconsumers, they will learn to buy food wisely. Included is food selection for weight control and health.Materials fee for projects taken home.INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGYINTRODUCTION TO AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY5900 SemesterIn this course, students will explore the fields of transportation and energy technology. They will develop aknowledge and understanding of the principles upon which an automobile operates, develop basic skillsrequired to perform maintenance in domestic and foreign cars, and develop skills required to use tools andequipment for such servicing. Samples of activities which will be covered are application of hydraulic lifts,hydraulic jacks, floor jacks, air tools, hand tools, lubrication, oil change, spin balance, tires, brakes, and ascope analyzer machine.AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY 25900 SemesterThis course introduces students to advanced principles upon which an automobile operates and buildsupon basic skills required to perform maintenance in domestic and foreign cars attained in the Introductionto Automotive Technology course. Students also have opportunities to build skills required to use tools andequipment for such servicing.Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Introduction to Automotive Technology and/or teacherrecommendation.ROP AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALIZATION2725 YearThis course is designed to prepare students for entry-level jobs in the automotive service industry. Specificareas covered include the brake system, steering, suspension, ignition system, the charging system, thecooling system, mufflers, wheel balancing, a tire machine, engine overhaul and an engine scope analyzer.The students will understand and follow safety procedures for working in the shop and in thetransportation and energy technology industries. They will understand the application of specific tools andequipment used to perform service and repairs in automobiles, as well as the leadership/management andbusiness practices in the industry. See also ROP section.Prerequisite: Grades 11 and 12 or 16 years of ageCONSTRUCTION SKILLS5731 YearThis course will prepare students for entry-level work in the field of construction. Students will get handson experience with carpentry.Materials fee for projects taken home.45


ELECTRONICS 15635 SemesterAn introduction to electronics will be given with an emphasis on electronic assembly techniques. Studentswill construct a small audio amplifier, computer bug and burglar alarms. Students will learn how to makeprinted circuit boards, solder, measure continuity, and do simple testing and trouble-shooting proceduresusing a multimeter. An introduction to electricity, magnetism, component identification, component testing,and electromagnetism will be given. Female students are encouraged to enroll in this course.Materials fee for projects taken home.ELECTRONICS 25640 YearStudents will study power supply circuits, amplifiers and radio circuits. Advanced test equipment such as adigital voltmeter and an oscilloscope will be used by the student for testing and trouble shooting for itemsthey construct. Students will also work will robotics and work with Electronic Circuit Design software, aswell as build electrical systems and learn about the Electrical Apprenticeship Programs. Opportunities willbe provided for students to participate in contests and events, and field trips to view various companies andcolleges. Female students are encouraged to enroll in this course.Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Electronics I and/or teacher recommendation.Materials fee for projects taken home.TECHNOLOGY CORE/MANUFACTURING ACADEMY5497 YearThis class covers the computer hardware, electrical, and networking engineering pathway andmanufacturing pathway. This class will provide learning opportunities for students interested in preparingcareers in the assembly, manufacturing, programming, design, production, information technology,computer telecommunications, and other systems. This class is also a part of the Academy three-periodcluster of technology, English, and the appropriate grade level of social science. Students will learn aboutthe following technology areas: robotics, construction, drafting, electronics, graphic communications,transportation, and computer repair. Students will use computers and complete hands-on projects to learnabout these technology areas. Projects are designed to integrate technology and English-language arts sostudents can relate learning of these subjects to their individual interest areas.Prerequisite: Enrollment in Manufacturing and Telecommunications Academy. The course may be repeatedfor credit.Materials fee for projects taken home.PRINTMAKING 11012 YearThis course is designed to provide students with a foundation to Printmaking as a Fine Art. Students willcreate original print projects using linoleum block, intaglio/etching, screen printing, nature prints,monoprints, lithography, papermaking & handmade bookbinding. Students will explore the personal stylesand cultural heritage of famous printmaking artists, art movements, and participate in art critiques.Computers & internet is used throughout the year for art image ideas and museum research. Secondsemester will emphasize students advanced skills, multi-color printing and multi-plate techniques,professional art display and presentation, digital computer techniques, and the historical aspects ofprintmaking. Students are required to keep a current portfolio of their print samples & class progress.This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.Materials fee for projects taken home.ROP CAREERS IN EDUCATION2876 SemesterStudents will learn how to assist the teacher in a classroom setting at the elementary, middle, and highschool levels. Classroom topics include child development, guidance, and management techniques. See alsoROP section.ROP CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY2728 YearThis course will prepare students for entry-level work in the field of construction. Students will get handson experience with carpentry. See also ROP section.Materials fee for projects taken home.46


ROP COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING5620 YearStudents will learn to create architectural and various engineering designs on the computer using the CADprogram such as Solidworks as a tool for these designs. Opportunities will be provided for students toparticipate in contests and events, and field trips to view various companies and colleges. Employmentopportunities may be offered in the field of design & drafting for select students who master the program.See also ROP section.ROP DIGITAL ART/GRAPHIC DESIGN2682 SemesterStudents in this course will learn the basic tools and fundamentals of Adobe Photoshop and AdobeIllustrator while designing layouts and logos for individual portfolios. Projects will be designed to enhancestudent understanding of graphic design and illustration. See also ROP section.ROP TV AND VIDEO PRODUCTIONS (BUC TV)2742 SemesterThis is a comprehensive program that introduces the students to the television (video) industry. This alsointroduces the skills necessary for jobs such as producer, director, editor, video tape operator, technicalscript supervisor, grip, floor manager, etc. On-the-job experiences provided through organized laboratoryactivities. This course will also acquaint students with the broad spectrum of career opportunities in thefilm and video industry. Students will work on BUC T.V.; this course will satisfy the Academy Technologyrequirement. See also ROP section.ROP ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION2772 SemesterThis is a comprehensive program that introduces the students to the television (video) industry. This coursebuilds upon the skills necessary for jobs such as producer, director, editor, video tape operator, technicalscript supervisor, grip, floor manager, etc acquired in ROP TV and Video Productions. On-the-jobexperiences are provided through organized laboratory activities. This course will also continue tofamiliarize students with the broad spectrum of career opportunities in the film and video industry.Students will work on BUC T.V.; this course will satisfy the Academy Technology requirement. See also ROPsection.Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ROP TV and Video Productions (BUC TV) and/or teacherrecommendationROP UC FILM/VIDEO PRODUCTIONS 12770 SemesterThis course is designed to introduce students to concepts and principles used in film and video production.This course exposes students to the basics of visual storytelling through the creation of storyboards, scriptwriting, basic shot types, camera movements, lighting, audio, and techniques of editing. Students will learnthe skills necessary for jobs within the industry such as producer, director, art director, set design, cameraoperator, script supervisor, editor, etc. See also ROP section. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements inthe following category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.ROP UC FILM/VIDEO PRODUCTIONS 22771 SemesterThis course is designed to introduce students to concepts and principles used to pursue a career pathway infilm and video production. This course exposes students to the basics of visual storytelling through thecreation of storyboards, script writing, basic shot types, camera movements, lighting, audio, and techniquesof editing. Students will learn the skills necessary for jobs within the industry such as: producer, director, artdirector, set design, camera operator, script supervisor, editor, etc. See also ROP section This course meets theUC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.Prerequisite: ROP UC Film/Video Productions 1ROP UC GRAPHIC DESIGN2755 YearThe graphic design course will explore the ever changing trends in the global field of design. Students willunderstand the impact of the arts and design throughout history and in various cultures. Students will learnmethods and theory such as elements and principles of design to enhance their artistic vision and style. Seealso ROP section.This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual andPerforming Arts.Materials fee for projects taken home.47


BUSINESSBusiness classes are open to students from 9th-12th grades. Through successful completion of courses,students have an opportunity to gain job-entry skills as well as personal skills in the areas of computertechnology, information processing, administrative support services, and accounting/finance. Businesseducation classes meet the Applied Arts graduation requirement when taken in grades 9-12.BUSINESS SKILLS2400 SemesterThis one-semester course is designed to assist students in developing career essentials. This includeslearning the skills, abilities, and attitudes, needed by business workers to obtain employment and performeffectively within these occupations. Projects include: formatting business documents and spreadsheets.Students will learn skills such as keyboarding with proper technique and working collaboratively.WORD PROCESSING2130 SemesterThis introductory course is designed to instruct students on the correct finger placement for the alphabetic,numeric, and symbol keyboard. Students will then apply this skill and format basic letters, memorandums,tables, and academic reports using MS Word. Students will present a PowerPoint project.WORD PROCESSING 22132 SemesterIn this course, students will continue on formatting work place documents, letters, memorandums, tables,and academic reports. Units include: keyboarding review, publication projects - newsletter and brochure,work samples portfolio.ROP COMPUTER APPLICATIONS2700 YearThis two-semester course is designed to prepare students for entry-level jobs utilizing the PC. Students willincrease their knowledge of computer applications and receive training on workplace oriented projects.Applications include: MS Word, MS Excel, MS PowerPoint, MS Access, MS Publisher, Webpage/HTML,Photoshop. Upon successful completion of course, students will earn a Certificate of Completion. Studentsmay also earn college credits from Cerritos College. See ROP office for additional details. See also ROPsection.ROP DESKTOP PUBLISHING2737 YearIn this two-semester course, students will design publications using desktop publishing software. Projectsinclude: flyers, newsletters, brochures, business cards, and calendars. Units include: Photoshop,ImageReady, Webapge/HTML, Digital Portfolio. Upon successful completion of course, students will earn aCertificate of Completion. Students may also earn college credits from Cerritos College. See ROP office foradditional details. See also ROP section.NON-DEPARTMENTALHEALTH6875 SemesterThis required course is a contemporary field of study on today's health issues. The issues covered in thissemester course are proper nutrition, physical fitness, communicable and non-communicable diseases,abuse, human sexuality, personal safety, life-saving techniques, mental health concepts and some humananatomy.YEARBOOK3830 YearStudents selected for this class are involved in the design, layout, and production of the school's yearbook,writing of stories and captions, photography, candid and group events, design and layout of section pagesand the overall editorial theme of each year's book. Course may be repeated for credit with permission.Course Prerequisite: Grades 9-12; Advisor's signaturePSYCHOLOGY4600 SemesterThis course will provide a study of personality, thinking, learning, heredity and environment, emotion,mental illness, perception, child development, and other aspects of behavior of human beings. This coursemeets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (g) - Electives.Course Prerequisite: Grades 11-1248


AVID6820 YearThe course is designed to develop and reinforce the attitudes, skills, and knowledge required to successfullyenter and complete a college prep academic program in high school, and move onto post graduate study.Students will learn and apply study skills and learning strategies to improve performance in the contentareas: Note taking, outlining, writing, vocabulary development, speaking, inquiry, reading, test strategiesand the use of technology to improve performance will be stressed. This course meets the UC/CSU a-grequirements in the following category: (g) - Electives.Course Prerequisite: GPA between 2.0 and 3.0; average or above average standardized test scores,especially in math; student interview; high student motivation; positive attitude; parent contract.OFFICE AIDE1809 SemesterStudents that desire to be an office aide must have good grades, attendance, and no disciplinary entries ontheir student screen. Students in these positions are asked to assist in the day-to-day operations of theoffices on our campus. This includes answering phones in a polite and professional manner, taking passesout to classes without disturbing classes, and assisting in the numerous other tasks that an office manager isasked to do. A maximum of fifteen credits may be counted towards graduation.Course Prerequisite: Counselor approval; Grades 11-12LIBRARY AIDE1802 SemesterStudents are trained to file books correctly in the Dewey System and to read shelves. They assist otherstudents in finding both casual reading books and research materials. Students assist peers in using onlineand other computer resources. Students assist library clerks with other tasks including: textbookprocessing, stocking, deliveries, book mending, cleaning and other related tasks. A maximum of fifteencredits may be counted towards graduation.Course Prerequisite: Counselor approval; Grades 11-12TEACHER AIDE1805 SemesterStudents in these positions assist teachers in the instruction of students in various subjects. Students may beasked to translate for students, to tutor students in a one on one fashion, or be asked to lead small grouplessons teaching various subject matters. They may also assist the teacher in organization of teachingmaterials or in the collection and distribution of teaching supplies and materials. Students are not asked tograde student work or enter grades into the computer.Course Prerequisite: Counselor and teacher approval; Grades 11-12DRIVER EDUCATION6840(Fall)/6841(Spring) SemesterDriver Education is the state required course that needs to be completed before a student can take thewritten test for the driver's permit issued at 15 ½ years of age. This course will cover rules of the road, safetyand right-of-way regulations as they pertain to the state's Department of Motor Vehicles materials.ASB/LEADERSHIP4825 YearThis course is mandatory for all student body officers and ASB appointed positions. These students serve asthe student government for Bellflower High School and should be role models for their peers. Their role asleadership students should embody school spirit and BUC Pride. The course will introduce students to theelements of sound organizational and administrative skills, and the preparation to implement them withintegrity and forthrightness. This course is open to a limited number of students.Course Prerequisite: Students need a 2.0 G.P.A.; good attendance and have no discipline issues.PEP SQUAD8254 YearStudents develop skills in yell leading, song, mascots, and precision drill team. They will develop routinesfor games, rallies, assemblies, half-time shows, and competitions. The group also develops routines for thenext year’s tryouts.Prerequisite: Tryout the previous spring and physical exam on file. Students considering this course shouldbe aware of the requirement of a commitment of time – mornings, evenings, and some weekends.Fee is required for uniforms taken home.49


REGIONAL OCCUPATION PROGRAM (R.O.P)The ROP program continues to offer over 200 student’s hands-on experiences in the community in thecareer areas of banking, retail marketing, food services, medical services, emergency services, graphic arts,computer animation, and computer technology. Many of these courses lead to certification, others toworkplace experience. The Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification prepares students to take theonline exam in specific areas such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access.ROP A+ CERTIFICATION OPERATING SYSTEMS2699 SemesterThis course provides PC service technicians with industry recognized certification as defined by CompTIA(the largest non-profit certification body). Students will learn about the history of computer operatingsystems such as pre-installing, installing, and configuring DOS, Windows XP), BIOS configurations, bootorder, file systems, upgrades, peer-to-peer networking, domain and models, dual boots, virtual memory,IRQ and DMA, labs, and much more. Both A+ Certification classes offer field learning experiences andpossible employment in related fields. To earn college credit from Cerritos College, please see ROPcounselor for details.ROP ANIMATION/GRAPHIC DESIGN2738 SemesterStudents will learn the basic tools and fundamentals of basic art elements in creating graphic design andbasic cartooning. Students will use standard industry software like Adobe Photoshop and AdobeIllustrator. Students will begin in graphic design to understand the process and time of each program towork toward animation. Students will work on individual portfolios to expand their knowledge of the field.ROP AUTO SPECIALIZATION2725 YearThis course is designed to introduce the student or adult to the basics of automotive diagnostics and repair.This course is also designed to prepare students for entry-level positions in the automotive field such as: tireperson, oil-lube person, brakes and alignment technician, and tune-up technician. This class includes handson instruction, written assignments, and projects.ROP BANKING OCCUPATIONS (includes Internship)2702 SemesterRequirements: Must have transportation to Bellflower H.S to enroll during the fall and to Mayfair H.S. toenroll during the spring. Students must also have an internship site. In addition, students must haveexcellent attendance & attitude and businesslike clothing. Successful completers of this course have a 60-75% hiring rate with a starting salary of $8.00 per hour. Test required for employment. Big Commitment---High Quality! Learn excellent customer service skills that you can use anywhere! This course providesvaluable hands-on training after classroom preparation (sales, customer service, loss prevention, dealingwith hold-ups, teller routine, handling currency, etc.)ROP BUSINESS OCCUPATIONS CC/CVE2878 SemesterThis program trains students for entry-level positions in office work. This course is focused on businessrelatedskill development including business communications, employability skills, information technology,leadership development, and administrative functions. Students may also be placed in communityclassroom worksites and/or paid employment related to office occupations.Requirements: Must have transportation to internship site. Keyboarding knowledge required. Must beable to type 25 wpm or have taken Computer Applications, Office Occupations or MOS Certification with apassing grade of C or better preferredROP CAREERS IN EDUCATION2876 SemesterStudents will learn how to assist the teacher in a classroom setting at the elementary, middle, and highschool levels. Classroom topics include child development, guidance, and management techniques.50


ROP CAREERS WITH CHILDREN (Includes Internship)2691 SemesterStudents in this course will receive entry-level training in the field of child care and nursery schooloccupations (infant and elementary school). Students may be placed on internships and/or possibleemployment at infant centers, nursery, and elementary schools. Training in CPR, safety, and first aid isincluded in this course.Requirements: Students must like working with young children. Students must also have a positiveattitude and good attendance. Patience and creativity is also a must!ROP CATERING AND BANQUETS CC (Includes Internship)2710 SemesterStudent will receive training in customer relations, food service techniques, operating principles, andprocedures.Requirements: Must have transportation to internship site.ROP COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING5620 YearStudents will learn to create architectural and various engineering designs on the computer using the CADprogram such as Solidworks as a tool for these designs. Opportunities will be provided for students toparticipate in contests and events, and field trips to view various companies and colleges. Employmentopportunities may be offered in the field of Design & Drafting for select students who master the program.ROP CISCO NETWORKING2689 SemesterThis is a four-course sequence that qualifies students to take the CISCO CCNA Certification Test. It coversthe fundamentals of computer internet –including safety terminology, protocols, network topology andstandards, cabling, electrical considerations, the OSI models, IP addressing, Bridges, Switches, hubs, routers,and basic networking design. Upon completion of the course, students may apply for certification with avoucher.Prerequisites: Students should have successfully completed the ROP Computer Repair class and haveteacher approval prior to enrolling in this course.ROP COMMERCIAL ART/ADVERTISING2763 SemesterThis course is designed to introduce advertisement, brand, and product design. Students will use AdobePhotoshop and Illustrator for class projects. This class will cover storyboarding, illustration, photography,art history, and contemporary art. Students will be graded on their portfolio, improvement, andparticipation.ROP COMPUTER APPLICATIONS2700 YearThis course is designed to prepare students for entry-level jobs in businesses that use microcomputers for avariety of functions. Training with microcomputers will include application problems in word processing,presentation, spreadsheet, and database using Microsoft Office software.Prerequisite: Keyboarding knowledge of at least 25 words per minute is preferred.ROP CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY2728 YearThis course will prepare students for entry-level work in the field of construction. Students will get handson experience with carpentry.Materials fee required.ROP DESKTOP PUBLISHING2737 YearStudents enrolled in this course will use publishing software to learn the desktop publishing elements ofdesign. Students will learn to create publications using desktop publishing software. Students will beintroduced to Photoshop, Web Development. Students will also compile an electronic portfolio.Prerequisite: Keyboarding knowledge of at least 25 words per minute is preferred.ROP DIGITAL ART/GRAPHIC DESIGN2682 SemesterStudents in this course will learn the basic tools and fundamentals of Adobe Photoshop and AdobeIllustrator while designing layouts and logos for individual portfolios. Projects will be designed to enhancestudent understanding of graphic design and illustration.51


ROP FIRE SERVICE OCCUPATIONS2743 SemesterStudents in this course will experience intensive, hands-on learning. Students will explore careers in rescueservices, learn fire prevention and mitigation skills; use and care of fire-fighting tools, gear, and equipment;fire science; first aid; and CPR. Possible field trips to forest service, fire service, fire station, industrial firedepartment, city fire department, and private fire academy.ROP GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS CC/CVE2684 SemesterStudents will be placed in a classroom setting for 30 hours to build on their knowledge and review the skillsthey have learned from previous Graphic Design classes. Students will then be placed on an unpaidinternship for at least 40 hours where the student will gain valuable hands on experience in a GraphicDesign/Graphic Communications business. Internships may lead to paid employment.ROP HEALTH OCCUPATIONS2774 SemesterThis course trains students for employment in entry-level positions in hospital and health relatedoccupations. The student acquires occupationally specific skills in one or more entry level job titles in theareas of therapeutic, diagnostic, clerical, and supportive services in the healthcare facility. The goal of thecourse is to expose the students to the diverse career opportunities available in the health care field.ROP UC FILM/VIDEO PRODUCTIONS 12770 SemesterThis course is designed to introduce students to concepts and principles used in film and video production.This course exposes students to the basics of visual storytelling through the creation of storyboards, scriptwriting, basic shot types, camera movements, lighting, audio, and techniques of editing. Students will learnthe skills necessary for jobs within the industry such as producer, director, art director, set design, cameraoperator, script supervisor, editor, etc. See also ROP section. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements inthe following category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.ROP UC FILM/VIDEO PRODUCTIONS 22771 SemesterThis course is designed to introduce students to concepts and principles used to pursue a career pathway infilm and video production. This course exposes students to the basics of visual storytelling through thecreation of storyboards, script writing, basic shot types, camera movements, lighting, audio, and techniquesof editing. Students will learn the skills necessary for jobs within the industry such as producer, director, artdirector, set design, camera operator, script supervisor, editor, etc. See also ROP section This course meets theUC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.Prerequisite: ROP UC Film/Video Productions 1ROP UC GRAPHIC DESIGN2755 YearThis course will explore the ever-changing trends in the global field of design. Students will understand theimpact of the arts and design throughout history and in various cultures. This course is UC approved and iseligible for elective credit. Students will learn methods and theory such as elements and principles ofdesign to enhance their artistic vision and style. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the followingcategory: (f) - Visual and Performing Arts.ROP LAW ENFORCEMENT/CRIMINAL JUSTICE2720 SemesterThis course is designed to prepare students for entry-level jobs in the law enforcement field. This courseenables students to examine a wide variety of career opportunities in public and private law enforcement.Students will receive an introduction to law enforcement, public safety dispatcher, records clerk, policecadet, and security guard.ROP MICROSOFT SPECIALIST (MOS) CERTIFICATION2750 SemesterThis class will prepare students to be proficient in Microsoft software; students will take the online examgiven by Microsoft and be certified in a specific area such as Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, or MicrosoftPowerPoint.ROP OFFICE OCCUPATIONS (GENERAL OFFICE CLERK)2704 SemesterThis course is designed to train students for entry-level positions in the business/clerical area. Classroominstruction will include introduction to computers, word processing, keyboarding techniques, printing,using a calculator, filing, telephone etiquette, penmanship, proofreading, listening and speaking skills,regulations relating to sexual harassment, and time management. Units on employment preparation and52


positive work habits and attitudes will be covered. Students may earn college credits from Cerritos College,but must see ROP office for additional details.Prerequisite: Keyboarding knowledge preferred but not required.ROP OPTICIAN2765 YearStudents will learn how to read and interpret prescriptions, make glasses from start to finish, learn framerepair, designs, and styles, learn eye anatomy, customer service skills, and get real work experience in anoptical lab.ROP PHARMACY TECHNICIAN2741 YearThe American Institute of Health Sciences in Long Beach is offering this course through the Los AngelesCounty ROP as a private, post-secondary site. This course offers hands on training and internships. This isan 11-month course. It is held off-campus. Please see the ROP counselor for additional details.Course Prerequisite: Students enrolled in this course should be high school seniors interested in the fieldand have a GPA of 3.0 or aboveROP RETAIL MARKETING CC (includes Internship)2705 SemesterThis course provides students with the opportunities to prepare for and achieve careers in theretail/marketing industry. Learning experience will include advertising, fashion trends, communications,business plans, and basic sales techniques. Internships and possible employment in related fields. Studentsshould possess a positive & mature attitude and have good attendance. Students must also be trustworthy,honest, and dependable!! Businesslike clothing is necessary. Students in this course have experienced a90% hiring rate.Prerequisite: Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 and a work permit approval from his/her highschool counselor.ROP RECREATION OCCUPATIONS CC/CVE (includes Internship)2733 SemesterThis course trains students to lead organized recreational activities such as arts and crafts, games, dance,camping, and sports. Students will plan, organize, and direct these activities in playgrounds, recreationareas, parks, community centers, and theme parks. Students will learn how to schedule lessons, classes, andfacilities in a recreation program, and will organize and direct program participants. Students will also betaught how to keep records of equipment to ensure that equipment is used properly.ROP ROBOTICS2744 SemesterThis course is about Robots and Electronics. Students will use basic electronic skills to design and program arobot to find its way through mazes and other challenges. Working in teams students will construct aworking robot, write computer programs to control it and work with advanced electronic circuits to solvenavigation and science problems. Students will study the connection between applied physics principlesand several branches of engineering. Students will investigate the creation and uses of robots in NASAexploration, industrial manufacturing, engineering design, hazardous duties, maintenance, firefighting,surgery, and military robots. This course trains students for post-secondary education and/or entry-levelpositions in a variety of related occupations, such as robotics technician, computer programmer, and robotmachine operator.ROP SPORTS MARKETING2759 SemesterThis class requires hands-on experience conducting research and developing marketing strategies,promoting and advertising products and services related to the sports industry. Students will learn thefundamental concepts of marketing and business principles in the scope of amateur, college andprofessional sports.ROP TV & VIDEO PRODUCTIONS2742 SemesterThis is a comprehensive program that introduces students to the television (video) industry. It alsointroduces students to the skills necessary for jobs such as producer, director, assistant director, editor,videotape operator, technical script supervisor, grip, floor manager, etc. On-the-job experiences areprovided through organized laboratory activities. This course also acquaints students with the broadspectrum of career opportunities in the film and video industry.53


ROP ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION2772 SemesterThis is a comprehensive program that introduces the students to the television (video) industry. This alsobuilds upon the skills necessary for jobs such as producer, director, editor, video tape operator, technicalscript supervisor, grip, floor manager, etc acquired in ROP TV and Video Productions. On-the-jobexperiences are provided through organized laboratory activities. This course will also continue tofamiliarize students with the broad spectrum of career opportunities in the film and video industry.Students will work on BUC T.V.; this course will satisfy the Academy Technology requirement. See also ROPsection.Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ROP TV and Video Productions (BUC TV) and/or teacherrecommendationROP UC ANIMATION2683 YearThis course is designed to introduce students to the elements of art and how they relate to animation.Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to simplify human and animal images into cartooncharacters. A loop animation will be created utilizing a bouncing ball to crate a complete animation fromstoryboard to character and object design to filming. A variety of tasks ranging from the use of the computerto input pencils drawings to preparing 2D and 3D animation for computer imagery to expressing feelingsand emotions through animation. The development of cartooning and animation in the United States willalso be covered in this course. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) -Visual and Performing Arts.ROP UC DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY2756 YearThis course trains students for entry-level employment in the photography field. Students learn types andoperations of cameras and accessories common to the photography industry. This course will include blackand white film processing, proper printing techniques, studio lighting equipment, exposure meters, printfinishing, and portfolio presentations. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category:(f) - Visual and Performing Arts.ROP UC GRAPHIC DESIGN2755 YearThis course will explore the ever-changing trends in the global field of design. Students will understand theimpact of the arts and design throughout history and in various cultures. Students will learn methods adtheory, such as elements and principles of design to enhance their artistic vision and style. Through two andthree-dimensional design projects, students will develop problem-solving skills, artistic perception, criticalthinking, and self-direction. This course meets the UC/CSU a-g requirements in the following category: (f) - Visualand Performing Arts.COOPERATIVE VOCATIONAL EDUCATIONCooperative Vocational Education (CVE) classes is a program for students who are already working for payand would like high school credits and additional instruction. Students who are 16 or 17 years old must beregistered in an approved CVE class in order to qualify for an extended work permit. Students must alsoattend related instruction for a minimum of 2 ½ hours per week in order to receive credit for their work.ROP FOOD SERVICES CVE2714 SemesterThis course will emphasize food preparation, customer relations, food services technicians, operatingprincipals and procedures, operations of cash registers, order taking, inventory and supply, marketing anddisplay. Students will have the opportunity to earn a Serve Safe Certification upon successful completion ofcourse.ROP BUSINESS OCCUPATIONS CVE2878 SemesterThis program trains students for entry-level positions in office work. This course is focused on businessrelatedskill development including business communications, employability skills, information technology,leadership development, and administrative functions. Students may also be placed in communityclassroom worksites and/or paid employment related to office occupations.Requirements: Must have transportation to internship site. Keyboarding knowledge required. Must beable to type 25 wpm or have taken Computer Applications, Office Occupations or MOS Certification with apassing grade of C or better preferred54


SPECIAL SERVICESSPECIAL EDUCATIONStudents who qualify for special education programs may be served in a variety of ways. Bellflower offers afull inclusion Resource Specialist Program, a Special Day Class setting for students whose needs requirespecial education 50% or more of the school day, and physical health impaired and other health impairedservices, which includes classes for severely handicapped students. Bellflower has two school psychologistswho work with students with special needs, an Adaptive Physical Education teacher, and a Speech andLanguage Specialist. Each student receiving special education services has an annual review of the programand an Individual Education Plan is written by a team of specialists, including the parent and student. Foradditional information, please see your counselor.Bellflower offers a broad spectrum of special education services for those students who have active IEP’s.Services range from RSP full inclusion to SDC and OHI self contained.GIFTED AND TALENTED EDUCATION (GATE)The GATE program serves students who are gifted academically and/or in the visual performing arts.Students who have been identified as gifted according to the Gifted and Talented Education criteria of ourdistrict receive differentiated instruction within the classroom. In addition, students can enroll in coursesdenoted as "Honors" or “AP”. High achieving students are also given the opportunity to take these classes.Course content in these classes is a combination of enrichment and acceleration.ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM (AP)Advanced Placement (AP) classes are college-level courses taught on the high school campuses whichprepare students to take the AP exams each spring. Students who pass AP exams receive college credit atmany colleges and universities (including the UC and CSU systems). AP courses carry an extra grade pointas long as the student earns a "C" or better so that an "A" = 5 points, "B" = 4 points and "C" = 3 points.Students wishing to be admitted to competitive universities or majors should consider taking AP courses intheir sophomore, junior and senior years. Recommendations are normally required for enrollment.CAREER CENTERThe Career Center, with a computer for each student, has expanded the methods of providing students witha bridge between school, college and the world of work by using Choices software to describe colleges anduniversities as well as to discuss career and interest opportunities. Each year, under the supervision of theCareer Center technician and high school counselors, the Career Center processes over 2,000 students,guiding them through resume writing and in-depth career planning. In addition, each student receives acareer-planning packet containing a LACOE career handbook.CONCURRENT ENROLLMENTBellflower Unified School District students may enrich their programs or make up failed courses throughconcurrent enrollment in the Bellflower Adult School or Cerritos College. With prior approval from theirhigh school counselor, students may apply these courses toward high school graduation. Permission formsare available in the counseling centers.55


2+2+2 START PROGRAM/CERRITOS COLLEGEThe development of the 2+2+2 START Program is the product of a cooperative effort between the BellflowerUnified School District, Cerritos College and the California State Universities. The 2+2+2 START Programincludes 2 years of high school, (junior/senior years), plus 2 years community college, plus 2 years at aCalifornia State University and offers an opportunity for high school students to prepare for college work ora job and make themselves eligible for course credit at Cerritos College. Credit is based upon course workand an examination by Cerritos College faculty. The 2+2+2 START Program is for high school studentstaking approved BUSD courses in the areas of automotive technology, business education, drafting,electronics, math and science. Additional opportunities for approved high school 2+2+2 course work inother areas are under consideration. Courses under the 2+2+2 START Program are designated in the highschool course catalog with a letter. Students may use high school classes and Cerritos College educationtowards obtaining a Bachelor's degree at California State Universities, Los Angeles and Long Beach.ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT (ELD)English Language Development (ELD) is available to students of limited English proficiency whose primarylanguage is not English. The ELD program may include courses for beginning, intermediate and advancedlevel students in English, where students receive further instruction in history, science and math. Placementin the program is voluntary and is based on the results of language testing. The English LanguageDevelopment (ELD) classroom library and the school library provide LEP students with novels in their ownlanguage so that they can continue to grow in their native language while learning English. The curriculumaddresses interdisciplinary enrichment. Students bring in assignments from social studies, science, healthand other classes and work on vocabulary development, syntax review and verb tense practice using theseassignments. There is a copy of all students’ textbooks in the class so that they can work in class on theirhomework with the help of the aide. English Learner students are provided with ‘realia’ and Total PhysicalResponse exercises on a daily basis.LIBRARY MEDIA CENTERThe library is the hub of curricular activity on campus. A wide range of appropriate print, non-print,electronic and human resources are available. The Library media program facilitates resource-basedlearning where students access, evaluate and use resources to affect their own learning. Teachers and thelibrarian and staff work together to provide research skills, information analysis, technology skills, readingmotivation and cultural literacy to all students. Curriculum development, an ongoing evaluation ofmaterials and equipment, and direct work with students are also integral functions of the library mediaprogram.Textbooks and teacher resources are managed and distributed in the library. Students are responsible forinstructional materials assigned or loaned to them. Students or parents are responsible for the cost ofreplacing any instructional materials assigned or loaned that are lost or damaged. BUSD AP 6161.The library is generally open before school, at lunch and after school for student use. Peer tutors areavailable after school. Students must use a school ID card to use the computers or check out books.Additionally, a district Internet agreement must be on file before a student will be allowed the use of thelibrary computers. Students may buy replacement ID cards in the library.LIBRARY COMPUTER RESOURCE CENTERStudents receive training in computer applications, enabling them to utilize technology in their academicand personal lives. Students engage in creating documents, spreadsheets and databases, Internet-basedprojects and develop multi-page documents and multimedia presentations. They have the ability to utilizeword processing programs, electronic publishing software, spreadsheet programs, courseware, and relatedsoftware and Internet search and retrieval programs.56


CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP FEDERATIONCSF is a statewide honor society founded in 1921. It exists to foster a high standard of scholarship, serviceand citizenship. To qualify for membership each semester, a student must receive 10 points based on aformula which weighs academic and non-academic classes differently. When a student qualifies, he/shebecomes a member by paying dues, attending a minimum number of meetings and completing the requiredvolunteer project which each chapter establishes.Membership during any four of a student's last six semesters in high school entitles him/her to:• Life Membership designation on his/her diploma and school transcripts• The right to apply for scholarships reserved for Life Members (over 50 colleges and universitiesoffer such scholarships)• Special recognition at graduationMost colleges and universities recognize CSF membership as an advantage. When considering anapplication, most colleges and universities look favorably upon CSF membership. For more information,contact your counselor or the CSF Advisor at Bellflower.BELLFLOWER HIGH TECH MANUFACTURING ANDTELECOMMUNICATIONS ACADEMYBellflower High School's academy follows the California Partnership Academy model, and it servesstudents in grades ten through twelve. It is structured as a school-within-a-school and creates a close,family-like atmosphere, integrating academic and career technical education. Emphasis is also placed onstudent achievement and positive post-secondary planning. One of the main intents of the program is toprompt students to consider future career possibilities and focus on career interests in tandem with theiracademics. It is our hope to increase your student’s academic motivation and preparedness by providingcontext for what your student is learning in this/her core academic subjects. Additionally, all of the coursesoffered as part of our academy program also meet the California state content learning standards for allsubjects.Our academy program is comprised of a team of teachers who work together to plan and implement theprogram. As a result of the teacher collaboration, students also have opportunities to participate inmotivational activities to further encourage academic, occupational and post-secondary preparation.Students are exposed to integrated and project-based curriculum, mentor programs, classroom speakers,field trips, and exploration of post-secondary and career options.57


ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Ms. Julie AdamsFALLSPORTSCOACHWINTERSPORTSCOACHSPRINGSPORTSCOACHCross CountryR. WeimanD. BellBoys’ Basketball R. Sears Boys’ Baseball K. TrippFootball D. Brown Boys’ Soccer B. Norman Boys’ Golf K. MeeksGirls’ Golf K. Meeks Girls’ Basketball C. Reuter Boys’ Tennis R. IlaganGirls’ Tennis R. Ilagan Girls’ Soccer J. Schroeder Girls’ Softball A. StewartGirls’VolleyballH. Chen Wrestling M. Hernandez Boys’ Volleyball H. ChenCheer K. DiTota Track & Field D. PopeSwimmingM. SchicoraCLUBSCLUB ADVISOR CLUBDESCRPTIONMEMBERSHIPCRITERIAAA Auto ClubMr. Mario MirandaThis club helps promote Career TechnologyEducation, Academics and the AutomotiveIndustry.Open to all students.ASB/LeadershipMrs. Holly HennessyThese students are the student government forBellflower High School and should be rolemodels for their peers. Their role as leadershipstudents should embody school spirit and BUCPride.Students need a 2.0 G.P.A.;good attendance and have nodiscipline issues.58


Band CouncilMr. Omar VidanaThe Band Council is responsible for helping thedirector make decisions about the activities ofthe high school instrumental musicdepartment. Membership in an organizationsuch as this one is a remarkable opportunity toboth work as a team and gain individualrecognition, to experience leadership andfollow the lead of others, and to learndiscipline, cooperation and responsibility whileat the same time engaging in a creative activity.Member of the InstrumentalMusic Program and selectioncriteria processClub EternalMs. Lane FleshmanProvides common ground for Christianstudents.All are welcome.Classic Rock ClubMr. Michael HunterThe Classic Rock Club studies and reflects onpopular culture of the 60's-90's by listening toand discussing the Rock music of those eras;promoting a sense of community throughmusic appreciation and discussing historicalevents of the popular culture.Open to all. Participantsshould be willing to shareand discuss different genresand decades of popular RockMusic with an openmind.Computer ClubMr. Lin ThompsonThis club explores the many aspects ofcomputers and its applications from educationto gaming.All are welcome.EnsembleMs. Carolyn KelleyThis club works to promote and raise moneyfor all of the Choral programs at BHS.Open to all students whoenjoy singing and music.Fashion ClubMs. Fashion DelgadilloThis club is geared towards students interestedin becoming designers, models, make upartists, photographers, or set designers.Students will share their passion for style andlearn aspects of the fashion industry.Open to all students.FHA - HEROMs. Pam SeamsterThis club promotes and participates inactivities and competitions relative to homemaking, communication, and leadership.Open to any interestedstudent.Filipino ClubMr. Robert SpencerPromotes the heritage and culture of thePhilippine Islands.All are welcome.History ClubMr. Lin ThompsonThis club studies and celebrates history andhistorical events that influence our lives. Alsoraise money for worthy causes around BHS.All are welcome.Key Club (KiwanisEducating Youth)Mr. Michael McConnVolunteers willing to participate in variousservice activities in school and the community.25 hours of communityservice and attend weeklymeetings.Latinos United Mr. Paul Aleman Offers opportunities for students to attendmotivational and leadership events. Promotesa better understanding of Latino heritage.Fundraisers are held I order to attend culturalmuseums. The club is also involved inInternational Day providing cultural food anddances.All are welcome.59


Le Club Français(French Club)Ms. Lauley AnguileAcquaints students with the variousfrancophone cultures and encourages thelearning of the French language.All are welcome. Officers arein a French class or havecompleted one and must be ajunior or a senior.Parent TeacherStudent Association(PTSA)Mr. Joseph PerrySupports the education and welfare of childrenand youth. Partnership of parents, educatorsand students working together for the successof all students.$10 membership dues.Seniors must be a PTSAmember to be eligible for aPTSA Scholarship.Photo ClubMs. Haide GamboaThis club raises money for and promotesactivities surrounding photography and buildsphotography skills.Open to any interestedstudentRoots and ShootsEnvironmentalScience ClubMs. Melissa WengerA program of the Jane Goodall Institute, is apowerful, youth-driven, global network ofmore than 8,000 groups in almost 100 countries.Together, youth of all ages are taking action toimprove our world through service learningprojects that promote care and concern foranimals, the environment and the humancommunity.Open to any interestedstudent.The SocietyMr. Tom HoganThis club focuses on high academicachievement and the importance of continuededucation.Open to any interestedstudent in good academicstandingSpanish Club Mrs. Rogelia Mendez This clubs works to promote the SpanishLanguage and Spanish Culture.Open to any interestedstudent.Speech Club Mr. Lin Thompson This club prepares students for speechcompetitionsAll are welcome.Yearbook ClubTreasure ChestMr. Sean AlliceThis club oversees and promotes the yearbookand is committed to documenting and takingpictures in order to capture the wonderfulevents around our school.Teacher permission(interview).Young BlackScholars(YBS)Ms. Dana KiddAssists in preparing students for admission to afour-year college/university. Activities includecollege tours, community service and guestspeakers.Members are encouraged tomaintain a 3.0 GPA.60


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