Graduate Catalog: 2012-2013 - Alabama A&M University

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Graduate Catalog: 2012-2013 - Alabama A&M University

1 Crump Agricultural Mechanics Bldg. 26 Foster Living and Learning Center 51 Prentice Dining Hall2 Old Band and Drafting Building 27 Frank Lewis Gym 52 ROTC Skills Center3 Old Barn and Silo 28 Gravitt Apartments 53 Campus Police Office4 Bibb Graves Hall 29 Grayson Hall 54 Old Security Office5 Boiler #1 30 Greenhouses 55 Old Silo6 Boiler #2 31 Gym Annex 56 Stephens Hall7 Buchanan Hall 32 Hillcrest (President’s Home) 57 Terry Hall8 School of Business 33 Honors Building 58 Thigpen Hall9 Carnegie Hall 34 Hopkins Hall 59 Thomas Hall10 Carpentry Building 35 Hurt Hall 60 Old University Stadium11 Carter Science Hall 36 Infirmary 61 Walker Wood Hall12 Carver Complex 37 Kendrick Maintenance Facility 62 Water Pump House13 Carver Annex 38 Ralph H. Lee University Center 63 West Campus Living and Learning14 Councill Credit Union 39 McCalep Vocational Building 64 State Black Archives15 Chambers Science Building 40 McCormick Building 65 Baseball and Softball Fields16 Councill Training Center 41 Mechanical Engineering Annex 66 Soccer Field17 W.H. Councill Hall 42 Morris Hall 67 The Quad18 Louis Crews Stadium 43 Morrison Building 68 Tennis Courts19 Dawson Building 44 Palmer Hall 69 The Duck Pond20 Drake Dining Hall 45 T.R. Parker Building 70 Covered Footbridge21 Learning Resources Center 46 T.R. Parker Annex22 T.M. Elmore Gym 47 Patton Hall23 School of Engineering 48 Polk Cottage24 Forestry and Plant Science 49 Post Office25 Foster Irradiation Center 50 Poultry Science Building1


TABLE OF CONTENTSCampus Map ……………………………………………………………………………… 1Institutional Profile ……………………………………………………………………….. 2College Calendar …………………………………………………………………………. 4General Information ……………………………………………………………………… 9Academic Support ………………………………………………………………………… 11Student Services …………………………………………………………………………... 13Admissions Requirement ………………………………………………………………... 15Registration, Federal Regulations ………………………………………………………… 18Fees and Expenses ………………………………………………………………………… 20Residency Status ………………………………………………………………………….. 19Refund Polices ……………………………………………………………………………. 20Financial Aid ……………………………………………………………………………… 21Academic Policies ………………………………………………………………………… 23Comprehensive Exam Requirements ……………………………………………………... 28Thesis/Dissertation Requirements ………………………………………………………… 29Degree Program Requirements …………………………………………………………… 31Course Descriptions ……………………………………………………………………… 100Directory of Administrative Officials ……………………………………………………. 177Directory of Graduate Faculty …………………………………………………………… 178Organizational Chart ……………………………………………………………………... 1853


ALABAMA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 2012-2013Fall Semester 2012August 11, SaturdayAugust 11-14, Saturday Soar/Bulldog daysAugust 12-14, Sunday – TuesdayAugust 13, Monday 1:00 PM – 3:00 PMAugust 13-14, Monday-TuesdayAugust 14, Tuesday 4:00 PM-6:00 PMAugust 15, WednesdayAugust 16, ThursdayAugust 17, ThursdayAugust 17, SaturdayAugust 20-30, Monday-ThursdayAugust 24, FridayAugust 31, FridaySeptember 3, MondaySeptember 5, WednesdaySeptember 21, FridayOctober 1, MondayOctober 5, FridayOctober 8, MondayOctober 19, FridayOctober 15-29, Monday – FridayOctober 26-29, Friday-MondayNovember 1,TuesdayNovember 9, FridayNovember 20, TuesdayNovember 21-23, Wednesday-FridayNovember 26, MondayNovember 26, MondayDecember 5-6, Wednesday-ThursdayNew Students ArriveContinuing students arriveCollege MeetingsRegistration, academic advisement and scheduleadjustment periodGraduate School orientation, Clyde FosterMultipurpose Room, School of BusinessAll classes beginLast day to complete financial arrangementsLate registration and drop/add beginsOral thesis/dissertation examinations beginAttendance verification periodLast day to register or add coursesClasses dropped for failure to attendLabor DayDeadline to change from credit to audit and audit tocreditLast day for graduate students to submit applicationfor December graduation and fall comprehensiveexaminationsLast day to remove incomplete grades for DecembergraduatesDeadline to Submit Notification to the Office ofGraduate Studies of a Student’s Thesis/DissertationTopicMid-Term grades due in the Registrar’s office bynoonLast day to schedule and oral Thesis/dissertationexaminationComprehensive exams for graduate studentsFall break for students, faculty and staffAcademic advisement period and registration forSpring 2013Last day to drop classes or to withdraw from theUniversityFinal thesis/dissertation papers due in the Office ofGraduate StudiesThanksgiving RecessClasses resumePeriod opens for the submission of applications forMay 2013 graduation.Final exams for December 2012 graduates(Graduates and Undergraduates)4


December 12, WednesdayDecember 7-13, Wednesday – ThursdayDecember 7, WednesdayDecember 13, ThursdayDecember 14, WednesdayDecember 14, FridayDecember 17, MondayDecember 17, MondayDecember 21, FridayFinal submission of Teacher Education clearance tothe Office of Graduate Studies for DecembergraduatesFinal exam for all other studentsFinal grades due for December graduates (due inBanner by noon)Residence halls closed for continuing students at9:00 PMResidence halls closed for all students at 5:00 PMCommencementFinal grades due in Banner by noonHoliday recess begins at 5:00 PM (Faculty)Holiday recess begins at 5:00 PM (Staff)5


Spring 2013January3, ThursdayJanuary 3, Thursday 4:00 PM – 6:00 PMJanuary 4-6, Friday – Sunday,January 4-, FridayJanuary 7, MondayJanuary 8, TuesdayJanuary 9, WednesdayJanuary 10-17, Thursday-ThursdayNew students arriveGraduate School orientationContinuing students arriveRegistration, academic advisement and scheduleAdjustment period.Saturday classes beginLast day to complete financial arrangements beforedropping spring scheduleLate registration and drop/add beginsAttendance verification periodJanuary 11,FridayLast day to register or add a classJanuary 18, FridayClasses dropped for failure to attend classJanuary 18, Friday Deadline for submitting application for May 2013graduation Spring 2013 comprehensive examsJanuary 21, MondayMartin Luther King, Jr. HolidayJanuary 25, FridayLast day to change from credit to audit and audit tocreditFebruary 25, MondayRegistration for summer session 2013 beginsMarch 1, FridayPriority date for Fall 2013 financial aid processingMarch 2-8, Saturday-FridayMid-term examinationsMarch 9-17, Saturday-SundayMarch 4-8, Monday-FridayMarch 8, FridayMarch 15, FridayMarch 18, MondayMarch 18, MondayMarch 22, FridayMarch 25, MondayApril 1,MondayApril 4, ThursdayApril 4, ThursdayApril 8, MondayApril 12, FridayApril 22, MondayApril 24-25, Wednesday-ThursdayApril 26, FridayApril 29, MondayMay 2, ThursdayMay 2, ThursdayResidence halls closed for Spring BreakComprehensive exams for graduate studentsDeadline to submit notification to the Office ofGraduate Studies of thesis/dissertation topicSpring recess (Staff)Last day to submit Comprehensive examinationresults to the Office of Graduate StudiesPeriod opens for graduate students to submitapplication for July 2013 degree completion andsummer 2013 comprehensive examinationOral thesis/dissertation examinations endRegistration for Fall 2013 beginsDeadline for removal of incomplete grades for May2013 graduatesHonors Day ConvocationFinancial aid exit interviews for graduatesLast day to drop classes and/or withdraw from theuniversityAnnual STEM dayDeadline to submit final thesis/dissertation to theOffice of Graduate StudiesFinal exams for May 2013 graduatesFinal grades for May graduates due in banner by5:00 PM (graduates and undergraduates)Final submission of Teacher Education Clearance tothe Office of Graduate Studies for May graduatesFinal exams endNon-graduates check out of residence halls6


Summer Session 2013May 22-23, Tuesday-WednesdayRegistration, academic advisement and scheduleadjustment periodMay 23, WednesdayLast day to complete financial arrangementsMay 27, MondayMemorial Day holiday (University closed)May 28, TuesdayLate registration and drop/add period beginsMay 28, TuesdayClasses beginMay 28, TuesdayOral thesis examinations beginMay 30, ThursdayLass Day to register or add a courseJune 6, ThursdayDeadline for the removal of incomplete gradesJune 6, ThursdayDeadline to submit notification to Office of GraduateStudies of thesis and dissertation topicJune 13, ThursdayLast day to drop courses for mini session IJune, 1722, Monday-ThursdayComprehensive examinations (graduate students)June 24, Monday Final exams (mini session I)June 25,TuesdayFinal Grades due in the banner system by 5:00 PM(Mini Session)June 27, ThursdayRegistration for mini session IIJune 28, FridayDeadline to submit comprehensive examinationresults to the Office of Graduate StudiesJune 28, FridayDeadline to submit final thesis/dissertation to theOffice of Graduate StudiesJuly1, MondayClasses Start (mini session II)July 2, TuesdayLast day to register or add courses (mini session II)July 3, WednesdayLast day to drop classes and withdraw from theUniversityJuly 4, ThursdayIndependence holiday observedJuly 8, MondayClasses resumeJuly 29-30, Monday-TuesdayFinal examsJuly 31, WednesdayFinal submission of Teacher Education clearance tothe Office of Graduate Studies for summer clearanceAugust 1, ThursdayFinal grades due in banner8


GENERAL INFORMATIONABOUT THE UNIVERSITYAlabama Agricultural and Mechanical University(AAMU) was organized in 1875 through the untiringefforts of its founder and first President, WilliamHooper Council, an ex-slave. The school doorsopened on May 1, 1875, as the Huntsville NormalSchool. Industrial education was added in 1878,generating widespread attention, which helped togarner financial support from the Slater and PeabodyFunds and private contributors. Under the secondMorrill Act of 1890, AAMU became a land grantinstitution and moved to its present location in 1891.The University has undergone four name changesduring its 130 years of existence. Upon earning juniorcollege status in 1919, the name was changed to theState Agricultural and Mechanical Institution forNegroes. Senior college level courses were added in1939; the first graduating class received thebachelor’s degree in 1941, and the name was changedto Alabama A&M College in 1949. The collegebecame a fully accredited member of the SouthernAssociation of Colleges and Secondary Schools in1963. In 1969, the name was changed to AlabamaAgricultural and Mechanical University.THE CAMPUSAlabama Agricultural & Mechanical University is adynamic, public comprehensive liberal arts institutionlocated in Normal, just minutes from Huntsville,Alabama. The University comprises 70 buildings on2,000 acres. A large agricultural research farm issituated about 10 miles off-campus in Hazel Green,Alabama, and the University’s Agribition Center isalso located about one mile east of the main campus.Affiliated offices, such as the North Alabama Centerfor Educational Excellence, are also located severalmiles from campus.9


MISSION STATEMENTAlabama Agricultural and Mechanical Universityreflects the uniqueness of the traditional land-grantinstitution, combining teaching, research service,liberal arts, and vocational fields. The Universityoffers baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral degreesthat are current with the times to all qualified andcapable individuals who are interested in furtherdeveloping their technical, scientific, professional,and scholastic skills and competencies. Theuniversity operates in the three-fold function ofteaching, research, and extension and other publicservices. Alabama A&M University, a center ofexcellence, provides an educational environment forthe emergence of scholars, scientists, leaders, criticalthinkers, and other contributors to a global society. Incooperation with business, industry, governmentalagencies, and other private and community-basedinstitutions, Alabama A&M University provides alaboratory where theory is put into practice globally.Alabama A&M University is committed to:1. Excellence in education and the creation of ascholarly environment in which inquiring anddiscriminating minds will be nourished.2. Education of students for effectiveparticipation in local, state, regional, national,and international societies.3. Search for new knowledge through researchand its applications.4. Provision of a comprehensive outreachprogram designed to meet the changing needsof the larger community outside the campus.5. Programs necessary to adequately address themajor needs and problems of capable studentswho have experienced limited access toeducation.6. Integration of state-of-the art technology intoall aspects of University functions.STUDENT LIFEAlabama A&M University’s mission is to provide“excellence in education and a scholarly environmentin which inquiring and discriminating minds may benourished.” But this mission extends beyond theclassroom walls into student and campus life. To aidin the overall educational experience, the A&MOffice of Residential Life and Housing worksdiligently to provide quality and comfortable livingaccommodations with a plethora of amenities tomake your stay convenient. During your stay atA&M, enjoy your residential life experience and takefull advantage of this educational opportunity. Extracurricularclubs and activities help build therelationships that are part of the college experience.Other services enrich the classroom experience, orprovide for your health, well-being, and safety whileyou are a student at Alabama A&M University.ALUMNIAmong an extensive list of distinguished alumniare: John Stallworth, former Pittsburgh Steelers andPro Football Hall of Famer, William E. Cox,publisher of Diverse Issues in Higher Education,and Ruben Studdard, former “American Idol.”THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIESThe basic purpose of the Graduate School is to offercollege graduates an opportunity to extend theirgeneral and technical knowledge in specific fields; toincrease their professional skills; and to becomeacquainted with the tools and practices of research.All students in the School of Graduate Studies workunder the direction of the Graduate Council. Nomajor deviations from published graduate regulationsare permissible unless they are approved by theCouncil.10


ACADEMIC SUPPORT AND FACILITIESACADEMIC COMPUTINGAAMU has six computer laboratories which offer thelatest in technology and access to the Internet. Thecomputer labs are open to all registered students andare free of charge. Typical applications includedesktop publishing, database management,spreadsheet analysis, graphics, word processing,statistical analysis, and mathematical computation.Some labs support additional software such asAutoCAD and other design applications. All maincampus buildings and residence halls are connectedto the campus network and Internet through fiberoptic cable. Students are provided with consolidatedcomputing services, including web based email.J.F. DRAKE MEMORIAL LEARNINGRESOURCES CENTER (LIBRARY)The Joseph F. Drake Memorial Library and LearningResources Center (Drake LRC) is the main library forgraduate studies at Alabama A & M University.Drake LRC named in honor of the fourth presidentwas dedicated in 1968 and became the LRC with themerger of the library and media center. The 1,000seat modern facility provides students with access toa collection of books, print, online journals,microforms and databases. Accessible, to studentsfrom the LRC, are two computer lab, 2 multi-purposerooms, 7 group study rooms, learning commons areason each level. A team of professional librariansprovide services to faculty and studentsapproximately 81 hours per week. The VirtualLibrary of Alabama (AVL) provides all students,teachers, and citizens of the State of Alabama withonline access to essential library and informationresources. It is primarily a group of online databasesthat have magazines, journals, and newspaper articlesfor research such as EbscoHost Academic SearchPrimer, ERIC, Business Source Primer, MasterFilePrimer and Gale’s Cengage InfoTrac PowerSearch.Drake LRC is a member of the Network of AlabamaAcademic Libraries (NAAL). Through this consortianetwork an additional seventeen databases such asPsycInfo, PsycArticles, SportDiscus, SocIndex, andMental Measurement Yearbook are provided forstudents. For resources that are not contained in theapproximately 400,000 volume collection of books,eBooks, microforms and journals, faculty andstudents may request those items through interlibraryloan. Drake LRC is on social media-follow us onTwitter and Facebook or call us at 256-372-4723 or4712.INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMSAlabama Agricultural and Mechanical Universitywelcomes international students and the diversebackgrounds they bring to our campus, andencourages all students to study abroad. TheInternational Student Center works with students,faculty and staff across campus to promoteinternational and cross-cultural learning. The Officealso assists international students by providinginformation and counseling to non-immigrant studentvisa regulations and processes, housing, financial andwork issues, and adjustment to life in the U.S.CAREER DEVELOPMENT SERVICESCareer Development Services is a centralized officewith a mission to assist students and alumni incrystallizing career objectives and preparing foremployment opportunities by providing planningservices which will enable students to moveconfidently from the academic environment to theworld of work. Some of the services provided byCareer Development Services are:1. On-campus interviews for sophomores, juniors,seniors, graduate students, and alumni with local,state, and national employers.2. Annual mini-workshops and individualcounseling sessions for seniors, alumni, and coop/internship,applicants on resume and coverletter writing, interviewing skills, and job searchstrategies.3. Job listing services which provide currentinformation about specific employmentopportunities.4. Listings of part-time and summer employmentfor off-campus jobs.5. Classroom presentations on employment trends,resume writing, job search techniques, and careerplanning.6. Cooperative Education (undergraduate/graduate)and summer internships.11


7. CDS Career Resource Library. Resourcesinclude company binders, videotapes, books,CD’s, and journals.8. Credential services for teacher educationcandidates.9. Job referral service.OFFICE OF ACADEMIC SUPPORTSERVICES/UNIVERSITY COLLEGEThe Office of Academic Support Services is a unit ofUniversity College that provides academic servicesand programs designed to assist students in theirpursuit of academic excellence at Alabama A&MUniversity. These services and programs have beendeveloped and implemented to impact studentretention and degree completion.TAN (TUTORIAL ASSISTANCE NETWORK)Tutoring services are certified by the CollegeReading and Learning Association’s Tutor TrainingCertification Program (CRLA)1. Individual and group tutoring –offered for mostcourses; tutors are CRLA-certified,2. Supplemental Instruction – (best practiceretention program) an academic assistanceprogram that utilizes peer-assisted, regularlyscheduled,informal review study sessions inwhich students compare notes, discussreadings, develop organizational tools, andpredict test items. Students learn how tointegrate course content and study skills whileworking together. The sessions are facilitatedby “SI leaders”, students who have previouslydone well in the course and who attend all classlectures, take notes, and act as model students.3. Presents and facilitates Residential HallWorkshops designed for freshmen tostrengthen their study techniques and academicskills (approximately 10 per semester), and4. Offers Academic Success Coaching viaindividual and/or group sessions to helpstudents develop and refine academic skills,i.e., study and test-taking skills, textbookreading strategies, and effective note taking.BARC (BULLDOG ACADEMIC RESOURCECONNECTION)1. Provides specialized academic counselingand intervention for students on academicprobation and those experiencing academicdifficulty, including goal setting, timemanagement planning, study skills,2. Presents and facilitates online BulldogSuccess Seminars for students on academicprobation,3. Presents and facilitates the LearningStrategies Workshops in Residential Hallsfor sophomores, junior and seniors toincrease their academic success skills,4. Offers realistic graduation planning to helpstudents to get back on track after probation,5. Develops Academic Success Plans to helpstudents return to good academic standing asquickly as possible, and6. Calculates Semester Needed GPA to providestudents’ with the GPA needed to return togood academic standing at the end of thesemester, sometimes it is not possible for astudent to return to good academic standingin one semester.12


STUDENT SERVICESTHE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETYThe Department of Public Safety is responsible forprotecting life, property and enforcing the laws of theState of Alabama and Alabama A&M University.The Department mandates the preservation of peaceand public order, crime prevention and theapprehension and prosecution of violators of the law.The Department of Public Safety is committed to thephilosophy of community-oriented law enforcementand pledges the highest professional standards whileproviding an environment conducive to academicexcellence. In addition, the Department workscooperatively with other local law enforcementagencies to investigate violations of campusregulations and policies and state laws. TheDepartment of Public Safety is committed toproviding quality service 24 hours a day.STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES (SHS)Alabama A&M University‘s Student Health Services(SHS), located in the little white building across fromMorris Hall Dormitory, serves to protect andmaintain the health of all currently enrolled students.The Student Health Services is an outpatient centerand provides both clinical and educational servicesfor all students. Should tests, x-rays, and otherservices beyond the scope of the Center berecommended, the Student Health staff will assiststudents with a referral and insurance billing. Anyongoing medical condition such as, but not limited to,diabetes, hypertension, epilepsy or migraine is theresponsibility of the student‘s primary care physician(PCP). Student Health Services will monitor thestudent‘s health in collaboration with the PCP.Student Health Services is staffed by physicians,medical assistants, nurses and a nurse practitioner.The Center‘s hours of operation are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30p.m., Monday – Friday; it is closed on weekends andholidays. Any student needing medical attentionshould report to SHS during its hours of operation. Ifa student has an acute illness after hours he or sheshould seek treatment at University Walk-In FamilyCare located at 501 Wynn Drive. The telephonenumber is (256) 890-8700. The office hours areMonday thru Friday, 8 a.m. – 7 p.m. Saturday,Sunday, and holidays, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. In the event ofan emergency, the student should seek treatment atthe Huntsville Hospital Emergency Room located at101 Sivley Road. The student should return to theStudent Health Center the next business day for areferral.OFFICE OF VETERAN AFFAIRSThe Office for Veteran Affairs serves as a resourcecenter and an advocate for veterans. Generalinformation, counseling and professional referrals areavailable for veterans. The Office of Veteran Affairsworks closely with the U.S. Veteran’s AdministrationOffice in the disbursement and coordination ofappropriate documents and benefits.PARKINGAll motor vehicles parked on the campus of AlabamaAgricultural & Mechanical University must beregistered with campus police. A Student ParkingPermit Form is available during the annualregistration process or at campus police.STUDENT IDENTIFICATION CARDThe identification card is the student’s officialpassport. It should be carried at all times. Loss ofidentification cards should be reported immediatelyto the Financial Services Office located on the firstfloor of Patton Hall. The replacement charge is$50.00 for boarding students and $25.00 for nonboardingstudents. The ID card is used for checkingout books and other resources from the LearningResources Center. It is also used for admission tomany University events. Lending this card to anyone,or failure to present it when requested by authorizedpersonnel, is a violation of University policy.13


OTHER STUDENT LIFE FACILITIES AND SERVICESCAFETERIAThe University requires all persons living inresidence halls to purchase a meal card. The cost ofthe meal card is part of the overall package of roomand board and is non-refundable. Meal Cards arenon-transferrable and must be used during the periodfor which they are issued. A fee of 650.00 will becharged for replacing a lost or damaged Meal Card.Special consideration will be given to students whohave medically-related dietary restrictions. Specialdiets will be prepared upon presentation of astatement from the University physician or nursepractitioner. Students should see the Food ServicesDirector during the first week of classes to arrangefor special diets. Non-boarding students maypurchase a Meal Card at the same rate as boardingstudents. A $30.00 replacement fee will be chargedfor a lost or damaged Meal Card.THE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTOREThe University Bookstore is located on the secondfloor of the University Center. The bookstore is openMonday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.Textbooks may be purchased from the bookstorelocated in the Ralph H. Lee Student Center. Thebookstore accepts the following method of payments:cash, cashier’s check, traveler’s check, personalchecks, American Express, Discover, MasterCard,and VISA credit cards.14


GRADUATE ADMISSIONSADMISSIONS POLICIESApplicants for admission to graduate study atAlabama Agricultural & Mechanical University musthold a bachelor's degree from a regionally accreditedcollege or university (or the equivalent of a four-yearbaccalaureate degree from another country). In manydegree programs, the number of applications receivedfrom individuals qualified for graduate studyregularly exceeds the number of students who can beaccommodated. In such cases, only the most highlyqualified are offered admission. The number ofspaces available in various departments is limitedaccording to the availability of faculty, specialresources, and funds for students requiring financialassistance. The decision to admit an applicant isbased primarily on a combination of the followingcriteria:1. Quality of undergraduate and previous graduatework. The Graduate School requires as aminimum a “B” average (3.0 on a 4.0 scale in allundergraduate courses taken at a regionallyaccredited college or university). 2. Official, GRE/GMAT Scores.3. Letters of Recommendation that speak to theapplicant’s potential for successful completion ofthe degree program to which the applicant isapplying.4. Supplemental evidence of potential success forgraduate studies. Some programs require otherevidence of potential for success, such as aportfolio, personal interviews, examples ofscholarly work, and or research.5. Available space in the program, and competitiverating within the applicant pool for the giventerm of entry.2. Official transcripts from each collegiateinstitution attended directly mailed to the Schoolof Graduate Studies Office, P. O. Box 998,Normal, AL 35762.3. Official test scores of the Graduate RecordExamination (GRE) are required for all programsexcept for an MBA for which the GraduateManagement Admission Test (GMAT) scoresare required (University Code: 1003). Testscores over five years old or results brought bythe applicant to the Office of Graduate Studiesare not accepted.4. Two letters of recommendation on officialAlabama Agricultural & Mechanical University“Letter of Recommendation” forms. Theserecommendations should speak to the applicant’spotential for successful completion of thegraduate program to which he/she is applying(usually, letters of recommendation are from theapplicant's former professors). Additionalrecommendations may come from employers orsupervisors who are familiar with the applicant'swork experience.5. Details on any professional work experience.6. Applicants must demonstrate adequate academicpreparation in their proposed area of study.Those with deficiencies in academic preparationmay be required to take additional coursework tostrengthen their backgrounds.7. Other requirements specified by the particulardegree program to which the applicant isapplying.APPLICANTS FOR ADMISSION MUST MEETTHE FOLLOWING MINIMUMREQUIREMENTS:APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION MUSTINCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:1. Completed “official” Alabama Agricultural &Mechanical University Application forAdmission to Graduate Studies and a nonrefundableapplication fee. Adequate performance in prerequisite courses is also required(i.e. all grades in these courses must be a “B” or above). Graduates of Benedict, Martin Methodist, Morris, Judson,Voorhees, North Carolina Wesleyan, Stillman, Talladega,Edward Waters, Lane, Miles, Rust, Tougaloo, Concordia, andRegular/Full AdmissionTo be admitted unconditionally, applicants must:1. Have a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a(4.0 GPA scale) at the undergraduate level froma regionally accredited college/university.2. Submit a minimum score of 146 on the verbaland 140 on the quantitative portions of the GRE.Together the combined score must be aLivingstone Colleges and Johnson C. Smith, Fort Valley Stateand Fisk Universities do not have to pay the application fee.15


minimum of 286. Some programs may requirehigher GRE scores. MBA students are requiredto attain a minimum GMAT score of 350.3. Hold a baccalaureate degree or its equivalentfrom a regionally accredited college oruniversity.4. Meet all program-specific requirements.NOTE: Individual departments may require higherGRE/GMAT scores or other specific requirements;see departmental sections for details.Conditional Admission*Students who do not meet one of the two mainrequirements (GPA or GRE/GMAT test scores) forregular admission may be admitted conditionally.Students admitted conditionally are allowed onesemester to fulfill the Graduate Record Examination(GRE) or Graduate Management Analytical Test(GMAT) requirement. Students are required to earn aminimum grade of “B” in these courses to progress toregular admission. Students failing to meet thesestandards can be at the discretion of the Dean ofGraduate Studies dismissed from the Graduateprogram.The Office of Graduate Studies updates the recordsof students, who were admitted conditionally, duringthe first two weeks of each semester and during thefollowing periods:April 15-25July 15-25November 15-30The Office of Graduate Studies will not process anystudent seeking a change of status outside of the dateslisted above.Conditionally admitted students have two semester(inclusive of summer sessions) to remove allprovisions outlined in the original letter ofadmissions. Students who fail to remove conditionsat the end of two semesters will be ineligible toreceive student loans or other forms of financialassistance.Non-Degree AdmissionThis is a category for students who do not intend toseek an advanced degree from Alabama A&MUniversity. Persons seeking to enroll as non-degreestudents must possess an undergraduate degree froma regionally or nationally accredited institution. Theyalso must have a cumulative undergraduate GPA of2.5 (on a 4.0 scale). Non-degree students usuallyinclude:1. Those who intend to transfer graduate creditearned at Alabama A&M University to otherinstitutions.2. Those who intend to use graduate credits earnedfor professional certification.3. Those that enroll for personal satisfaction.A non-degree student who subsequently seeks fulladmission must satisfy requirements for admission tothe specific program. Non-degree students are onlyallowed to transfer a maximum of 9 semester hours ifthey get approval to enter an AAMU graduate degreeprogram.ADMISSION OF STUDENTS FROM OTHERCOUNTRIESAlabama A&M University welcomes applicationsfrom students from other countries. Applicationsshould be sent three to six months before theregistration date for each term. All applicants mustmeet Graduate School and departmentalrequirements as described in this catalog. Inaddition, international students must submit anofficial academic transcript accompanied byofficial/or notarized English translations. Thesedocuments must be sent directly from theinstitution(s) attended. Personal copies are notaccepted. All foreign (non-U.S.) transcripts mustbe translated and evaluated by the World EducationServices (WES). This review must provideconclusive evidence that the applicant is therecipient of a degree comparable to the Americanbachelor's degree, which normally terminates 16years of full-time study, 4 years of which are at thepost-high school level. The official transcripts mustshow all post-high school work attempted,including grades or marks in each course,examination grades and standing in examinationsand classes, or whatever other credentials areavailable to give a clear description of the student'sacademic accomplishments. Other requirementsfor international students include:1. Scores of the Graduate Record Examination(GRE) or Graduate Management Admission Test(GMAT). Test results must be sent directly tothe School of Graduate Studies from theEducational Testing Services (Alabama A&MUniversity Code: 1003).16


2. A certified financial statement indicating theapplicant’s ability to pay for the cost ofeducation. An original/official bank statementno more than six months old at the time ofregistration must be submitted to the GraduateSchool in order to obtain the I-20 for the F-1student visa. In certain cases, advance paymentof tuition and fees may be required.3. The Test of English as a Foreign Language(TOEFL) or the International English TestingSystem (ELS) Certification Examination isrequired if the applicant's first language is notEnglish; the minimum score for admission on theTOEFL internet-based version is 500 (paperbasedtest) or 61 (internet-based test), and the 5.5on the ELS Certification Examination. TheAlabama A&M University Code is 1003.The Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NewJersey 08540, administers these tests in testingcenters all over the world. Further information aboutthe test and testing dates may be obtained atwww.ets.org or from the nearest U.S. Embassy,Consulate or United States Information Service,United States Educational Commission andfoundations abroad and bi-national centers.Admission to graduate study does not carry anyimplication concerning the award of financial aid.Assistance for graduate students in the form ofassistantships is available from some departmentalprograms and administrative units, but applicantsfrom abroad are in competition with U.S. students foravailable awards. The University reserves the right,even after the arrival and enrollment of students fromanother country, to make individual curricularadjustments whenever particular deficiencies orneeds are found. Students may be required to takesuch courses without credit and at their own expense.This could also apply to additional course work inEnglish as a foreign language whenever necessary.NOTE: All international students are required tomaintain an international student health insuranceonce admitted to the University. Coverage for aspouse and/or dependents is available and must bepurchased separately at the Student Health Center. Abrochure explaining the coverage of the studenthealth insurance program is available at the StudentHealth Center.READMISSIONA student who has not registered for at least threecredits during a twelve-month period will betransferred to inactive status and must file anapplication for readmission. Readmission is notautomatic, nor does it necessarily reinstate thestudent in the status accorded prior to becominginactive. Students not enrolled over a twelve-monthperiod, who have not exceeded twenty-four monthsmay apply directly to the Dean of Graduate Studiesfor readmission. Students not registered in more thantwenty-four months must submit a new admissionapplication (along with required fees and appropriatecredentials) directly to the Office of Graduate Studiesand have their credentials reviewed by theirrespective department before a decision onreadmission can be rendered.ADMISSION OF UNDERGRADUATES TOGRADUATE COURSESSenior undergraduate AAMU students who havecompleted all required courses, and are within 6hours of graduation may enroll for a maximum of sixsemester hours of graduate work. Students seeking toenroll in a Graduate course must have a 2.5 GPA (ona 4.0 scale) and a letter from their academic advisorgranting permission to enroll a graduate course.When graduate courses are taken for undergraduatecredit, they may not be used as part of a futuregraduate program. Seniors who are completing theirfinal semester at other institutions will be consideredfor admission when they present the followingdocuments:1. Official undergraduate transcript.2. Letter from the institution’s Registrar stating thestudent has applied for graduation and willgraduate that semester if the courses enrolled inare successfully completed.Admission, if granted, will be contingent upon thereceipt of the diploma or a letter from the Registrarindicating that the student has completed therequirements for the degree and when the degree willbe awarded. The student will also be required toprovide the School of Graduate Studies, Office of theDean with an official transcript within 30 days ofregistration.17


REGISTRATION, FEDERAL REGULATIONS, FEES AND EXPENSESDISPOSITION OF APPLICATIONMATERIALSCredential or supporting materials submitted foradmission to Graduate School become the property ofAlabama Agricultural & Mechanical University andare not returned. Copies will not be provided to thestudent or to a third party outside of the Universityeven at the applicant’s request. Copies may beprovided to appropriate offices at the University inthe interest of academic matters or financial awardsrelative to the applicant.REGISTRATIONOnce admission has been granted, students arerequired to complete registration within the set timeperiod stipulated by the university calendar. It isimperative that students enter accurate and completeinformation on all registration cards/forms.CROSS-REGISTRATIONAlabama Agricultural & Mechanical University andthe University of Alabama at Huntsville offergraduate students in the Biological Sciences theopportunity to cross register. Each department retainsthe authority to establish the prerequisites foradmission and the maximum enrollment in its homecourses and to grant priority in registration to its owngraduate students.GENERAL GRADUATE DEGREEREGULATIONSprogram that may be altered where such alterationsare thought to be in the mutual interest of theUniversity and its students.FEDERAL REGULATIONSAlabama A&M University does not discriminate onthe basis of race, color, religion, ethnicity, nationalorigin, age, sex, marital, or handicapped status. Thiscommitment is made by the University and requiredby federal, state, and local laws and regulations,including Title IX, 86.9.Each student at theUniversity has the right to inspect his/her studentrecords as per Federal Register, Vol. 40 Number 3,Part III, Privacy Rights of Parents and Students.COURSE ENROLLMENTA maximum of nine graduate credit hours areconsidered a full academic load during the regularacademic semesters, Fall & Spring. However, tomaintain a graduate assistantship (Teaching orResearch) a student must be enrolled in a minimumof 6 graduate hours offered by Alabama A&MUniversity during the regular academic semester.During summer sessions students must enroll in 3semester hours offered by Alabama A&M Universityto qualify for a graduate assistantship.FEES AND EXPENSESTuition rates and fees are posted on the University'sweb site. The University reserves the right to changefees, charges, rules and regulations without priornotice.Every graduate student is expected to becomefamiliar with the University and all Graduate Schoolregulations. The information and educationalrequirements in the catalog represent a flexible18


RESIDENCY STATUSREQUIREMENTS FOR RESIDENCYFor the purpose of assessing tuition and fees, AAMUclassifies students as Alabama residents or nonresidents.Residency, for this purpose, meansdomicile; domicile means living in the state ofAlabama with the intent to make Alabama a fixedand permanent home. For example, students mayhave more than one home address but only onedomicile. All out-of-state students must pay nonresidentfees. A student who comes to Alabama forthe purpose of attending an institution of highereducation is considered a non-resident student.Registration for voting, obtaining an Alabamadriver’s license, purchasing of property, andemployment in Alabama are considered necessarycomponents of establishing residency. Students fromoutside of Alabama will be assumed to be nonresidentstudents, unless they affirmatively fall withinthe criteria specified below.RESIDENCY CLASSIFICATION FORTUITION PURPOSESIn Alabama, as in all other states, tuition at publiclysupported four-year universities is higher for nonresidentstudents than for resident students. The rulesused in determining residency seek to ensure thatonly legal Alabama residents are assessed theresident fee. Many of these rules appear below:1. Residency is a person’s true, fixed, andpermanent home and place of habitation. It is theplace where a person intends to remain and towhich the person expects to return when theperson leaves without intending to establish anew domicile elsewhere. In order to establish adomicile in Alabama, a person must maintain apredominant physical presence in Alabama for12 consecutive months after moving to the state.2. No emancipated minor or person 19 years of ageor older shall be deemed to have gained oracquired Alabama residency status for tuitionpurposes while attending any educationalinstitution in this state, unless the individualmakes a clear demonstration that he/she hasestablished residency in this state.3. A financially dependent person who is claimedas a dependent by another person who has notestablished and maintained an Alabamaresidency shall be presumed to be a nonresident.This presumption may be overcome by evidenceof the student’s long-standing presence inAlabama and demonstration of other factors (Forcomplete details, contact the Office of theRegistrar)4. A full-time employee of AAMU, his/her spouse,and dependent children under age 25, mayregister for the payment of resident fees, eventhough they have not been residents of Alabamafor the preceding 12 months.5. Military personnel and their dependentsstationed in Alabama and on active military dutyare entitled to Alabama residency classificationfor tuition purposes.For full details about residency, contact the Office ofthe Registrar.CHANGES IN RESIDENCE STATUSApplicants who are classified by AAMU as nonresidentsbut who later claim to qualify as legal bonafide residents of Alabama must file a Petition forAlabama Residency Classification for TuitionPurposes with the Office of Graduate Studies.To receive consideration, petitions for change ofstatus and all supporting documentation must be filedwith the Office of Graduate Studies for theprospective session on or before:Fall Semester ................................................... July 15Spring Semester .............................................. Nov. 15Summer Sessions ........................................... April 1519


REFUND POLICIESTUITION AND FEESThe tuition and fees are refundable in accord with thefollowing schedule when a student withdraws fromthe University after completing the registrationprocess:Fall and Spring SemestersFrom the first day of class through the seventhcalendar day: 90%.From the eighth calendar day through the fourteenthcalendar day: 80%.Summer SemesterBefore classes start: 90%.From the first day of class through the fifth day ofclass: 75%.From the sixth day of class through the twelfth day ofclass: 50%.After the thirteenth day of class, there are no refunds.A full refund will be issued, if a course is cancelledby AAMU. Fees paid with credit card will becredited to the customer’s card.From the fifteenth calendar day to the twenty-firstcalendar day: 70%.From the twenty-second calendar day through thethirtieth calendar day: 60%.After the thirtieth calendar day, there are no refunds.20


FINANCIAL AIDTYPES OF FINANCIAL AIDAlabama A&M University attempts to providefinancial support for as many graduate students aspossible. The University has a complete financial aidprogram composed of the following forms of aid:1. Assistantships/Fellowships (research andteaching assistantships).2. National Direct Student Loans.3. Work-study jobs.4. Guaranteed student loans.Assistantships/FellowshipsA number of graduate fellowships andAssistantships are available in departments thatoffer graduate degree programs. Studentsinterested in graduate fellowships should addressinquiries to: The Dean, School of GraduateStudies, Alabama Agricultural and MechanicalUniversity, P.O. Box 998, Normal, AL 35762 orinquire directly with the Department/Programsthey desire to enter.Loans and Part-Time EmploymentStudent part-time jobs are open to graduatestudents. Students interested in loans or part-timeemployment may obtain detailed information bywriting to: Director of Financial Aid, AlabamaAgricultural and Mechanical University, P.O.Box 907, Normal, Alabama 35762.Graduate School ScholarshipThe University has designated a limited numberof scholarships for graduate students. Thesescholarships are awarded through an applicationprocess. Applications are available in theGraduate Office. In addition, many degreeprograms also have a limited number ofscholarships available for graduate students. Forinformation of departmental scholarships, pleasecontact individual programs for details.Satisfactory Academic ProgressA student must meet the standards of SatisfactoryAcademic Progress in order to receive Title IVfunds. The concept of Satisfactory Progress goesbeyond good standing to mean evidence ofpositive movement toward the student's degree.Alabama A&M University is required by federalregulation, to establish standards of SatisfactoryAcademic Progress Policy for students receivingassistance through the below named programs:1. Federal Direct Loan Program2. Federal Carl D. Perkins Loan3. Federal Work Study (FWS)4. Federal Supplemental EducationalOpportunity Grant5. Federal Stafford Loan Program6. Federal Parent Loans7. Federal Pell Grant8. Alabama Student Assistance Grant9. Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG)10. National SMART Grant11. Teacher Education Assistance for Collegeand Higher Education Grant (TEACH)Each of the following components must be met bythe aid recipient:Qualitative Component (the grade pointaverage you must maintainQuantitative Component (the number ofhours you must successfully pass)Time Frame Component (the length of timeyou will be eligible to receive aid).To receive aid, students must successfully earnthe required percentage of attempted hours, obtainthe grade point average and not exceed thenumber of hours of eligibility. All students whodesire to become or who are recipients of Title IVfunds must meet the Standards of SatisfactoryAcademic Progress Policy requirements.Students who fail to meet the requirements forSatisfactory Academic Progress, may file afinancial aid appeal. Appeals can be submittedonline via the financial aid website. The appealsmust include the reason why the student failed tomake “Satisfactory Academic Progress” as wellas a plan of action that will allow the student tomake SAP at the next evaluation. If an appeal isapproved, the student is placed on probation for aone semester period. Students who have not metthe requirements after the probationary period arerequired to submit a new appeal along with an21


academic plan which will ensure that they areable to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress by aspecific point in time. This timeframe mustcoincide with the maximum timeframe outlined inthe University’s Satisfactory Academic Policy.Graduate students must maintain a cumulative GPAof 3.00. The maximum allowable hours that agraduate student can attempt and remain eligible toreceive Title IV funds are outlined below:MaximumCredit HoursDescription70 Maximum allowed for a traditional master’sdegree.80 Maximum credit hours allowed for those seekinga graduate business degree100 Maximum credit hours allowed for a specialist'sdegree or a second master's degree (Both includehours taken for a master's degree)120 Maximum credit hours allowed for a doctoraldegree program (includes master's degree hours)Grades of "I" received during the first twosemesters, by graduate students enrolled inThesis or Dissertation courses are exempt,from being included in the total hoursattempted.Title IV funds will not be granted tograduate students who have attempted morethan 120 credit hours.However, in all cases graduate students are requiredto earn at least 67% of the hours which they attempt.All periods of a student enrollment count whencalculating Satisfactory Academic Progress, evenperiods in which the student did not receive Title IVfunds.WithdrawalsStudents who withdraw from classes officially orunofficially should understand how withdrawslsaffect their eligibility for financial aid as determinedby this Satisfactory Academic Progress procedure.Withdrawals affect students Cumulative Grade PointAverages. Financial aid will not be awarded, if theGrade Point Average (GPA) falls below the requiredlevel. Moreover, hours enrolled in which a studentfailed to complete will affect the student's completionrate. If the student falls below the required number ofhours that must be completed, the student will beineligible for further aid until all deficiencies havebeen resolved. In determining whether the studentmeets the qualitative and quantitative components,the following will not be considered as creditssuccessfully completed: Grades of “F”, “I”(Incomplete), “W” (Withdrawals), “WP”(Withdrawals while Passing); or “FA” (Failure toAppear). These grades, however, are counted ashours attempted. Transfer hours accepted towardcompletion of a student’s program must be countedas hours attempted and hours earned. Repeatedcourses will also be included in the total hoursattempted and earned.Financial Aid Appeals ProcessStudents losing aid may appeal to have their Title IVaid reinstated only under the following conditions:undue hardship as a result of extenuatingcircumstances such as; student’s illness, or the illnessor death of a parent or spouse. All students seeking toredress a financial aid decision must file an appealwithin two weeks of the date the student is notified ofthe financial aid suspension. For more information onthe Appeals process visit the financial aid web siteat:http://www.aamu.edu/Admissions/fincialaid/importantinformation/Pages/Satisfactory-Academic-Progress-Policy.aspx.22


ACADEMIC POLICIESQUALITY OF WORKStudents enrolled in graduate programs must producework of high quality and must earn a cumulativeaverage of "B" (3.00 GPA) or better in courses forwhich credit is given towards the graduate degree.No grade below "C" is acceptable for graduate credit;the maximum number of C’s that will be accepted forgraduate credit is one.PROBATIONStudents enrolled in graduate degree programsoffered by Alabama Agricultural & MechanicalUniversity are expected to maintain a 3.00cumulative grade-point average. Students whosecumulative grade-point average fall below 3.0 or whofail to make satisfactory progress may be placed onacademic probation. Graduate students placed onacademic probation are required to restore theiroverall grade-point average to 3.0 within 9 additionalsemester hours of graduate work, including repeatedand dropped courses. Failure to do so may result indismissal from graduate study.DISMISSALStudents wishing to be readmitted following adismissal must wait at least one year before applying.(One year is defined as two semesters or onesemester and one summer session.) During thisperiod, they are ineligible for admission to anyprogram at Alabama Agricultural & MechanicalUniversity. However, a grade below B afterreadmission in any course will result in immediatedismissal.STUDENT APPEAL PROCESSAny graduate student may appeal for variations inuniversity-wide graduate policies and regulations bysubmitting a written grievance to the Dean ofGraduate Studies. Instructions for filing a grievanceare available in the Office of Graduate Studies or onthe University website.ACADEMIC INTERGRITYThe integrity of the academic enterprise of anyinstitution of higher education requires honesty in allaspects of its endeavor. Maintaining academicintegrity is therefore the responsibility of all faculty,staff, and students at Alabama Agricultural &Mechanical University. Academic dishonesty isprohibited in all programs of Alabama A&MUniversity. Sanctions may be imposed on anystudent who has committed an act of academicdishonesty.Definitions of Academic DishonestyAcademic dishonesty includes but is not limited to:1. Cheating - use, or attempted use, of trickery,artifice, deception, breach of confidence, fraud,or misrepresentation of one's academic work.Submission of the same work in its entirety forcredit in two courses without obtaining thepermission of the instructors constitutescheating. Collaborating with others when notexplicitly allowed by the instructor constitutescheating.2. Fabrication - falsification or invention of anyinformation or citation in any academic exercise(including the graduate school applicationprocess).3. Plagiarism - representing, whether intentionallyor unintentionally, the words or ideas of anotheras one's own work in any academic exercise.4. Facilitating dishonesty - helping or attempting tohelp another commit an act of academicdishonesty, including substituting for another inan examination, misrepresenting oneself, orallowing others to represent as their own one'spapers, reports, or academic works.CATALOG RIGHTS AND EXCLUSIONSStudents' academic requirements are based on theCatalog that is in force during their first semester ofenrollment at Alabama A&M University. Studentsare not allowed to switch from one catalog toanother. Students who transfer from one program toanother are admitted to the new program under thecatalog-in-force at the time of admission. Dismissedstudents are reinstated under the catalog-in-force atthe time of reinstatement.23


STATUTE OF LIMITATIONSThere is a statute of limitation on all graduate coursesof six years, with the exception of Urban andRegional Planning, Communicative Sciences &Disorders, and Social Work, which have seven years.The statute of limitation for all Ph.D. programs iseight years. In extraordinary cases, students mayapply for an extension of the statute of limitation.The request must be approved by the department andsubmitted to the Dean of Graduate Studies for finalaction. Requests for an extension of the statute oflimitations must be accompanied by a writtendepartmental assessment of the work and itsrelevance to the current curriculum mandates of thedegree program. CLASS ATTENDANCEAll students are expected to attend classes on aregular basis. No absences of any nature will beconstrued as relieving the student from responsibilityfor the completion of all work assigned by theinstructor. A student registering late for a class willbe responsible for all work assigned and materialcovered during the class sessions that were missed.The first class meeting of an evening class, whichmeets one night per week for 15 weeks, representsabout seven percent of the total class time; this firstmeeting is a regular class. If students wait until thesecond class meeting to enroll, the class could becancelled due to inadequate enrollment at the firstclass meeting. During the first week of each course,the instructor shall inform students of the attendancepolicies for the course. Class attendance policies aredetermined by the instructor and should allow for areasonable number of absences which are requireddue to documented official university-sponsoredactivities, health problems and other emergencies. Itis the student’s responsibility to make arrangements,which are acceptable to the instructor, to completework missed during the student’s absence from class. Courses over 12 years will not be accepted for credittoward any degree program.CREDIT HOUR REQUIREMENTSCandidates for a Master of Science degree must earna minimum of 30 or more semester credit hours(SCH), depending upon the specific degreerequirements. Degree requirements are found in thegraduate catalog currently in force at the time thestudent's degree plan was approved by the graduatedean. For most Master of Science degrees, 18semester hours of the total 30 consist of corerequirements and thesis.Most M.Ed. degree programs are 30-36 semesterhour programs. Students seeking licensure must meetall requirements as specified by the state, which mayentail more than the minimum 30 credit hours.The specialist degree program is designed primarilyto provide professional preparation for studentsinvolved in school-site administration and thoseindividuals who have district-wide administrativeresponsibilities.The specialist degree program requires completion ofa minimum of 36 graduate semester hours with thenumber of actual credit hours a function of theprevious educational background of each student andhis or her goals.The Doctor of Philosophy degree is the highestacademic degree conferred by the university. Thestudent who receives the Doctor of Philosophy mustdemonstrated proficiency in content matter of thechosen discipline. Students also must demonstratethe ability to critically evaluate work in the chosenfield of study. The student must have shown ability towork independently in the field and must have madean original contribution to the advancement ofknowledge. However, Ph.D. requirements varyamong programs and change from time to time (Formore details see specific requirements listed in thiscatalog under each degree program).PROGRAMS OF STUDYEach graduate student is required to prepare aprogram of study in consultation with his or hermajor advisor(s). Completed programs of studiesmust be received from each student by the start of thesecond semester of enrollment. Students who do notfile a program of study within the specified deadlinewill not be allowed to register for the next term.Programs of study must include a detailed listing ofthe available options within each student’s area ofemphasis. Only under extreme circumstances and24


with adequate justification should changes be madeto programs of study. All changes to programs ofstudies must have the approval of the student advisor,Department Chairperson and the Dean of therespective School.All changes in the planned degree program must bemade at least one semester prior to the student'sapplication for graduation. Under no circumstancesshould a change in the program of study be requestedfor failing a required course.ENGLISH WRITING PROFICIENCYEach graduate student must demonstrate a minimumlevel of competency in written communication.Students may meet this requirement by:1. Scoring a minimum 146 on the verbal section ofthe Graduate Record Examination.2. Scoring 24 or more on the verbal section of theGraduate Management Admission Test forstudents entering the MBA Program.Students who fail to obtain requisite scores on theGRE or GMAT are required to enroll in ENG 500and pass the course with a grade of B or A. However, in every case, the English WritingProficiency requirement must be fulfilled during thestudent’s first semester of enrollment. Students whofail to complete this requirement within the specifieddeadline will not be allowed to register for the nextterm unless permission is granted by the Dean ofGraduate Studies.BASIC MATHEMATICS SKILLSEach graduate student must demonstrate a minimumlevel of competency in mathematics. Students maymeet this requirement by:1. Scoring a minimum combined (verbal andquantitative) score of 286 or a minimum 140 inthe quantitative section of the Graduate RecordExamination.2. Scoring a combined score of 350 in the GraduateManagement Admission Test for studentsentering the MBA Program.Students who fail to obtain requisite scores on theGRE of GMAT are required to enroll in MTH 500and pass the course with a grade of B or A. However, in every case, the Mathematics SkillsProficiency requirement must be fulfilled during thestudent’s first semester of enrollment in an AlabamaAgricultural & Mechanical graduate degree program.Students who fail to complete this requirement withinthe specified deadline will not be allowed to registerfor the next term unless permission is granted by theDean of Graduate Studies.GRADINGLetter Grades: One of two types of grading systems isassigned to each course: (I) the Letter Grade System,and (II) the P-No Quality Point System. Eachdepartment has the responsibility for developingsupplemental procedures that will enable the studentand interested persons to learn about the faculty'sjudgment of the student's competence.Type I A SuperiorB SatisfactoryC Below ExpectationsF FailureType II P SatisfactoryF FailureType II (explanation and authorization for its use):The "P" grade is a critical and evaluative gradeindicating at least satisfactory graduate attainment.Each department, in cooperation with the School ofGraduate Studies, determines when Type II gradingwill be available for a graduate course. With respectto each of its graduate courses, each department mayforbid or request the use of the Type II system.In addition, the following non-evaluative letters areused, when appropriate: Enrollment in ENG 500, or MTH 500 is not a substitute for GREVerbal or the GRE Mathematics Exam. Nor is enrollment in thecourses a substitute for low GRE performance. Students who failto obtain the requisite GRE scores are urged to take the GRE asecond time. Failure to obtain requisite scores by the end of thefirst year of enrollment may lead to dismissal from GraduateStudy.WWMXIIPWithdrawalMilitary Withdrawalnon-credit auditWork incompleteIn Progress: Projects(Thesis, Dissertation,Research)25


AuditingA student may register to audit a course only with theapproval of the instructor. The letters "X" will berecorded on the transcript if the student satisfies theconditions agreed upon with the instructor. Allstudents who audit courses are required to beregistered as auditors.Incomplete WorkThe letter "IP" is recorded for incomplete work inprogrammatically designated research, thesis andfieldwork courses. The letter "I" may be given inother courses in which the scope of the student'sproject requires more time for its proper completion.An "I" grade given for courses other than thesis ordissertation research is to be removed within onesemester after the end of the term of registration forthe course. A course for which an "I" or "IP" isrecorded is not included in the calculation of theGPA, and no credit is awarded until the course iscompleted with a quality grade. Removal of an "I"must be authorized by the instructor and approved bythe School Dean on a Grade Change AuthorizationForm. A student may not graduate without removing"I" or "IP" grades from his/her record.Credits and Quality PointsEach credit for which letter grades are recorded havethe following quality value: A=4; B=3; C=2; D=1and F=0.. The GPA is defined as the total number ofquality points earned in courses divided by the totalnumber of credits attempted. Each credit for which“P” is recorded carries no designated number ofquality points but implies a performance in the rangeof 3 or 4. Courses for which "W", "I", or "AU" arerecorded do not contribute either credits or qualitypoints toward graduation. When a course is repeated,only the last grade received is counted in computingthe GPA. Graduate students must achieve theminimum GPA established by their programs, in nocase less than 3.00, in order to be eligible to take thecomprehensive examination, to be admitted tocandidacy or to be eligible for graduation.WithdrawalA student may withdraw from a course under theconditions listed below:1. Classes dropped after the first week of theregular semester and through the end of thewithdrawal period specified in the courseschedule will carry a grade of “W.”2. Classes dropped after the withdrawal period willcarry the actual grades obtained.Repetition of CoursesIn every case, all "D" and "F" grades must berepeated (graduate and undergraduate courses).Graduate students normally are not permitted torepeat courses for which they have received credit,but, under unusual circumstances, a department mayauthorize an exception to this policy. When agraduate student repeats a course in which the subjectmatter has not changed, only the last grade receivedis counted in computing the quality point average.However, graduate students are only allowed torepeat a course once. Any student who repeats andfails a course the second time will be dismissed fromthe graduate degree program.Grade ChangesA grade given by an instructor for completed workwill not be changed unless an error has been made inreporting or recording the grade. Re-examination orextra work may not be used as a basis for a change ofgrade.Independent StudyStudents who are using University facilities to anextent greater than represented by their formal courseload (and those required by a fellowship or otherappointment to be full-time students) are required toregister for an appropriate number of additionalcredits of Independent Study to reflect their correctstatus. All graduate study not under the directsupervision of a specific faculty member is, bydefinition, Independent Study. This includes studyfor comprehensive and overview examinations, thepreparation of research proposals, etc. Before astudent is permitted to take an independent studycourse, the student must have completed a minimumof 12 semester hours of graduate work.Field ResearchRegistration for Directed Study is limited to studentsin good academic standing who wish to study or26


carry out a project in an area not normally availablein a formal course. The work must be under thedirect supervision of a faculty member who hasapproved the proposed work in advance ofregistration. A detailed description of the workshould be recorded by the directing faculty memberin the student’s file in both the department and theSchool of Graduate Studies, Office of the DeanTransfer CreditTransfer credit must be acceptable to the student'sadvisory committee and be pertinent to the student'splanned degree program. A petition for transfer ofgraduate credit and one official transcript upon whichthe transfer courses are recorded must be submittedto the Dean of Graduate Studies. Only courses withgrade "B" or better will be approved. Courses with a"P" grade are not acceptable. Alabama A&MUniversity only accepts transfer credit frominstitutions of higher education that have beenaccredited by one of the regional accreditingcommissions recognized by the Council for HigherEducation Accreditation (CHEA).Students seeking Master's degrees may, upondepartmental approval, transfer a maximum of twelvesemester hours of approved graduate credits from anaccredited institution. Credits must have been earnedwithin the past six years. A student who hascompleted course credits in a certification program atAlabama A&M University may transfer such creditsinto a master's degree program with the consent ofthe departmental program or school. Such creditsmay be transferred only if they fall within the past sixyears set for the master's degree.For students admitted to the Educational Specialistprogram, previous and appropriate post- master'sdegree credit earned at the Alabama A&M Universityor any regionally accredited university before astudent applies for admission to the Ed.S. Programcan be applied toward the Ed.S. degree provided 1) itmeets the time limitation test, 2) the student meetsresidency requirements, and 3) the Graduate Dean ofAlabama A&M University approves such credit foracceptance.Because the purpose of the Ed.S. degree may differfrom that of the AA-Certificate, credit earned in anAA program at Alabama A&M is not automaticallyapplicable to an Ed.S. program. Instead, if a holder ofan AA-Certificate enters an Ed.S. program at a laterdate the Ed.S. Advisory Committee will recommendto the School of Graduate Studies, Office of theDean, how much of the credit earned in the AAcertificate should be credited toward the Ed.S.program. The Ed.S. Committee and the School ofGraduate Studies, Office of the Dean, in light of theobjectives of the department, will decide to accepttoward an Ed.S., as much as all, or as little as none,of the credit earned in an AA-Certificate program.The only exception is the residency requirement.Students seeking a Ph.D. may transfer credits subjectto the following conditions:1. All credits submitted for transfer must beevaluated by the department and approved by theDean of the School of Graduate Studies.2. Only such courses, which are the same or similarin content as the courses listed for the particularspecialization, will be approved for transfer.3. A student who has earned the Master’s degreecan transfer up to a maximum of 24 semesterhours of credit, whereas a student who does nothave a master's degree can transfer up to amaximum of 12 semester hours of graduatecredit.Graduate Credit For National Board CertifiedTeachersThere is a possibility for a National Board CertifiedTeacher (NBCT) to receive up to 3 semester hours ofgraduate credit to apply to an elective course in aprogram of study at Alabama Agricultural &Mechanical University. To pursue this possibility agraduate student must be admitted into one of theCollege of Education's graduate programs and musthave completed the NBPTS process and awardedNational Board Certification. To pursue thispossibility, the graduate student must do thefollowing:1. Confer with his/her graduate advisor and theDean of the School of Education to determine ifNational Board Certification can be applied tohis/her specific program of study. If approved,credits for National Board Certification can onlybe used as elective credits. All persons receivingapproval to use National Board Certificationmust complete the National Board CertificationCredit Acceptance form and receive approvalfrom his/her graduate advisor, the programDepartment Chair, the Dean of the School ofEducation, and the Dean of Graduate Studies. Inaddition, persons receiving approval to useNational Board Certification must submit a newprogram of study to reflect the elective course(s)in which the credits would replace. In all cases,27


credits for National Board Certification must besubmitted by the start of the second semester ofenrollment (The University will not acceptNational Board Certification credits submittedafter the second semester of enrollment).2. The NBCT must contact ACE and request twotranscripts. To do this, he/she can go to theNBPTS website and click on "click here to applyfor graduate credit" in the top right corner. Thatlink takes them to the ACE web site. ACEverifies that they are a NBCT and issues them atranscript showing between six and nineacademic credits (Alabama A&M University willonly accept a maximum of 3 semester hours ofNational Board Certification credits). There is a$100 application fee for each transcript that thestudent will pay to ACE for this service.Transcripts must be mailed to Alabama A&MUniversity, Office of Graduate Studies, P.O. Box998, Normal, Alabama 35762. The transcriptthat is issued means that NBPTS recommendsthe NBCT for graduate credit for considerationby the NBCT's university. As stated, it is up tothe university to decide if it will recognize thosecredits.Foreign Transfer CreditsAll non-English transcripts must be translated andevaluated by the World Education Services (WES).This review must provide a conclusive course bycourse evaluation of all coursework the student seeksto transfer.COMPREHENSIVE EXAM REQUIRMENTSStudents eligible for take the ComprehensiveExamination must formally apply for the test on theprescribed form in the office of Graduate Studies.Students who fail to apply in a timely manner willprohibited from sitting for the ComprehensiveExamination. The scores of students who sit for aComprehensive Exam without receiving priorapproval from the Graduate School will be voided.If a student fails the Comprehensive Examination, atleast one semester must intervene before the secondexamination is given. If the student fails thisexamination two times, referral will be made to adepartmental committee, which will determine theappropriate action; this action should not eliminatethe student from retaking the comprehensiveexamination for a third and final time.Comprehensive exams are designed to evaluate thecandidate's proficiency in the theory and practice inboth the major and minor fields of the designatedarea of study. Before sitting for the ComprehensiveExam, student must:1. Obtain Regular/Full admission status.2. Maintain a GPA of 3.00 or above.3. Complete all required deficiency courses for thedegree.4. Complete all required courses for the degree.5. Remove all I’s, except thesis grades.6. Remove all grades of "D" and "F" in thestudent’s current program of study.All students seeking to take a comprehensive exammust be enrolled in a class or classes during thesemester in which the student seeks to take thecomprehensive exam.MS/MEdAll non-thesis Master’s students, with the exceptionof students enrolled in the degree programs inBusiness Administration and Materiel Engineering,are required to pass a written comprehensiveexamination.Ed.SAll Ed.S. students are required to pass a writtencomprehensive examination and write a thesis orcomplete an Action Research paper.Ph.DAll Ph.D. students are required to write a dissertationand defend it successfully. They are also required topass qualifying and /or candidacy examination(s) asrequired by the department. Eligibility requirementsfor these tests are defined in the departmental sectionof this bulletin.28


THESIS/DISERTATION REQUIREMENTSStudents who choose the option of writing a thesismust adhere to the following:1. Each student is responsible for identifying amajor professor, choosing a research topic, andwriting and editing the thesis or dissertation.The major professor serves as the chairperson ofthe student's advisory committee. The studentand the major professor select the members toserve on the research advisory committee. Thecommittee usually consists of four to fivemembers; at least one comes from outside of thestudent's major area of emphasis. Once theadvisory committee has been selected andapproved, they will serve as advisors for thecandidate in the development of the researchproposal. Before the end of the second semesterof enrollment, the student must complete (1) aPlanned Degree Program, (2) attend thethesis/dissertation preparation workshop, and (3)prepare and acceptable thesis or dissertationproposal. All thesis and dissertation papersmust conform to either the APA, Chicago, orMLA writing styles (depending on thepreference of the specific department).2. The subject of the thesis/dissertation should bechosen from the candidate's field of majorinterest and must be approved by thedepartmental advisory committee. Thethesis/dissertation should reveal a capacity tocarry on independent study or research.3. The student is advised to consult the School ofGraduate Studies and the publication "Thesis andDissertation Guidelines for Graduate Students"for general information regarding the preparationof a thesis/dissertation.4. Each student is required to enroll in at least onesemester hour of thesis/dissertation writingduring the semester he/she expects to defendhis/her thesis/dissertation. The student must alsosubmit a committee-approved draft to the Officeof Graduate Studies at least two weeks prior tothe scheduling of the oral defense. All thesis, anddissertation papers must be submittedelectronically by the following dates:a. October 19, 2012 ……. fall semesterb. March 22, 2013 ………spring semesterc. May 28, 2013. ………..summer semesterThesis, and dissertation papers must besubmitted electronically (for more details aboutthe electronic submission of thesis, anddissertation papers see the Thesis andDissertation Guide).5. Immediately following the candidate's oraldefense examination, the student should consulteither the advisor or the Graduate Office or theThesis and Dissertation Guide for specificdirections concerning binding, labeling and otherroutine procedures.ACTION RESEARCH REQUIREMENTSAll students seeking Ed.S. degrees must complete anAction Research project. Action Research projectsare designed to solve is practical problems throughthe application of the scientific method. Mostprojects are concerned with a local problem and areconducted in a local setting. Action researchproblems may employ either a quantitative orqualitative methodology. In the completion of theAction Research Project students must adhere to thefollowing:1. Enroll in the courses FED 696 and FED 697(courses must be taken in sequence).2. Prepare an Action Research paper proposalin conjunction with the instructor of FED696. Each proposal must:a. Briefly state the rationale for thestudy.b. Describe the population fromwhich the study will target. Howmany subjects will be used andhow will they be selected (Ifconsent will have to be given byproxy, be sure to include astatement of why this particularproject is merited with thispopulation).c. Describe in non-technical terms theexperimental research proceduresto which subjects will be exposed.Include sufficient detail so that theinstructor of FED 696 canindependently evaluate the risks tosubjects. If questionnaires will beused, include copies of these itemswith your proposal.d. Describe the procedures you willuse to insure that informationgleamed from participants willremain confidential, or give reasonswhy this cannot be done. In casesinvolving sensitive or potentiallyharmful information, where subjectidentities are to be retained pleasedescribe your security procedures.29


3. Once project has been approved by theinstructor of FED 696 student continue todevelopment of the Action Researchproposal in FED 697.4. After the final paper has been approved bythe instructor of FED 697 the student mustsubmit a copy of the paper electronically tothe Office of Graduate Studies using theETD process (for more information see:Action Research/Final Research papersubmission criteria on the Graduate Schoolwebsite). All papers submitted to theGraduate School must be submitted at leastthree weeks before the end of the semesterin which the student seeks to complete thedegree program.FINAL RESEARCH PAPERS/PROJECTS FORNON-THESIS OPTIONS OF MASTER’SDEGREE PROGRAMSAll students completing the non-thesis option ofmaster’s degree programs must submit a copy of thefinal paper/final research project (electronically) tothe Office of Graduate Studies using the ETD process(for more information see: Action Research/FinalResearch paper submission criteria on the GraduateSchool website). All papers submitted to theGraduate School must be received at least threeweeks before the end of the semester in which thestudent seeks to complete the degree program._______________________________________CHANGING FROM THESIS TO NON-THESISOPTIONStudents are allowed one change from thesis to nonoptionfor all degree programs. Thesis courses willnot be counted toward the requirements of the nonthesisoption. Students seeking to change from thethesis option to the non-thesis option must:a. Officially withdraw from all thesis courses;b. Complete a new program of study whichshows the additional courses the student willneed to complete to finish the non-thesisoption;c. Reapply for graduation and admission tocandidacy;Complete all of the identified requirements(including curriculum) of the new-degreeprogram curriculum.d. All students who change from a thesis to anon-thesis option are prohibited fromgraduating in the semester in which thechange from thesis to non-thesis option wasinitiated.___________________________________________APPLICATION FOR GRADUATIONStudents must apply for graduation before thedeadline dates given below. However, if they fail tomeet requirements for the semester applied, theymust reapply.Deadline Dates:December Graduation ............................ September 30May Graduation ..........................................January 31July Degree Completion .................................. May 31CLEARANCE FOR DEGREEEach candidate for a degree will receive a letter fromthe Graduate Office verifying clearance after finalgrades are submitted.CONFERRING OF DEGREEAdvanced degrees are conferred at the close of thesummer, fall, and spring semesters. A studentcompleting requirements during a fall semesterreceives a diploma at the Spring Commencement.Attendance at the commencement exercise is stronglyencouraged.SECOND MASTER'S DEGREEWith the approval of the appropriate department andthe Graduate Dean, a graduate student who hascompleted a master's degree from Alabama A&MUniversity may transfer up to ten appropriate creditsfrom the first program to the second. Allrequirements for the master's degree in the secondprogram must be met. Students holding a master’s orother advanced degree from Alabama A&MUniversity seeking a second master’s or otheradvanced degree from Alabama A&M University arenot required to submit a new GRE/GMAT score ifthe original GRE score is five years old or less.30


GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS31


AGRIBUSINESSMASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRIBUSINESS_________________________________PROGRAM DIRECTORAmin Sakar256-372-1280amin.sakar@aamu.eduABOUT THE PROGRAMSThe graduate program leading to the M.S. degree inAgribusiness is designed to meet the needs ofcandidates who wish to pursue careers in agribusinessor related industries. Its flexibility providescandidates the opportunity to concentrate in areas oftheir individual interests. Each candidate in theprogram will be required to take an eight-course coreprogram. There is a thesis option and a non-thesisoption. Candidates electing the thesis option musttake 6-hours of Agribusiness thesis to bring the totalnumber of credits to 30 hours and write an acceptablethesis after meeting the course requirement. Thoseelecting the non-thesis option must take twoadditional courses to bring the total number of creditsto 36 hours and write an acceptable research paper.All candidates must pass a comprehensiveexamination.Program Requirements with the ThesisoptionSem.HoursAGB532 Advanced Farm Management 3AGB 533 Advanced Agricultural3MarketingAGB590 Research Methods in3AgribusinessAGB623 Advanced AgribusinessManagement3AGB 624 Advanced Agricultural3Financial AnalysisAGB 625 Advanced Agricultural Policy 3MBA 515 Management Information3SystemsElective 3AGB 599 Agribusiness Thesis 6Total 3032Program Requirement with the Non- Sem.Thesis OptionHoursAGB 531 Agricultural Economics 3AGB 533 Advanced Agricultural3MarketingAGB 532 Advanced Farm Management 3AGB 623 Advanced Agribusiness3ManagementNEW STUDENTS NOT ACCEPTEDINTO THE PROGRAMAGB 624 Advanced Agricultural3Financial AnalysisAGB 625 Advanced Agricultural Policy 3MBA 515 Management Information3SystemsMKT 538 International Marketing &3LogisticsMBA 505 Managerial Economics 3ECO 505 Applied Economics Statistics 3Elective 6Total 36Sem.Available ElectivesHoursAGB 509 Advanced StudiesAGB 531 Agricultural Economics *AGB 606 Rural Development333ECO 502 Microeconomics Thesis 3MBA 504 Macroeconomics 3MBA 505 Managerial Economics 3MGT 564 Personnel Administration 3MBA 515 Management Information3SystemFIN 543 International Finance 3MBA 505 Managerial Economics 3ABG 626 Agricultural modeling and 3Forecasting*Required course for the non-thesis option.


ART EDUCATIONMASTER OF EDUCATION IN ARTEDUCATIONPROGRAM DIRECTORScott Smith256/372-4073scott.smith@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyAssociate ProfessorsScott SmithJoe WashingtonAssistant ProfessorsJennie CouchRobert BeanABOUT THE PROGRAMThe Department of Fine Arts offers coursework andfield experiences leading to the Master of Sciencewith teacher certification (Class A and A –“Alternative”) in Art Education and MusicEducation.ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSApplicants to the Art Education program must inaddition to the requirements of the Graduate School:1. Submit an art portfolio of twenty (20) currentimages in a JPEG format.2. Produce documentation of a teaching certificatein Art Education. (If applicable).3. Persons who do not hold a bachelor’s degree inart and are interested in pursuing a master’sdegree in art education may also apply; however,a consultation visit with the Art Programcoordinator prior to the application is required.DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-ThesisOption for Master of Science in Education Class A“Single Teaching”Sem.Required ProgramHoursART 500 level or above 3ART 500 level or above 3ART 500 level or above 3ART 500 level or above 3ART 500 History & Philosophy of Art 3EducationART 532 Supervision of Art in Public 3SchoolFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundation of Education3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Introduction to Education3ResearchFED 504 Evaluation of3Teaching/LearningFED 529 Computer-Based3Instructional TechnologySPE 501 Introduction to Study of0-3Exceptional Individual Total 33-36Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOption for Master of Science in Education Class A“Alternative 5 th Year”Sem.Required ProgramHoursART 500 History/Philosophy of Art3EducationART 500 Advisor Approved 500 level 12Art CoursesART 532 Supervision of Art in Public 3SchoolsART 595 Internship 6FED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundation of Education3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Introduction to Education3ResearchFED 504 Evaluation of3Teaching/LearningFED 529 Computer-Based3Instructional TechnologySPE 501 Introduction to Study of0-3Exceptional Individual *SED 515 Reading in the Content Area 3Total 42-45 Required if not previously completed.33


BIOLOGYMASTER OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGYPROGRAM DIRECTORJeanettte Jones256-372-4924jeanette.jones@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyProfessorsJeanette JonesAssociate ProfessorsFlorence OkaforSampson HopkinsonAssistant ProfessorsZulfiqar AhmadJacob SavageToure ThompsonConwin VanterpoolPROGRAM MISSIONThe Master of Science program in Biology offersstudents opportunity for advanced learning in theirchosen area of Biology. Our purpose is to trainstudents broadly in modern biological principles sothat they acquire the strong foundation needed tobecome highly skilled and intellectually independentscientists. The program is committed to excellence ineducation, research and service.ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSAn applicant who has received a baccalaureatedegree from an accredited college or university mayapply for admission to the Biology Graduate Programin accordance with the admission criteria of theUniversity. Additional requirements for this programinclude:1. Clear evidence of scholastic competence to meetthe requirements for an advanced degree.2. A minimum GPA of 2.50 (based on a 4.00system) in the major area.3. One year of chemistry, including one term oforganic chemistry and or biochemistry.Applicants who do not meet these requirements mayapply for conditional or provisional admission.Policy Statement1. The degree is a cooperative degree awarded byAAMU or UA Huntsville.2. Initial registration may be at either institution.3. As a requirement for a degree, each graduateteaching assistant must conduct one or morelaboratory or lecture sections, as decided byhis/her graduate advisory committee, in an arearelated to his/her field of concentration.4. An advisory committee for an individualenrolled at one of the two schools shall have atleast one representative from the other school.5. Students will be admitted in accordance withadmission criteria of the respective institutions.a) Except for the purpose of taking courses,conducting research and other strictlyacademic matters, students will not beencouraged to transfer back and forthbetween schools (see 'b" below).b) Students will need to declare the school ofintent (from which they wish to receive adegree) by the end of nine semester hourstaken or by the end of their first academicterm.c) Thereafter, a student may not transferbetween schools and must remain in thesame area of emphasis.d) Equipment and facilities at the tworespective departments shall be available toall graduate students in the program withoutregard to the institution at which thestudents are enrolled.ABOUT THE PROGRAMStudents may choose a thesis (Plan I), or non-thesisoption (Plan II), or Master of Education in SecondaryEducation (Plan III). Students interested in Plan IIIare however required to consult with their majoradvisor for more details about the plan.Master of Science (Thesis Option), Plan IAll Master of Science degree candidates mustsatisfactorily complete a minimum of 24 semesterhours of course work and submit an acceptable thesis,which shows creative thinking and independent34


judgment in developing a problem from primarysources.Master of Science (Non-Thesis), Plan IIStudents completing the non-thesis degree option arerequired to write a Master’s report. The focus of thereport is determined jointly by the student and thestudent’s academic advisory committee. The natureof the report can be a library search, survey, orexperimentation as determined by the student'sadvisory committee. For the Master of Sciencedegree, a student must complete a minimum of 33semester hours of course work.Master of Education in Secondary Education,Plan III Students interested in Plan III are requiredto consult their major advisor for more details aboutthe program.The Biology Master of Science (MS) degree is a30/36 semester hour program, organized into fourmajor components.1. A core of required courses (9credit hours).2. An area of specialization (15 – 18credit hours).3. A master's thesis (6 credit hours) or a terminalresearch report component and credit hour ofelective courses.4. A comprehensive examination (non-thesisoption) or thesis and oral defense without thecomprehensive examination.Core Course RequirementsThe Biology graduate program aims to providestudents with the concepts and skills needed to enterPhD programs or professional programs and functioneffectively as biologists. All students enrolled in theBiology program must complete the Biology core.The core requirements consist of 9 credit hours ingeneral Biology. These courses focus on the basicconcepts of biological research, instrumentation andethics. Listed below are the core courses of theBiology program:Sem.Core CoursesHoursBIO 512 Instrumentation in the3Biological SciencesBIO 513 Research Ethics and1Professional IntegrityBIO 500 Current Concepts in Biology 3BIO 690 Seminar 1BIO 692 Research 1Comprehensive ExaminationA written comprehensive examination composedjointly by the faculties of both institutions will beadministered to each non-thesis student. Thisexamination will normally be taken after the studenthas completed the required course work.DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Thesis Option*Sem.Required ProgramHoursBIO 512 Instrumentation in the3Biological SciencesBIO 513 Research Ethics and1Professional IntegrityBIO 500 Current Concepts in Biology 3BIO 690 Seminar 1BIO 692 Research 1Specialty/Concentration 15BIO 699 Thesis 6Total 30Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOption Sem.Required ProgramHoursBIO 512 Instrumentation in the3Biological SciencesBIO 513 Research Ethics and1Professional IntegrityBIO 500 Current Concepts in Biology 3BIO 690 Seminar 1BIO 692 Research 1Specialty/Concentration 18Other Electives 9Total 36CONCENTRATIONSMicrobiology ConcentrationSem.HoursBIO 522 Microbial Physiology 3BIO 523 Principles of Virology 3BIO 524 Mycology 3 Students must select 15- 18 credits of courses from a specificconcentration area to qualify for an MS degree. Concentrationscurrently offered include: Microbiology, Physiology, Geneticsand Molecular Biology, Ecology and Systematics, andEntomology. Must choose at least 3 credits from each specialization area.35


BIO 525 Parasitology 3BIO 526 Microbial Ecology 3BIO 621 Pathogenic Bacteriology 3BIO 622 Applied and Industrial3MicrobiologyBIO 623 Advanced Virology 3BIO 624 Immunology 3BIO 625 Medical Mycology 3Physiology ConcentrationSem.HoursBIO 531 Plant Physiology 3BIO 532 Animal Physiology 3BIO 533 Advanced Physiology I 3BIO 534 Advanced Physiology II 3BIO 535 EndocrinologyBIO 541 Cell Physiology 3BIO 544 Cell & Development Biology 4(UAH)BIO 631 Pharmacology 3BIO 632 Cardiovascular Physiology 3BIO 633 Endocrinology II 3Genetics and Molecular BiologyConcentrationSem.HoursEntomologySem.HoursBIO 551 Insect Physiology 4BIO 552 Insect Pest Management 4BIO 553 Insect Taxonomy and4MorphologyBIO 651 Medical Entomology (UAH) 4BIO 652 Advanced Applied4EntomologyBIO 653 Taxonomy of Immature4InsectsGeneral Course ElectivesSem.HoursBIO 510 Radiation Biology 4BIO 511 Biological Control 4BIO 590 Problems in Biological3ScienceGraduate Level 3Biostatistics/Biometrics courseGraduate Level Bioinformatics Course 3BIO 691 Special Topics 1-4BIO 699 Master’s Thesis 1-3BIO 540 Molecular Biology 3BIO 542 Analytical Biochemistry (L) 3BIO 546 Cytogenetics 3BIO 641 Advanced Cell Biology 3BIO 642 Advanced Cell Physiology 3BIO 643 Microscopy (UAH) 4BIO 645 Human Cytogenetics and Its 3Clinical ApplicationBIO 646 Molecular GeneticsBIO 647 Enzymology (UAH) 3BIO 648 Enzymology Laboratory2(UAH)BIO 649 Advanced Genetics I 3BIO 650 Advanced Genetics II 3Ecology and Systematics ConcentrationSem.HoursBIO 560 Environmental Biology 3BIO 561 Physiological Ecology 4BIO 562 Community Ecology (UAH) 4BIO 564 Limnology (UAH) 4BIO 565 Phycology 4BIO 570 Plant Pathology 4BIO 571 Plant Taxonomy 4BIO 580 Advanced Invertebrate4ZoologyBIO 660 Ecosystem Dynamics (UAH) 436


BUSINESS MANAGEMENT & ADMINISTRATIONMASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION(MBA)PROGRAM DIRECTOR:Dana Harris256-372-4821dana.harris@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyProfessorsEmeka DunuUchenna ElikeHossien JamshidiBarbara JonesMohammad RobbaniAmin SarkarMarsha GriffinAssociate ProfessorsNareatha StuddardAta YesilyaprakAndrea HawkinsHalima QureshiQian ShenAssistant ProfessorsLarry McDanielMaurice DawsonHelen GarbeJifeng MuMISSION STATEMENTThe MBA program prepares men and women foradministrative positions in industry and the publicsector. The program which utilizes a traditionalclassroom model maintains a strict student to facultyratio of 1:6. This provides the program flexibility torespond to emerging issues on the local, national, andglobal scale. Each class combines business theorywith practical applications, ensuring that studentsgrasp the context in which they will practice theirnew skills.ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTSApplicants for admission to the MBA program mustshow high promise of success for graduate study.Key barometers used by faculty in the MBA programin evaluating student promise of success includeundergraduate grades, scores on the GraduateManagement Admissions Test (GMAT) and otherrelevant criteria. Applicants for regular admission tothe Master of Business Administration must meet allthe requirements for admission to the GraduateSchool as well as the following:Regular AdmissionGMAT Score of at least 350 or have at least threeyears of documented managerial experience. Conditional1. Minimum of 2.7 GPA and GMAT score ofat least 325.2. Minimum of 2.7 GPA and minimum of threeyears of managerial experience.*In addition, all applicants are required to submit:1. Academic records2. Two letters of recommendation3. Resume4. 200-250 word essay (statement ofpurpose)DEGREE REQUIREMENTSA minimum of 33 graduate-level credit hours beyondthe basic core is required to complete the MBAProgram (33 hours are needed to complete theprogram with a concentration in Logistics). Theprogram is divided into three sections: the basic core,the professional core, and electives. The basic core of12 credit hours is designed to serve as a levelingmechanism for students whose previous programs arenot in business or do not provide adequatepreparation. Depending upon their previous academicrecords, students may be exempted from part or all ofthe basic core courses by the Director of the MBAProgram. The professional core is 24 credit hours ofmandatory courses, which focus on the internal andorganizational business environments, the functionalareas, quantitative techniques, and managerial Managerial experience indicates that the applicant has beeninvolved in an enterprise that is a significant concern.37


communications. Students also choose 9 credit hoursof electives. To complete the MBA degree, studentsmust have a 3.0 GPA or higher for all courses takenat Alabama A&M University as part of the MBAprogram. They must also have a 3.0 GPA or higherfor all courses taken at Alabama A&M University inthe MBA Program beyond the basic corerequirements. Transfer credit is not considered in theGPA for the MBA program. In addition, onlystudents who have full admission and appropriateprerequisites will be admitted into courses in theProfessional Core.Sem.Basic Core *HoursECO 500 Survey of Economic Analysis 3MBA 503 Quantitative Methods for3BusinessMBA 506 Foundations of Accounting 3and FinanceMBA 507 Basics of Management and 3MarketingTotal 12Program Requirements TraditionalNon-Thesis Option MBA*Professional Core (Required)Sem.HoursACC 512 Accounting Analysis for3ManagementECO 514 Managerial Economics 3FIN 511 Financial Management and 3PolicyMBA 517 Global Issues in Business 3MGT 510 Operations Management 3MGT 515 Organizational Theory and 3BehaviorMGT 516 Strategic Management 3MKT 514 Management of Marketing 3ActivitiesMGT 564 Human ResourcesManagementMGT 565 Entrepreneurship/Small3Business ManagementMGT 580 Emerging Information3TechnologyMKT 532 Consumer Behavior 3Total 33Program Requirements with Concentration inLogistics and Supply Chain Management*Sem.Professional Core (Required)HoursACC 512 Accounting Analysis for3ManagementECO 514 Managerial Economics 3FIN 511 Financial Management and 3PolicyMBA 517 Global Issues in Business 3MGT 510 Operations Management 3MGT 515 Organizational Theory and 3BehaviorMGT 516 Strategic Management 3MKT 514 Management of Marketing 3ActivitiesElectives (Any Three)LSM 536 Logistics and Supply Chain 3ManagementLSM 571 Adaptive Supply Chain3ManagementLSM 572 Logistics and Supply Chain 3Risk ManagementLSM 599 Strategic Supply Chain3PlanningTotal 333Electives (Any Three)ACC 571 Tax Issues in Business 3ECO 503 Macroeconomics 3FIN 541 Security Analysis and3Portfolio Management* Depending upon their previous academic records,students may be exempted from part or all of thebasic core courses to complete the Degree programby the Director of the MBA Program.38


CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGYMASTER OF SCIENCE IN CLINICALPSYCHOLOGYPROGRAM DIRECTORAnnie M. Wells256-372-8128Annie.wells@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyProfessorsAnnie WellsAssociate ProfessorsCalvin MatthewsAssistant ProfessorsRhonda SherrodABOUT THE PROGRAMThe Master of Science program in ClinicalPsychology offers students the educationalbackground to prepare for work as mental healthspecialists in a variety of settings. The programprovides broad-based instruction in practical clinicalpsychology which provides the framework necessaryfor graduates to apply for master’s level licensure asa professional counselor in the state of Alabama. TheM.S. program requires 48 credits of course work inthesis and non-thesis options. Currently, the programis intended for both part-time and full-time students,with classes designed to accommodate workingstudents.PSY 592 Professional3Orientation/IssuesPSY 597 Counseling Practicum 3PSY 605 Psychopharmacology 3PSY 610 Psychopathology 3PSY 622 Clinical Internship I 3PSY 623 Clinical Internship II 3PSY 599 Thesis 6Total 48Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOptionSem.Required ProgramHoursPSY 502 Descriptive & Inferential3Behavioral StatisticsPSY 530 Individual & Family Therapy 3PSY 555 Personality Theory 3PSY 556 Group Dynamics 3PSY 559 Counseling Techniques 3PSY 561 Individual Testing 3PSY 585 Research in Psychology 3PSY 590 Personality Assessment 3PSY 592 Professional3Orientation/IssuesPSY 597 Counseling Practicum 3PSY 605 Psychopharmacology 3PSY 610 Psychopathology 3PSY 622 Clinical Internship I 3PSY 623 Clinical Internship II 3Electives (500-600 Level) 6Note Comprehensive Exam is RequiredTotal 48DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Thesis OptionSem.Required ProgramHoursPSY 502 Descriptive & Inferential3Behavioral StatisticsPSY 530 Individual & Family Therapy 3PSY 555 Personality Theory 3PSY 556 Group Dynamics 3PSY 559 Counseling Techniques 3PSY 561 Individual Testing 3PSY 585 Research in Psychology 3PSY 590 Personality Assessment 339


COMMUNICATIVE SCIENCES & DISORDERSMASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMMUNICATIVESCIENCES AND DISORDERSPROGRAM DIRECTORJennifer Vinson256-372-4035jennifer.vinson@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyProfessorsBarbara CadyJennifer VinsonAssociate ProfessorBarbara BushCarol DeakinHope ReedAssistant ProfessorsEsther Phillips-RossCynthia LewisMISSION STATEMENTThe Communicative Sciences and Disorders (CSD)program offers an education and scholarlyenvironment in which undergraduate and graduatestudents receive quality academic training andprofessional experience in the field of Speech-Language Pathology. The program functions within astudent-centered environment devoted to learning,research, scholarship, creativity, professionalexpertise and personal development designed toensure that students are ethical, knowledgeable,skillful and capable of working independently and incollaboration with clients, families and otherprofessionals.The commitment of the CSD program to theUniversity’s mission is reflected in the undergraduateand graduate academic course work in normal andabnormal development and behavior across thehuman life span; in course work that engendersawareness of issues in culturally diverse populations,in human communication disorders, in diagnostic andtreatment methodologies; in clinical practicarequirements and in technology-integrated coursework teaching independent research skills thatsupport lifelong learning.PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONThe program offers the Master of Science degree inCommunicative Sciences and Disorders, and isnationally accredited by the Council on AcademicAccreditation (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). AAMU isone of only eight Historically Black Institutionswhich offer a nationally accredited program inspeech-language pathology.The field of Speech-Language Pathology involves theidentification, assessment and treatment of a widevariety of communication disorders (congenital,developmental, and acquired) in both children andadults. Such disorders may include phonological(articulation), language, voice, fluency (stuttering)and hearing problems. Speech-language pathologistsalso participate in the assessment and management ofclients with swallowing difficulties. They work in avariety of locations including hospitals, schools,rehabilitation centers, community health centers,universities, skilled care facilities, and in privatepractice.The wide varieties of disorders and treatmentapproaches pertinent to the field require a workingknowledge of neuroanatomy, behavioral science,speech/language development, effective teachingstrategies, methods for motivating people, andexcellent communication skills. Therapists with abachelor's degree can perform important duties insome settings, but a master's degree is essential forachieving professional independence, and someduties demand a doctoral degree.This degree program contains both academic andclinical components. It is a two year program ifstudents have an undergraduate degree in CSD, and athree year program if the undergraduate degree is inanother area.Our graduate students and senior level undergraduatestudents gain experiences providing speech andhearing services in the campus-based AAMU Speechand Hearing Clinic and in externship sites across thestate. The AAMU Clinic is a teaching clinic and hasbeen serving the public since the late 1960s. Studentscomplete a minimum of 400 clinical clock hourssupervised by ASHA certified, Alabama licensedfaculty members and external supervisors. The clinicserves clients of all ages from within the communityas well as the University campus40


OBJECTIVESAlabama A&M University’s master’s degreeprogram in Communicative Sciences and Disordershas as its primary objective the education of highlycompetent speech-language pathologists who arecapable of interacting in a variety of employmentsettings such as hospitals, clinics, public schools,rehabilitation centers, private practice, nursingfacilities, or special centers/schools. The secondobjective is to provide training which allows personswith varying backgrounds to become fully qualifiedto apply for national certification through theAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association(ASHA), for state licensure through the AlabamaBoard of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathologyand Audiology (ABESPA) and for the alternativeteaching certificate through the Alabama StateDepartment of Education (ASDE). Individualsapplying for teaching certification must take and passthe Alabama Prospective Teacher Test (APTT) BasicSkills Assessment. The third objective of the programis to increase the representation of ASHA certifiedminority speech-language pathologists.ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSSelected applicants are admitted to the Program inthe fall and spring semesters of the academic year forwhich they apply.Application DeadlinesFall ................................................................. April 15Spring ........................................................ October 15Because enrollment into the CSD Program iscompetitive applications are reviewed carefully toassign priority to the most qualified students. Itshould be noted that not every student whosecredentials meet stated quantitative standards will beadmitted.Students must first meet all requirements foradmission to the School of Graduate Studies plus thefollowing criteria:1. An undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of3.0 or better (on a 4.0 grading scale).2. Graduate Records Examination (GRE) minimumscore of 146 (400) on the Verbal portion and140 (400) on the Quantitative portion is required.3. Transcripts of all undergraduate work attempted,including junior colleges and communitycolleges4. Three letters of recommendation (ondepartmental or institutional letterhead,preferably from the student’s undergraduateprofessors)5. A letter, written by the applicant, expressing aStatement of professional goals and objectives(No specific format required at this time)6. Applicants whose first language is not Englishrequire a minimum score on the Test of Englishas a Foreign Language (TOEFL) of 600 (paperbased),250 (computer-based), or 100 (Internetbased)within two years prior to application. TheTOEFL scores must be on file in the GraduateSchool prior to receipt of the application forgraduate study.Note: CSD application deadlines are different fromthe Office of Graduate Studies. Only completedpackages will be reviewed.DEGREE REQUIREMENTSThe Communicative Sciences and Disorders degreeis a 57-63 semester hour program for studentsholding a bachelor level degree in speech-languagepathology, and an 87-93 semester hour program forstudents holding a bachelor level degree in an areaother than speech-language pathology. * In order tomeet the current ASHA certification requirementsstudents are required to enroll in CSD 516 AdvancedClinical Practicum every semester of enrollment untilall required clinical clock hours are completed.Students will not be permitted to graduate until allclinical clock hours are completed.ADVISINGEach student’s program is planned with the guidanceof, and in consultation with, a departmental advisorin the area of Communicative Sciences andDisorders. The program does not take responsibilityfor courses taken without program advisement andapproval. A copy of the program of study can beobtained from the program office or on the CSDwebsite.Decision on clinical/academic performance andpossible termination of students from the program* Students who do not hold a bachelor’s degree in speech pathologymay be required to take additional courses. Depending upontheir previous academic records, students may be required to takeprerequisite courses to complete the Degree program.41


will be based on factors such as course grades,demonstrated clinical competence, and personality/disposition factors.PRAXISAll candidates must pass the ETS PRAXIS (NationalExamination in Speech-Language Pathology) with ascore of 600 or above in lieu of the comprehensiveexamination. The University must receive evidenceof a passing test score by the official date of thecomprehensive exam of final semester of registeredenrollment.OTHER REQUIREMENTSSpeech, Language and Hearing Screening1. CSD students must take and pass a speechlanguage-hearingscreening examination duringtheir first semester. The purpose of this screeningis to identify any speech, language or hearingproblem that may interfere with a students'academic or clinical progression in the program.2. Students must demonstrate the ability to speakStandard American English intelligibly,including modeling of all English phonemes.3. Students will be enrolled in the AAMU Speechand Hearing Clinic free of charge if test resultsdeem intervention necessary.Fingerprinting/Background CheckProgram Requirements for the Non-Thesis Option(57-63 semester hours, with CSD 516 repeated asneeded to complete clinical clock hours)Sem.Required ProgramHoursCSD 504 Advanced Evaluation &3Assessment ofCommunicative DisordersCSD 510 Stuttering and Other3Disorders of Speech FlowCSD 513 Language Disorders in3AdultsCSD 515 Language Development in 3Communication DisordersCSD 516 Advanced Clinical Practicum 3CSD 520 Language Disorders in3ChildrenCSD 522 Voice Disorders 3CSD 525 Case Management in SLP 3CSD 534 Articulation and3Developmental PhonologicalDisordersCSD 538 Neuroanatomy 3CSD 539 Craniofacial Anomalies 3CSD 544 Motor Speech Disorders 3CSD 545 Swallowing Disorders 3CSD 550 Seminar in CSD 3CSD 598 Research Methodologies in 3Communication DisordersPSY 502 Descriptive & Inferential3Behavioral Statistics48Graduate students enrolled in the CSD Program will,in their first semester, undergo a criminal backgroundcheck which includes fingerprinting and a check ofnational and state criminal databases.Fingerprint/background check is a requirement for allindividuals in the College of Education, includingCSD students.42


COMPUTER SCIENCEMASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTERSCIENCEPROGRAM COORDINATORYujian Fu256-372-8461yujian.fu@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyProfessorsJian FuAssociate ProfessorsVenkata AtluriAlak BandyopadhyayXiang ZhaoAssistant ProfessorsYujian FuMuhammad Ghanbarialgorithms, computer organization and architecture,programming language theory and operating systems.The required mathematics and science backgroundinclude two courses in college calculus, a linearalgebra course, and exposure to mathematical logic.A student must have a GPA of 3.00 in these, as wellas an overall undergraduate GPA of 3.00 otherwisethe student must take required undergraduatebackground courses as specified by the graduateadvisory committee at the time of admission.To be admitted to the master’s program, the applicantmust have the equivalent of an undergraduate degreein computer science from a regionally accreditedcollege or university. The candidate must have aminimum score of 500 on the quantitative portion ofthe GRE.GENERAL REQUIREMENTSThe program provides for thesis and non-thesisoptions.ABOUT THE PROGRAMThe graduate program is designed to equip studentswith advanced knowledge in both computer sciencetheory and application. This includes opportunitiesthrough funded research, seminars, lab-work, andfield trips to acquire hands-on experience on a widevariety of state-of-the-art computer hardware andsoftware systems.The department offers a rigorous Master of Sciencedegree in Computer Science, providing basiccompetence in the principal areas of computerscience. On this foundation, the student has theopportunity to build expertise in one of a number ofpractical and theoretical subjects, working toward adeeper understanding under the guidance of a facultymember.ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSProspective students must have substantialbackground in computing, mathematics and science.The required computing background typicallyincludes: competence in programming usingC++/Java, discrete structures, data structures andMaster's Degree with the Non-Thesis OptionStudent who chooses the non-thesis option mustcomplete 36 hours of course work. The courseworkconsists of 18 hours of core courses and 18 hours ofcomputer science (CMP) electives. With this option,the student must pass the comprehensive exam withinthree attempts. The comprehensive examination willconsist of questions from the knowledge units fromeach of the six core courses. A score of 75 or better isrequired to pass the comprehensive examination.Students also must complete all core courses prior totaking the comprehensive examination.Master's Degree with the Thesis OptionStudents who choose to take the thesis option mustcomplete 33 semester hours of course work plus 6hours of thesis. The course work consists of 18 hoursof core courses and 9 hours of computer science(CMP) electives. The master's research and thesismust be an original work that (l) offers a theoreticalcontribution to the field or (2) provides a newmethodology or techniques for solving practicalproblems in the area of computer science.43


Core CoursesEvery student must take all of the core courses tofulfill the breadth-first requirement. A minimumGPA of 3.00 must be earned in the core courses.Elective CoursesA number of elective courses are provided for thestudent to master in interested field(s) ofspecialization.Program Requirements with the Thesis OptionProfessional Core (Required)Sem.HoursCMP 511 Design and Analysis of3AlgorithmsCMP 521 Object Oriented3Programming and DesignCMP 531 Computer Architecture 3CMP 541 Operating Systems Principles 3CMP 551 Database Management3SystemsCMP 561 Software Engineering3MethodologyCMP Electives 9CMP Thesis 6Total 33Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOptionProfessional Core (RequiredSem.HoursCMP 511 Design and Analysis of3AlgorithmsCMP 521 Object Oriented3Programming and DesignCMP 531 Computer Architecture 3CMP 541 Operating Systems Principles 3CMP 551 Database Management3SystemsCMP 561 Software Engineering3MethodologyCMP Electives 18Total 36ElectivesCMP 513 Management Information3SystemsCMP 515 Numerical Analysis 3CMP 517 Applications of Statistical3MethodsCMP 523 Compiler Design 3CMP 525 Advanced Data Structures 3CMP 535 Information to Bioinformatics 3CMP 543 Computer Communications 3CMP 550 Artificial Intelligence 3CMP 554 Neural Networks 3CMP 555 Advanced Database Systems 3CMP 562 Multimedia Systems and3ApplicationsCMP 570 Computer Graphics and3AnimationCMP 577 Fuzzy and Expert Systems 3CMP 591 Cooperative Educational3Work ExperienceCMP 593 Advanced Topics in3Computer ScienceCMP 597 Independent Study 344


COUNSELING & GUIDANCEMASTER OF SCIENCE IN COUNSELING &GUIDANCEPROGRAM DIRECTORJames H. Stewart256-372-8128james.stewart@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyProfessorsJames H. StewartAnnie WellsAssociate ProfessorsCalvin MatthewsJoan Fobbs-WilsonAssistant ProfessorsRhonda SherrodGeorge MamboleoABOUT THE PROGRAMThe Master of Science program in Counseling andGuidance offers students the educational backgroundto prepare for work as school counselors. The M.S.program requires 48 credits of course work in thesisand non-thesis options. Currently, the program isintended for both part-time and full-time students,with classes designed to accommodate workingstudents.DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Thesis OptionSem.Required ProgramHoursSPE 501 Intro. To Study Exceptional 0-3ChildrenPSY 502 Descriptive & Inferential3Behavioral StatisticsPSY 514 Advanced Developmental3PsychologyPSY 555 Personality Theory 3PSY 556 Group Dynamics 3PSY 557 Organization andAdministration of Guidance3PSY 558 Use & Interpretation of Tests 3PSY 559 Counseling Techniques 3PSY 585 Research in Psychology 3PSY 592 Professional3Orientation/IssuesPSY 595 Counseling Diverse3PopulationsPSY 597 Counseling Practicum 3PSY 612 School Counseling Internship 3PSY 660 Consultation 3PSY 599 Thesis 6Total 45-48Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOptionSem.Required ProgramHoursSPE 501 Intro. To Study Exceptional 3ChildrenPSY 502 Descriptive & Inferential3Behavioral StatisticsPSY 514 Advanced Developmental3PsychologyPSY 555 Personality Theory 3PSY 556 Group Dynamics 3PSY 557 Organization and3Administration of GuidancePSY 558 Use & Interpretation of Tests 3PSY 559 Counseling Techniques 3PSY 560 Occupational Psychology 3PSY 585 Research in Psychology 3PSY 592 Professional3Orientation/IssuesPSY 597 Counseling Practicum 3PSY 612 School Counseling Internship 3PSY 660 Consultation 3500-600 Level Electives 6Note: Comprehensive Exam is requiredTotal 45-4845


COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGYMASTER OF SCIENCE IN COUNSELINGPSYCHOLOGYPROGRAM DIRECTORAnnie M. Wells256-372-8128Annie.wells@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyProfessorsAnnie WellsAssociate ProfessorsCalvin MatthewsJoan Fobbs-WilsonAssistant ProfessorsRhonda SherrodGeorge MamboleoABOUT THE PROGRAMThe Master of Science program in CounselingPsychology offers students the educationalbackground to prepare for work as mental healthspecialists in a variety of settings. The programprovides broad-based instruction in practicalcounseling psychology which provides theframework necessary for graduates to apply formaster’s level licensure as a professional counselor inthe state of Alabama. The M.S. program requires 48credits of course work in thesis and non-thesisoptions. Currently, the program is intended for bothpart-time and full-time students, with classesdesigned to accommodate working students.DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements for the Non-Thesis Optionfor MS Degree in Counseling Psychology Required ProgramPSY 502 Desc & Inter. BehavioralStatisticsPSY 514 Adv. DevelopmentalPsychologySem.Hours33PSY 555 Personality Theory 3PSY 556 Group Dynamics 3PSY 558 Use & Interpretation of Tests 3PSY 559 Counseling Techniques 3PSY 560 Occupational Psychology 3PSY 585 Research in Psychology 3PSY 592 Professional3Orientation/IssuesPSY 595 Counseling Diverse3PopulationsPSY 597 Counseling Practicum 3PSY 620 Counseling Internship I 3PSY 621 Counseling Internship II 3Electives 9Total 48Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOption with a Concentration in RehabilitationCounselingTrack I – Blindness Track Required ProgramSem.HoursCore CoursesPSY 502 Descriptive & Inferential3Behavioral StatisticsPSY 585 Research in Psychology 3PSY 556 Group Dynamics 3ConcentrationPSY 507 Introduction to Rehabilitation 3CounselingPSY 508 Job Development and3PlacementPSY 509 Vocational Assessment 3PSY 553 Case Management 3PSY 554 Medical Aspects and3Adjustment in RehabilitationPSY 559 Counseling Techniques 3PSY 560 Occupational Psychology 3PSY 591 Psychosocial Aspects of3DisabilitiesPSY 597 Counseling Practicum 3MS – Orientation to6BlindnessPSY 616 Internship in Vocational3CounselingPSY 617 Internship in Rehabilitation 3CounselingTotal 54 Candidates must take and pass the Comprehensive Examination46


Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOption with a Concentration in RehabilitationCounselingTrack II – Deafness Track Required ProgramSem.HoursCore CoursesPSY 502 Descriptive & Inferential3Behavioral StatisticsPSY 585 Research in Psychology 3PSY 556 Group Dynamics 3ConcentrationPSY 507 Introduction to Rehabilitation 3CounselingPSY 508 Job Development and3PlacementPSY 509 Vocational Assessment 3SPE 524 Sign Language 3PSY 553 Case Management 3PSY 554 Medical Aspects and3Adjustment in RehabilitationPSY 559 Counseling Techniques 3PSY 560 Occupational Psychology 3PSY 591 Psychosocial Aspects of3DisabilitiesPSY 597 Counseling Practicum 3UT Orientation to Deafness. 3This training will fulfill twoof the 6 credit hours of theelective requirementsPSY 616 Internship in Vocational3CounselingPSY 617 Internship in Rehabilitation 3CounselingTotal 48CounselingPSY 508 Job Development and3PlacementPSY 509 Vocational Assessment 3PSY 510 Rehabilitation High and Low 3TechnologyPSY 553 Case Management 3PSY 554 Medical Aspects and3Adjustment in RehabilitationPSY 559 Counseling Techniques 3PSY 560 Occupational Psychology 3PSY 591 Psychosocial Aspects of3DisabilitiesPSY 597 Counseling Practicum 3Elective 3PSY 616 Internship in Vocational3CounselingPSY 617 Internship in Rehabilitation 3CounselingTotal 48Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOption with a Concentration in RehabilitationCounselingTrack III – General Track Required ProgramSem.HoursCore CoursesPSY 502 Descriptive & Inferential3Behavioral StatisticsPSY 585 Research in Psychology 3PSY 556 Group Dynamics 3ConcentrationPSY 507 Introduction to Rehabilitation 3 Candidates must take and pass the Comprehensive Examination47


ELEMENTARY EDUCATIONPROGRAM DIRECTORRena Lott256-372-5504Rena.lott@aamu.eduAssociate ProfessorRena N. LottAssistant ProfessorsAngela R. WilliamsRhonda Moore-JacksonMarjorie BattleNorma BoweABOUT THE PROGRAMThe Department of Elementary and Early ChildhoodEducation offers coursework and field experiencesleading to the Master in Education with TeacherCertification (Class A and Class A Alternative) inEarly Childhood Education (P-3) and ElementaryEducation (K-6). The Department also offerscoursework and research opportunities for theEducational Specialist (Ed.S.) degree in EarlyChildhood Education and Elementary Education withClass AA teacher certification.DEGREE COMPLETION REQUIREMENTSCandidates for the Master’s in Elementary Education(regardless of Track) must successfully:1. Complete all undergraduate deficiency courses.2. Complete the prescribed courses listed in theapproved plan of study.3. Obtain an overall grade-point average of 3.00(based on a 4.00 system).4. Pass a written comprehensive examination thatcovers the content of the program, complete aninternship. All students enrolled in the Alternative Master’s (5 th yearprogram) must also complete 205 hours of diverse fieldexperiences prior to enrolling in the fall semester of internship.Fifty hours of field experiences are completed at Level I of theprogram. Twenty hours, three full days, are completed whileenrolled in FED 501 Foundations of Education and/or FED 521Multicultural Education courses. The three days of fieldexperiences for these courses are completed in Title I, high povertyschools. Thirty hours, four full days, are completed while enrolledin SPE 501 Introduction to Individuals With Disabilities. Field5. Pass all parts of the Alabama ProspectiveTeacher Test (9) passing of the Praxis II in theappropriate area.ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR GRADUATESTUDENTS FOR THE INTERNSHIP(ALTERNATIVE MASTER’S 5 TH YEAR)Graduate students who expect to participate ininternship shall meet all the Teacher Educationprogram admission criteria described in the AlabamaAdministrative Code and be admitted to a TeacherEducation program after the completion of FED 501or FED 521, SPE 501 and EDU 529. Only studentswho have a minimum of 3.00 grade point average(GPA) in the teaching field (all work used), inprofessional studies (all work used) and overall willbe eligible for internship. Graduate students mustobtain and maintain a minimum overall of 3.00 gradepoint average (GPA) throughout their program.An application for internship must be completed andfiled in the Office of Field Experiences at least oneyear prior to the internship date. The deadline for thespring is March 15 of the previous year, and for thefall semester, September 15 of the previous year.Before a graduate student can participate ininternship, the following prerequisites must be met:1. The student must have on file an application to aTeacher Education program.2. The student must meet all requirements foradmission to a Teacher Education program.3. GRE scores must be on file with the TeacherService Center4. The student must meet general studiesrequirements.5. The student must have obtained and maintained aminimum of 3.00 grade point average inprofessional studies, the teaching field andoverall.6. All undergraduate deficiencies must becompleted.7. The student must have completed all coursework (excluding internship) from the Stateapproved checklist.experiences are completed in special education settings, withstudents with exceptionalities. One hundred fifty-five hours offield experiences are completed during Level II of the programwhile enrolled in teaching field courses. Students alternateexperiences between urban and rural school settings. Fifty-five ofthe 155 hours may be completed in service learning settings.48


8. The student must have removed all grades of“Incomplete.”9. The student must not have any grades of “C” orlower in any course.10. Program of study must be on file with theTeacher Service Center and the Graduate Office.11. Official transcripts from other universities andcolleges attended must be on file with theTeacher Service Center.12. The student must obtain requisite score on thePraxis II exam in appropriate area ofconcentration.13. The student must clear thefingerprint/background check with the StateDepartment of Education.CERTIFICATIONAll teacher education majors that have met therequirements must apply for Alabama Certification.A candidate who files an application must completethe curriculum approved by the State of Alabama.The completion of the curriculum approved forcertification and all other requirements for graduationwill qualify the student to apply for a professionaleducator’s certificate. The levels of AlabamaProfessional Educator Certificates for students in thegraduate program are: Class A: Master’s degree andClass AA: Ed.S. degree.MASTER IN EDUCATION WITH TEACHERCERTIFICATION – ALTERNATIVE FIFTHYEAR CLASS A P-3 IN EARLY CHILDHOODEDUCATION *ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSThe alternative 5th year program is for applicantswho do not hold a baccalaureate degree in a teachingfield but wishes to obtain teacher certification. Theprogram enables qualified candidates to acquire theknowledge and skills of an entry-level teacher whileat the same time earn a Master’s degree. In additionto specific course requirements found on pages 43-44applicants seeking admission to the alternative 5thyear program, program must be admitted to theSchool of Graduate Studies and to TeacherEducation. Admission to Teacher Education requiresthe applicant to:1. Present evidence of having completed abaccalaureate degree from a regionallyaccredited institution.2. A grade point average of 2.50 or better (4.00point system) on all course work previouslycompleted.3. Complete all undergraduate deficiencies.4. Pass a speech, language and hearing screening.5. Provide results of a negative tuberculosis skintest.Required ProgramSem.HoursECE 514 Basic Skills 3ECE 520 Foundation of Teaching3ReadingECE 521 Research in Elementary &3Early ChildhoodECH 506 Curriculum Design 3ECH 516 Multi-Sensory Approaches to 3LearningECH 595 Internship in ECH 6FED 502 Foundations of Education3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Educational Research 3FED 504 Evaluation of Teaching &3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based3Instructional TechnologySPE 501 Introduction to Study of3Exceptional ChildrenSPE 530 Classroom Behavior3ManagementElective Courses 6Total 45Elective CoursesART 534 Art in Childhood Education 3ECE 505 Problems in Improving Math 3ECE 507 Children’s Literature 3ECE 509 Trends in Teaching Social3StudiesECE 510 Problems in Improving3ScienceECE 512 Investigation of Language3ArtsECE 518 Environmental Education 3 In addition to other deficiencies, candidates seeking thealternative Master’s in Early Childhood Education (p-3) mustcomplete the following undergraduate teaching field courses:FCE 304 Teaching Reading to Young Children, ECE 305 M/Min Math, ECH 300 Programs in ECH, ECH 405 Organization/Administration in ECH and PSY 403 Educational Psychology.Early childhood Education Alternative Master’s candidatesseeking the additional endorsement in Elementary Education (K-6) must complete the following graduate courses: ELE 509Evaluation in Elementary Schools and ELE 519 ElementarySchool Curriculum. A Passing score on a comprehensive writtenexamination covering the content of the program areas isrequired.49


Across the CurriculumECE 506 Curriculum Design 3ECH 517 Theory, Methods & in ECH 3EARLY CHILDHOOD (PRE-ELEMENTARY)EDUCATION ALTERNATIVE FIFTH-YEARMASTER’S PROGRAM-CLASS A P-3ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTSIn addition to specific course requirements found onpages 47-48 applicants seeking admission to theprogram must (1) present evidence of havingcompleted a baccalaureate degree program in thesame teaching field from an accredited school, (2)present a copy of a Class B Professional Educator’sCertificate, and (3) present transcript(s) showing abaccalaureate degree grade point average of 2.50 orbetter (4.00 system).DEGREE REQUIRMENTS Program Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursECE 514 Basic Skills 3ECE520Foundations of Teaching3ReadingECE 521 Research in Elementary &3Early ChildhoodECH 506Curriculum Design 3ECH 516Multi-Sensory Approaches to 3LearningECH 595Internship in ECH 6FED 501Foundations of Education orFED 521Multicultural Education 3FED 503 Educational Research 3FED 504Evaluation of Teaching &3LearningFED 529Computer-Based3Instructional Technology In addition to other deficiencies, candidates seeking thealternative Master’s in Early Childhood Education (p-3) mustcomplete the following undergraduate teaching field courses:FCE 304 Teaching Reading to Young Children, ECE 305 M/Min Math, ECH 300 Programs in ECH, ECH 405 Organization/Administration in ECH and PSY 403 Educational Psychology.Early childhood Education Alternative Master’s candidatesseeking the additional endorsement in Elementary Education (K-6) must complete the following graduate courses: ELE 509Evaluation in Elementary Schools and ELE 519 ElementarySchool Curriculum. A Passing score on a comprehensive writtenexamination covering the content of the program areas isrequired.SPE 501Introduction to Study of3Exceptional ChildrenSPE 530Classroom Behavior Mgmt 3Electives * 6Total 45EARLY CHILDHOOD (PRE-ELEMENTARY)EDUCATION TRADITIONAL MASTER’SPROGRAM CLASS A P-3ADMISSION REQUIRMENTSIn addition to specific course requirements found onpages 43-44 applicants seeking admission to theprogram must (1) present evidence of havingcompleted a baccalaureate degree program in thesame teaching field from an accredited school, (2)present a copy of a Class B Professional Educator’sCertificate, and (3) present transcript(s) showing abaccalaureate degree grade point average of 2.50 orbetter (4.00 system).DEGREE REQUIRMENTSSem.Program Requirements with the Non- HoursThesis OptionECE521Research in Elementary &3Early ChildhoodECH 506Curriculum Design 3ECH 516Multi-Sensory Approaches to 3LearningECH 517Theory, Methods & Materials 3in ECH EducationFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501Foundations of Education3orFED 521Multicultural EducationFED 503Educational Research 3FED 504Evaluation of Teaching &3LearningFED 529Computer-Based3Instructional TechnologySPE 501Introduction to Study of3Exceptional ChildrenElectives 6Total 36Partial Listing of Electives Open To This Track*ECH 502Workshop in Early3Childhood EducationECE 503Learning Styles 350


ECE 504Problems in ImprovingReadingELE 509Evaluation in ElementarySchools33StudiesECE 510 Problems in Improving3ScienceECE 512 Invest. of Language Arts 3ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ALTERNATIVEFIFTH-YEAR MASTER’S PROGRAM – CLASSAP-3ABOUT THE PROGRAMDEGREE REQUIRMENTS Program Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursECE 514 Basic Skills 3ECE 520 Foundations of Teaching3ReadingECE 521 Research in Elementary &3Early ChildhoodELE 509 Evaluation in Elementary3SchoolsELE 519 Elementary School3CurriculumELE 595 Internship 6FED 501 Foundations of Education3ORFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Educational Research 3FED 504 Evaluation of Teaching &3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based3Instructional TechnologySPE 501 Introduction to Study of3Exceptional ChildrenSPE 530 Classroom Behavior3ManagementElectives 6Total 45Available ElectivesART 534 Art in Childhood Education 3ECE 505 Problems in Improving Math 3ECE 507 Children’s Literature 3ECE 509 Trends in Teaching Social 3 In addition to other deficiencies, candidates seeking theAlternative Master’s in Elementary Education (K-6) mustcomplete the following undergraduate teaching field courses:ECE 304 Teaching Reading to Young Children, ECE 305 M/Min Math, ECE 407 Teaching Intermediate Readers, ELE 300Elementary School Organization and PSY 403 EducationalPsychology. Elementary Education Alternative Master’scandidates seeking the additional endorsement in EarlyChildhood Education (P-3) must complete the following graduatecourses: ECH 506 Curriculum Design and ECH 516 Multi-Sensory Approaches to Learning. A passing score on acomprehensive written examination covering the content of theprogram areas is required.ELEMENTARY EDUCATION TRADITIONALMASTER’S PROGRAM – CLASS K-6ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTSIn addition to specific course requirements found onpages 43-44 applicants seeking admission to theprogram must (1) present evidence of havingcompleted a baccalaureate degree program in thesame teaching field from an accredited school, (2)present a copy of a Class B Professional Educator’sCertificate, and (3) present transcript(s) showing abaccalaureate degree grade point average of 2.50 orbetter (4.00 system).DEGREE REQUIRMENTS Program Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursECE 520 Foundations of Teaching3ReadingECE 521 Research in Elementary &3Early ChildhoodELE 509 Evaluation in Elementary3SchoolsELE 519 Elementary School3CurriculumFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of EducationFED 521 Multicultural Education 3FED 503 Educational Research 3FED 504 Evaluation of Teaching &3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based3Instructional TechnologySPE 501 Introduction to Study of3Exceptional ChildrenElectives 6Total 36Available ElectivesECE 503 Learning Styles 3ECE 504 Problems in Improving3ReadingECE 505 Problems in Improving Math 3 A Passing Score on a comprehensive written examinationcovering the content of the program areas is required.51


ECE 507 Children’s Literature 3ECE 509 Trends in Teaching Social3StudiesECE 512 Investigation of Language3ArtsECE 518 Environmental Education3Across CurriculumECH 506 Curriculum Design 3ECH 516 Multi-Sensory Approaches to 3LearningEDUCATIONAL SPECIALIST DEGREE INEARLY CHILDHOOD PRE-ELEMENTARYEDUCATION PROGRAM – CLASS AA P-3ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTSIn addition to specific course requirements found onpages 43-44 applicants seeking admission to theprogram must (1) present evidence of havingcompleted a baccalaureate degree program in thesame teaching field from an accredited school, (2)present a copy of a Class B Professional Educator’sCertificate, and (3) present transcript(s) showing abaccalaureate degree grade point average of 2.50 orbetter (4.00 system).DEGREE REQUIRMENTS Program Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursECE 602 Theoretical Foundations 3ECE 671 Advanced Research in3ELE/ECHECH 602 Strategies of Parent3InvolvementFED 696 Action Research I 3FED 697 Action Research II 3FED 600 Advanced Curriculum3DevelopmentFED 603 Advanced Educational3ResearchFED 604 Advanced Evaluation of3Teaching & LearningFED 605 Qualitative Methods of3Educational ResearchSPE 501 Introduction to Study of3Exceptional Children Candidates who have not taken statistics at the master level mustenroll in FED 502 Educational Statistics prior to enrolling inteaching field courses and before completing the Ed.S. program.A passing score on a comprehensive written examinationcovering the content of the program areas is required.SPE 667 Professional Writing 3Electives 3Total 36Available ElectivesECE 510 Problems in Improving 3ScienceECE 603 Field Research 3ECE 625 Trends in Teaching Social3StudiesECH 502 Workshop in Early3Childhood EducationELE 614 Teaching Strategies Affecting 3Dimension of ReadingFED 531 Current & Emerging3Instructional TechnologiesFED 532 Curriculum Integrating3TechnologyEDUCATIONAL SPECIALIST DEGREE INELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAMCLASS AA P-3ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTSIn addition to specific course requirements found onpages 43-44 applicants seeking admission to theprogram must(1) present evidence of havingcompleted a Master’s degree from an accreditedschool with Class A Certification in the sameteaching field(s) in which the Ed.S. degree is soughtand (2) present transcript(s) showing a Master’sdegree grade point average of 3.00 or better (4.00system).DEGREE REQUIRMENTS*Program Requirements with the Non- Sem.Thesis OptionHoursECE 602 Theoretical Foundations 3ECE 671 Advanced Research in3ELE/ECHELE 614 Teaching Strategies Affecting 3Dimension of ReadingFED 696 Action Research I 3FED 697 Action Research II 3FED 600 Advanced Curriculum3DevelopmentFED 603 Advanced Educational3ResearchFED 604 Advanced Evaluation of3Teaching & LearningFED 605 Qualitative Methods of3Educational ResearchSPE 501 Introduction to Study of3Exceptional Children52


SPE 667 Professional WritingElectives33Total 36Available ElectivesECE 603 Field Research 3ECE 625 Trends in Teaching Social3StudiesECH 602 Strategies of Parent3InvolvementELE 511 Workshop in Elementary3EducationFED 531 Current & Emerging3Instructional TechnologiesFED 532 Curriculum Integrating3Technology53


FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCESMASTER OF SCIENCE IN FAMILY ANDCONSUMER SCIENCESPROGRAM DIRECTORCynthia M. Smith256-372-4172Cynthia.smith@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyProfessorsVirginia CaplesOla SandersNahid SistaniCynthia M. SmithAssociate ProfessorsJohnson KamaluAssistant ProfessorsCarol HallAllison YoungABOUT THE PROGRAMThe Master of Science program in Family andConsumer Sciences is dedicated to preparingresearchers and academicians to engage in a diverserange of intellectual issues critical for the well-beingof individuals and families. The flexibility of theMaster’s degree program in Family and ConsumerSciences allows students the opportunity to achieveprofessional and personal goals. In addition toflexibility, a thesis or non-thesis option is offered. Atotal of 34 semester hours of course work, 13 ofwhich are common core courses, is required forcompletion of the program. The remaining hours (15thesis/21 hours for non-thesis) may be taken throughone of the Area Concentrations:1. Apparel, Merchandising and Design.2. Human Development and Family Studies.3. Nutrition and Hospitality Management.ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAMAAFCS program. Academic records of applicantswith a bachelor’s degree in a related or unrelatedfield will be assessed for the necessary prerequisites.Any prerequisite not met will require additionalundergraduate or graduate courses.Program Requirements for the Thesis Option forconcentration in Apparel, Merchandising andDesignSem.Core (Required)HoursFCS 508 Trends & Issues in the3ProfessionFCS 511 Administration and3Leadership in FCSFCS 514 Seminar 1AGB 590 Research Methods in the3Agribusiness or FED 503NRE 529 Statistics or FED 502 or3PSY502Sub-Total 13Concentration (Select 5 courses min. 15 credithours)AMD 527 Consumer Textiles 3AMD 528 Social Psychological &3Economic Aspect of ClothingAMD 530 Special Problems 3FCS 530 Special Problems 1-3AMD 533 Historic Costume 3AMD 534 Advanced Costume Design 3ADM 535 Advanced Tailoring 3AMD 537 Fashion Merchandising Study 1-3TourAM 540 Clothing for the Elderly 3FCS 512 Technological Advances & 3Application in the ProfessionAMD 618 Textile Economics 3FCS 600 Program Planning &3EvaluationAMD 650 New Directions in Clothing 3& TextilesSub-Total 15FCS 599 Master’s Thesis 6Total 34In addition to the general requirements for admissionto graduate study at Alabama A&M University,applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree in a Familyand Consumer Sciences program from an accredited54


Program Requirements with the Thesis Optionfor concentration in Human Development andFamily StudiesCore (Required)Sem.HoursFCS 508 Trends & Issues in the3ProfessionFCS 511 Administration and3Leadership in FCSFCS 514 Seminar 1AGB 590 Research Methods in the3Agribusiness or FED 503NRE 529 Statistics or FED 502 or3PSY502Sub-Total 13Concentration (Select 5 courses min. 15 credithours)HDF 500 Family Development &3CultureFCS 512 Technological Advances & 3Application in the ProfessionHDF 515 Social & Emotional3Development of ChildrenHDF 517 Consumer Behavior 3HDF 518 Parenting Perspectives 3HDF 519 Child Development Programs 3HDF 520 Family Resource3ManagementHDF 521 Youth Programs 3HDF 524 Adults & Their Relationships 3HDF 526 Multi-Sensory Approaches to 3LearningHDF 530 Special Problems 3FCS 530 Special Problems 1-3HDF 544 Support Systems for the3ElderlyHDF 604 Reading in Child3Development and EarlyChildhood EducationFCS 600 Program Planning &3EvaluationHDF 610 Strategies of Parent3InvolvementSub-Total 15FCS 599 Master’s Thesis 6Total 34Program Requirements with the Thesis Optionfor concentration in Nutrition and HospitalityManagementCore (Required)Sem.HoursFCS 508 Trends & Issues in the3ProfessionFCS 511 Administration and3Leadership in FCSFCS 514 Seminar 1AGB 590 Research Methods in the3Agribusiness or FED 503NRE 529 Statistics or FED 502 or3PSY502Sub-Total 13Concentration (Select 5 courses min. 15 credithours)NHM 501 Advanced Maternal and3Child NutritionNHM 502 Advanced Quantity Food3ProductionNHM 503 Experimental Foods 3NHM 504 Breastfeeding and Human3LactationNHM 505 Contemporary Problems in 3the Hospitality IndustryNHM 511 Nutrition Education Program 3Planning and ImplementationNHM 530 Special Problems 3FCS 512 Technological Advances & 3Application in the ProfessionFCS 53 Special Problems 1-3NHM 548 Workshop 3FCS 600 Program Planning &3EvaluationNHM 612 Adolescent and Geriatric3NutritionMGT 564 Human Resource3ManagementFIN 511 Financial Management &3PolicyMGT 515 Organizational Theory and 3BehaviorSub-Total 15FCS 599 Master’s Thesis 6Total 3455


Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOption for concentration in Apparel,Merchandising and DesignCore (Required)Sem.HoursFCS 508 Trends & Issues in the3ProfessionFCS 511 Administration and3Leadership in FCS orFCS 514 Seminar I 1AGB 590 Research Methods in the3Agribusiness or FED 503NRE 529 Statistics or FED 502 or3PSY502Sub-Total 13Concentration (Select 7 courses min. 21 credithours)AMD 527 Consumer Textiles 3AMD 528 Social Psychological &3Economic Aspect of ClothingAMD 530 Special Problems 3FCS 530 Special Problems 1-3AMD 533 Historic Costume 3AMD 534 Advanced Costume Design 3ADM 535 Advanced Tailoring 3AMD 537 Fashion Merchandising Study 1-3TourAMD 540 Clothing for the Elderly 3FCS 512 Technological Advances & 3Application in the ProfessionAMD 618 Textile Economics 3FCS 600 Program Planning &3EvaluationAMD 650 New Directions in Clothing 3& TextilesSub-Total 21Total 34NRE 529 Statistics or AGB590 or3FED503Sub-Total 13Concentration (Select 7 courses min. 21 credithours)HDF 500 Family Development &3CultureFCS 512 Technological Advances & 3Application in the ProfessionHDF 515 Social & Emotional3Development of ChildrenHDF 517 Consumer Behavior 3HDF 518 Parenting Perspectives 3HDF 519 Child Development Programs 3HDF 520 Family Resource3ManagementHDF 521 Youth Programs 3HDF 524 Adults & Their Relationships 3HDF 526 Multi-Sensory Approaches to 3LearningHDF 530 Special Problems 3FCS 530 Special Problems 1-3HDF 544 Support Systems for the3ElderlyHDF 604 Reading in Child3Development and EarlyChildhood EducationFCS 600 Program Planning &3EvaluationHDF 610 Strategies of Parent3InvolvementSub-Total 21Total 34Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOption for concentration in Nutrition andHospitality ManagementCore (Required)Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOption for concentration in HumanDevelopment and Family StudiesSem.Core (Required)HoursFCS 508 Trends & Issues in the3ProfessionFCS 511 Leadership and3Administration in FCSFCS 514 Seminar 1AGB 590 Research Methods in the3Agribusiness or FED 503FCS 508 Trends & Issues in the3ProfessionFCS 511 Administration and3Leadership in FCSFCS 514 Seminar 1AGB 590 Research Methods in3Agribusiness or FED 503NRE 529 Statistics or FED 502 or3PSY502Sub-Total 1356


Concentration (Select 7 courses min. 21 credithours)NHM 501 Advanced Maternal and3Child NutritionNHM 502 Advanced Quantity Food3ProductionNHM 503 Experimental Foods 3NHM 504 Breastfeeding and Human3LactationNHM 505 Contemporary Problems in 3the Hospitality IndustryNHM 511 Nutrition Education Program 3Planning and ImplementationNHM 530 Special Problems 3FCS 512 Technological Advances & 3Application in the ProfessionFCS 530 Special Problems 1-3NH 548 Workshop 3FCS 600 Program Planning &3EvaluationNHM 612 Adolescent and Geriatric3NutritionMGT 564 Human Resource3ManagementFIN 511 Financial Management &3PolicyMGT 515 Organizational Theory and 3BehaviorSub-Total 21Total 3457


FOOD SCIENCEMASTER OF SCIENCE IN FOOD SCIENCEDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN FOODSCIENCEPROGRAM DIRECTORMartha Verghese256-372-4175Martha.verghese@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyProgram ProfessorsOla SandersMartha VergheseLloyd WalkerJacqueline JohnsonResearch Associate ProfessorsKoffi KonanAssistant ProfessorsJudith BoatengLamin KassamAssociate ProfessorsGamal Abd-rahimJulio CorreaJorge VizcarraJosh HerringREQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER OF SCIENCEADMISSION REQUIREMENTSFor admission, into the program a student must havea Bachelor of Science degree in an area ofagricultural or other sciences, nutrition, engineeringor mathematics. Students holding degrees in otherfields may be required to take additional courses tosatisfy any deficiencies of core courses consideredvital for food science undergraduate majors. *Candidates must satisfy the general admissionrequirements of the School of Graduate Studies,which include a minimum GPA of 2.75 in theirundergraduate degree program for regular admission.Graduate Record Examination scores must be* Students without a undergraduate degree in Food Science arealso required to complete FAS503 – Food Microbiology, FAS507 – Food Chemistry, and FAS 561 – Food Engineering.submitted. Students seeking to enter the M.S. degreeprogram will be admitted under the followingconditions:1. Regular Admissions – At least a 2.75 grade pointaverage (on a 4.0 point scale), or a 3.00 GPA inthe student’s major area of concentration. Acomposite GRE score of at least 286 (146 verbaland 140 math).2. Conditional Admissions – At least a 2.50 – 2.74GPA (on a 4.0 point scale). A composite scoreless than 286 with verbal of 146 andmathematics of 140.Thesis OptionA minimum of 30 semester hours to include 24 hoursof coursework including at least one hour of graduateseminar and 6 semester hours of thesis research arerequired for graduation. Of these, at least 12 hours ofcoursework should be at 600 level, with a minimumof 9 hours at 600 level in the major area of emphasis.Students without an undergraduate degree in themajor will be guided by their graduate studentadvisory committee to take additional courses thatwill generally extend the hours in the programbeyond 30 semester hours. The students are expectedto complete the degree within a period of twocalendar years. During the course of graduate study,the student will be required to maintain a minimumGPA of 3.0. A successful defense of the thesis and acompleted thesis document prepared according to theGuidelines of the School of Graduate Studies willcomplete the degree requirements.Non-Thesis OptionA minimum of 36 semester hours to include 32 hoursof coursework and 4 hours of master's report asdetermined by the student's advisory committee arerequired. Eighteen (18) hours must be in the student'smajor area and, of these, 9 hours must be at the 600level or higher. An additional 3 credits required at the600 level or higher may be in supporting areas. Themaster's report is prepared in the form and style ofthe thesis document but limited in scope as guided bythe student's advisory committee. Passing acomprehensive examination administered by thestudent's advisory committee is required to completethe degree requirements.58


Program Requirements with the Thesis OptionSem.Required Program HoursNRE 530 Principles of Experimentation 3FAS 697 Seminar 1FAS 699 Research for M.S Master’s 6ThesisArea Content Courses (At least 9 20hours must be at the 600 level)Total 30Program Requirements for the Non-ThesisOptionSem.Required Program*HoursNRE 530 Principles of Experimentation 3FAS 697 Seminar 1FAS 698 Masters Report 4Area Content Courses (At least 9 28hours must be at the 600 level)Total 36Thesis option students must take 20 hours ofarea content courses. Non-thesis option studentsmust take 28 hours of area content coursesArea Content CoursesFAS 505 Meat Science 3FAS 508 Food Analysis 3FAS 521 Poultry Products Technology 3FAS 538 Fruits, Vegetables and Cereal 3Products TechnologyFAS 550 Regulation of Food Safety3and QualityFAS 551 Food Quality Assurance 3FAS 553 Agricultural Biochemistry 4FAS 572 Food Processing 4FAS 605 Special Problems 2-3FAS 611 Food Toxicology 3FAS 615 Food Enzymes 3FAS 617 Food Flavors and Pigments 3FAS 632 Monogastric Nutrition and 3MetabolismFAS 640 Product Development and3esearch Students without an undergraduate degree in Food Science arealso required to complete FAS 503 Food Microbiology, FAS507 Food Chemistry, and FAS 561 Food Engineering.FAS 642 Minerals and Vitamins in3Foods and NutritionFAS 644 Proteins in Foods and3NutritionFAS 646 Carbohydrates and Lipids in 3Foods and NutritionFAS 654 Food Microbiological3TechniquesFAS 657 Analytical Techniques and 3InstrumentationFAS 658 Food Microstructure 3FAS 672 Food Rheology 3FAS 671 Introduction to3BiotechnologyFAS 676 Food Processing and3NutrientsFAS 701 Advanced Food3MicrobiologyFAS 707 Advanced Chemistry 3FAS 711 Advanced Food Toxicology 3FAS 736 Advanced Sensory3EvaluationFAS 741 Advances in Nutrition 3FAS 761 Advanced Food Engineering 3FAS 771 Advanced Food3BiotechnologyFAS 772 Advanced Food Processing 3FAS 796 Advanced Topics in Food 1-3ScienceREQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D.OFPHILOSOPHY IN FOOD SCIENCEADMISSION REQUIREMENTSCandidates seeking admission in the Doctor ofPhilosophy degree program must have:1. A M.S. degree in Food Science, Nutrition,Animal Science, Agronomy, Horticulture, PlantScience, Biology, Chemistry or a closelyrelated area from a regionally accreditedinstitution.2. Provide evidence of a cumulative GPA of 3.00in all baccalaureate coursework and a 3.25cumulative GPA in all M.S. coursework.3. A minimum combined score of 308 on theverbal, quantitative and analytical sections ofthe GRE or its equivalent.4. Three letters of reference that provideinformation about the applicant’s academicbackground and ability to pursue the Ph.D.program.5. A personal statement on a career objective andresearch interest.59


DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR THEDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHYAll students accepted into the Ph.D. program aregranted a provisional admission until they pass thequalifying examination. Candidates who have somedeficiencies in their background but who meet thegeneral requirements of the department and theGraduate School for admission must completeadditional coursework recommended by theDepartmental Graduate Studies Committee with aminimum GPA of 3.00, at which time they shall beallowed to take the qualifying exam. Deficiencycoursework does not count toward the degreerequirements. Upon the successful completion ofall deficiency coursework and the qualifying exam,regular admission will be granted. Acomprehensive examination must be completedwithin five years of the student's initial enrollmentand after completing at least 80 percent of thecoursework and completion of languagerequirements. A dissertation proposal will becompleted with the guidance of the advisorycommittee. Admission to candidacy is an indicationof completion of all coursework, successful passingof written and oral comprehensive examinations,and having filed an approved dissertation proposalwith the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies.Candidacy marks the achievement in which thestudent's major attention is to focus on thedissertation efforts. Each Ph.D. student mustcomplete the following program requirements:1. A total of 28 credit hours (minimum GPA of3.00) beyond the Master's level at the 600 levelor above, including 9 semester hours or more atthe 700 level, are required. An additional twocredit hours of FAS 797 Seminar are requiredof all doctoral students.2. A reading knowledge of at least one foreignlanguage in which there exists a significantbody of literature relevant to the major field ofstudy or at least 3 semester hours of a scientificcomputer programming language. The foreignlanguage requirement is satisfied by a grade of"B" or better in a 200-level or higher languagecourse.3. A meaningful teaching experience in which thePh.D. student works under the supervision of afaculty member in the regular conduct of theorganization, delivery and evaluation of acourse is required.4. Successful completion of written and oralcomprehensive examinations after completingat least 80 percent of the prescribed coursework.5. Completion of a doctoral dissertation involvinga minimum of 12 semester hours of dissertationresearch on a topic determined through thecollaborative efforts of the major advisor andthe graduate student advisory committee. Theeffort must be scholarly and make a significantcontribution to the field of study.6. A final oral examination is required and mustbe taken at least two weeks prior to graduation.The examination will be concerned primarilywith the candidate's dissertation but mayinclude other aspects of the student's graduatework.Program Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree Sem.Required Program*HoursNRE 530 Principles of Experimentation 3FAS 657 Analytical Techniques &3InstrumentationFAS 797 Seminar 2FAS 799 Research for Ph.D. 12NRE 502 Scientific Writing 3Area Concentration Hours 23Total 46PH.D. students must take at least 23 credit hoursfrom this section, including 9 hours or more atthe 700 levelArea Content CoursesFAS 605 Special Problems 2-3FAS 611 Food Toxicology 3FAS 615 Food Enzymes 3FAS 617 Food Flavors and Pigments 3FAS 632 Monogastric Nutrition and 3MetabolismFAS 640 Product Development and3ResearchFAS 642 Minerals and Vitamins in3Foods and NutritionFAS 644 Proteins in Foods and3NutritionFAS 646 Carbohydrates and Lipids in 3Foods and NutritionFAS 654 Food Microbiological3TechniquesFAS 657 Analytical Techniques and 3InstrumentationForeign language or computer programminglanguage requirement (200 level or higher), and NRE502 Scientific Writing (3 hrs) on recommendation ofgraduate advisor also required.60


FAS 658 Food Microstructure 3FAS 672 Food Rheology 3FAS 671 Introduction to3BiotechnologyFAS 676 Food Processing and3NutrientsFAS 701 Advanced Food3MicrobiologyFAS 707 Advanced Chemistry 3FAS 711 Advanced Food Toxicology 3FAS 736 Advanced Sensory3EvaluationFAS 741 Advances in Nutrition 3FAS 761 Advanced Food Engineering 3FAS 771 Advanced Food3BiotechnologyFAS 772 Advanced Food Processing 3FAS 796 Advanced Topics in Food 1-3Science61


GUIDANCE AND PSYCHOLOGYMASTER OF SCIENCE IN GUIDANCE ANDPSYCHOLOGYPROGRAM DIRECTORCalvin O. Matthews256-372-8128Calvin.matthews@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyProfessorsAssociate ProfessorsCalvin O. MatthewsABOUT THE PROGRAMThe Master of Science Degree in CounselingPsychology at Alabama Agricultural & mechanicalUniversity is a rigorous and comprehensive programthat prepares students for professional careers incounseling psychology. The program is 48 semesterhours in length and focuses on emotional, social,vocational, educational, health-related,developmental, and organizational concerns.The program culminates in an original research paperor thesis and an internship in a setting that matchesstudents' career interests. The program can be used toprepare for careers in a variety of settings in thefields of mental health and higher education,including mental health centers, hospitals and clinics,private practice, university counseling centers,student affairs and career services. The program canalso be used to prepare for further training in doctoralprograms in clinical and counseling psychology. Theprogram can be completed in about 2 years by fulltimestudents taking approximately 9 credits (3courses) each semester and by taking some coursesover the summer months. Students can also completethe program more gradually, taking fewer classeseach term.PSY 502 Descriptive & Inferential3Behavioral StatisticsPSY 514 Advanced Developmental3PsychologyPSY 555 Personality Theory 3PSY 556 Group Dynamics 3PSY 557 Organization and3Administration GuidancePSY 558 Use & Interpretation of Tests 3PSY 559 Counseling Techniques 3PSY 560 Occupational Psychology 3PSY 585 Research in Psychology 3PSY 592 Professional3Orientation/IssuesPSY 597 Counseling Practicum 3PSY 612 School Counseling Internship 3PSY 660 Consultation 3Electives (500-600 Level) 6Note: Comprehensive Exam RequiredTotal 45-48DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non ThesisOptionSem.Required ProgramHoursSPE 501 Introduction to Study ofExceptional Children0-362


INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGYMASTER OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIALTECHNOLOGYtechnical education program at the postsecondarylevels or corporate training programs.PROGRAM DIRECTORF. Michael Ayokanmbi256/372-4312Graduate FacultyProfessorsPeter RomineAssociate ProfessorsF. Michael AyokanmbiTheodore DixieStephen EgarievweChris OdionuAssistant ProfessorsWing ChanAschalew KassuABOUT THE PROGRAMThe Master of Science degree in IndustrialTechnology provides students with an opportunity todevelop higher levels of technical-management,leadership, and instruction competencies needed tobroaden their career potential for positions inbusiness, industry, education, and government. Theprograms objectives are achieved through acurriculum that emphasizes:1. Project planning and implementation;2. Tools and strategies for process improvement;3. The safe, effective, efficient, and creative use oftechnological resources and materials inperforming technological processes;4. The application of mathematics, natural/physicalsciences, social sciences and technologicalconcepts in solving practical technologyproblems and extending human capabilities;5. Principles, practices, and standards used inperforming tasks associated with technologybasedsystems;6. Supervision of personnel and the management oftechnological systems in the production anddelivery of consumer goods and services;7. Design and delivery of instruction in a career orREQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER OF SCIENCEADMISSION REQUIREMENTSThe master’s degree program in IndustrialTechnology is open to students who have earned aBachelor of Science Degree in Industrial Technology,business, computer science, or science, technology,engineering, and mathematics (STEM) relateddisciplines. Program faculty consider the followingfactors in making admission decisions:NEW STUDENTS NOT ACCEPTEDINTO THE PROGRAM1. A minimum GRE score of 146 in verbal andquantitative sections, respectively. Applicantswho already have a master’s degree in anydiscipline will be exempt from this requirement.2. Undergraduate GPA of 2.50 or above.Applicants with baccalaureate degrees in otherdisciplines, or with a GPA of less than 2.50 and aminimum of 3 years of work experience in oneof the previously mentioned disciplines will beconsidered for admission.3. Three letters of reference, including one from theapplicant’s current or most recent employer orinstructor.4. Letter of intent. A brief statement explaining thereason for pursuing a master’s degree inIndustrial Technology and how this degree isexpected to help in achieving his or her careergoals.Applicants without undergraduate degrees inbusiness, computer science, or STEM-relateddisciplines will be required to take INT 107Industrial Materials and Processes I and INT 334Production Planning and Control in their firstsemester of enrollment, and earn a minimum grade of“B” in each course.PROGRAM REQUIREMENTSTHESIS OPTION (30 SEMESTER HOURS)The thesis option requires a minimum of 30 semesterhours, which include fifteen (15) semester hours ofcore courses, nine (9) semester-hours of electives inthe area of specialization, and six (6) semester-hoursof thesis. The electives should be chosen in any areathat strengthens a student’s goal and is approved by63


the advisor.Program Requirements with the Thesis OptionRequired ProgramINT 512 Statistical Methods in3Applied Engineering,Technology & Mgt.INT 530 Industrial Management 3INT 550 Research Techniques for3Applied Engineering &Technology Mgt.INT 560 Project Management 3INT 575 Engineering Cost Analysis 3INT 699 Master’s Thesis 6Technical Electives 9Total 30NON-THESIS OPTION (36 SEMESTERHOURS) Students who select the non-thesis option mustcomplete a minimum of 36 semester hours, whichinclude fifteen (15) semester-hours of core courses,eighteen (18) semester-hours of courses in the areaof specialization, and three (3) semester-hours ofINT 610/EET 610/MET 610 (Applied Engineering,Technology, and Management Project). Electivesmay be selected from business, mathematics,engineering/technology, computer science, or anyother area that strengthens the student’s goal and isapproved by the advisor.Required CurriculumSem.HoursINT 512 Statistical Methods in3Applied Engineering,INT 530 Industrial Management 3INT 550 Research Techniques for3Applied Engineering&Technology Mgt.INT 560 Project Management 3INT 575 Engineering Cost Analysis 3INT 610 Applied Engineering,Technology, and3Management ProjectTechnical Electives 18Total 36NEW STUDENTSSem.NOT ACCEPTEDHoursAPPROVED ELECTIVESINTO THE PROGRAMIndustrial ManagementINT 515 Advanced Statistical Quality 3ControlINT 525 Management of Technology 3& OperationsINT 534 Quality Management 3INT 535 Leadership & Supervision in 3Technology ManagementINT 537 Industrial Safety Standards 3INT 541 Design of Experiments 3INT 543 Lean Six Sigma 3INT 570 Internship/Co-Operative3EducationINT 612 Special Problems in Applied 3Engineering, Technology, &ManagementLSM 536 Logistics & Supply Chain3ManagementLSM 571 Adaptive Supply Chain3ManagementLSM 572 Logistics/Supply Chain Risk 3ManagementMBA 510 Operations Management 3MBA 517 Global Issues in Business 3Manufacturing ManagementINT 500 Manufacturing and Design 3ProblemsINT 510 Computer-Integrated3ManufacturingINT 515 Advanced Statistical Quality 3ControlINT 534 Quality Management 3INT 535 Leadership & Supervision in 3Technology ManagementINT 541 Design of Experiments 3INT 543 Lean Six Sigma 3INT 540 Industrial Automation 3INT 570 Internship/Co-OperativeEducation3 All candidates for the Master of Science degree in IndustrialTechnology with the non-thesis option must pass a comprehensiveexamination administered by the Department. Specializations are available in Industrial Management,Manufacturing Systems Management, Quality Assurance,Electrical Engineering Technology, or any selection of coursesthat meet a student’s career goals.64


INT 612 Special Problems in Applied 3Engineering, Technology, &ManagementLSM 536 Logistics & Supply Chain3ManagementLSM 571 Adaptive Supply Chain3ManagementLSM 572 Logistics/Supply Chin Risk 3ManagementMBA 510 Operations Management 3MBA 517 Global Issues in Business 3Quality AssuranceINT 515 Advanced Statistical Quality 3ControlINT 534 Quality Management 3INT 535 Leadership & Supervision in 3Technology ManagementINT 541 Design of Experiments 3INT 543 Lean Six Sigma 3INT 570 Internship/Co-Operative3EducationINT 612 Special Problems in AppliedEngineering, Technology, &3ManagementLSM 536 Logistics & Supply Chain3ManagementLSM 571 Adaptive Supply Chain3ManagementLSM 572 Logistics/Supply Chain Risk 3ManagementMBA 510 Operations Management 3MBA 517 Global Issues in Business 3Electrical Engineering TechnologyEET 501 Telecommunications and3Network TechnologyEET 505 Computer Telephony3IntegrationEET 516 Automatic Control Systems I 3EET 517 Automatic Control Systems II 3EET 518 Robotics 3INT 540 Industrial Automation 3INT 570 Internship/Co-Operative3EducationINT 612 Special Problems in AppliedEngineering, Technology, &Management365


INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAMMASTER OF EDUCATION ININSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIPPROGRAM DIRECTORDerrick Davis256-372-4047derrick.davis@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyAssociate ProfessorsDelores PricePhillip RedrickABOUT THE PROGRAMThe Master of Education in Instructional Leadershipis a unique degree program that prepares teachers forleadership roles in schools and school systemenvironments. The curriculum fuses theory withpractice, drawing on an array of knowledge fromAlabama A&M University’s School of Educationfaculty as well as notable local experts. Theprogram’s flexible schedule usually allows studentsto complete the degree program in approximately twoyears.ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS *In addition to an earned baccalaureate-levelprofessional Educator Certificate in a teaching fieldor earned master‘s-level Professional EducatorCertificate in a teaching field or instructional supportarea, the applicant shall:1. Have a minimum of three (3) years of successfulteaching experience.2. Submit an admission portfolio before aninterview. The portfolio will contain thefollowing:a. Three (3) letters of recommendation (Thesemust include letters from the applicant‘sprincipal or supervisor). Each localsuperintendent will establish requirements for* An applicant will not be considered for admission unless allapplication requirements are met by the specified deadline. Thedecision from the Graduate Admissions Committee iscommunicated in writing to the applicant.recommendations from the principal and/orsupervisor.b. Completed copy (all forms) of the most recentperformance appraisal to include theprofessional development component, ifavailable.c. Evidence of ability to improve studentachievement (give 2 examples).d. Evidence of leadership and managementpotential, including proof of most recentaccomplishments in the area of educationalleadership (give 2 examples).3. Summary of candidate‘s reasons for pursuinginstructional leadership certification.4. Summary of what the candidate expects from thepreparation program.5. Qualify for program admission by successfullycompleting an interview conducted by a programadmission committee that includes both P-12instructional leaders and higher education faculty.6. The candidate will also be required to take andpass a writing assessment.GENERAL REQUIREMENTS1. A Master‘s degree in Instructional Leadershipfrom an accredited college or university, or aMaster‘s degree in any field and professionalcertification in Education Administration from anaccredited college or university;2. Minimum GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale);3. Two official copies of transcripts of allundergraduate/graduate work attempted includingjunior/community colleges.4. A GRE minimum combined score of 146 Verbaland 140 on Quantitative OR 246 on theVerbal/Quantitative sections.Degree Offerings in the Instructional LeadershipProgramCertification Programs1. The Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree inInstructional Leadership. This degree is designedfor individuals who hold current teachingcertification. With the completion of this degree,candidates are eligible for Class A Certification inInstructional Leadership.2. The Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) degree inEducation with a concentration in InstructionalLeadership. This degree is designed for66


individuals who seek greater preparation forleadership in P – 12 schools and/or those whoaspire towards pursuing doctoral level studies ineducational administration.Non-certification ProgramsThe Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) degree inEducation with a concentration in InstructionalLeadership and option in Higher Education. Thisprogram is designed for individuals seeking toenhance their skills in leadership positions inpostsecondary institutions. The program is alsodesigned for those individuals who aspire towardspursuing doctoral level studies in educationaladministration. This degree program does not lead toClass AA certification in Instructional Leadership.Graduate programs in the area of InstructionalLeadership consist of the Class A Endorsement inInstructional Leadership; the Master of Education(M.Ed.) degree with Class A Certification and theEducational Specialist (Ed.S.) degree with Class AACertification and a non-certification option in HigherEducation. The M.Ed. degree program leading toClass A Certification requires 33 – 36 semesterhours, including 12 – 15 semester hours offoundation courses, 18 semester hours ofinstructional support courses, and 3 semester hours ofinternship. The Ed.S degree program leading to ClassAA Certification requires 36 – 39 semester hours,including 18 – 21 semester hours in foundationcourses, 15 semester hours in instructional supportcourses, and 3 semester hours of mentoring.The Instructional Leadership program also offers theEd.S. degree in Education with a concentration inInstructional Leadership and an option in HigherEducation not leading to Class AA certification. Thenon-certification program at the Ed.S. level isparticularly designed for individuals whose primaryinterests are in teaching at the two-year college leveland/or those who aspire towards pursuing doctorallevel studies in curriculum & instruction in theteaching field. The Ed.S. program requires 36 – 39semester hours, including 12 – 15 semester hours offoundation courses, 6 semester hours of thesisresearch, 12 semester hours of teaching field courses,and 6 semester hours of additional courses.Program RequirementsProfessional Core (Required)Sem.HoursEDL 530 Data Driven Instruction 3EDL 543 Legal and Ethical Aspects of3School OperationsEDL 547 Education Finance 3EDL 563 Curriculum Development,3Improvement and AssessmentEDL 564 School Community Relations 3EDL 566 Management of School3OperationsEDL 567 Instructional Leadership 3EDL 569 Collaboration, Mentoring and3Human Resource DevelopmentEDL 595-01 Internship in Educational 1LeadershipEDL 595-02 Internship in Educational 1LeadershipEDL 596 Residency/Internship in3Instructional LeadershipSPE 501 Introduction to the Study of0-3Exceptional ChildrenFED 501 Foundations of Education OR 3FED 521 Multicultural Education (3)FED 503 Educational Research 3Total 35-3867


MATERIEL ENGINEERINGMASTER OF ENGINEERING IN MATERIELENGINEERINGPROGRAM DIRECTORShowkat J. Chowdhury256-372-8401Showkat.chowdhury@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyProfessorsNesar U. AhmedMohammad A. AlimShowkat J. ChowdhuryZhengtao DengKaveh HeidaryGoang S. LiawPabitra K SahaMohamed A. SeifVernell Trent MontgomeryAssociate ProfessorsVenkata R. GotetiAmir MobasherXiaoqing QianAndrew R. ScottZhigang XiaoAssistant ProfessorsSudip BhattacharjeeMohamed GadallaADMISSION REQUIREMENTSApplicants for admission to the Graduate School ofAAMU must provide transcripts from each postsecondaryschool attended, as well as a transcript ofthe Graduate Record Examination (GRE).Applicants must also provide two letters ofrecommendation and submit details of anyprofessional work experience. Students from non-English speaking countries are required to have aminimum score of 500 on the Test of English as aForeign Language (TOEFL).Regular AdmissionTo be admitted with regular status to the Master ofEngineering program, an applicant must:1. Hold a bachelor’s degree in an engineeringprogram from an accredited ABET program.2. Provide evidence of an overall Grade PointAverage (GPA) of at least 3.00 on a scale of 4.00(in most cases an official transcript of allprevious academic work completed will berequired), or have passed the National Council ofExaminers for Engineering and Surveying(NCEES) Fundamentals of EngineeringExamination.3. Minimum of GRE scores of 148 on thequantitative portion and 294 on the combinedverbal and quantitative portions.ABOUT THE PROGRAMThe Departments of Civil, Electrical, and MechanicalEngineering collectively offer a graduate programleading to the Master of Engineering (M.Eng) degreein Materiel Engineering. Materiel is defined as theequipment, apparatus, and supplies used by anorganization. Materiel engineering involves thedesign, production, test and evaluation, distribution,operation and support, and ultimate disposition ofman-made equipment, apparatus, and supplies, and,as such, is highly interdisciplinary. This program isintended for individuals holding a bachelor’s degreefrom a regionally accredited institution in any area ofengineering or a closely related discipline. Thecollective program requires a minimum of 30 hoursto complete the program.Conditional AdmissionApplicants who do not meet one of above conditionsmay be admitted on a conditional basis under thefollowing conditions:1. GPA or GRE Deficiency. Persons with abachelor’s degree in engineering may receiveconditional admission provided their GPA is atleast 2.5 on all undergraduate engineeringcourses attempted. This condition also holds forindividuals with a GRE deficiency, includingthose who have not taken the GRE.2. Degrees in Other Fields. Individuals with abachelor’s degree in physics, mathematics,computer science, chemistry, or other fieldsclosely related to engineering may receiveconditional admission provided they havecompleted prescribed deficiency coursesidentified by the programmatic faculty.68


3. Students admitted conditionally are allowed amaximum of 15 semester hour recommended bythe department advisor. All students admittedconditionally are required to earn a minimumgrade of ’B’ in each deficiency course toprogress to regular admission. Students failingto meet this requirement will be dismissed fromthe School of Graduate Studies.Non-Degree Graduate StatusTo pursue graduate engineering courses using thenon-degree graduate status, an application must firstbe submitted to the School of Engineering andTechnology. This is to ensure that the applicant hasthe required background for the desired course(s).If approved, the application will then be passed onto the School of Graduate Studies for processing.Up to nine semester hours of graduate credit may beearned while in the non-degree status.Program Requirements for the Non-Thesis OptionRequired ProgramSem.HoursGEN 601 Life-Cycle Design3EngineeringGEN 602 Product Assurance3EngineeringGEN 603 Analysis and Simulation3MethodsGEN 604 Test and Evaluation3EngineeringGEN 690 Material Engineering Project 3Discipline Specialization9CoursesApproved Electives 6Total 30Discipline Specialization Courses General EngineeringGEN 590 Special Topics 3GEN 600 Special Topics 3 All students will select at least three courses from Civil,Electrical or Mechanical Engineering, or General Engineeringfor their area of specialization, with the approval of theiradvisor.Civil EngineeringCE 501 Structural Steel Design 3CE 502 Reinforced Concrete Design 3CE 504 Hydraulic Engineering and 3DesignCE 506 Computer Analysis of3StructuresCE 508 Foundation Design 3CE 509 Public Health Engineering 3CE 510 Transportation Engineering 3and DesignCE 511 Urban Transportation3PlanningCE 512 Pavement Systems 3CE 513 Construction Management 3CE 514 Design of Timber Structures 3CE 550 Hydraulics of Open Channel 3FlowCE 555 Wastewater Treatment 3CE 556 Solid Waste Disposal 3CE 557 Hazardous WasteManagement3Electrical EngineeringEE 502 Electrical Machines 3EE 503 Feedback Systems Analysis 3and DesignEE 504 Communication Theory 3EE 510 Microwave Engineering 3EE 520 Power Systems I 3EE 521 Power Systems II 3EE 524 Advanced Digital Systems 3EE 525 High Performance3Computing and NetworksEE 531 Advanced Semiconductor3EngineeringEE 541 Digital Signal Processing 3EE 545 Advanced Electromagnetic3TheoryEE 551 Integrated Circuit Fabrication 3EE 552 Semiconductor3InstrumentationEE 555 Optimal Control Theory 3EE 556 Nonlinear Control Systems 3Mechanical Engineering ME 511 Power Plant Performance 3ME 512 Analysis and Synthesis ofGas Turbines andComponents3 Elective courses may be taken with the approval of advisor.69


ME 513 Rocket Propulsion 3ME 514 Gas Turbine Engine Design 3and ManufactureME 515 Heating, Ventilating, Air3Conditioning, RefrigerationME 516 Gas Dynamics 3ME 532 Design for Manufacture and 3Reliability.ME 571 Systems Engineering 3ME 572 Economic Evaluation of3DesignME 573 Logistics 3ME 581 Quality and Reliability3AssuranceME 582 Operations Planning andScheduling.370


PHYSICAL EDUCATIONMASTER OF EDUCATIONPROGRAM DIRECTOR:Rodney C. Whittle256-372-8260rodney.whittle@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyProfessorsRodney C. WhittleAssociate ProfessorsHarriet HamiltonKay HamiltonAssistant ProfessorsJerolyn GolightlyMISSION STATEMENTThe Health, Physical Education Program offerscoursework and field experiences leading to theMaster of Science in Education with teachercertification (Class A and Alternative 5 th year) inPhysical Education. Faculty provide candidates withresearch, and theory techniques that will prepareprofessionals to broaden their pedagogicalexperiences. In addition to teaching concepts,theories, methods, and materials the faculty placesemphasis on strategies and techniques of integratingtechnology into the teaching of physical education.PROGRAM REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis Option Class A Program forSingle Teaching Field18 hours from Advisor Approved courses inPhysical Education from the following:Sem.HoursPED 501 Sociology of Sport 3PED 503 Advanced Exercise3PhysiologyPED 504 Curriculum Instruction in PE 3PED 506 Evaluation in PE and Sport 3PED 507 Management in PE and 3AthleticsPED 508 Psychomotor Fd. Spt. 3PED 509 Coaching Theory & Tech. 3PED 511 Science & Med. In Spt. 3PED 598 Research in PE 3CoreEducation Course Requirements 15-18 hoursSED 527 Guided Learning in3Secondary SchoolsEDL 530 Data Driven Decision3MakingFED 500 Professional Seminar 3SPE 501 Intro Stdy of Exc. Child 0-3FED 501 Foundations of Education 3FED 529 Computer-Based Instruction 3Total 33-36Program Requirements with the Non-Thesis Option Master of EducationAlternative Fifth Year ProgramSem.HoursCoreFED 521 Multicultural Ed. 3FED 529 Comp-Based Inst. Tech. 3FED 501 Foundations of Ed 3FED 504 Eval. Tch. & Learning 3SPE 530 Mgmt. of Classroom3BehaviorSED 515 Reading in Content Area 3SPE 501 Intro. To Study of Ex. Child 0-3PED 595 Internship 6PED 504 Curr. & Inst. In PE 315 Hour from Advisor Approved Courses inPhysical Education from the followingPED 501 Sociology of Sport 3PED 503 Adv. Ex. Physiology 3PED 506 Eval. In PE 3PED 507 Mgmt. in PE & Ath. gm. 3PED 598 Research in PE 3PED 508 Pychomtor Fd. Spt. 3PED 509 Coaching Theory & Tech 3PED 511 Science and Med. In Sport 3PEDTotal 42-4571


PHYSICSProgram DirectorAnup Sharma256/372-8102Master of ScienceGraduate FacultyProfessorsMohan D. Aggarwal (Chair of Physics)Mostafa DokhanianMatthew E. EdwardsBommareddi Rami ReddyBarry Johnson (Adjunct)Ravi B. Lal (Emeritus)Paul Ruffin (Adjunct)Anup SharmaArjun Tan (Emeritus)Jai-Ching WangAssociate ProfessorsTianxi ZhangAshok BatraAssistant ProfessorsAshok BatraVernessa M. EdwardsPadmaja GuggillaMarius P. SchamschulaABOUT THE PROGRAMAlabama Agricultural & Mechanical University’sPhysics Department provides students with a richeducational environment in which to study physicsand discover high technology research in optics,materials science, and space science programs. Theprogram is ranked among the top ten nationally in theawarding of graduate degrees to African-Americans.ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSAdmission Requirements for the Master ofScience (M.S.) Program in Physics/ AppliedPhysicsFor admission to the Master of Science program inapplied physics, applicants must:(a.) Have a bachelor's degree from a regionallyaccredited university with a major inphysics, chemistry, physical science,astronomy or engineering;(b.) Have an overall GPA of 3.00 (based on a4.00 system);(c.) A Graduate Record Examination (GRE)score of at least 600 in the quantitativesection of the general area is required;(d.) Students from non-English speakingcountries are required to have a minimumscore of 61 (internet-based test) on the Testfor English as a Foreign Language(TOEFL). PROGRAM REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Thesis Options:Master of Science with Space ScienceconcentrationStudent must complete at least 24 semester hours ofcourse work with a minimum of 12 hours in thearea of Space Science concentration plus 6 semesterhours of Master's Thesis hours. The student mustwrite a thesis on an approved topic under thesupervision of a thesis advisor, and satisfactorilydefend the thesis before an advisory committeeappointed by the department and approved by theDean of the School of Graduate Studies.Required ProgramSem.HoursPHY 500 Analytical Mechanics 3PHY 505 Electromagnetic Theory I 3PHY 521 Quantum Mechanics I 3PHY 610 Introduction to Solar-3Terrestrial PhysicsPHY 699 Master's Thesis (In two or6more semesters)Approved Concentration (Electives) 12Total 30 Students with bachelor's degrees in optical, materials, or spacesciences will be eligible for admission into the graduate programwith optics/lasers and materials science and space scienceconcentrations (Students with a degree in an area other thanphysics may be required to take prerequisite undergraduatephysics courses). Must select 9 hours from approved Space Science electives and3 credit hours from approved General Physics, Optics, orMaterial Science Electives.72


Program Requirements with the Thesis Options:Master of Science with Optics concentrationStudent must complete at least 24 semester hours ofcourse work with a minimum of 11 hours in thearea of Optics concentration plus 6 semester hoursof Master's Thesis hours. The student must write athesis on an approved topic under the supervision ofa thesis advisor, and satisfactorily defend the thesisbefore an advisory committee appointed by thedepartment and approved by the Dean of the Schoolof Graduate Studies.Required ProgramSem.HoursPHY 500 Analytical Mechanics 3PHY 505 Electromagnetic Theory I 3PHY 521 Quantum Mechanics I 3PHY 649 Geometrical Optics 3PHY 657 Physical Optics and4InterferometryPHY 671 Laser Physics I 4PHY 699 Master's Thesis (In two or6more semesters)Approved Electives 4Total 30Program Requirements with the Thesis Options:Master of Science with Materials ScienceconcentrationStudent must complete at least 24 semester hours ofcourse work with a minimum of 12 hours in thearea of Materials Science concentration plus 6semester hours of Master's Thesis hours. Thestudent must write a thesis on an approved topicunder the supervision of a thesis advisor, andsatisfactorily defend the thesis before an advisorycommittee appointed by the department andapproved by the Dean of the School of GraduateStudies.Required ProgramSem.HoursPHY 500 Analytical Mechanics 3PHY 505 Electromagnetic Theory I 3PHY 521 Quantum Mechanics I 3PHY 632 Elements of Materials3SciencePHY 634 Crystal Physics and Crystal 3Must select at least four hours from the list of SpaceScience, General Physics, Optics, Materials Science electivesor approved graduate Computer Science courses.GrowthPHY 635 Magnetic and Optical3Properties of MaterialsPHY 699 Master's Thesis (In two or6more semesters)Approved Electives 6Total 30Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOptions: Master of Science with Space ScienceconcentrationStudent must complete at least 30 semester hours ofcourse work with a minimum of 18 hours in thearea of Space Science concentration. The studentmust pass a comprehensive examination given bythe department.Required ProgramSem.HoursPHY 500 Analytical Mechanics 3PHY 505 Electromagnetic Theory I 3PHY 521 Quantum Mechanics I 3PHY 610 Introduction to Solar-3Terrestrial PhysicsPHY 612 Physics of the Sun and the3Solar WindPHY 614 Physics of the Magnetosphere 3PHY 617 Physics of the Ionosphere and 3ThermospherePHY 620 Radio Wave Propagation in 3the IonospherePHY 625 Planetary Atmospheres and 3IonospheresApproved Electives 3Total 30 Must select at least three hours from the list of Materials Scienceelectives and three hours from the list of list of SpaceScience, General Physics, or Optics electives. Must select at least three hours from the list of General Physics,Optics, Materials Science electives or approved graduateComputer Science courses.73


Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOptions: Master of Science with OpticsconcentrationStudent must complete at least 30 semester hours ofcourse work with a minimum of 18 hours in thearea of Optics concentration. The student must passa comprehensive examination given by thedepartment.Required ProgramSem.HoursPHY 500 Analytical Mechanics 3PHY 505 Electromagnetic Theory I 3PHY 521 Quantum Mechanics I 3PHY 649 Geometrical Optics 3PHY 657 Physical Optics and4InterferometryPHY 671 Laser Physics I 4Approved Electives 10Total 30Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOptions: Master of Science with MaterialsScience concentrationStudent must complete at least 30 semester hours ofcourse work with a minimum of 18 hours in thearea of Materials Science concentration. Thestudent must pass a comprehensive examinationgiven by the department.Required ProgramSem.HoursPHY 500 Analytical Mechanics 3PHY 505 Electromagnetic Theory I 3PHY 521 Quantum Mechanics I 3PHY 632 Elements of Materials3SciencePHY 634 Crystal Physics and Crystal 3GrowthPHY 635 Magnetic and Optical3Properties of MaterialsApproved Electives & 12Total 30 Must Select at least seven hours from the list of Optics electivesand three credit hours from the list of Space Science, GeneralPhysics, Optics, Materials Science elective or approvedgraduate Computer Science courses.& Must select nine hours from the list of approved MaterialScience electives and three hours from the list of SpaceScience, General Physics, Optics, Materials Science electives orapproved graduate Computer Science courses.Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOptions: Master of Science with PhysicsEducation concentrationStudent must complete at least 36 semester hours ofcourse work with a minimum of 12 hours ofadvisor-approved graduate Physics courses.Required ProgramSelect at least twenty-four hours ofadvisor-approved courses from listbelow plus 12 hour of approvedelectives.SPE 501 Introduction to the Study ofExceptional IndividualsSem.Hours24FED 501 Foundations of Education 3FED 502 Introduction to Educational 3StatisticsFED 503 Introduction to Educational 3ResearchFED 504 Evaluation of Teaching-3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based3Instructional TechnologiesFED 531 Current and Emerging3Instructional TechnologiesFED 532 Curriculum Integration of3TechnologySED 515 Reaching in the Content Area 3SED 527 Guiding Learning in the3Secondary SchoolSED 530 Secondary School3CurriculumApproved Electives 12Total 36ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR THEDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PH.D.)PROGRAM IN PHYSICS/ APPLIEDPHYSICS:Admission to the doctoral program requires aMaster's degree in physics, chemistry, physicalscience, astronomy, or engineering. Applicantsmust have a GPA of 3.05 on a scale of 4.0. AGraduate Record Examination (GRE) score of atleast 600 in the quantitative section of the generalarea is also required (The GRE Advanced inPhysics is strongly urged). Students from non- Must select nine hours from the list of approved list of SpaceScience, General Physics, Optics, Materials Science electives orapproved graduate Computer Science courses.374


English speaking countries are required to have aminimum score of 61 (internet-based test) on theTest for English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).Program Requirements for the Doctor ofPhilosophyPersons seeking the Ph.D. in physics must completea total of at least 48 semester hours of creditincluding 15 semester hours in the area of generalphysics. In addition to this requirement studentsmust pass the departmental qualifying examination(A person who has been admitted on the basis of amaster's degree may take the qualifyingexamination after the first semester in the program).Students also must pass the candidacyexamination. Candidacy examinations must bepassed at least nine months before the expectedgraduation date (Students are not considered Ph.D.candidates until they pass the departmentalcandidacy examination). Student also must preparean acceptable dissertation with a minimum of 12semester hours. No student is allowed to registerfor more than six hours of dissertation credits in anygiven semester. There is no foreign languagerequirement for the degree.Ph.D. candidates must make an oral presentation onthe dissertation and must defend the findings beforea committee of examiners as stated earlier. Thepresentation of the dissertation must be completedat least six weeks before the intended graduationdate.Program Requirements for Doctor of Philosophyin Applied Physics with Space ScienceconcentrationRequired ProgramSem.HoursPHY 500 Analytical Mechanics 3PHY 503 Methods of Mathematical3PhysicsPHY 505 Electromagnetic Theory I 3PHY 518 Thermodynamics and3Statistical MechanicsPHY 521 Quantum Mechanics I 3PHY 610 Introduction to Solar-3Terrestrial PhysicsApproved Gen Physics, Optics, 18 The departmental qualifying exam must be taken after thecompletion of 18 credit hours but not before the completion of the24 th credit hour. Students who fail to take the exam during thespecified window are not allowed to continue in the program.Material Science, orapproved Computer ScienceElectivesApproved Space Science Electives 12PHY 799 Dissertation (In two or more 12semesters)Total 60Program Requirements for Doctor of Philosophyin Applied Physics with Optics concentrationRequired ProgramSem.HoursPHY 500 Analytical Mechanics 3PHY 503 Methods of Mathematical3PhysicsPHY 505 Electromagnetic Theory I 3PHY 518 Thermodynamics and3Statistical MechanicsPHY 521 Quantum Mechanics I 3PHY 649 Geometrical Optics 3PHY 651 Spectroscopy 4PHY 657 Physical Optics and4InterferometryPHY 671 Laser Physics I 4Approved Gen Physics, Optics, Material 18Science, or approvedComputer Science ElectivesPHY 799 Dissertation (In two or more 12semesters)Total 60Program Requirements for Doctor ofPhilosophy in Applied Physics withMaterials Science concentrationRequired ProgramSem.HoursPHY 500 Analytical Mechanics 3PHY 503 Methods of Mathematical3PhysicsPHY 505 Electromagnetic Theory I 3PHY 518 Thermodynamics and3Statistical MechanicsPHY 521 Quantum Mechanics I 3PHY 632 Elements of Materials3SciencePHY 634 Crystal Physics and Crystal 3GrowthPHY 635 Magnetic and Optical 375


Properties of MaterialsPHY 636 Semiconductor Physics 3PHY 799 Dissertation (In two or more 12semesters)Approved Space Science, Gen Physics, 21Optics, Material Science, orapproved Computer ScienceElectivesTotal 60APPROVED PHYSICS ELECTIVESSpace Science CoursesPHY 610 Introduction to Solar-Terrestrial PhysicsPHY 612 Physics of the Sun and theSolar WindPHY 614 Physics of the MagnetospherePHY 617 Physics of the Ionosphere andThermospherePHY 620 Radio Wave Propagation inthe IonospherePHY 625 Planetary Atmospheres andIonospheresGeneral Physics CoursesPHY 503 Methods of MathematicalPhysicsPHY 504 Physics in ModernTechnologyPHY 506 Electromagnetic Theory IIPHY 518 Thermodynamics andStatistical MechanicsPHY 519 Advanced StatisticalMechanicsPHY 522 Quantum Mechanics IIPHY 525 Solid State Physics IPHY 531 Mathematical Methods inApplied Physics IPHY 532 Mathematical Methods inApplied Physics IIPHY 537 Advanced LaboratoryPHY 600 Solid State Physics IIPHY 601 Seminar/ColloquiumPHY 701 Applied Solid StateElectronics IPHY 791 Applied Solid StateElectronics IIPHY 792-94 Selected TopicsOptics CoursesPHY 649 Geometrical OpticsPHY 650 Instrumental OpticsPHY 651 SpectroscopyPHY 655 Optics LaboratoryPHY 657 Physical Optics andInterferometryPHY 660 Quantum OpticsPHY 663 Electro-Optical SystemsPHY 665 Lens DesignPHY 670 Non-Linear OpticsPHY 671 Laser Physics IPHY 672 Laser Physics IIPHY 675 Thin Films & IntegratedOptics IPHY 680 HolographyPHY 690 Introduction to BiophotonicsPHY 692 NanophotonicsPHY 703 Laser SystemsPHY 712 Optical Phase Conjugation IPHY 714 Optical Phase Conjugation IIPHY 715 Fiber OpticsPHY 725 Optical FiberCommunicationsPHY 750 Laser SpectroscopyPHY 755 Optics Laboratory IIPHY 771 Signal ProcessingPHY 775 Thin Films & IntegratedOptics IIMaterials Science CoursesPHY 632 Elements of MaterialsSciencePHY 634 Crystal Physics and CrystalGrowthPHY 635 Magnetic and OpticalProperties of MaterialsPHY 636 Semiconductor PhysicsPHY 637 Special Topics in MaterialsSciencePHY 638 Imperfections in SolidsPHY 639 Electron Spectroscopy andElectron DiffractionPHY 640 Mechanical Behavior ofSolidsPHY 642 Materials for EnergyProduction DevicesPHY 644 Modern Composite MaterialsPHY 648 Advanced Materials ScienceLaboratoryPHY 705 Solid State DiffusionPHY 710 Thermodynamics ofMaterialsPHY 720 Radiation Effects inCrystalline SolidsPHY 730 Solidification ProcessPHY 735 Materials for RadiationDetectorPHY 796-97 Advanced Topics inMaterials Science76


PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCEMASTER OF SCIENCE/DOCTOR OFPHILOSOPY IN PLANT AND SOIL SICENCEPROGRAM DIRECTORWubishet Tadesse256-372-4219Graduate FacultyProfessorsUdai BishnoiTommy ColemanRory FraserDavid MaysSrinivasa MentreddyGovind SharmaKhairy SolimanYong WangAssociate ProfessorsGeorge BrownErnest CebertRamesh KantetyMonday MbilaKozma NakaErmson NyakatawaWubishet TadesseAssistant ProfessorColmore ChristianXiongwen ChenKarnita-Golson GarnerLuben DimovRegine MankoloElicia MossLeopold NyochembengRodulfo Pacumbaba, Jr.Thilini RanatungaIrenus TazisongMezemir WagawREQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER OFSCIENCE IN PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCEA minimum of 30 hours at graduate level is requiredfor the Master of Science degree. Only 6 thesiscredits can be applied toward the minimum 30 credit.All candidates are required to pass a qualifying examwithin the first semester of enrollment. Studentsmust successfully present an oral/written proposal oftheir thesis research by the end of their first semesterStudents also must pass a graduate seminar courseand the final oral thesis examination after completionof their thesis and approval by their committee.ADMISSIONFor admission to the Master of Science program, thecandidate must have a minimum GPA of 2.75 (basedon a 4.00 point system), or a 3.00 in the student'smajor area of concentration. Students may beadmitted conditionally if they have a GPA of 2.50 to2.75, or 2.75 to 3.00 in the major area ofconcentration.Program Requirements with the Thesis OptionRequired ProgramSem.HoursNRE 502 Scientific Writing in2Biological SciencesNRE 529 Statistic 3NRE 591 Graduate Seminar 1NRE 599 Thesis 6Approved area Concentration 18CoursesTotal 30Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOptionRequired ProgramSem.HoursNRE 529 Statistics 3NRE 598 Master’s Report 4Approved area Concentration 25CoursesTotal 32Area Concentration Courses/ElectivesNRE 500 Techniques for Teaching3Horticulture in K-12NRE 501 Commercial Nursery and3Greenhouse ManagementNRE 502 Scientific Writing in2Biological SciencesNRE 503 Techniques for Land Judging 3NRE 505 Instrumental Techniques for 377


Plant and Soil ScienceNRE 506 Soil Microbiology 4NRE 510 Forage Management 3NRE 511 Weed Science and Herbicide 3TechnologyNRE 512 Field Research Techniques in 2AgronomyNRE 515 Seed Biology 4NRE 517 Sustainable Crop Production 3NRE 520 Vegetable Crop Production 3NRE 521 Plant Propagation 3NRE 522 Landscape Design and4ConstructionNRE 523 Tropical Food Crop3ProductionNRE 524 Horticulture Marketing and 3ManagementNRE 525 Postharvest Physiology of3CropsNRE 527 Ornamentals II – Flowers and 3Foliage PlantsNRE 528 Fruit Crops Production 3NRE 529 Statistics 3NRE 530 Principles of Experimentation 3NRE 531 Principles of Plant Breeding 3NRE 532 Plant Disease Diagnosis 4NRE 533 Introduction to Molecular4GeneticsNRE 534 Cytogenetics 4NRE 535 Plant Genetics 2NRE 536 Regression Analysis 3NRE 537 Plant Tissue Culture Methods 3and ApplicationNRE 538 Plant Genetics 3NRE 539 SAS Programming 2NRE 540 Seed Production Practices 4NRE 541 Phytophysiology 4NRE 545 Bioinformatics Applications 3NRE 550 Earth Science 3NRE 550 Soil Genesis and SurveyNRE 551 Chemistry of ToxicSubstancesNRE 552 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3NRE 553 Hazardous Waste3ManagementNRE 554 Tropical Soils 3NRE 555 Micronutrients in Plant Soil 3SystemsNRE 556 Soil Clay Mineralogy 3NRE 560 Soil Chemistry 3NRE 561 Soil Physics 4NRE 562 Plant Pathology Techniques 4NRE 563 Mineral Nutrition of Plants 3NRE 564 Plant Growth and3DevelopmentNRE 565 Applications of Geostatistics 33NRE 567 Plant Virology 3NRE 568 Allelopathy 3NRE 570 Soil, Plant and Water4AnalysisNRE 571 Aerial Photo Interpretation 3NRE 572 Soil and Water Pollution 3NRE 573 Air Pollution: Theory and3TechniquesNRE 574 Quantitative Approaches in 3Remote SensingNRE 575 Principles of Wetlands 3NRE 576 Remote Sensing of Earth3Surface FeaturesNRE 577 Insect Biology and Pest3ManagementNRE 578 GIS, Spatial Analysis, and4ModelingNRE 580 Natural Resource Policy 3NRE 581 Forest Hydrology and3Watershed ManagementNRE 583 Forest Resources Economics 3NRE 584 Ecological Processes 3NRE 587 Landscape Ecology 3NRE 588 Wildlife Techniques 3NRE 589 Forest Ecological1-3ManagementNRE 590 Advanced Topics in Soil and 3Plant ScienceREQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. IN PLANTAND SOIL SCIENCEADMISSIONS Applicants seeking admission to the Ph.D. programmust satisfy the general admission requirements ofthe Graduate School. In addition, prospectivecandidates must have:1. A M.S. degree in agronomy, horticulture, plantscience, soil science, forestry, wildlife biology,ecology, natural resource/forest economics orrelated area.2. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 inbaccalaureate course work and a 3.00 cumulativeGPA in master’s courses(based on a 4.00 pointsystem).*3. A minimum combined score of 308 on theverbal and quantitative sections of the GRE.* Candidates who have some deficiencies in their background butmeet most of the requirements for admission may be grantedprovisional admission into the program. Upon completingpreliminary work with a minimum GPA of 3.00, regular admissionwill be granted.78


4. Three letters of reference indicating the student'sacademic background and ability to pursue thePh.D. program.5. A letter of application which includes a personalstatement on career objectives and researchinterest.DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR THEDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHYTo fulfill the Doctor of Philosophy requirements, atleast 50 percent of the credit hours required forgraduation must be earned, within a period of twoconsecutive calendar years, at Alabama A&MUniversity. The Department’s Graduate Committeeand the School of Graduate Studies must approvedeviations from this. Additionally, each candidatemust complete the following program requirements:1. Complete all core courses recommended by theDepartment’s Graduate Committee.2. Complete a minimum of 48 semester hours ofgraduate course work beyond the master's levelof which a minimum of 30 credit hours must beat the 500 level or above. Nine credit hours,excluding doctoral dissertation, must becompleted at the 700 level. All courses must befrom the approved course listing.3. Complete an acceptable written dissertationwhich constitutes a significant contribution tocurrent knowledge in the area of Plan and SoilScience.4. Ph.D. candidates must demonstrate proficiencyin two languages or comprehensive command ina single language. Normally, this requirement isfulfilled through the satisfactory completion ofadvanced reading courses administered by theforeign language department (with a grade of Bor above) or through the completion of sixsemester hours of computer science languages(with a grade of B or above). Languagerequirements must be fulfilled before a studenttakes the Ph.D. project examinations describedbelow.5. Must pass a teaching experience course after thecompletion of 75% of the required coursework.6. Successfully complete both a written and oralcomprehensive examination after the completionof at least 80 percent of the prescribed coursework. The comprehensive examination covers abroad aspect of the course work taken by thestudent as well as the subject matter within thestudent's area of concentration. Thecomprehensive is used as a means of judgingwhether the individual has a mature andsubstantive grasp of the discipline as a whole.PROGRAM REQUIREMENTSRequired ProgramSem.HoursNRE 502 Scientific Writing in2Biological SciencesNRE 529 Statistics 3NRE 591 Graduate Seminar 1NRE 798 Teaching Experience for2Doctoral StudentsApproved area Concentration 28CoursesNRE 799 Doctoral Dissertation 12Total 48 See pages 74-75 for the list of concentrationcourses.79


READINGDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN READINGPROGRAM DIRECTORRena Lott256-372-5504rena.lott@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyAssociate ProfessorsFrederick BigenhoRena LottAssistant ProfessorsAngela R. WilliamsRhonda Moore-JacksonABOUT THE PROGRAMThe doctoral program in Reading provides highquality instruction and research in the area of readingand literacy. As the only program of its kind inAlabama, the program utilizes a rigorous course ofstudy, combined with mentorship experiences led bytop-rated faculty.ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSApplicants for a Doctor of Philosophy Degree inReading/Literacy must have completed three yearsof P-12 teaching; must have an overall GPA of 3.5on a 4.0 scale at the Master level. Also required arethe following: (1) a completed Graduate Schoolapplication of admission; (2) all official transcripts;(3) three letters of recommendation that address theapplicant’s academic and professional work; (4)writing samples in the form of a term paper, thesis,or published journal article (5) (5) a GraduateRecord Examination (GRE) composite score of290; (6) A philosophy paper related to theapplicant’s goals for personal and professionalgrowth.To be considered for admission, the applicant mustensure that his or her file is complete. No action willbe taken on incomplete files. Applicants wishing tocheck on the status of their files should contact TheGraduate School in the L.R. Patton Building, Room300, or call 256-372-4996.Applicants Not Meeting the Admission CriteriaCandidates who do not meet the GRE scorerequirement will be required to take additionalcoursework as outlined by his or her advisor. AllAdditional coursework must be successfullycompleted prior to full admission to the GraduateSchool and admission to the Reading program.PROGRAM REQUIREMENTSProfessional Core (Required)Sem.HoursRDG 700 Trends/Issues 3RDG 701 Assessment in Reading/3LiteracyPSY 502 Descriptive and InferentialBehavioral Statistics3Interview with Reading FacultyRDG 704 Curriculum inReading/LiteracyRDG 709 Advanced Study in ContentArea ReadingCandidates take Qualifying ExamRDG 702 Seminar in Reading—Special 3TopicsRDG 703 Qualitative Research3Methods in Reading/LiteracyRDG 721 Theory/Research 3RDG 720 New Literacy 3RDG 713 Family Literacy 3RDG 705 Seminar in Reading 3RDG 708 Leadership in Reading 3RDG 706 Adv. Seminar 3Foreign Language6RequirementCandidates take Comprehensive ExamRDG 710 Dissertation 18Total 633380


SECONDARY EDUCATIONPROGRAM DIRECTORDelores Price256-372-5459Delores.price@aamu.eduGraduate FacultyAssociate ProfessorsFrederick BigenhoSha LiDelores PricePhillip RedrickAssistant ProfessorsDerrick DavisADMISSION REQUIREMENTSApplicants to the Educational Specialist Degree mustbe admitted to the School of Graduate Studies and toTeacher Education. Admission to Teacher Educationrequires the applicant to (1) present evidence ofhaving completed a Master’s degree with class ACertification in the same teaching field(s) in whichthe Ed.S. degree is sought (except in SpecialEducation), (2) present transcript(s) showing aMaster’s degree grade point average of 3.00 or better(on a 4.00 system)._________________________________Educational Specialist Degree in Administrationand Supervision Class AA 6-12DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non- Sem.Thesis OptionHoursECE 602 Theoretical Foundations 3EAS 630 Mgt. of Instructional3ProgramsEAS 630 School Org. for Per.3DevelopmentEAS 632 Fed., St., Loc. Leg. Policy 3Dev.EAS 633 Mgt. Ed. Support Services 3EAS 634 Org. Leadership for3OperationsEAS 635 Mentoring for Educational 3LeadersFED 696 Action Research I 3FED 697 Action Research II 3FED 600 Adv. Curriculum3DevelopmentFED 603 Adv. Educational Research 3FED 604 Adv. Eval. Teaching &LearningFED 605 Qualitative Methods Ed.3ResearchSPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children(Required if not previously)Total 36-39Secondary Education, Biology (Alternative-Fifth Year Program)(6-12)DEGREE REQUIRMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of Education 3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Intro to Education Research 3FED 504 Evaluation to Teaching &3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based Instruc.3TechSED 524 Science in the Secondary3SchoolSED 515 Reading in the Content Area 3SED 595 Internship 6SPE 501 Intro to Study of ExceptionalChildren0-3(Required if not previously completed)500 level advisor-approved courses in 15BiologyTotal 42-4581


SECONDARY EDUCATIONBUSINESS/MARKETING EDUCATION(CLASS A) (6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSApplicants for Master’s degree certification programsmust be admitted to the School of Graduate Studiesand to Teacher Education. Admission to TeacherEducation requires the applicant to (1) presentevidence of having completed a Baccalaureate degreeprogram in a teaching field, (2) present a copy of aClass B professional educator’s Certificate ( RegularMasters program), and (3) present transcript(s)showing a Baccalaureate degree grade point averageof 2.50 or better (4.00 system).Applicants for the Master’s degree in InstructionalLeadership must have a minimum of three full yearsof full-time experience in a P-12 setting.Applicants for the P-12 Reading SpecialistsCertification must have completed two years ofteaching experience and present a copy of a Class BProfessional Educator’s Certificate in ElementaryEducation, Early Childhood Education, orCollaborative Teacher. Applicants may also hold aClass B professional Educator’s Certificate inSecondary Education, but must complete tow coursesin reading, including an introduction to reading.Program Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursBED 501 Prin. Teaching Business Subj. 3BED 515 Mgt. of Computer Info3SystemBED 595 Internship 6FED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of Education 3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 504 Evaluation to Teaching &3LearningSED 515 Reading in the Content Area 0-3(Required if not previously completed)500 level advisor-approved courses in 15Business Education and related areasTotal 36-39SECONDARY EDUCATION,BUSINESS/MARKETING EDUCATION(ATERNATIVE-FIFTH YEAR PROGRAM)(6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSThe Alternative 5 th Year program is for one who doesnot hold a baccalaureate degree in a teaching field butwishes to obtain teacher certification. The programenables one to acquire the knowledge and skills of anentry-level teacher while at the same time earning aMaster’s degree. Applicants for the AlternativeMaster’s (5 th year) degree program must be admittedto the School Graduate Studies and to TeacherEducation. In addition the requirements of theGraduate School, admission to Teacher Educationrequires the applicant to (1) complete allundergraduate deficiencies, (2) pass speech, languageand hearing screening, (3) have the TB skin test, (4)pass all parts of the Alabama Prospective TeacherTest, and (5) pass the Praxis II in the appropriatearea.DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursBED 501 Prin. Teaching Business Subj. 3BED 515 Mgt. of Computer Info3SystemsBED 595 Internship 6FED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of EducationorFED 521 Multicultural Education 3FED 504 Evaluation to Reaching &3LearningSPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children(required if not previously completed)500 level advisor-approved courses in 15BiologyTotal 36 - 3982


SECONDARY EDUCATION, CAREERTECHNOLOGIES (CLASS A) (6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSApplicants for the Master’s degree certificationprograms must be admitted to the School of GraduateStudies and to Teacher Education. Admission toTeacher Education requires the applicant to (1)present evidence of having completed aBaccalaureate degree program in a teaching field, (2)present a copy of a Class B professional educator’sCertificate ( regular Master’s program); and (3)present transcript(s) showing a baccalaureate degreegrade point average of 2.50 or better (on a 4.00 pointsystem).Applicants for the Master’s degree in InstructionalLeadership must have a minimum of three full yearsof full-time experience in a P-12 setting.Applicants for the P-12 Reading SpecialistsCertification must have completed two years ofteaching experience and present a copy of a Class BProfessional Educator’s Certificate in ElementaryEducation, Early Childhood Education, orCollaborative Teacher. Applicants may also hold aClass B professional Educator’s Certificate inSecondary Education, but must complete two coursesin reading, including an Introduction to Reading.DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of Education 3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Intro to Education Research 3FED 504 Evaluation to Teaching & 3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based Instruc.3TechFED 542 Theories of Curriculum3DevelopmentSED 527 Guiding Learning in3Secondary SchoolsSPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children(Required if not previously completed)TTE 503 Career Information&GuidanceTYE 502 Teaching Sub. In CareerTech.33Choose six semester hours from the6following list:TTE 510 Found. & Prin. Of C/TE 3TTE 560 C/TE Student Organizations 3TYE 599 Thesis Research in6Technology EdTYE 603 Workshop: Teaching Lab 3Sub Dis TechTYE 604 Workshop: Teaching Lab 3Sub Exp TechTotal 33-36SECONDARY EDUCATION, CAREERTECHNOLOGIES (CLASS AA) (6-12)DEGREE REQUIRMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursEAS 563 Instruc. Super. & Curr.3DevelopmentFED 600 Adv. Curriculum3DevelopmentFED 601 Adv. Philosophy of3EducationFED 603 Adv. Educational Research 3FED 604 Adv. Eval. Teaching &3learningFED 605 Qualitative Methods Ed.3ResearchTLE 602 Technology Ed. 21st Century 3TYE 601 Appropriate Technology 3FED 696 Action Research l 3FED 697 Action Research II 3SPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children Choose six semester hours from the6following list:TTE 510 Found. & Prin. Of C/TE 3TTE 560 C/TE Student Organizations 3TYE 599 Thesis Research in6Technology EdTYE 603 Workshop: Teaching Lab 3Sub Dis TechTYE 604 Workshop: Teaching Lab 3Sub Exp TechTotal 36-39 Required if not previously completed83


SECONDARY EDUCATION, CAREERTECHNOLOGIES (CLASS AA) (6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSApplicants to the Educational Specialist Degree mustbe admitted to the School of Graduate Studies and toTeacher Education. Admission to Teacher Educationrequires the applicant to (1) present evidence ofhaving completed a Master’s with degree Class ACertificate in the same teaching field(s) in which theEd.S. degree is sought, (except in SpecialEducation), (2) present transcript(s) showing aMaster’s degree grade point average of 3.00 or better(4.00 system).DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursEAS 563 Instruc. Super. & Curr.3DevelopmentFED 600 Adv. Curriculum3DevelopmentFED 601 Adv. Philosophy of3EducationFED 603 Adv. Educational Research 3FED 604 Adv. Eval. Teaching &3learningFED 605 Qualitative Methods Ed.3ResearchTLE 602 Technology Ed. 21st Century 3TYE 601 Appropriate Technology 3FED 696 Action Research l 3FED 697 Action Research II 3SPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children Choose six semester hours from the6following list:TTE 510 Found. & Prin. Of C/TE 3TTE 560 C/TE Student Organizations 3TYE 599 Thesis Research in6Technology EdTYE 603 Workshop: Teaching Lab 3Sub Dis TechTYE 604 Workshop: Teaching Lab 3Sub Exp TechTotal 36-39SECONDARY EDUCATION, CAREERTECHNOLOGIES (ALTERNATIVE-FIFTHYEAR PROGRAM (6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSThe Alternative 5 th Year program is for one who doesnot hold a baccalaureate degree in a teaching field butwishes to obtain teacher certification. The programenables one to acquire the knowledge and skills of anentry-level teacher while at the same time earning aMaster’s degree. Applicants for the AlternativeMaster’s (5 th year) degree program must be admittedto the School Graduate Studies and to TeacherEducation. In addition to the requirements of theGraduate School, admission to Teacher Educationrequires the applicant to (1) complete allundergraduate deficiencies, (2) pass speech, languageand hearing screening, (3) have a TB skin test, (4)pass parts of the Alabama Prospective Teacher Test,and (5) passing of the Praxis II in the appropriatearea.DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of Education 3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Intro to Education Research 3FED 504 Evaluation to Teaching &3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based Instruc.3TechSED 515 Reading in the Content Area 3SPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children TTE 503 Career Information &3GuidanceTTE 562 CR Lab Management in C/TE 3TYE 502 Teaching Sub. In Career3Tech.TYE 504 Plan/Org. Tech Ed. Programs 3TYE 595 Internship 6Choose six semester hours from the6following list:TTE 510 Found. & Prin. Of C/TE 3TTE 560 C/TE Student Organizations 3TYE 599 Thesis Research inTechnology Ed6 Required if not previously completed84


TYE 603 Workshop: Teaching Lab 3Sub Dis TechTYE 604 Workshop: Teaching Lab 3Sub Exp TechTotal 42-45SECONDARY EDUCATION, ENGLISHLANGUAGE ARTS (CLASS A) (6-12)ADMISSIONS REQUIRMENTSApplicants for the Master’s degree certificationprograms must be admitted to the School of GraduateStudies and to Teacher Education. Admission toTeacher Education requires the applicant to (1)present evidence of having completed a baccalaureatedegree program in a teaching field, (2) present a copyof a Class B professional educator’s Certificate(regular master’s program), and (3) presenttranscript(s) showing a Baccalaureate degree gradepoint average of 2.50 or better (on a 4.00 pointsystem).Applicants for the Master’s degree in InstructionalLeadership must have a minimum of three full yearsof full-time experience in a P-12 setting.Applicants for the P-12 Reading SpecialistCertification must have completed two years ofteaching experience and present a copy of a Class BProfessional Educator’s Certificate in ElementaryEducation, Early Childhood Education, orCollaborative Teacher. Applicants may also hold aClass B professional Educator’s Certificate inSecondary Education, but must complete two coursesin reading, including an introduction to reading.DEGREE REQUIRMENTSProgram Requirements Non-ThesisOptionSem.HoursFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations ofEducationorFED 521 Multicultural Education 3FED 503 Intro to Education3ResearchFED 504 Evaluation to Teaching 3& LearningFED 529 Computer-Based3Instruc. TechFED 542 Theories of curriculum 3DevelopmentSED 527 Guiding Learning in 3Secondary SchoolsSPE 501 Intro to Study of0-3Exceptional Children 500 level advisor-approved courses in 15English Language Arts.Total 36-39SECONDARY EDUCATION, ENGLISHLANGUAGE ARTS (ALTERNATIVE-FIFTHYEAR PROGRAM (6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSThe Alternative 5 th Year program is for one who doesnot hold a Baccalaureate degree in a teaching fieldbut wishes to obtain teacher certification. TheProgram enables one to acquire the knowledge andskills of an entry-level teacher while at the same timeearning a Master’s degree. Applicants for theAlternative Master’s (5 th year) degree program mustbe admitted to the School Graduate Studies and toTeacher Education. In addition the requirements ofthe Graduate School, admission to Teacher Educationrequires the applicant to (1) complete allundergraduate deficiencies, (2) pass the speech,language and hearing screening, (3) have a TB skintest, (4) pass all parts of the Alabama ProspectiveTeacher Test, and (5) pass the Praxis II in theappropriate area.DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of EducationorFED 521 Multicultural Education 3FED 503 Intro to Education Research 3FED 504 Evaluation to Teaching &3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based Instruc.3TechFED 515 Reading in the Content Area 3SED 512 E.L.A. in the Secondary3SchoolSED 595 Internship 6SPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children *500 level advisor-approved courses in 15English Language Arts.Total 42-45 Required if not previously completed85


SECONDARY EDUCATION, GENERALSCIENCES (CLASS A) (6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSAdmission to Teacher Education requires theapplicants to (1) present evidence of havingcompleted a baccalaureate degree program in ateaching field, (2) present a copy of a Class BProfessional Educator’s Certificate ( RegularMaster’s program), and (3) present transcript(s)showing a Baccalaureate degree grade point averageof 2.50 or better (4.00 system).Applicants for the Master’s degree in InstructionalLeadership must have a minimum of three full yearsof full-time experience in a P-12 setting.Applicants for the P-12 Reading SpecialistsCertification must have completed two years ofteaching experience and present a copy of a Class BProfessional Educator’s Certificate in ElementaryEducation, Early Childhood Education, orCollaborative Teacher. Applicants may also hold aClass B professional Educator’s Certificate inSecondary Education, but must complete two coursesin reading, including an introduction to reading.DEGREE REQUIRMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of Education 3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Intro to Education Research 3FED 504 Evaluation to Teaching &3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based Instruc.3TechFED 542 Theories of Curriculum3Develop.SED 527 Guiding Learning in3Secondary SchoolsSPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children *500 level advisor-approved courses in 12Biology, Chemistry, Earth & SpaceSciences, and/or PhysicsTotal 33-36SECONDARY EDUCATION, GENERALSCIENCES (ALTERNATIVE-FIFTH YEARPROGRAM (6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSThe Alternative 5 th Year program is for one who doesnot hold a baccalaureate degree in a teaching field butwishes to obtain teacher certification. The programenables one to acquire the knowledge and skills of anentry-level teacher while at the same time earning aMaster’s degree. Applicants for the AlternativeMaster’s (5 th year) degree program must be admittedto the School of Graduate Studies and to TeacherEducation. In addition to the requirements of theGraduate School, admission to Teacher Educationrequires the applicant to (1) complete allundergraduate deficiencies, (2) pass speech, languageand hearing screening, (3) have a TB skin test, (4)pass all parts of the Alabama Prospective TeacherTest, and (5) pass the Praxis II in the appropriatearea.DEGREE REQUIRMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of Education 3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Intro to Education Research 3FED 504 Evaluation to Teaching &3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based Instruc.3TechSED 515 Reading in the Content Area 3SED 524 Science in the Secondary3SchoolSED 595 Internship 6SPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children 500 level advisor-approved courses in 15Biology, Chemistry, Earth & SpaceSciences, and/or PhysicsTotal 42-45 Required if not previously completed86


SECONDARY EDUCATION, MATHEMATICS(CLASS A) (6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSAdmission to Teacher Education requires theapplicant to (1) present evidence of having completeda baccalaureate degree program in a teaching field;(2) present a copy of a Class B professionaleducator’s Certificate ( regular Master's program);and (3) present transcript(s) showing a Baccalaureatedegree grade point average of 2.50 or better (on a4.00 point system).Applicants for the Master’s degree in InstructionalLeadership must have a minimum of three full yearsof full-time experience in a P-12 setting.Applicants for the P-12 Reading SpecialistCertification must have completed two years ofteaching experience and present a copy of a Class BProfessional Educator’s Certificate in ElementaryEducation, Early Childhood Education, orCollaborative Teacher. Applicants may also hold aClass B professional Educator’s Certificate inSecondary Education, but must complete two coursesin reading, including an Introduction to Reading.DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of Education3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Intro to Educational Research 3FED 504 Evaluation to Teaching &3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based Instruc.3TechFED 542 Theories of Curriculum3Develop.SED 527 Guiding Learning in3Secondary SchoolsSPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children 500 level advisor-approved courses in 12MathematicsTotal 33 -36SECONDARY EDUCATION, MATHEMATICS(CLASS AA) (6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSApplicants to the Educational Specialist degreeprogram must be admitted to the School of GraduateStudies and to Teacher Education. Admission toTeacher Education requires the applicant to (1)present evidence of having completed a Master’swith degree Class A Certificate in the same teachingfield(s) in which the Ed.S. degree is sought (exceptin Special Education); (2) present transcript(s)showing a Master’s degree grade point average of3.00 or better (on a 4.00 point system).DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursEAS 563 Instruc. Super. & Curr.3DevelopmentFED 600 Adv. Curriculum3DevelopmentFED 601 Adv. Philosophy of3EducationFED 603 Adv. Educational Research 3FED 604 Adv. Eval. Teaching &3learningFED 605 Qualitative Methods Ed.3ResearchFED 696 Action Research l 3FED 697 Action Research II 3SPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children *500 level advisor-approved courses in 12MathematicsTotal 36-39SECONDARY EDUCATION, PHYSICS (CLASSA) (6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSAdmission to Teacher Education requires applicantsto (1) present evidence of having completed abaccalaureate degree program in a teaching field, (2)present a copy of a Class B Professional Educator’sCertificate (regular Master’s program), and (3)present transcript(s) showing a baccalaureate degreegrade point average of 2.50 or better (on a 4.00 pointsystem). Required if not previously completed87


Applicants for the Master’s degree in InstructionalLeadership must have a minimum of three full yearsof full-time experience in a P-12 setting.Applicants for the P-12 Reading SpecialistCertification must have completed two years ofteaching experience and present a copy of a Class BProfessional Educator’s Certificate in ElementaryEducation, Early Childhood Education, orCollaborative Teacher. Applicants may also hold aClass B professional Educator’s Certificate inSecondary Education, but must complete two coursesin reading, including an introduction to Reading.DEGREE REQUIRMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of Education 3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Intro to Education Research 3FED 504 Evaluation to Teaching &3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based Instruc.3TechFED 542 Theories of Curriculum3DevelopmentSED 527 Guiding Learning in3Secondary SchoolsSPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children 500 level advisor-approval courses in12PhysicTotal 33-36Secondary Education, Technical Education (ClassA) (6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSAdmission to Teacher Education requires applicantsthe applicant to (1) present evidence of havingcompleted a baccalaureate degree program in ateaching field, (2) present a copy of a Class Bprofessional educator’s Certificate ( Regular Master’sprogram), and (3) present transcript(s) showing aBaccalaureate degree grade point average of 2.50 orbetter (on a 4.00 point system).Applicants for the Master’s degree in InstructionalLeadership must have a minimum of three full yearsof full-time experience in a P-12 setting.Applicants for the P-12 Reading SpecialistCertification must have completed two years ofteaching experience and present a copy of a Class BProfessional Educator’s Certificate in ElementaryEducation, Early Childhood Education, orCollaborative Teacher. Applicants may also hold aClass B professional Educator’s Certificate inSecondary Education, but must complete two coursesin reading, including an Introduction to Reading.DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of Education 3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Intro to Education Research 3FED 504 Evaluation to Teaching &3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based Instruc.3TechFED 542 Theories of Curriculum3DevelopmentSED 527 Guiding Learning in3Secondary SchoolsSPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children *TLE 506 Prog., Plan., Dev., Eval.C/TETLE 507 Instruc., Plan, Exe., Eval.C/TEChoose six semester hours from the6following list:TTE 510 Found. & Prin. Of C/TE 3TTE 560 C/TE Student Organizations 3TYE 599 Thesis Research in6Technology EdTYE 603 Workshop: Teaching Lab 3Sub Dis TechTYE 604 Workshop: Teaching Lab 3Sub Exp TechTotal 33-3633 Required if not previously completed88


SECONDARY EDUCATION, TECHNICALEDUCATION (ALTERNATIVE-FIFTH-YEARPROGRAM ) (6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSThe Alternative 5 th Year program is for one who doesnot hold a baccalaureate degree in a teaching field butwishes to obtain teacher certification. The programenables one to acquire the knowledge and skills of anentry-level teacher while at the same time earning aMaster’s degree. Applicants for the AlternativeMaster’s (5 th year) degree program must be admittedto the School of Graduate Studies and to TeacherEducation. In addition the requirements of theGraduate School, admission to Teacher Educationrequires the applicant to (1) complete allundergraduate deficiencies, (2) pass the speech,language and hearing screening, (3) have a TB skintest, (4) pass all parts of the Alabama ProspectiveTeacher Test, and (5) pass the Praxis II in theappropriate area.TTE 560 C/TE Student Organizations 3TYE 599 Thesis Research in6Technology EdTYE 603 Workshop: Teaching Lab 3Sub Dis TechTYE 604 Workshop: Teaching Lab 3Sub Exp TechTotal 42-45DEGREE REQUIREMENTSProgram Requirements with the Non-Thesis OptionSem.HoursFED 500 Professional Seminar 3FED 501 Foundations of Education 3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Intro to Education Research 3FED 504 Evaluation to Teaching &3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based Instruc.3TechSED 515 Reading in the Content Area 3SPE 501 Intro to Study of Exceptional 0-3Children TLE 506 Prog., Plan., Dev., Eval.3C/TETLE 507 Instruc., Plan, Exe., Eval.3C/TETLE 595 Internship 6TTE 501 Teaching Rel. Instruct. C/TE 3TTE 508 Coord. COOP C/TE 3or500 Level advisor-approved course inINT or TTE electiveChoose six semester hours from the6following list:TTE 510 Found. & Prin. Of C/TE 3 Required if not previously completed89


SOCIAL WORKMASTER OF SOCIAL WORKPROGRAM COORDINATORDennis Weiss256-372-8302dennis.weiss@aamu.eduProgram ProfessorsEdith FraserTonya PerryAssociate ProfessorsJitendra KapoorAssistant ProfessorsDonna HarrisJoAnne McLinnRachel RobinsonPamela PlummerMISSION STATEMENTThe Graduate Social Work program prepares studentsto become competent, ethical and advancedprofessional social work practitioners capable ofassuming a wide range of roles and functions inworking with vulnerable individuals, families,groups, public and private organizations andinstitutions in rural and urban communities. TheGraduate Social Work Program is accredited by theCouncil on Social Work Education.ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSStudents seeking admission to the Social Workprogram must:1. Hold a Bachelor’s degree from a regionallyaccredited college or university.2. Have a cumulative undergraduate grade pointaverage of at least 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale) and meetthe general requirements for admission to theSchool of Graduate Studies at Alabama A&MUniversity.3. Submit two essays. Each essay should notexceed 500 words. Essays must focus on thefollowing:a. Why applicants wish to pursue the MSWdegree;b. A major contemporary social problem that isof concern to the profession of social work;(state why, in your opinion, it is a problemfor the profession), and how you wouldintervene to ameliorate and/or eradicate thisproblem.4. Submit three letters of reference that reflect theapplicant’s academic and professional potentialand ethical and values orientation. Preferablyletter of recommendations should be written byformer professors or others who are, or who havebeen in a position to evaluate aspects of thecandidates’ academic, personal and intellectualcapabilities.5. A personal interview with the Social WorkAdmission’s Committee or a designated MSWfaculty member may be required.While there is no requirement for a specificundergraduate major to qualify for graduate study insocial work, applicants are expected to have hadpreparation in the liberal arts, usually throughundergraduate coursework in the social andbehavioral sciences, humanities and life sciences. Atleast 24 credits are required in these areas.Advanced StandingApplicants with a BSW degree from a CSWEaccredited program and a cumulative GPA of 3.00including upper division social work courses mayapply for advanced standing. Qualified applicantsmust complete 39 semester hours, of which 8semester hours are in field instruction, to finish thedegree program. Students obtaining AdvancedStanding must complete the degree program in three(3) consecutive semesters. For more information onAdvanced Standing, contact Dr. Edith Fraser,Director of the Social Work program, at 256-372-8776.Note: Admission to the Graduate program willoccur twice annually in the summer and in thefall. There will be no spring admission.Annual Application DeadlineSummer Admission ..................................February 15Fall Admission ............................................... March 1Program Requirements for the Non-ThesisOption – (Advanced Standing Program)90


Required Program - FoundationSem.HoursSWK 522 Race, Ethnicity, Gender & 3DiversitySWK 523 Rural Urban 2SWK 587 Social Work Empowerment 3Concentration Area Courses 31Total 39Areas of ConcentrationFamily & Child WelfareSWK 600 Social Work Intervention 3SWK 610 Family & Child Welfare 3SWK 621 Family Theories & Processes 3SWK 660 Assessment of Individuals 3SWK 680 Field Practicum & Seminar II 4SWK 601 Social Work Practice –3GroupsSWK 630 Needs Assessment & Prg3EvaluationSWK 681 Field Practicum& Seminar III 4SWK 689 Integrative Seminar 3SWK Elective 231Community Mental HealthSWK 602 SWK Practice Intervention in 3Mental HealthSWK 616 Issues & Policies in CMH 3SWK 621 Family Theories & Processes 3SWK 660 Assessment of Individuals 3SWK 680 Field Practicum & Seminar 4IISWK 601 Social Work Practice –3GroupsSWK 630 Needs Assessment &3Program EvaluationSWK 681 Field Practicum & Seminar 4IIISWK 689 Integrative Seminar 3SWK Elective 231Program Requirements for the Non-ThesisOption – (Two-Year Program)Required Program -1 st YearFoundationSemHoursSWK 500 Social Work Practice 3SWK 510 Social Work Policy I 3SWK 520 HBSE I 3SWK 522 Race, Ethnicity, Gender &3DiversitySWK 530 Applied Social Work3ResearchSWK 501 Social Work Practice II 3SWK 511 Social Work Policy II 2SWK 521 HBSE II 3SWK 523 Rural/Urban Social Work 2SWK 581 Field Practicum & Seminar I 429Required Program–1 st Year Foundation (Sat)Classes SWK 500 Social Work Practice 3SWK 520 HBSE I 3SWK 501 SWK Practice II 3SWK 521 HBSE II 3SWK 530 Applied Social Work3ResearchSWK 510 Social Work Policy I 3SWK 522 Race, Ethnicity & Gender & 3DiversitySWK 581 Field Practicum & Seminar 4SWK 511 SWK Policy II 2SWK 523 Rural Urban Social Work 229Concentration Areas: 2 nd YearFamily & Child Welfare (Fall/Spring)SWK 600 Social Work Intervention 3SWK 610 Family & Child Welfare 3SWK 621 Family Theories & Processes 3SWK 660 Assessment of Individuals 3SW 680 Field Practicum & Seminar II 4SWK 601 Social Work Practice –3GroupsSWK 630 Needs Assessment & Prg3EvaluationSWK 681 Field Practicum & Seminar 4IIISWK 689 Integrative Seminar 3SWK Elective 231Community Mental Health (Fall/Spring)SWK 602 SWK Practice Intervention in 3Mental HealthSWK 616 Issues & Policies in CMH 3SW 621 Family Theories & Processes 3SWK 660 Assessment of Individuals 3SWK 680 Field Practicum & Seminar II 4 Required for students in the Saturday program91


SWK 601 Social Work Practice –3GroupsSWK 630 Needs Assessment &3Program EvaluationSWK 681 Field Practicum & Seminar 4IIISWK 689 Integrative Seminar 3SWK Elective 231TotalProgram Requirements for the Non-ThesisOption – (Three-Year Program)Sem.Required Program - Foundation HoursSWK 500 Social Work Practice 3SWK 510 Social Work Policy I 3SWK 520 HBSE I 3SWK 522 Race, Ethnicity, Gender &3DiversitySWK 501 Social Work Practice II 3SWK 511 Social Work Policy II 2SWK 521 HBSE II 3SWK 523 Rural/Urban Social Work 2SWK 530 Applied Social Work3ResearchSWK 581 Field Practicum& Seminar I 429Areas of ConcentrationFamily & Child Welfare 2 nd YearSWK 600 Social Work Intervention 3SWK 610 Family & Child Welfare 3SWK 660 Assessment of Individuals 3SWK 601 Social Work Practice –3GroupsSWK 630 Needs Assessment & Prg3EvaluationSWK Elective 2SWK 616 Issues & Policies in CMH 3SWK 660 Assessment of Individuals 3SWK 601 Social Work Practice –3GroupsSWK 630 Needs Assessment &3Program EvaluationSWK Elective 23 rd YearSWK 621 Family Theories & Processes 3SWK 680 Field Practicum& Seminar II 4SWK 681 Field Practicum & Seminar III 4SWK 689 Integrative Seminar 331TotalProgram Requirements for the Non-ThesisOption – (Four-Year Program)Required Program - FoundationSem.HoursSWK 500 Social Work Practice 3SWK 510 Social Work Policy I 3SWK 501 Social Work Practice II 3SWK 511 Social Work Policy II 2SWK 523 Rural/Urban Social Work 2SWK 522 Race, Ethnicity, Gender &3Diversity16Required Program -2 nd YearFoundationSWK 520 HBSE I 3SWK 530 Applied Social Work3ResearchSWK 521 HBSE II 3SWK 581 Field Practicum,& Seminar I 4133 rd YearSWK 621 Family Theories & Processes 3SWK 680 Field Practicum & Seminar II 4SWK 681 Field Practicum & Seminar 4IIISWK 689 Integrative Seminar 331Community Mental Health - 2 nd YearSWK 602 SWK Practice Intervention inMental Health3Concentration AreasFamily & Child Welfare – 3 rd YearConcentrationSWK 621 Family Theories & Processes 3SWK 600 Social Work Intervention 3SWK 610 Family & Child Welfare 3SWK 601 Social Work Practice –3GroupsSWK 630 Needs Assessment & Prg 392


EvaluationSWK 680 Field Practicum & Seminar II 419Family & Child Welfare – 4 th YearConcentrationSWK 660 Assessment of Individuals 3SWK 681 Field Practicum& Seminar III 4SWK Elective 2SWK 689 Integrative Seminar 3SWK 615 Grants writing 214Community Mental Health – 3 rd YearConcentrationSWK 621 Family Theories & Processes 3SWK 602 SWK Practice Intervention in 3Mental HealthSWK 616 Issues & Policies in CMH 3SWK 601 Social Work Practice –3GroupsSWK 630 Needs Assessment & 3Program EvaluationSWK 680 Field Practicum& Seminar II 419Community Mental Health – 4 th YearConcentrationSWK 660 Assessment of Individuals 3SWK 681 Field Practicum & Seminar 4IIISWK 689 Integrative Seminar 3SWK Elective 212Program Requirements With ThesisOptionRequired ProgramSWK 631 Thesis Research Project 1-3SWK 632 Thesis Option 1-36Total (w/o Thesis) 60Total (With Thesis) 62-6693


SPECIAL EDUCATIONMASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIALEDUCATION (COLLABORATIVE TEACHERK-6)PROGRAM DIRECTORRena Lott256-372-5504Associate ProfessorsDr. Rena LottAssistant ProfessorsDr. Freddie StewartSPE 595 Internship in ECSE 6ECE 520 Foundations of Teaching3ReadingFED 501 Foundations of Education or 3FED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Introduction to Educational 3ResearchFED 504 Evaluation of3Teaching/LearningFED 529 Computer-Based3Instructional TechnologyTotal 36ABOUT THE PROGRAMThe Masters of Education program in SpecialEducation prepares teachers to educate students withintellectual and learning disabilities, and studentswith emotional/behavioral disorders. Personsgraduating from the program satisfy the proficienciesneeded for advanced licensure and are eligible foremployment in a range of settings to include publicschools and other educational settings.ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSApplicants for Master’s degree certification programsmust be admitted to the school of graduates Studiesand to Teacher Education. Admission to teacherEducation requires the applicant to (1) presentevidence of having completed a baccalaureate degreeprogram in a teaching field, (2) present a copy of aClass B Professional Educator’s Certificate (RegularMaster’s program), (3) present transcript(s) showinga baccalaureate degree grade point average of 2.50 orbetter (4.00 system), (4) Teacher EffectivenessValidation form (Regular Master’s program) and, (5)The Graduate record Examination (GRE).Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOptionRequired ProgramSem.HoursSPE 516 Collaborative Consultation 3SPE 522 Learning Strategies for3Elementary EducationSPE 530 Behavior Management 3SPE 540 Teaching Elementary3Students w/ DisabilitiesSPE 541 Teaching ECSEw/Disabilities3MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIALEDUCATION (COLLABORATIVE TEACHER6-12)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSApplicants for Master’s degree certification programsmust be admitted to the school of graduates Studiesand to Teacher Education. Admission to teacherEducation requires the applicant to (1) presentevidence of having completed a baccalaureate degreeprogram in a teaching field, (2) present a copy of aClass B Professional Educator’s Certificate (RegularMaster’s program), (3) present transcript(s) showinga baccalaureate degree grade point average of 2.50 orbetter (4.00 system), (4) Teacher EffectivenessValidation form (Regular Master’s program) and, (5)The Graduate record Examination (GRE).Program Requirements with the Non ThesisOption*Required ProgramSem.HoursSPE 500 Teaching Secondary Students 3w/DisabilitiesSPE 516 Collaborative Consultation 3SPE 520 Learning Strategies for3AdolescentsSPE 525 Transitioning Students w/3DisabilitiesSPE 530 Behavior Management 3SPE 595 Internship in ECSE 6Special Education certified students must take six semesterhours of course work in lieu of internship.94


FED 501 Foundations of Education orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Introduction to EducationalResearchFED 504 Evaluation ofTeaching/LearningFED 529 Computer-BasedInstructional TechnologyTake 3 Hours from the list belowSED 521 English in the SecondarySchools orSED 523 Social Science in theSecondary Schools orSED 524 Science in the SecondarySchoolsTotal 36MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIALEDUCATION (ALTERNATIVE FIFTH YEARCOLLABORATIVE TEACHER K-6)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSThe Alternative 5 th year program is for applicantswho do not hold a baccalaureate degree in a teachingfield but wishes to obtain teacher certification. Theprogram enables qualified candidates to acquire theknowledge and skills of an entry-level teacher whileat the same time earn a Master’s degree. Applicantseeking admission to the Special EducationCollaborative Teaching program (regardless of track)must be admitted to the School of Graduate Studiesand to Teacher Education. Admission to teacherEducation requires the applicant to:1. Present evidence of having completed abaccalaureate degree from a regionallyaccredited institution.2. A grade point average of 2.50 or better (4.00system) on all course work previouslycompleted.3. Complete all undergraduate deficiencies.4. Pass a speech, language and hearingscreening.5. Provide results of a background check and anegative tuberculosis skin test.6. Pass all parts of the Alabama ProspectiveTeacher Test.Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOption Required ProgramSem.3333333HoursSPE 501 Introduction to the Study of 3Exceptional ChildrenSPE 515 Language Development 3SPE 516 Collaborative Consultation 3SPE 518 Application of Child3DevelopmentSPE 522 Learning Strategies for3Elementary EducationSPE 530 Behavior Management 3SPE 540 Teaching Elementary3Students w/ DisabilitiesSPE 541 Teaching ECSE3w/DisabilitiesSPE 595 Internship in ECSE 6FED 501 Foundations of Education or 3FED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Introduction to Educational 3ResearchFED 504 Evaluation of3Teaching/LearningFED 529 Computer-Based3Instructional TechnologyEDE 503 Introduction to Educational 3ResearchECE 512 Investigation of Language3ArtsECE 520 Foundations of Teaching3ReadingTotal 51MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIALEDUCATION (ALTERNATIVE FIFTH YEARCOLLABORATIVE TEACHER 6-12) ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSRequirements are the same as those given on page 92for the general admissions requirements for theM.ED program in Special Education.Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOptionRequired Program Special Education certified students must take six semesterhours of course work in lieu of internship.Undergraduate Prerequisites for Alternative 5 thSem.Year, Collaborative 6-12SPE 205 Language Development 3SPE 403 IEP Writing 3SPE 402 Corrective Reading 3EDU 305 Materials & Methods of Teaching3Math in Elementary Schools95


HoursSPE 500 Teaching Secondary Students 3w/DisabilitiesSPE 501 Introduction to the Study of 3Exceptional ChildrenSPE 516 Collaborative Consultation 3SPE 518 Application of Child3DevelopmentSPE 520 Learning Strategies for3AdolescentsSPE 525 Transitioning Students w/3DisabilitiesSPE 530 Behavior Management 3SPE 595 Internship in ECSE 6FED 501 Foundations of Education or 3FED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Introduction to Educational 3ResearchFED 504 Evaluation of3Teaching/LearningFED 529 Computer-Based3Instructional TechnologySED 515 Reading in the Content Area 3SED 530 Secondary School3CurriculumTake 6 Hours from the list belowSED 521 English in the SecondarySchools orSED 523 Social Science in theSecondary Schools orSED 524 Science in the SecondarySchoolsTotal 51MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIALEDUCATION (EARLY CHILDHOOD)ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSRequirements are the same as those given on page 92for the general admissions requirements for theM.ED program in Special Education.Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOptionRequired Program Sem.HoursSPE 515 Language Development 3SPE 518 Application 3SPE 541 Teaching ECSE 3333w/DisabilitiesSPE 545 Intro to Early Childhood3Special EducationSPE 546 Parent Family Assessment 3SPE 548 Assessment and Evaluation 3in ECSESPE 549 Adaptive Techniques in3Methods in ECSESPE 550 Learning Strategies for3Young ChildrenSPE 595 Internship in ECSE 6FED 501 Foundations of Education 3orFED 521 Multicultural EducationFED 503 Introduction to Educational 3ResearchFED 504 Evaluation of Teaching/3LearningFED 529 Computer-Based3Instructional Tech.Total 42EDUCATIONAL SPECIALIST DEGREE INSPECIAL EDUCATION (CLASS AACERTIFICATION COLLABORATIVETEACHER K-6ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSApplicants to the Educational Specialist Degree mustbe admitted to the School of Graduate Studies and toTeacher Education. Admission to Teacher Educationrequires the Applicant to (1) present evidence ofhaving completed a Master’s degree with Class ACertification in the same teaching field(s) in whichthe Ed.S. Degree is sought (*except SpecialEducation), (2) present transcript(s) showing aMaster’s degree grade point average of 3.00 or better(4.00 system).Program Requirements with the Thesis OptionRequired ProgramSem.HoursSPE 609 Seminar in Special Education 3SPE 641 Evaluation Meth/Ma for3Special EducationCandidates holding a class ”B” teaching certificate in a fieldother than special education may enter the traditional M.Ed.program but are required to take.SPE 403 IEP Writing 3SPE 501 501 Introduction to the Study of 3Exceptional children96


SPE 643 Curriculum Planning K-6 3SPE 660 Advanced Collaborative3ConsultationSPE 664 Supervising Collaborative K- 36SPE 667 Professional Writing 3FED 696 Action Research I 3FED 697 Action Research II 3FED 600 Advanced Curriculum3DevelopmentFED 602 Advanced Educational3StatisticsFED 603 Advanced Education3ResearchFED 604 Advanced Evaluation of3Teaching/LearningTotal 36SPE 667 Professional Writing 3FED 696 Action Research I 3FED 697 Action Research II 3FED 600 Advanced Curriculum3DevelopmentFED 602 Advanced Educational3StatisticsFED 603 Advanced Education3ResearchFED 604 Advanced Evaluation of3Teaching/LearningTotal 36EDUCATION SPECIALIST DEGREE INSPECIAL EDUCATION (CLASS AACERTIFICATION COLLABORATIVETEACHER 6-12ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSRequirements are the same as those given on Page93.Program Requirements with the Thesis Option *Required ProgramSem.HoursSPE 609 Seminar in Special Education 3SPE 641 Evaluation Meth/Ma for3Special EducationSPE 664 Supervising Collaborative K- 36SPE 660 Advanced Collaborative3ConsultationSPE 665 Supervising Collaborative 6- 312 Programs97


URBAN & REGIONAL PLANNINGMASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONALPLANNINGPROGRAM DIRECTORChukudi V. Izeogu256-372-4990Graduate FacultyProfessorsEarl N.M. GoodingChukudi V. IzeoguJacob O. OluwoyeAssociate ProfessorsDonald OutlandConstance J. WilsonAssistant ProfessorsRussell J. FricanoJoseph A. LeeInstructorBernece HerbertMISSION STATEMENTAlabama A & M University (AAMU) is a land grantinstitution that combines education, research andservice in professional, vocational and liberal artsfields. The Department and Regional Planning(DCRP) fulfills the mission of AAMU by providing anationally accredited research and practice-orientedplanning education for the training of students fromdiverse backgrounds for careers in the planningprofession so that they can address pressing problemsand issues of physical, environmental, economic andsocial change in urban and rural communities in thisage of advancing technology.ADMISSION REQUIREMENTSApplicants for admission into the Master of Urbanand Regional Planning (MURP) program must meetall requirements as prescribed by the GraduateSchool, and must have attained an undergraduatecumulative GPA of 2.80 (based on a 4.00 pointsystem).Applicants with an undergraduate GPA less than theminimum requirement may be considered forprovisional admission. Provisionally admittedstudents must take recommended deficiency courses,and bring their GPAs to 3.0 within the first semesterof enrollment in order to qualify for full graduateadmission. Students who have been grantedprovisional admission status who subsequently raisetheir GPA to 2.8 or above cannot opt for the thesisoption. Only students who met the admissionrequirement for regular admission initially (146 onverbal and 140 quantitative portions of the GRE anda 2.8 GPA) can select the thesis option.PROGRAM STRUCTUREThe MURP program consists of a total of 46 credithours (42) credit hours for a student with anundergraduate degree in Planning from an accreditedplanning program). The 46 credit hours consists of 28hours of core courses; 12 hours of concentrationelectives, and 6 hours of thesis OR 3 hours of either aterminal research or a terminal project, as well as 3hours of elective and take a written ComprehensiveExamination.A student with an undergraduate degree in Planningmay be granted a waiver of 4 hours of the required 28hours of core courses but must complete a total of 42credit hours to graduate from the program. Studentswho demonstrate competencies in specific subjectareas such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS),Computer Applications in Planning or QuantitativeMethods as well as students who have documentedexperience in planning practice may be granted awaiver of related courses by the program faculty.Upon exemption, the students must substituteapproved electives to make up the 46 credit hoursrequired for graduation.STATUTE OF LIMITATIONA student enrolled in the MURP program MUSTcomplete ALL REQUIREMENTS for the MURPDegree within a time period of SEVEN (7) years.Program Requirements with the Thesis OptionRequired ProgramSem.HoursURP 500 Fundamentals of Urban1PlanningURP 510 Planning Theory and History 398


URP 511 Planning Research Methods 1 3URP 520 Legal Basis of Planning 3URP 521 Planning Research Methods ll 3URP 525 Planning Studio I 3URP 526 Computer Applications in3PlanningURP 527 Planning Studio ll 3URP 529 Professional Practice 3URP 531 Population and Economic3AnalysisURP 599 Thesis 6Area Concentration Hours 12Total 46Program Requirements with the Non-ThesisOptionRequired ProgramSem.HoursURP 500 Fundamentals of Urban1PlanningURP 510 Planning Theory and History 3URP 511 Planning Research Methods 1 3URP 520 Legal Basis of Planning 3URP 521 Planning Research Methods ll 3URP 525 Planning Studio I 3URP 526 Computer Applications in3PlanningURP 527 Planning Studio ll 3URP 529 Professional Practice 3URP 531 Population and Economic3AnalysisURB 555 Terminal Research Proposal 1URB 557 Terminal Research OR 2URP 559 Planning ProjectURB Elective Course 3Area Concentration Hours 12Total 46ElectivesProgram Concentrations and Courses(Students must take at least two courses denotedwith asterisks and two others courses from aparticular area concentration list below)Management PolicySPS 553 Hazardous Waste3ManagementURP 556 Independent Research 3URP 523 Site Planning 3SPS 775 Advanced Principles of GIS 3Total 122. Housing and Community DevelopmentUS 506 Urban Economics* 3URP 543 Housing Issues in Planning* 3URP 544 Historic Preservation 3URP 553 Community Development3ProcessURP 556 Independent Research 3SWK 630 Needs Assessment and3Program EvaluationECO 530 Economic Development 3Total 123. Transportation PlanningURP 535 Transportation Planning* 3URP 538 Transportation Modeling* 3URP 539 Public Transportation3AdministrationSPS 775 Advanced Principles of3Geographic InformationURP 556 Independent Research 3Total 124. International Development PlanningURP 564 Urban Planning in Dev.3Nations*URP 566 Global Environment and3Populations Issues*AGB 606 Methods and Techniques of 3Rural Dev.URP 561 Seminar on Economic3Development PlanningURP 515 Regional Development3TheoryURP 556 Independent Research 3Total 121 Environmental Planning Sem.HoursURP 542 Environmental Planning* 3URP 545 Environmental Assessment* 3URP 533 Land Use Planning 3SPS 580 Natural Resource 399


ACRONYMS AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONSACCOUNTINGACCHEALTH EDUCATIONHEDAGRIBUSINESS EDUCATIONAGBHISTORYHISAPPAREL,MERCHANDISING AND DESIGNAMDHOME ECONOMICSHECARTARTHUMAN DEV. AND FAMILY RESOURCES MANAGEMENTHDFBUSINESS EDUCATIONBEDINDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGYITBIOLOGYBIOLEARNING RESOURCE CENTERLRCBUSINESS ADMINISTRATIONBUSLOGISTICS AND CHAIN SUPPLY MANAGEMENTLSMCHEMISTRYCHEMANAGEMENTMGTCIVIL ENGINEERINGCEMANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMSMISCIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGYCETMARKETINGMKTCOMMUNICATIVE SCIENCE AND DISORDERSCSDMATHEMATICSMTHCOMMUNITY PLANNINGCPMECHANICAL DRAFTING AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGYMDTCOMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCESCMPMECHANICAL ENGINEERINGMECONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENTCMGMUSICMUSCRIMINAL JUSTICECJNATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCESNREEDUCATION ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISIONEASNUTRITION AND HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENTNHMEARLY CHILDHOOD EDU. AND ELEMENTARY EDU.ECEOFFICE SUPPLY MANAGEMENTOSMEARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATIONECHPHILOSOPHYPHILECONOMICSECOPHYSICAL EDUCATIONPEDEDUCATIONEDUPHYSICSPHYELECTRICAL ENGINEERINGEEPOLITICAL SCIENCEPSCELECTRICAL. ELECTRONICS ENGINEERTING TECHNOLOGYEETPSYCHOLOGYPSYELEMENTARY AND EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATIONECESECONDARY EDUCATIONSEDELEMENTARY EDUCATIONELESOCIAL WORKSWKENGLISHENGSOCIOLOGYSOCFAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCESFCSSPECIAL EDUCATIONSPEFOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATIONFEDTECHNICAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATIONTTEFINANCEFINTELECOMMUNICATIONSTELFOOD AND ANIMAL SCIENCEFASURBAN PLANNINGUPLHIGHER EDUCATION ADMINISTRATIONHEAURBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNINGURS100


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS101


ACCOUNTINGACC 512 Accounting Analysis for Management -Three semester hours. This course deals withconcepts, theory, and applications of managerialaccounting. Stress is on planning, control, problemsolving, and decision-making. (Prerequisite: MBA506 or at least two undergraduate courses inprinciples of accounting)ACC 571 Tax Issues in Decision-Making - Threesemester hours. A study of federal tax structure,including legal, economic, and governmentalimplications, the central focus will be on businessdecisions, research methodology, and tax planning.(Prerequisites: Federal Tax Accounting I and II andACC 512 or consent of instructor)ACC 572 Accounting Information Systems -Three semester hours. A study of accountinginformation systems, including small to medium tolarge computer-based systems, the central focus willbe on design and implementation of systems to meetall accounting informational needs for managers.This course carries a $10 lab fee. (Prerequisite: ACC512 or consent of instructor).AGRIBUSINESSAGB 502 Advanced Rural Electrification - Threesemester hours. Advanced wiring with emphasis onplanning, designing the wiring system; buildingservice entrance; wiring the home and utilitybuildings; appliance wiring and trouble shooting.AGB 505 Teaching Vocational Education to theDisadvantaged and Handicapped - Three semesterhours. Special methods and techniques of teachingvocational education to the disadvantaged withemphasis on the sociological, psychological andphysiological factors that influence learning.AGB 508 Planning, Organizing and TeachingAgribusiness Mechanics - Three semester hours.Selection of teaching materials, tools, training aids,methods, and techniques of teaching AgribusinessMechanics.AGB 509 Advanced Studies - One to three semesterhours. Individual field study in partial fulfillment ofneeds for research experience.AGB 510 Vocational Guidance - Three semesterhours. Need for and the nature of vocationalguidance; their duties and relations; programs andevaluation of results.AGB 512 Small Gasoline Engines - Three semesterhours. This course deals with the maintenance,overhauling and trouble shooting of 2 and 4 cyclegasoline engines.AGB 515 Agricultural Surveying - Three semesterhours. This course provides practical application inthe use of the transit and land measuring devices. Thestudent will gain experience in land measurement,profile and topographical mapping, and the use of thetransit in soil and water conservation.AGB 520 Advanced Welding and MetalworkTechnology - Three semester hours. This coursecovers basic gas and arch welding principles,procedures, and application in maintenance andconstruction; selection of machines, equipment,materials for welding and safe operation of metaljoiningmachines.AGB 521 Vocational Education Program Planning,Development and Evaluation - Three semesterhours. Principles, theories and practices in planning,developing and evaluating state and local programs invocational education.AGB 522 Adult Vocational Education - Threesemester hours. The characteristics of adults aslearners and the history, philosophy and nature ofadult education. Emphasis will be placed on planning,developing and implementing a comprehensive adultvocational education program.AGB 523 Advance Farm Power and FieldMachinery - Three semester hours. Advanced studyof power units, designs, principles of operation,economic applications and adaptation of fieldmachines.AGB 524 Advanced Wood and MachineTechnology - Three semester hours. This course isdesigned for those who have a need for knowing aboutthe several related factors involved in the fabricationof wood and wood major power woodworkingmachines and hand tools as related to woodfabrication.AGB 525 Advanced Wood Design and Assembly -Three semester hours. This course is designedspecifically for teachers of specialized secondary andpost-secondary woodworking programs. Attention102


will be given to design and assembly of woodproducts that are used in the Agricultural industry.AGB 531 Agricultural Economics - Three semesterhours. This course is designed for graduate studentswho have had no previous training in agriculturaleconomics. It emphasizes the application of basiceconomic concepts such as profit maximization, costminimization, resource substitution, demand andsupply to the production and distribution ofagricultural commodities. The focus is onmanagement and decision making but attention is alsogiven to persistent policy issues and internationaltrade.AGB 532 Advanced Farm Management - Threesemester hours. The analysis of farm business recordsand the application of economic concepts in decisionmaking in farm planning, farm organization and farmmanagement. Emphasis will be on enterpriserselection and combination; resource combination,substitution and valuation; the relationship betweenthe production function and supply; cost minimizationand profit maximization.AGB 533 Advanced Agricultural Marketing -Three semester hours. A study of the marketingsystem and the market for farm products. Methods ofreducing cost and improving marketing processes; areview of the activities of government agencies andtheir effects on the marketing system; the role andproblems of cooperatives in agricultural marketing.AGB 540 Vocational Education for Special NeedsStudents - Three semester hours. Analysis ofeducational procedures and practices appropriate forteaching individuals with special needs. Attention isfocused on characteristics and learning styles,curriculum modification, evaluation, IEP and studentplacement.AGB 550 Personal Financial Management - Threesemester hours. This course deals with short term aswell as long term planning and management ofpersonal financial resources. It provides students witha working knowledge of personal finance from amanagerial perspective with emphasis on theapplication of financial management to personal orfamily financial problems. Focus is on budgeting,purchasing, borrowing, saving and investing butattention is also given to other topics such as thefinancial aspects of weddings, divorce, retirement,funerals and insurance, as well as the effects of tax oninvestment decision.AGB 590 Research Methods in Agribusiness -Three semester hours. Principles and techniquesappropriate for planning, designing, conducting andreporting research in Agribusiness.AGB 599 Research in Agribusiness Education - Sixsemester hours. Thesis credit only.AGB 600 Computer Applications in Agribusiness -Two semester hours. Theory and practice in computerapplications and equipment as it relates to thesecondary and technical school level. Emphasis isplaced on word processors and spreadsheets in theDOS and Windows environment.AGB 601 Continuing Education in Agriculture -Three semester hours. Principles and practicesinvolved in developing vocational and technicalprograms in agriculture for out-of-school youths andadults, with emphasis on the disadvantaged.AGB 602 Occupational Experience in VocationalEducation in Agriculture - Three semester hours.Approved principles and procedures used by thevocational agribusiness teachers in selecting, planning,conducting and evaluating occupational workexperience programs for students in vocationalagribusiness. Emphasis will be placed on thetransition from school to work.AGB 603 Organization and Implementation ofVocational Education Programs for Disadvantagedand Handicapped - Three semester hours. Methodsand techniques of developing and implementingvocational job training programs for the disadvantagedand handicapped. Emphasis will be placed onlocating and securing state and federal funds foreducating and training the disadvantaged. This coursewill also stress writing proposals.AGB 604 Seminar in Agricultural Education -Three semester hours. This course is designed toinvestigate and analyze the current problems, issuesand developments in Agribusiness Education.AGB 605 Supervision of Student-Teacher inAgribusiness Education - Three semester hours.Principles and techniques for directing the laboratoryexperience of student-teachers in AgribusinessEducation.AGB 606 Methods and Techniques of RuralDevelopment - Three semester hours. This coursewill deal with approved methods of developing humanand natural resources in rural areas, with emphasis onconducting feasibility studies to determine needs.103


AGB 608 Vocational Youth Organizations - Threesemester hours. Methods and techniques ofdeveloping, implementing and conducting vocationalyouth organizational youth organization activities willbe examined in this course. Emphasis will be placedon how vocational youth organizations contribute tothe total educational program.AGB 609 Instructional Media in VocationalEducation - Three semester hours. Theory andpractice in developing and using instructional mediaand equipment at the secondary and technical schoollevel is the focus of this course.AGB 610 Advanced Teaching Methods inAgribusiness Education - Three semester hours.This course examines theory, principles andprocedures associated with effective instruction inagriculture at secondary and technical levels.Emphasis is placed on what research says abouteffective teaching.AGB 611 Internship in Agribusiness - Two to sixsemester hours. Guided participation in selected areasto further enhance professional and/or technicalcompetency needed by Agribusiness teachers.AGB 612 Farm Structure Planning andConstruction - Two semester hours. This course isdesigned to keep Agribusiness and CooperativeExtension personnel abreast of new innovations inplanning and construction of farm structures.AGB 613 Modern Plumbing - Two semester hours.This course is designed to keep Agribusiness andCooperative Extension Personnel abreast of newdevelopments in planning and installing a ruralplumbing and sanitation system.AGB 614 Metrics in Agriculture - One semesterhour. This course is designed to introduce students tobasic metric units and show how these are applied tovarious phases of Agriculture. A deliberate effort willbe made to get the students to use metric units so thatthey can apply them with ease and confidence.AGB 617 Advanced Woodwork - Two semesterhours. This course is designed to keep in-serviceagriculture personnel abreast of the latestdevelopments in woodworking.AGB 618 Small Gasoline Engine Theory andPractice - Two semester hours. Specific attention willbe given to trouble shooting, adjusting and repairingnew systems as they are installed on new four cyclemodels.AGB 619 Applied Techniques in Electric EnergyUtilization - Two semester hours. This course isdesigned to provide knowledge and technical skills inthe operation, maintenance and efficient use ofelectrically operated agricultural machines and tools.Special emphasis will be placed on the safe andenergy efficient operation of these items.AGB 620 Advanced Electric Motors and Controls -Two semester hours. This course is designed todevelop an appreciation and gain knowledge of theelectrical machines used in our electrical industries;how to connect electrical machines into electricalcircuits; develop and appreciation in planning circuitsand procedures of jobs in electrical machine wiringproblems; and to develop a safety-first attitude in thestudents.AGB 621 Advanced Metal Fabrication - Twosemester hours. This course covers advanced metalfabrication techniques. It includes advanced weldingprocesses. Metallurgy of welding, strength ofmaterials and design of weldments.AGB 622 2 Cycle Engines - Two semester hours.Specific attention will be given to trouble shooting,adjusting and repairing new systems as they areinstalled on new 2 cycle models.AGB 623 Advanced Agribusiness Management -Three semester hours. The application of managerialmethodology in decision making in an agribusinessfirm and computer application in management areemphasized. Financial strategies, capital budgeting,long range planning for growth and profit and theevaluation of the agribusiness industry will becovered.AGB 624 Agricultural Financial Analysis - Threesemester hours. An economic study of the acquisitionand use of capital in agriculture with focus on the useof financial statements to analyze risks, returns andrepayment capacity. Emphasis will also be given torisk management strategies, capital budgeting andcapital allocation over time, financial markets andinstitutions serving agriculture.AGB 625 Agricultural Policy - Three semesterhours. A solid foundation in economic principles andtheory is important and assumed. Agricultural policyis dynamic and constantly evolving, particularly at thistime. The economic, scientific and political basis ofthe policy process is examined by reviewing thecurrent methods and prescriptions of the contrastingpositions and how they finally converge in new policy104


that is both actionable and appropriate. Case studies ofhow this is achieved will be the subject of individualgraduate student research papers.APPAREL, MERCHANDISING ANDDESIGNAMD 527 Consumer Textiles - Three semesterhours. The physical and chemical examination offibers, yarns, structures, color and finishingtechniques of textiles with major emphasis on thecomparison and evaluation of fabrics for specificconsumer uses. Theory and laboratory experienceare provided which focus on decisions, processesand materials directly related to textile performance.AMD 528 Social Psychological and EconomicAspects of Clothing - Three semester hours. Thestudy of clothing as it relates to the behavior ofindividuals and groups with emphasis on theproduction, consumption and use of clothing andtextiles as related to social science theories.AMD 530 Special Problems - One to threesemester hours. An investigation of problems inclothing, or issues and problems related to Apparel,Merchandising and Design and family well-being.AMD 533 Historic Costume - Three semesterhours. A comprehensive study of dress throughoutperiods of history, including the cultural andeconomic factors associated with the development,adoption and abandonment of styles.AMD 534 Advanced Costume Design - Threesemester hours. Creative problems in dress designtailored to individual needs; the application of flatpattern theory and Computer-Aided Design togarment design, incorporating the relationship offabric geometry, hand, and surface ornamentationto garment design.AMD 535 Advanced Tailoring - Three semesterhours. The application of tailoring techniques to theconstruction of suits/coats for women and men.Traditional and contemporary tailoring techniquesare explored.AMD 537 Fashion Merchandising Study Tour -One to three semester hours. A study of the manyfacets of the fashion industry, including tours ofprimary and secondary suppliers, apparelmanufacturers, designer showrooms, fashion press,accessory showrooms, buying offices, testinglaboratories, pattern companies, merchandisingcenters, museums, etc. Pre- and post-tour seminarsand written assignments are required.AMD 540 Clothing for the Elderly - Threesemester hours. A study of the social, psychological,and economic aspects of clothing for the elderly.AMD 618 Textile Economics - Three semesterhours. An in-depth study of the economics of thetextile and apparel industry with emphasis on theproduction and distribution of goods. Focus isplaced on current, national and internationalproblems.AMD 650 New Directions in Clothing andTextiles - Three semester hours. A comprehensiveapproach to the study of current instructional andresearch trends and issues in the area of clothing andtextiles.ARTART 500 History and Philosophy of ArtEducation – Three semester hours. The historic andphilosophical development of art education in publicschools and the role of art in education is examined.ART 501-511 Advanced Drawing – Threesemester hours. Continued study in drawing foradvanced students, students who have fulfilled basicdrawing requirements. Prerequisite: Oneundergraduate course in drawing.ART 502-512 Advanced Painting – Threesemester hours. Continued study in painting foradvanced students; advanced work in paintingmedia will include traditional oil, tempera, acrylic,and mixed media techniques. Also, collage,assemblage, shaped canvasses, and morecontemporary approaches. Exploration inmultimedia and creative manipulation of imagery isinvestigated. Prerequisite: One undergraduate coursein painting.ART 503-513 Advanced Sculpture – Threesemester hours. Continued study in sculpture foradvanced students. Prerequisite: One undergraduatecourse in sculpture.ART 504-514 Advanced Printmaking – Threesemester hours. Continued study in lithography,intaglio, or relief printing. Prerequisite: Oneundergraduate course in desired area.105


ART 505-515 Advanced Ceramics – Threesemester hours. Continued study in ceramics foradvanced students. Prerequisite: One undergraduatecourse in ceramics.ART 506-516 Advanced Fibers – Three semesterhours. The advanced course in fibers emphasizespersonal development of skills and techniques,which exceed basic course requirements. Thestudent may elect a loom or non-loom emphasiswith concentration in one area or several relatedareas; macramé, basketry, batik, tie-dying, weaving.ART 507-517 Advanced Photography – Threesemester hours. Continued study in photography foradvanced students. Prerequisite: One undergraduatecourse in photography.167ART 508-518 Advanced Jewelry – Three semesterhours. Continued study in jewelry for advancedstudents. Prerequisite: One undergraduate course injewelry.ART 520 Art Survey – Three semester hours.Examination of modern and contemporary art styles,movements, and techniques via trips to museumsand galleries, visiting artists, lectures, and slidepresentations.ART 522 Origins of Modern Art – Three semesterhours. A survey of the history of painting andsculpture from the mid-nineteenth century and itsinfluence on twentieth century and contemporaryart. Analysis will include the major artists,beginning with the Impressionists and continuingthrough contemporary conceptual installation art.ART 524 African-American Art – Three semesterhours. The study of major events, personalities, andinfluences germane to the creation of art by blacksin America, including visual slave themes. Pan-African Art, "Black Art", and blacks in mainstreamart.ART 526 Research in Art History – Threesemester hours. Intensive study of selected periods,personalities, styles, and other characteristicsconsidered important in world art history, as well asan examination of bibliographical, photographic,archival, and iconographical materials used in thestudy of art, and methodological approaches forhistorical analysis.ART 528 Primitive Art - Three semester hours. Anexamination of the social and cultural qualitiesdemonstrated in the art of various preliteratecultures throughout the world.ART 532 Teaching and Supervision of Art in thePublic Schools and Practicum – Three semesterhours. Problems, issues, and procedures of artteaching and supervision in the elementary schooland junior and senior high schools; art in life ofschool and community; development of programsand procedures; problems in selecting, organizing,teaching, and evaluating art activities; practicum.ART 534 Art in Childhood Education – Threesemester hours. Readings for and planning theanalysis and development of art programs forchildren in preschools, elementary schools, andother community agencies.ART 538 Workshop – Curriculum Developmentin Art Education – Three semester hours. Providesthe art teacher an opportunity to explore innovativestudio approaches and teaching strategies in aworkshop setting with public school students.Reading, discussion, studio exploration, and actualteaching experience are facets explored.Prerequisite: One year teaching experience.ART 552 Independent Study - Three semesterhours. This course shall be available to all graduateart students who desire to continue work in anygiven area beyond the regular class offerings. Priorconsent of the instructor is required.168ART 595 Internship in Art Education - Sixsemester hours. This course consists of fourteenweeks of full-time teaching under the immediatedirection of supervising teachers in an off-campuspublic or approved private school. Candidates sharetheir experiences, discuss problems, and developnew techniques in a professional seminar for theduration of the teaching experience. The weeklyseminar is required. Prerequisite: Art ProgramapprovalBIOLOGYBIO 510 Radiation Biology - Four semester hours.Characteristics of radioisotopes; detection andcounting techniques and instrumentation; tracertechniques, health and safety system. (Prerequisite:consent of instructor)BIO 511 Biological Control - Four semester hours.Designed to introduce components of resistance, useof parasites, predators and microorganisms’ foreign106


exploration, shipment, release and establishment ofimported parasites and predators will be discussed.BIO 512 Histotechniques - Three semester hours.Microscopic study of the various tissues and organsof the animal system.BIO 522 Microbial Physiology (AAMU andUAH) - Three semester hours. The fundamentalsand basic principles of microbial cell structure,growth and cellular responses to environmentalchanges. Topics include macromolecular synthesisof cell structures, metabolism, the genome,environmental effects, and regulation. The topicsalso cover the depth and range of physiologicaldiversities found in microorganisms as well as theirbiotechnological exploitation. Lab Fee: level 4.(Prerequisites: Microbiology, Organic Chemistry,and Biochemistry)BIO 523 Principles of Virology - Four semesterhours (3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of lab). Thecourse will give a broad introduction into theconcepts and techniques of molecular virology,which are applicable to research on human, animaland plant viruses. Topics include the principles ofviral infectivity, multiplication and chemicalconstitution; laboratory techniques for viralisolation, cultivation, identification, andenumeration. Fundamental principles related to theinteraction of viruses with host cells will beemphasized. Fee: Level 4BIO 524 Mycology - Four semester hours. Study ofthe various lines of the phycomycetes usingrepresentative species; the various series of theactinomycete, and representative pathogenic (cropand vegetable pathogens) and non-pathogenicheterobasidiomycetideae. Ontogenetic, cellular andstructural study applied to all divisions, classes,series, orders, and families. Lab Fee: Level.BIO 525 Parasitology - Five semester hours. Theprotozoa and helminthes parasitic for humans andtheir laboratory identification are discussed.Arthropods are studied in relation to their roles asvectors. Two three-hour labs per week. Lab fee:Level 4. (Prerequisite: BIO 221)BIO 526 Microbial Ecology - Four semester hours.The relationship of soil and aquaticMicroorganisms and their importance inammonification, nitrification, and other biologicalprocesses. (Prerequisite: BIO 221)BIO 531 Plant Physiology (AAMU and UAH) -Four semester hours. A general introductory studyof life processes of plants, including water relations,mineral utilization, metabolism, photosynthesis,digestion, respiration, assimilation, and growth asaffected by growth hormones. One three-hour labper week. Lab Fee: Level 3. (Prerequisites: BIO 13,371 or 372, CH 113 or 331)BIO 532 Animal Physiology (UAH) - Foursemester hours. Basic course in organism function.Lecture topics include membrane physiology withrespect to transport phenomena, muscle, nervesynapse, and sensory receptor physiology. Thephysiology of respiration, heart, circulation, kidney,and gastrointestinal tract are treated as individualsystems with emphasis on regulation. Onelaboratory session per week illustratingphysiological principles discussed in lecture. LabFee: level 4.BIO 533 Advanced Physiology I (HumanPhysiology) - Four semester hours. Study of nerveand muscle cell function, fluid and electrolyteenvironment of body tissues, blood, heart,circulatory, nervous systems and alternative healingmethods for diseases. (Prerequisite: OrganicChemistry, preferably Biochemistry).BIO 534 Advanced Physiology II (HumanPhysiology) - Four semester hours. Continuation ofAdvanced Physiology I with consideration of kidneyfunction, human respiratory, digestive, reproductive,endocrine systems and disease alternative healingmethods. (Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry,preferably Biochemistry)BIO 535 Endocrinology - Four semester hours.Current developments in anatomy, physiology,chemistry, and regulation of major endocrineglands. Laboratory sessions in biological andchemical assays of hormones. (Prerequisite: BIO409)BIO 540 Molecular Biology - Four semester hours.Study of structure, behavior and function of thelarge biological molecules, including biologicaloxidations, metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids,amino acids, and the genetic aspects of metabolism.(Prerequisite: CHE 301)BIO 541 Cell Physiology - Four semester hours.Study of the inter-conversions and functions ofBiomolecules in cells, including the major metabolicpathways, bioenergetics, and interrelations ofvarious pathways, and various mechanisms ofmetabolic regulation. One three-hour lab per week.107


Lab Fee: level 4. (Prerequisites: BIO/CHE 361 and362 or Consent of Instructor)BIO 542 Analytical Biochemistry Laboratory -Two semester hours. Advanced laboratory coursedealing with modern techniques of molecularbiology and biochemistry.BIO 543 Cellular and Development Biology(UAH) - Four semester hours. Broad andcomprehensive integrated approach to cellular anddevelopment biology through lectures,discussions, and selected laboratory experiences.Aspects of cellular structure and function will becoupled with relevant aspects of developmentalmechanisms. Lectures will include such topics asmitosis, gametogenesis, nuclear-cytoplasmicinteractions, role of genes in cellular anddevelopmental expressions, mechanisms of hormoneaction on cellular function in development, cellmovements and affinities, and selectedmorphogenesis of germ layer derivatives.(Prerequisites: BIO 113, 114, 319, CH 101, 105, 113or CH 123, 126 and 331) May be takenconcomitantly.BIO 544 Cellular and Developmental Biology(UAH) - Three semester hours. Continuation of BIO543.BIO 545 Cellular and Developmental BiologyLab (UAH) - Two semester hours. Should be takenafter BIO 543 and concurrently with BIO 544. LabFee: Level 4.BIO 546 Cytogenetics - Four semester hours.Detailed analysis of composition, morphology andbehavior of genes, especially as they relate tofunction, development, and heredity. (Prerequisite:BIO 406)BIO 551 Insect Physiology - Four semester hours.Metabolism and utilization of carbohydrates, lipidsand nitrogen compounds; energy production,neuromuscular mechanics, hormones andmorphogenesis; role of organs and organ systems inmetabolism. (Prerequisites: General Entomology orequivalent and Advanced Biochemistry)BIO 552 Insect-Pest Management - Four semesterhours. Insect surveys, ecological basis for control,plant and animal resistance to insects, control byparasites, predators, microorganisms, andmanagement by genetics principles, chemicalattractants, chemical repellents, sterilization,insecticides, and integrated systems of pestmanagement. (Prerequisite: General Entomology orAdvanced Applied Entomology)BIO 553 Insect Taxonomy and Morphology(AAMU and UAH) - Four semester hours.Classification of insects, external and internalanatomy of insects, with emphasis on thecomparative and functional aspects. (Prerequisite:BIO 455)BIO 560 Environmental Biology - Three semesterhours. Principles of the interaction between livingsystems and their resources are considered.Particular emphasis will be given to currentproblems in the management of our naturalresources including new approaches in themanagement of pest populations.BIO 561 Physiological Ecology (UAH) - Foursemester hours. Physiological and behavioralresponses of organisms to natural changes in theirchemical and physical environment. One three hourlaboratory per week. Lab Fee: Level 3.(Prerequisite: BY 312 or Consent of Instructor.Recommended: BIO 361 or 532).BIO 562 Community Ecology (UAH) - Foursemester hours. Detailed consideration of ecologicalprinciples and concepts, as well as biotic and abioticfactors relative to the development of plantcommunities and ecosystems. One four-hour lab perweek. Lab Fee: Level 3. Field trips required.(Prerequisites: BIO 312 and Taxonomy)BIO 563 Population Ecology (UAH) - Foursemester hours. Distribution, population dynamics,and behavior of animal population in relation toenvironmental factors. One four-hour lab per week.Lab Fee: Level 3. Field trips required.(Prerequisites: BIO 312 and Organic Chemistry)BIO 564 Limnology (UAH) - Four semester hours.Fresh-water environments and organismsexemplified by lakes, ponds, and streams in NorthAlabama. Includes laboratory and required fieldtrips. One four hour lab per week. Occasionally,Saturday field trips will be required in lieu of theweek's laboratory session. Lab Fee: level 4:(Prerequisites: BIO 312, 315, 371 or 378, orConsent of Instructor)BIO 565 Phycology - Four semester hours.Morphology of classes; growth requirements;physical and chemical stresses on growth andproductivity. Succession and bioassay of pollutants.Systematic physiology and metabolism of ecology108


and environmental stress factors. Productivityculturing methods and economics. Man's use ofbiotechnology and industry. Terrestrial monitoring.BIO 570 Plant Pathology - Four semester hours.History of non-parasitic and parasitic diseasesincited by bacteria, fungi, plasmodiophorales,nematodes, and viruses will be discussed. Diseasecontrol through exclusion, eradication, protection,and post-resistance mechanisms will be mentioned.(Prerequisite: BIO 344)BIO 571 Plant Anatomy - Four semester hours.Ontogeny, differentiation, and maturation of thevarious tissues and organs of angiosperms.Investigate problems in the growth and developmentof an angiosperm using histological techniques. Twothree-hour labs per week. (Prerequisite: BIO 372 orConsent of Instructor)BIO 572 Plant Taxonomy - Four semester hours.Principles of classifying, naming, and identifyingvascular plants with special emphasis on floweringplants, including a consideration of ecologicalfactors influencing vegetation distribution.BIO 580 Advanced Inveterate Zoology (UAH) -Four semester hours. Phylogenetic consideration ofthe invertebrate, including structural, functional,embryological, and physiological relationships,leading to an understanding of the complexity ofanimals. Includes laboratory and field trips.(Prerequisite: Invertebrate Zoology or Consent ofInstructor)BIO 590 Problems in Biological Sciences - Threesemester hours. Considers the problems ofelementary and secondary school teachers of sciencein all areas of biological sciences. Emphasis onrelations of biological organisms to theirenvironment, stressing climatic and soil factorswhich influence their distribution and adaptations.Provision is made for individual investigation in thebiological science.BIO 620 Applied Environmental Psychology(Toxicology) - Four semester hours. Detailed studyof hazardous pollution in the environment: heavymetals, pesticides, radiation, ozone, hydrocarbons,their fate and impact on the ecosystem; assay ofpollutants and their bioremediation. Risk assessmentof pollutants in the environment and theirmanagement. (Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor)BIO 621 Pathogenic Bacteriology (UAH) - Fivesemester hours. Detailed study of bacteria that causeinfections in humans. Mechanisms of pathogenicityand host-parasite relationships are emphasized. Twothree-hour labs per week. Lab Fee: Level 4.(Prerequisites: BIO 361, 421, and 430 or Consent ofInstructor)BIO 622 Applied and Industrial Microbiology -Four semester hours. Physiological studies andfermentation processes. Function of microorganismsof industrial importance in the biological productionof antibiotics, vitamins, organic acids, alcohol,amino acids, waste treatment and their assay.(Prerequisite: Microbiology)BIO 623 Advanced Virology - Four semesterhours. Outline of field of virology stressing themolecular biology of virus replication. Topicsinclude immunology, genetics, and epidemiology.Emphasis on bacteria and vertebrate viruses,although plant and insect viruses may be discussed.(Prerequisites: Microbiology and Principles ofVirology)BIO 624 Immunology - Four semester hours.Theoretical and practical aspects of immunology.Current areas of immunology that are controversialwill be discussed in detail. One four-hour lab perweek. Lab Fee: Level 4. (Prerequisites: BIO 361 and430 or Consent of Instructor)BIO 625 Medical Mycology (AAMU and UAH) -Four semester hours. Comprehensive study of fungipathogenic to man with emphasis on theirproperties, pathogenesis, and laboratory diagnosis.Topics will include interrelationship between fungi,the environment and food. Two hour labs per week:level 4; (Prerequisites: BIO 421 and 430)BIO 631 Pharmacology - Four semester hours.Lecture and laboratory course. Major topics includedrug-receptor interaction, kinetics of drugabsorption, distribution, and elimination, and adiscussion of drugs affecting different systems. Alsoto be considered are topics such aspharmacogenetics, toxicity, mutagenesis,teratogenesis, carcinogenesis, and drug interactions.Emphasis is on mechanism of action of drugs inrelation to their use as therapeutic agents inmedicine. (Prerequisites: Advanced Physiology Iand II).BIO 632 Cardiovascular Physiology - Threesemester hours. Mechanisms of cardiac muscleexcitation and interaction. Analysis of peripheralcirculation. Neural regulation of circulation.Angiography, Electrocardiography, and109


Vectorcardiography as diagnostic tools.(Prerequisites: Medical Physiology I & II).BIO 633 Endocrinology - Four semester hours.Anatomy, physiology and biochemistry of theendocrine glands. Discussion of the systemic effectsof hormones, their regulation, integration, andmechanisms of action. Includes laboratory. Lab Fee:Level 4. (Prerequisites: BY 361 and 532 or Consentof Instructor).BIO 641 Advanced Cell Biology (AAMU andUAH) - Four semester hours. Integrated approach tothe fine structure and function of various cellularprocesses. Special attention to particular aspects ofcellular process each term; e.g., motility in cells,cellular differentiation, etc. Laboratory included.Lab fee: Level 4. (Prerequisite: Cellular andDevelopment Biology or Consent of Instructor).BIO 642 Advanced Cell Physiology - Foursemester hours. Biochemical and biophysicalcytology. The cell as matter, life history of the cell,molecular basis of cellular activities, enzymes andenergy conversions, functional localizations insubunits of the cell, mechanisms of motility,structure and function of cell membranes, effects ofradiation on cells, biochemical control mechanisms,cellular differentiation and the interaction betweencells, hypothesis of cellular origins. (Prerequisites:Molecular Biology, Physics, Cytology, andBiochemistry) Includes laboratory.BIO 643 Microscopy (UAH) - Four semesterhours. Introduction to the various methods ofpreparation for transmission electron microscopyand an analysis of electron micrographs. Attentionwill also be given to supporting techniques such asphase microscopy, autoradiography, scanningelectron microscopy, negative staining, andcytochemistry. Lab Fee: Level 4. (Prerequisites:Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor)BIO 644 Topics in Cell and Development Biologyand Biological Fine Structure (UAH) – Twosemester hours. Discussion of current topics in cellbiology with emphasis on student participation.Both plant and animal cells will be emphasized.Depending on the number of students, some termsmay be devoted to short research problems.(Prerequisites: BIO 543 and 643 or Consent ofInstructor)BIO 645 Human Cytogenetics and its ClinicalApplication - Three semester hours. Review ofnormal human chromosome structure and normalchromosome segregation and morphology withclinical considerations.BIO 646 Molecular Genetics (AAMU and UAH) -Three semester hours. The molecular mechanismsunderlying genetic principles. Structure of genes andchromosomes; primary; secondary and tertiarystructure of DNA; DNA replication; geneticrecombination; RNA transcription; translation andgenetic code; regulation of gene function; evolutionat the molecular level. (Prerequisites: BIO 319 andCHE 361)BIO 647 Enzymology (UAH) - Three semesterhours. Detailed study of enzymes including proteinsynthesis, primary, secondary, tertiary, andquaternary structure, nomenclature, physiologicaland catalytic functions, enzyme kinetics, andmetabolic regulations of enzyme activity.(Prerequisites: BIO 542 or CHE 561 or Consent ofInstructor)BIO 648 Enzymology Lab - Two semester hours.Techniques of isolation, purification, andcharacterization of enzymes. Lab Fee: Level 4.(Prerequisite: BIO 647)BIO 649 Advanced Genetics I - Four semesterhours. Three hours lecture and one hour laboratory.This is the first of the two-course sequence and willprovide instruction in genetics of viruses, bacteriaand fungi. This instruction will emphasize acomparative approach of structure, function andexpression of genetic material, genetic code, proteinsynthesis and transposable elements. Methods ofcloning recombinant DNA in these groups will bediscussed. (Prerequisites: Principles of Genetics,BIO 311: Microbiology, BIO 430; Biochemistry,BIO 407)BIO 650 Advanced Genetics II - Four semesterhours. Three hours of lecture and one hour oflaboratory. This is the second of the two-coursesequence and will include classical and molecularinstruction in animal genetics, population geneticsand evolutionary genetics. The emphasis will be onthe use of modern molecular techniques, such asallozyme and restriction fragment lengthpolymorphism, and DNA sequencing information instudying modern population and evolutionarygenetics. (Prerequisites: BIO 591, BIO 430, BIO407, and BIO 649)BIO 651 Medical Entomology (UAH) - Foursemester hours. Insects and other arthropods asparasites and disseminators of disease. Mechanisms110


of life cycles, biology and control of insect parasitesof humans. Lab Fee: Level 3. (Prerequisite: BIO 361and 455 or Consent of Instructor)BIO 652 Advanced Applied Entomology - Foursemester hours. Economic thresholds, economicinjury levels, population dynamics, residues in foodcrops, chemical control, insect transmission of plantand livestock diseases. (Prerequisite: GeneralEntomology)BIO 653 Taxonomy of the Immature Insect(AAMU and UAH) - Four semester hours. Studiesof the literature, comparative morphology, andtechniques of identification of the immature stagesof the insect, methods of collecting and preservingthe immature stages. (Prerequisite: BIO 455 orConsent of Instructor)BIO 660 Ecosystem Dynamics (UAH) - Foursemester hours. An analytical study of thefunctional energetics, interrelationships and adaptiveinteractions of living organisms in terrestrial aquaticand marine environments. Methodology includessimulations, modeling, field and laboratoryexperimentation, and other predictive andinvestigational procedures. One four-hour lab perweek. Lab Fee: level 3. Field trips required.(Prerequisites: BIO 564 and 565)BIO 661 Advanced Population Ecology (UAH) -Four semester hours. Interaction of populationstructure, genetic properties, and ecology factors incontrolling the dynamics and evolutionary characterof natural populations. One four-hour lab per week.Lab Fee: Level 3. (Prerequisites: BIO 312, 564, or565 or approval of instructor)BIO 690 Seminar (AAMU and UAH) - Onesemester hour. Students report on current journalarticles and research.BIO 691 Special Topics (AAMU and UAH) - Oneto four semester hours. Literature search relative totopics of special interest under direct supervision ofan instructor. For graduate students.BIO 692 Research (AAMU and UAH) - Two orfour semester hours. Individual investigations at thegraduate level into biological problems under thedirect supervision of a member of the graduatefaculty. A special problem may be carried out at theMarine Environmental Sciences Consortium,Dauphin Island, Alabama. Available to thesisstudents.BIO 699 Master's Thesis (AAMU and UAH) -One to three semester hours. Individual researchtowards completing the thesis requirement for theM.S. degree in Biology. Each Semester.BUSINESS EDUCATIONBED 501 Principles of Teaching BusinessSubjects - Three semester hours. Organization andpresentation of appropriate content in instructionalstrategies for business subjects in secondary schools.Internship experience in a school setting is required.BED 515 Management Information Systems -Three semester hours. An awareness of informationand systems in the society. Introduces the student toconcepts of system approaches to management andrelates the management information system tooperating systems of an organization.BED 521 Foundations of Business Education -Three semester hours. Principles, philosophy, andobjectives of business education and the relationshipof these factors to curriculum developments, testsand measurements, and guidance.BED 522 Functions of the Business/MarketingCoordinator - Three semester hours. An evaluationof the history, status, and philosophy ofadministration and supervision, and the role ofcoordination in business education at the state andlocal levels in high schools and colleges.BED 523 Current Problems in BusinessEducation - Three semester hours. A criticaloutlook on the administrative, curricular, evaluative,and instructional problems facing business educatorsat the high school and collegiate levels. Theproblems examined and evaluated in this course willbe discerned from current research and literature inthe field of business education.BED 524 Business and Office EducationPrograms - Three semester hours. Programplanning, organization, and implementation,curriculum construction, and evaluation in businessand office education.BED 526 Improvement of Instruction in GeneralBusiness Subjects - Three semester hours.Objectives, teaching procedures, instructionalmaterials, and curricular organization of basicbusiness courses.111


BED 527 Improvement of Instruction inInformation Processing - Three semester hours. Acourse designed for experienced and prospectiveteachers of information processing. The courseencompasses materials and methods basic toproficiency in information processing, availabilityof instructional materials, measurement of skills,standards, and achievement.BED 528 Improvement of Instruction in OfficeProcedures - Three semester hours. Materials,methods, and organization or instructional materialsused in the teaching of office procedures for today'soffice.BED 529 Improvement of Instruction inAccounting - Three semester hours. A criticalanalysis of the instructional materials and methods,standards, research, and evaluative instruments inaccounting. Emphasis is placed on computerizedaccounting.BED 595 Internship – Six semester hours. Thiscourse entails one semester of full-time teachingunder the immediate direction of supervisingteachers in off-campus public (or approved private)schools. Upon return to campus students share theirexperiences, discuss problems, and develop newtechniques in a professional seminar.BED 601 Curriculum Construction in BusinessEducation - Three semester hours. Advancedconcepts and criteria to be considered in curriculumconstruction, the method of conducting a curriculumstudy, and the ongoing process of evaluating thecurriculum in business education.BED 603 Coordination of Business Education -Three semester hours. Designed to provide a studyof problems, materials, methods, history, andcurrent theory and philosophy related to thecoordination of business education programs.BED 604 Advance Applications in InformationProcessing - Three semester hours. This course isdesigned to develop advanced techniques ininformation technology pertaining to creating anddesigning distance learning courses and interactiveweb activities.BED 606 Research Topics and Methods inBusiness/ Marketing Education – Three semesterhours. This course deals with review, analysis, andapplication of research procedures and data analysisin business education. In addition, this courseorients students to basic research procedures forresearch projects. Students will analyze researchproblems, synthesize research studies, and develop aproposal for a research study in their field ofexpertise in business education.CHEMISTRYCHE 508 Chemistry in the Secondary School -Three semester hours. Current methodology,research problems, and findings in chemistry asapplicable to the secondary school. The student willbecome familiar with supplementary materials suchas American Chemical Society publications (e.g.Chem. Comm., SPICE) as well as use of the Journalof Chemical Education for obtaining usefulinstructional materials.CHE 509 Laboratory Methods for ChemistryTeachers - Three semester hours. Emphasis isplaced on safety in the laboratory and the design andimplementation of chemical experiments for thesecondary school laboratory with limited facilities,as well as for the traditional high school chemistrylaboratory.CHE 510 Current Development in Chemistry -Three semester hours. New developments selectedfrom significant advances in chemistry arepresented. Course content will vary from year toyear with growth and development of the science.CHE 511 History of Chemical Theory - Threesemester hours. History of chemistry from itsancient beginnings up to contemporaryexperimenters and philosophies. Evidence forselected theories is critically presented. Topics suchas the periods of chemistry, the discovery of theelements, the role of chance in discoveries andhistorical aspects of fundamental laws are treated.CHE 512 Energy From Chemistry - Threesemester hours. Energy production from fossil fuelas well as nuclear energy and fuel cell technology.Other topics will include alternate energy sources,such as oil shale, battery research for electricvehicles, and other energy-producing facets ofchemistry.CHE 514 Analytical Chemistry For Teachers -Three semester hours. This course is designed forsecondary school teachers who have not had aformal course in analytical chemistry. Emphasis willbe placed on the basic fundamentals of analyticalchemistry to include wet and dry methods as well asmodern instrumental techniques.112


CHE 515 Laboratory Design for ElementaryTeachers - Three semester hours. This course isbased on the use of the LESSON (LawrenceLivermore Laboratory Elementary Science Study ofNature) program. This program involves the use ofspecific inexpensive kit materials to allowexperimentation with scientific principles on theelementary school level.CHE 612 Theory of Nuclear and RadiochemicalTechniques - Three semester hours. Introduction tothe theory of nuclear and radiochemistry withpractical experience with selected exercises, whichillustrate fundamental properties of radio nuclides.Topics will include: atomic and nuclear structure,radioactive decay, interaction of radiation withmatter and methods for detection of radiation.CHE 613L Nuclear and RadiochemicalTechniques Laboratory - One semester hour.Laboratory to accompany CHE 612. Radiationsafety orientation, measurement of half-life, pulseheight analyzers, and liquid scintillation countingtechniques will be presentedCIVIL ENGINEERINGCE 501 Structural Steel Design– Three semesterhours. Same as CE 401*. Introduction to the designof steel structures to include behavior of membersand their connections. Theoretical and practicalbasis for proportioning members are addressed.Prerequisite: undergraduate course in structuralanalysisCE 502 Reinforced Concrete Design– Threesemester hours. Same as CE 402*. A study of thetheory and design of reinforced concrete members.Design considerations for concrete bridges andbuildings are included. Prerequisite: undergraduatecourse in structural analysisCE 504 Hydraulic Engineering and Design -Three semester hours. Same as CE 404*. A study ofthe similitude, and flow measurement; open channelflow, pipe flow and their applications; and design ofvarious elements of hydraulic structures.Prerequisites: undergraduate course in fluidmechanicsCE 506 Computer Analysis of Structures - Threesemester hours. Same as CE 406. Focus onflexibility and stiffness methods of analysis.Development of matrix methods for both trusses andrigid frames and use of the computer in structuralanalysis, including finite element method areincluded. Prerequisites: undergraduate course instructures; good knowledge of computerprogrammingCE 508 Foundation Design - Three semester hours.Same as CE 408*. The study of shallow and deepfoundation elements, determination of bearingcapacity of spread footings, mat and pilefoundations. This course also includes instruction ondrilled caissons and piers as well as lateral earthpressure and the design of retaining structures.Prerequisite: undergraduate course or experience insoil mechanicsCE 509 Public Health Engineering - Threesemester hours. Same as CE 409. A study of theengineering aspects involved in the control of theenvironment for the protection of health and thepromotion of the comfort of man. Discussion willinclude communicable disease control, air pollution,refuse disposal, industrial hygiene, and radiologicalhealth hazards. Prerequisite: undergraduate courseor experience in environment analysisCE 510 Transportation Engineering and Design -Three semester hours. Same as CE 410*. A study ofengineering and design basics for highwaytransportation; elements of highway transportationand their characteristics; drivers; vehicles, volume,density, speed, and travel time; design for safety,service, and economy; highway alignment, crosssection and geometric design elements.Prerequisite: undergraduate course or experience intransportation systemsCE 511 Urban Transportation Planning - Threesemester hours. Same as CE 411. A study offunctions and elements of urban transportationincluding modeling trip generation, trip attraction,modal split and network assignment; integratedmodels, and computer applications. Prerequisites:undergraduate course or experience in transportationsystemsCE 512 Pavement Systems - Three semester hours.Same as CE 412. A study of the design of highwayand airport pavement systems; subgrades, sub-basesand bases; flexible and rigid pavements; drainageand earthwork; pavement evaluation andmaintenance. Prerequisites: undergraduate courseor experience in transportation systems113


CE 513 Construction Management - Threesemester hours. Same as CE 413 An introduction toconstruction project planning and scheduling bynetwork diagrams. Estimating and project controlfundamentals. Various equipment and productivityare included. Prerequisite: undergraduate studies orexperience in constructionCE 514 Design of Timber Structures - Threesemester hours. Same as CE 414. A study of woodas an engineering design material. Beams, columns,plywood design, and glued laminated structuralmembers as used in actual design and constructionare covered. Prerequisite: undergraduate course instructural analysisCE 550 Hydraulics of Open Channel Flow -Three semester hours. Same as CE 450. A study ofthe mechanics of fluid flow in open channels, as anextension of basic engineering hydraulics andexperimental concepts applied to the theory, design,and shape optimization of open channels.Classification of flow, channel cross section,hydraulic jump, stilling basins, specific energy,culvert hydraulics, and the use of design charts andtables are included. Prerequisite: undergraduatecourse in hydrogeologyCE 555 Wastewater Treatment - Three semesterhours. Same as CE 455. An introduction towastewater characteristics and treatment processes;biological mechanism, reactors, waste treatment,and kinetics. The engineering design of physicalprocesses such as sedimentation, thickening, andfiltration, as well as chemical processes, processingof sludge and advanced wastewater treatmentprocesses are included. A field trip to wastewatertreatment plant is required. Prerequisites:undergraduate course in hydrogeologyCE 556 Solid Waste Disposal - Three semesterhours. Same as CE 456. An introduction to theproblem of solid waste management, types andquantities of wastes, collection and transportation ofwastes, composting, landfill and incineration, andrecycling of wastes and resource recovery.Prerequisite: undergraduate course or experience inenvironmental analysisCE 557 Hazardous Waste Management - Threesemester hours. Same as CE 457. An introduction tothe transportation, storage, and disposal ofhazardous wastes. Legal aspects of hazardousmaterials, cleanup of hazardous material spills, andthe impact of hazardous materials on theenvironment are all covered. Prerequisite:undergraduate course or experience inenvironmental analysisCOMPUTER SCIENCECMP 511 Design and Analysis of Algorithms -Three semester hours. Introduces and illustratesbasic techniques for designing efficient algorithmsand analyzing algorithm complexity. Topics will bechosen from graph algorithms, sorting andsearching, NP-complete problems, pattern matching,parallel algorithms, and dynamic programming.(Prerequisite: CMP 215)CMP 521 Object Oriented Programming andDesign - Three semester hours. Object modeling,dynamic modeling, functional modeling, analysis,system design, and object design methodologies.Introduction to various object-oriented designmethodologies, including the Unified ModelingLanguage. (Prerequisites: CMP 215, CMP 440)CMP 531 Computer Architecture - Threesemester hours. Introduces computer architectureand system organization including virtual memorysupports, cache, pipeline, vector processing,multiprocessor, and RISC architecture. Study andcompare typical architectures to the extent that timepermits. (Prerequisites: CMP 380)CMP 541 Operating System Principles - Threesemester hours. Examines process synchronization,I/O techniques, buffering, file systems, processorscheduling, deadlocks, memory management, virtualmemory, job scheduling, resource allocation, systemmodeling, operating system security, performancemeasurement and evaluation.(Prerequisites: CMP 215, CMP 380)CMP 551 Database Management Systems - Threesemester hours. Provides a conceptualunderstanding of database management systems interms of the hierarchical, network, and relationalmodels. Data modeling, database design andadministration. Includes a review of file structuresand a discussion of database implementationtechniques. (Prerequisite: CMP 103)CMP 561 Software Engineering Methodology -Three semester hours. Explores the traditionalapproach to software construction, software crisis,and software characteristics. Covers varioussoftware engineering paradigms, and thefundamental concepts of analysis, design, coding,114


testing and maintenance. Introduces various CASEtools. (Prerequisite: CMP 215)Elective Courses:CMP 513 Management Information Systems -Three semester hours. Analysis of informationrequirements, Design approaches, processingmethods, data management, and the role ofcomputers in management information systems.Topics include models of an integrated system, andorganization and social implications of informationtechnology. (Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor)CMP 515 Numerical Analysis - Three semesterhours. Presents mathematical approach andcomputer solution to a wide variety of numericalproblems. Topics include interpolation andapproximation of data, solution of differentialequations, summation series, numerical integration,solution of linear and non-linear systems ofequations, and study of errors. (Prerequisite: CMP109 or CMP 204)CMP 517 Applications of Statistical Methods -Three semester hours. Treats data, probabilitydistributions, sampling techniques, normaldistribution, hypothesis testing, linear and multipleregression, correlation, analysis of variance, timeseries, index numbers, and parametric tests.(Prerequisite: MTH 237)CMP 523 Compiler Design - Three semester hours.Basic mathematical theory underlying the design ofcompilers and other language processors andprovides instruction on how to use that theory inpractical design situations. Topics include: lexicalanalysis, parsing, syntax-directed translation, codeoptimization, and code generation. (Prerequisite:CMP 215)CMP 525 Advanced Data Structures - Threesemester hours. Development of the efficient datastructures used to produce more efficient solutionsto classical problems, such as those based on thegraph theoretical model, as well as to problems thatarise in application areas of contemporary interest.(Prerequisite: CMP 215)CMP 535 Introduction to Bioinformatics - Foursemester hours. An interdisciplinary course meldinginformation from computer/information sciencesand molecular biology. Retrieval and interpretationof biomedical information, algorithms and softwareuse for sequence alignment, similarity searching ofmacromolecular sequence databases, and exposureto Java or Perl. (Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor)CMP 543 Computer Communications - Threesemester hours. Analysis of computer networkarchitecture including topologies, media, switching,routing, congestion, control, protocols, and specificcase problems. Addresses hardware interfaces andcarriers, network security, and performanceevaluation. (Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor)CMP 550 Artificial Intelligence - Three semesterhours. Formal concepts of artificial intelligence.Heuristic versus algorithmic methods, cognitiveprocesses and simulation, artificial applicationprogramming techniques, and surveying the areas ofgame playing, vision, learning and natural languageunderstanding. Students are provided direction forresearch using Internet and open literature resources.(Prerequisites: CMP 103, CMP 109 or CMP 204)CMP 554 Neural Networks - Three semesterhours. Introduction to natural networks, supervisedand unsupervised learning, neural networkarchitectures, training algorithms, black boardarchitecture, and other general concepts.(Prerequisite: CMP 109 or CMP204)CMP 555 Advanced Database Systems - Threesemester hours. Advanced database systems,including the areas of distributed and objectorienteddatabase design, resource allocation, accessplan selection, security measures, transitionmanagement, and query optimization.(Prerequisites: CMP 488)CMP 562 Multimedia Systems and Applications -Three semester hours. Design and implementationof the technologies used to implement computerbasedmultimedia applications such as streamingvideo playback, video conferencing, interactivetelevision, video editing, and hypermedia authoring.It acquaints the student with disciplines associatedwith multimedia, such as presentation software, theWorld Wide Web, HTML code, presentation design,and production. Other subjects that may beaddressed as required for projects adopted forstudent productions: bitmap graphics, vectorgraphics, text design, digital photography, audio andsound design, and navigational element design.(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor)CMP 570 Computer Graphics and Animation -Three semester hours. Introduction to the basicconcepts of computer science. Topics include:display device characteristics, systemconsiderations, raster vs. vector technology, linepatterns, line drawing algorithms, image rendering,115


2-D and 3-D modeling, and symmetry groups.(Prerequisites: CMP 103, CMP 109 or CMP 204)CMP 577 Fuzzy and Expert Systems - Threesemester hours. Theoretical and applications offuzzy systems. Topics may include: fuzzy settheory, approximate theory, fuzzy control, decisionmaking under fuzzy environment, fuzzy operationsresearch.Prerequisite: CMP 103, CMP 109 or CMP 204)CMP 591 Cooperative Educational WorkExperience - Three semester hours. Providesstudents with applied, hands-on experience in anindustry (computer-related) environment. Thestudent should have the advisor's approval prior totaking this course and should submit a report anddefend before a departmental committee.Submission of a copy of the three-credit-hourequivalent certificate to the graduate office uponcompletion of the course is required. (Prerequisite:Completion of all the core courses.)CMP 593 Advanced Topics in Computer Science- Three semester hours. This course is based uponthe topic to be addressed and the consent ofinstructor. Topics will be those of mutual interest tofaculty and students and not currently available inthe graduate program. (Prerequisites: Graduatestanding and Consent of Instructor.)CMP 597 Independent Study - Three semesterhours. Provides opportunity for the students toparticipate in the ongoing research in thedepartment. The student will work in closeinteraction with the professor of mutual researchinterest. The student is required to present at leastone research paper at a reputable conference andshould be evaluated by a departmental committee ofthree members formed by the chairperson.(Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 12semester hours of graduate course work)CMP 599 Graduate Thesis - One, two , or threesemester hours. This course consists of individualresearch towards completing the thesis requirementfor M.S. degree in Computer Science.COMMUNICATIVE SCIENCES ANDDISORDERSCSD 500 Introduction to CommunicationDisorders - – Three semester hours. An overview ofthe various disorders and current research and trendsin the field of speech-language pathology andaudiology.CSD 504 Advanced Evaluation and AssessmentCommunicative Disorders– Three semester hours.Emphasizes skills in the areas of measurement andevaluation, specification of goals and objectives,selection and development of measurement tools,delineation and execution of strategies for obtaining,analyzing, and interpreting test results for thespeech-language pathologist.CSD 509 Habilitation and Rehabilitation of theHearing Impaired– Three semester hours. Providesan overview of speech-language developmentcharacteristics of the hearing impaired child.Alternate communications will be explored.CSD 510 Stuttering and Other Disorders ofSpeech Flow– Three semester hours. Provides theinformation necessary to define and describe normaldysfluency, cluttering, and organic dysprosody andto distinguish them from stuttering.CSD 513 Language Disorders in Adults – Threesemester hours. Designed to give studentsknowledge and skills in language dysfunction, suchas in the assessment and treatment of dysphasia, theevaluation and management of dysarthria; rationaleand methodology associated with group andindividual counseling procedures andcommunication problems of the aged.CSD 514 Audiology– Three semester hours.Designed to give the student knowledge and skills inthe complete auditory assessment of the peripheralmechanism, causes and characteristics of disordersof hearing, and types of remediation available.CSD 515 Language Development –Communicative Disorders – Three semester hours.The study of normal language development withspecial emphasis on development of phonological,syntactic, and semantic systems in children.CSD 516 Advanced Clinical Practicum– Threesemester hours. Provides the student with clinicalpractice and experience under the direct supervisionof faculty or supervisors who hold the CCC from theAmerican Speech-Language-and-HearingAssociation (ASHA).116


CSD 520 Language Disorders in Children– Threesemester hours. Exploration of the nature oflanguage disorders and their effects on the totalchild.\CSD 522 Voice Disorders - 3 hours. Designed topromote understanding of the etiology, diagnosis,and intervention strategies/treatment of voicedisorders.CSD 525 Case Management in Speech-LanguagePathology– Three semester hours. This course isdesigned as an extension of a student’s experience atthe graduate level into the speech clinic and/or realworld job site. Students refine listening skills,counseling and psychotherapy techniques andexamine the role of the SLP in assisting clientsthrough grieving processes. Application techniquesare taught to assist in programming for a variety ofcommunication problems. Behavior therapy tomodify speech behaviors of individuals withcommunication problems will be discussed.CSD 534 Articulation and DevelopmentalPhonological Disorders– Three semester hours.Provides the student with theoretical and practicalknowledge in the nature and etiology of articulationand developmental phonological disorders, as wellas current assessment instruments and interventionstrategies.CSD 538 Neuroanatomy– Three semester hours.Provides an overview of neuroanatomical structure,identification of the parts of the central nervoussystem, an understanding of brain circulation,composition of neurotissue, and anatomy andphysiology of the spinal cord and nerves.CSD 539 Craniofacial Anomalies– Three semesterhours. The purpose of this course is to provide thestudent with an understanding of problems in speechand voice production which are associated withabnormalities of the oro-facial development; upperrespiratory functions; their relation to speech andvoice production; identification of abnormalfunction and its effect on speech pathologyassessment and treatment. Observation of aqualified clinician in diagnosis and remediation willbe required.CSD 544 Motor Speech Disorders– Threesemester hours. An advanced study of the symptomsand treatments associated with motor speechdisorders. This course is designed to provide thestudent with a background in basic neuroanatomyand functional neurology so that the student will beable to utilize most effectively the therapeuticapproaches that have been developed to provideappropriate intervention for individuals that haveexperienced neurologically related disorders. Thiscourse will also focus on the treatment and scope ofpractice associated with these disorders.CSD 545 Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders–Three semester hours. An advanced study of thesymptoms and treatments associated with Dysphagia(swallowing disorders). This course is designed toprovide the student with a background in basicneuroanatomy and functional neurology so that theywill be able to utilize most effectively thetherapeutic approaches that have been developed toprovide appropriate intervention for individuals thathave experienced neurologically related disorders.This course will also focus on the treatment andscope or practice associated with swallowingdisorders in children and adults. This course willinclude a survey of the research literature, currentmanagement trends and professional and health careindustry standards utilized in the rehabilitation ofpatients within the medical setting.CSD 550 Seminar in CSD - – Three semesterhours. This course involves the discussion of currenttrends and topics in the field of communicativesciences and disorders. Topics will include, but arenot limited to pharmacology, genetics,developmental coordination disorder (DCD), brainbasedlearning, and nonverbal learning disabilities(NLDs).CSD 598 Research Methodology inCommunication Disorders– Three semester hours.Designed to provide an introduction to theconceptual framework of research, and researchdesigns. The primary objective is an understandingof research methods to facilitate interpretation,evaluation, and application of research information.EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATIONECH 502 Workshop in Early ChildhoodEducation – Three semester hours. This course isdesigned to allow graduate candidates theopportunity to study or work on topics or projects ofcollective concern. Topics vary.ECE 503 Learning Styles – Three semester hours.This course takes an in-depth look at the personaland behavioral characteristics of an individualwhich can be identified as learning styles.117


ECE 504 Problems in Improving Reading – Threesemester hours. Investigations of the practices andtrends in the teaching of reading materials ofinstruction in reading, particularly remedialmaterials; techniques and materials for prevention ofreading difficulties; and diagnosis and remediationof reading difficulties.ECE 505 Problems in Improving MathematicsSkills – Three semester hours. This course presentsmaterials, teaching, and teaching procedures for theimprovement of learning in the new mathematics.The study of current problems affecting children’sdevelopment of number concepts and skills will beaddressed.ECE 507 Children’s Literature – Three semesterhours. Consideration will be given to locating andevaluating children’s books and to the method oforganizing, teaching, and evaluating a literatureprogram for children. The philosophy of theselection and study of literature, emphasizingappropriate content, good style, and suitability ofvarious age groups are examined. Extensive readingand sharing of children’s literature are required.ECE 509 Trends and Issues in Social Studies –Three semester hours. A detailed consideration ofproblems concerned with selection of what to teach;the grade placement of content, methods, andmaterials of teaching; and means of evaluatingachievements in social studies with particularattention given to recent trends.ECE 510 Improving Science Teaching – Threesemester hours. In this course, investigations andevaluations will be made of instructional methodsdesigned to challenge pupils at each level of theirelementary science and health program. The coursewill include such topics as the earth and universe,living things, matter and energy, magnetism andelectricity, nutrition, hygiene, and other personalhealth components.ECE 512 Investigation of Language Arts – Threesemester hours. The course is a study of the totallanguage arts program. Emphasis is onunderstanding the language processes, literacydevelopment, and the interrelatedness ofcommunication competencies—listening, speaking,reading/writing current research, goals, trends,issues, instructional strategies, programs, materials,and assessment/evaluation techniques are examined.Class sessions are designed to be interactive withclass members giving demonstrations that involvefellow classmates in hands-on participation andactive discussion.ECE 514 Basic Skills – Three semester hours. Thiscourse is a critical evaluation of recentdevelopments in the teaching of basic skills in theelementary school.ECE 518 Environmental Education Across theCurriculum – Three semester hours. This course isdesigned to assist educators in improving theirteaching of kindergarten through eighth gradelevels, specifically as it relates to environmentaleducation. Goals, objectives and teaching strategiesassociated with environmental education will bereviewed in keeping with the characteristic needs oflearners at specific age levels. Emphasis will beplaced on the interrelatedness of environmentaleducation with traditional curriculum content areas,especially science. Participants also will explorepractical applications of environmental educationphilosophies. The course incorporates “hands-on”habitat studies, inquiry-based learning, nationallyacclaimed environmental education programs and aresidential component stressing cooperativelearning.ECE 520 Foundations of Teaching Reading –Three semester hours. A fundamental coursedesigned to establish a foundation of the essentialreading skills that can be used effectively by preserviceteachers. This course focuses on teachingreading to a diverse population of elementarystudents using a variety of approaches.ECE 521 Research in Elementary/EarlyChildhood Education – Three semester hours.This course is concerned with Reviewing theLiterature around a topic of interest of the candidate,according to the latest APA Manual. This coursemakes it possible for a candidate to pursue an areaof special interest and develop an understanding ofhow to study a topic in-depth. This research is doneunder the supervision of the instructor, and mayculminate with an examination based on the contentof the research.ECE 602 Theoretical Foundations of EarlyChildhood Education – Three semester hours.This course traces the story of elementary and earlychildhood education. Candidates evaluate thetheoretical basis for P-6 programs through research,readings, and class discussions.ECE 603 Field Research – Three semester hours.This course is designed for Educational Specialistdegree candidates in early childhood or elementaryeducation for the purpose of developing research118


skills. Projects will involve models that draw uponteachers’ own questions, knowledge, and concernsas a basis for exploration and action. Candidateswill develop an understanding of research that isdesigned to both inform and support teachers’engagement in classroom issues. Candidates willidentify an area of interest and move fromconception of a field-based research topic to ananalytic framework for analyzing data. Allcandidates will submit a substantial written researchreport that includes a thorough review of thescientific literature. Presentation of an informal oralreport is required. Permission of the Chair of theReading Program is required for candidates toreceive credit for reading/literacy research.ECE 612 Advanced Instructional Strategies forYoung Children – Three semester hours. Thiscourse presents and explores a scientific approach toclassroom instruction. It is designed to foster thedevelopment of a personal philosophy of teachingwhich will serve as a guide for action in all phasesof traditional and innovative instruction and willinvolve strategies for analysis of teaching,individualized instruction, and mode of evaluationof learning.ECE 625 Trends in Teaching Social Studies inElementary Schools – Three semester hours. Thiscourse is concerned with a detailed consideration ofproblems concerned with selection of what to teach,the grade placement of content, methods, andmaterials of teaching, current research, and means ofevaluating achievements in social studies withparticular attention given to recent trends.ECE 671 Advanced Research in Elementary andEarly Childhood – Three semester hours. Thiscourse is concerned with guiding the candidate inthe development of the first three chapters in thethesis, according to the latest APA Manual. Thiscourse makes it possible for a candidate to pursue anarea of special interest and develop the foundationof a thesis completing the first three chapters (athesis is directed by a major advisor who maychoose not to use the three chapters developed inthis course in the completion of the candidate’sactual thesis). This study is done under thesupervision of the instructor, and may culminatewith an examination based on the content.EARLY CHILDHOODECH 506 Curriculum Design – Three semesterhours. Curriculum design in light of the latestunderstandings and needs in early childhoodeducation with some experience in theimplementation of certain aspects of the curriculumin laboratory school P-3.ECH 516 Multi-Sensory Approaches – Threesemester hours. The development of the sensoryavenues and the concomitant processes in infancyand childhood, including concept information,development of these processes, and evaluatingprocess are given consideration. Practicalexperiences identifying learning disabilities.ECH 517 Theory, Methods and Materials inEarly Childhood Education – Three semesterhours. The philosophies and methods extant in earlychildhood education, their purposes and efficacy,including a look at special education and itsinvolvement in the mainstream of education. It willinclude laboratory observation and participation.ECH 595 Internship in Early ChildhoodEducation – Six semester hours. This course is anintensive 14-week, full-time supervised internship ina public school. Weekly on-campus seminars are arequired part of the course.ECH 602 Strategies of Parent Involvement –Three semester hours. The importance and optimalrole of parent involvement factors in the being andbecoming of the child and adolescent through thevarious stages of the metamorphosis to maturity andbeyond. The method will be competency-based andpermit selection of a particular stage in the role ofparent involvement for concentration at any givenage and stage of human development by each of theclass members, while at the same time pursuing acomprehensive knowledge of the role of parenting atall stages, with an emphasis on optimal strategies forinvolvement. The student will be required todemonstrate the ability to prescribe strategies forparent involvement at each stage of thechild/adolescent development.ECH 698 Thesis I – Three semester hours.Candidates will complete the proposed thesis.ECH 699 Thesis II – Three semester hours.Candidates will complete the thesis.ECH 602 Strategies of Parent Involvement –Three semester hours. The importance and optimalrole of parent involvement factors in the being andbecoming of the child and adolescent through thevarious stages to the maturity and beyond. Thecourse will focus on parent involvement for119


concentration at any given age and stage of humanof the metamorphosis to maturity and beyond. Themethod will be competency-based and permitselection of a particular stage in the role of parentinvolvement for concentration at any given age andstage of human development by each of the classmembers, while at the same time pursuing acomprehensive knowledge of the role of parenting atall stages, with an emphasis on optimal strategies forinvolvement. The student will be required todemonstrate the ability to prescribe strategies forparent involvement at each stage of thechild/adolescent development.In addition to other deficiencies, candidates seekingthe Alternative Master’s in Early ChildhoodEducation (P-3) must complete the followingundergraduate teaching field courses: ECE 304,ECE 305, ECH 300, ECH 405 and PSY 403. Astate-required practicum is offered all day onWednesday when enrolled in undergraduatematerials and methods courses ECE 304 and ECE305 (Note: School of Education Policy prohibits thetransferring in of materials and methods coursestaken at other institutions). Early ChildhoodEducation Alternative Master’s candidates seekingthe additional endorsement in ElementaryEducation must complete the following graduatecourses: ELE 509 and ELE 519.ECONOMICSECO 500 Survey of Economic Analysis - Threesemester hours. This course is designed for studentswith limited or no background in economic theory atthe undergraduate level.ECO 503 Macroeconomic Theory - Threesemester hours. Examination of the modern theoryof income, employment, and the price level alongwith their principal determinants, interaction of theproduct and money markets and changes in the levelof economic activity over time. (Prerequisite: ECO500 or its equivalent).ECO 509 International Economics - Threesemester hours. An analysis of the forces thatdetermine international specialization; balance ofpayments analysis; exchange rates systems; andevaluation of current international economic policiesand programs.ECO 514 Managerial Economics - Three semesterhours. Managerial economics is designed to providethe student with a working knowledge of economictheories of consumer and producer behavior andtheir application to the decision-making process offirms in allocating their resources. Among the topicsincluded are: the firm as an economic entity,consumer choice, demand, decision making underuncertainty, production, cost theory, pricing theory,and the effects of different competitiveenvironments (with emphasis on market structureanalysis). (Prerequisite: ECO 500 or anundergraduate two-course sequence in principles ofeconomics).EDUCATION ADMINISTRATIONAND SUPERVISIONEAS 631 School Organization in PersonnelDevelopment – Three semester hours. Thetechniques and procedures for effective staffdevelopment are studied. Included are proceduresfor developing, implementing, monitoring andevaluating a program of staff developmentconsistent with school and system needs. Thedynamics of effective school and communityrelations are explored, considering communitydiversity and the socio-emotional politicalinfluences on school operations.EAS 632 Federal, State, Local Legislation andPolicy Development – Three semesterhours. Federal and state statutes are studied relatedto the rights of students and employees. State boardand local policies are reviewed in light of statutoryand judicial mandates pertaining to studentclassifications, employment, and contractual rightsof teachers and other staff. All major federallegislation, state statutes and policies, and relevantcourt decisions will be used to critique local schoolpolicies and operations.EAS 633 Management of Educational SupportServices – Three semester hours. All managementoperations of the school are explored. Attention isgiven to personnel matters, line and staff operatingrelationships, managing material resources, facilityoperations, transportation, fiscal management,conflict resolution, student records, security, andscheduling for instruction.EAS 634 Cultural and OrganizationalLeadership for Operations – Three semesterhours. Effective procedures for administeringstudent services and leadership skills will beexplored. Included will be means of monitoringstudent attendance, health and nutrition needs, plans120


or monitoring discipline, providing guidance andcounseling services, and providing library services.Also, leadership styles, planning strategies,accountability considerations, and accreditationstandards are studied.EAS 635 Mentoring for Educational Leaders –Three semester hours. On-site experiences will beprovided at each school level and the Central Officesupervised by University faculty and localpracticing administrators. These experiences aredesigned to assist students in the skills and abilitiesneeded by the effective administrator. A minimumof 300 clock hours is required.EAS 698 Thesis – One to six semester hours. Opento Ed.S. degree-level students only, based on theirreading in that area. The study is done under thesupervision of the student’s advisor, withdepartmental approval. It culminates with an oraldefense based on content of the research paper.EAS 699 Thesis – One to six semester hours. Opento Ed.S. degree-level students only, based on theirreading in that area. The study is done under thesupervision of the student’s advisor, withdepartmental approval. It culminates with an oraldefense based on content of the research paper.EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIPEDL 530 Data Driven Instruction – three semesterhours. This course isdesigned for and restricted to graduate studentsseeking a master’s degree in EducationalAdministration and Supervision and/or SecondaryEducation. The content of the courseis drawn from current research data. The student hasan opportunity to identify andanalyze areas of interest, study issues, trends,problems, procedures, implications, andinnovative programs identified in research data.EDL 543 Legal and Ethical Aspects of SchoolOperations – Three semester hours. Designed toprovide (a) interpretationand understanding of the state and federal laws thataffect individual schools and schooldistricts and (b) competency in fulfilling andadministering provisions of school laws forthe State of Alabama.EDL 547 Education Finance – Three semesterhours. A study of the relationship of finance andbusiness management to the quality of education,with emphasis placed on theories and principles ofschool support, including responsibility of federal,state, and local agencies, state foundation programs;preparation and administration of salary schedules,budgeting, and business administration includingpurchasing, accounting, insurance, and bonding.EDL 563 Curriculum Development,Improvement and Assessment – Three semesterhours. This course will emphasize planning,implementing, managing, and evaluation ofthe school’s curriculum and instructional programs.EDL 564 School Community Relations – Threesemesterhours. A critical study of the social context ofschool organization and development.Attention is given to the development of theschool’s staff, including the planning,operation, and evaluation of the developmentprograms. Public relations, and theinfluences of the community are considered.EDL 566 Management of School Operations –Three semester hours. This course includes all themanagerial problems, duties, and responsibilities ofthe school administrator, including personnel,facilities, fiscal management, transportation, foodservice, athletic operations, and scheduling.EDL 567 Instructional Leadership – Threesemester hours. The duties, responsibilities, andproblems of the educational leader are studied. Themethods for effective leadership are included, aswell as techniques for implementation, operation,and evaluation. The planning, operation, andevaluation of student services are included.EDL 595-01 Internship in EducationalLeadership – Three semester hours. This is a fieldlaboratory, supervised experience in whichadvanced graduate students will be involved inactual working situations to gain experience in thestructural organization, administrative orsupervisory behavior and practices, and relatedproblems. The internship will include experiences atthe elementary, middle, and high school levels andalso at the Central Office.EDL 595-02 Internship in Education LeadershipEDL 596 Residency/ Internship in InstructionalLeadership121


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERTECHNOLOGYEET 501 Computer Telephony Integration –Three semester hours. Introduction to moderntelecommunication and networking technologies.Including data traffic, queuing models, multi-accesschannels, switching and routing. Covers X.25,ISDN, Frame Relay, Asynchronous transfer mode,SONET, and wireless networks.EET 505 Computer Telephony Integration –Three semester hours. Introduces Enterprisecomputer telephony integration (ECTI) applicationsand advanced intelligent network (AIN) services.Covers examples of advanced carrier deliveredservices including; Virtual call centers, applicationsfor effective customer interactions, productivityapplications for Centrex users, blending of formaland informal call centers, and extending theresource pool of call centers to professionalsworking at home. Also provides an introduction toNetwork Computer-Telephony Integration (NCTI).Prerequisite: EET 501.EET 516 Automatic Control Systems I – Threesemester hours. Methods and principles of automaticcontrol. Pneumatic, hydraulic, and electricalsystems. Representative applications of automaticcontrol systems. Modeling and simulation ofmechanical systems. Development of equation ofmotion and dynamic response characteristics.Fundamentals of classical control applications,including mathematical analysis and design ofclosed loop control systems. Introduction tocomputer interfacing for data acquisition andcontrol.EET 517 Automatic Control Systems II – Threesemester hours. A continuation of EET 516Automatic Controls I. This course studies theapplication of modern control design methodsincluding optimal control, stochastic control anddigital control. Includes Electrical and Mechanicaldesign projects with electrical motors, hydraulicsand pneumatics. Prerequisite: EET 516.EET 518 Robotics – Three semester hours. Coverscomponents of a Robot System, types, electronicsystem components, analog-digital conversion anderror analysis. Also covers three-dimensionalkinematics, dynamics and control of robotmanipulators, hardware elements and sensors.Students will learn to analyze and design robotmanipulators. Students will work in teams todevelop a graphical simulation of a robotic systemusing a high-level language and graphics package.Prerequisite: graduate standing.EET 612 Special Problems - Three semester hours.Individualized research and investigation into areasnot covered in other classes.EET 699 Master’s Thesis (Same as INT 699) –Three semester hours. Required for a studentworking and receiving direction on a master’sthesis. A thesis student must enroll for 3 hours eachsemester, for a minimum of 6 hours, while workingand receiving direction on the master's thesis.Prerequisite: Completion of 15 semester hours.ELECTRICAL ENGINEERINGEE 502 Electrical Machines -Three semesterhours. Same as EE 402. A study of energyconversion; D.C. machines, motors, generators,principles of operation, characteristics, andapplications; transformers and induction machines,principles of operation, characteristics, andapplications; and synchronous machines, alternators,synchronous motors, principles of operation,characteristics, and applications. Prerequisite:undergraduate course in electromagnetic theoryEE 503 Feedback System Analysis and Design -Three semester hours. Same as EE 403*. A study ofopen and closed loop systems; time domainanalysis; transfer functions, poles, and zeros;frequency response, Bode plots; root locus methods;system stability, Routh-Hurwitz criterion, Nyquistcriterion; system compensation and design; statespace methods, state equations, state transitionmatrix, and system response. Prerequisite:undergraduate course in electrical signal analysisEE 504 Communication Theory -Three semesterhours. Same as EE 404*. A study of communicationsignals and systems; AM and FM methods; pulsecode modulation; multiplexing, and digitalcommunications. Prerequisite: undergraduate coursein electrical signal analysisEE 510 Microwave Engineering - Three semesterhours. Same as EE 410*. A review ofelectromagnetic theory, transmission lines andwaveguides, circuit theory for waveguide systems,impedance matching and transformation, passivemicrowave devices, electromagnetic resonators, andperiodic structures and filters. Prerequisite:undergraduate course in electromagnetic theory122


EE 520 Power Systems I - Three semester hours.Same as EE 420. Fundamental concepts of powersystem analysis, transmission line parameters, basicsystem models, steady state performance, networkcalculations, power flow solutions, symmetricalcomponents, fault studies, operating strategies andcontrol. Prerequisite: undergraduate course orexperience in energy conversionEE 521 Power Systems II - Three semester hours.Same as EE 421. Generating station characteristics,transmission line calculations, load studies andeconomic operations, and stability. Prerequisite: EE520 or extensive experience in power systemsEE 524 Advanced Digital Systems - Threesemester hours. Same as EE 424. A course designedto provide digital system design experience usingthe Verilog hardware description language (VerilogHDL). The history of descriptive hardware designand features of hardware description languages areexplained along with design and simulationexamples. With the use of the industry standardsimulation and synthesis tools, designs will beconstructed, synthesized, and configured in FieldProgrammable Gate Arrays (FPGA) or otherProgrammable Logic Devices. Prerequisite:undergraduate course or experience withmicroprocessorsEE 531 Advanced Semiconductor Engineering –Three semester hours. Same as EE 431*. Principlesof device electronics, physics of band models,Schottky barriers, bipolar and unipolar devices,conduction phenomena, SRH generationrecombinationstatistics, role of defects and noise.The course provides an introduction to widebandgapsemiconductors and devices. Prerequisite:undergraduate course or experience insemiconductor engineeringEE 541 Digital Signal Processing - Three semesterhours. Same as EE 441. A review of discrete timesignals and systems; sampling of continuous timesignals, sampling theorem; discrete time Fouriertransforms; Z-transforms; region of convergence;applications; discrete Fourier transforms; fastFourier transforms; design of digital filters, IIRfilters, FIR filters, and computer-aided design.Prerequisite: undergraduate course or experience insignal processingEE 545 Advanced Electromagnetic Theory -Three semester hours. Same as EE 445. Solution ofLaplace’s equation in two dimensions, circularharmonics, cylindrical harmonics, method of finitedifferences; wave propagation, perfect dielectrics,conductors, lossy dielectrics, transmission lineanalogy, Smith chart solutions; and computerapplications. Prerequisite: undergraduate course inelectromagnetic theoryEE 551 Integrated Circuit Fabrication - Threesemester hours. Same as EE 451*. Introduction toprinciples of monolithic IC fabrication includingbipolar and MOS transistor processing. The courseincludes active and passive device and processdesign, simulation, cleanroom procedures, inprocessand final test and evaluation techniques,yield, chip assembly and packaging. Prerequisite:undergraduate course or experience insemiconductor devicesEE 552 Semiconductor Instrumentation - Threesemester hours. Same as EE 452*. Basic principlesof semiconductor testing and evaluation. Varioustools and techniques will be introduced for test andevaluation of semiconductor materials, devices andintegrated circuits. Prerequisite: undergraduatecourse or experience in semiconductor devicesEE 555 Optimal Control Theory - Three semesterhours. Same as EE 455. A review of state spacemethods; optimal control problems, performancecriterion, minimum time problems, minimum energyproblems, and minimum fuel problems;optimization, using calculus of variations, Lagrange,Meyer, and Bolza problems, Lagrange equations,solution, applications; Pontryagin’s maximumprinciple, formulation, co-state variables, solution;dynamic programming, principle of optimality,discrete control processes; Hamilton-Jacobiapproach, closed loop control law, matrix Riccatiequation, applications; and stability in the sense ofLyapunov. Prerequisite: undergraduate course incontrol theoryEE 556 Nonlinear Control Systems - Threesemester hours. Same as EE 456. A study ofnonlinearities, classification, saturation, dead zone,hysteresis; phase plane formulation, phase portraits;description of function approach, limit cycles, andrelay servomechanisms. Prerequisite:undergraduate course in control theoryELEMENTARY EDUCATIONELE 509 Evaluation in Elementary Schools –Three semester hours. This course is designed todevelop candidates’ understanding of the principles123


and procedures of evaluation in elementaryclassroom settings. Both formal and informalmethods of evaluation will be emphasized, includingdesigning and constructing criterion-referencedtests, analyzing and interpreting results of normreferencedtests, as well as developing portfolios,rubrics, checklists, and other performanceassessments. National standards and the evaluationof personnel, programs, and curricula will beincluded in this course.ELE 511 Workshop in Elementary Schools –Three semester hours. This course is designed toallow graduate candidates the opportunity to studyor work on topics or projects of collective concern.Topics vary.ELE 519 Elementary School Curriculum – Threesemester hours. The course is designed to helpstudents develop or extend their knowledge baseregarding curricular and instructional concepts,designs, problems, and variables. Students willstudy the historical, psychological, philosophicaland social foundations of the elementary schoolcurriculum. The course will focus on characteristicsof children/learners, curriculum designs, strategiesfor learning, and content areas in the elementaryschool.ELE 595 Internship in Elementary Education –Six semester hours. This course is an intensive 14-week, full-time supervised internship in a publicschool. Weekly on-campus seminars are a requiredpart of the course.ELE 614 Teaching Strategies for the AffectiveDimension of Reading – Three semester hours.The content of the course is centered aroundteaching strategies that motivate children to seekself-actualization through pleasure and knowledgeacquired from reading. Techniques of bibliographyand children’s literature related to the affectivedomain are included.ELE 698 Thesis I – Three semester hours.Candidates will complete the proposed thesis.ELE 699 Thesis II – Three semester hours.Candidates will complete the thesis.ENGLISHENG 500 Writing for Graduate Students - Threesemester hours. This course meets during the regularsessions and during the summer session to helpstudents gain competency in writing. The coursecannot be used as credit toward a graduate degree.ENG 501 History of the English Language -Three semester hours. Growth of the EnglishLanguage from the Old English period to our time.Special attention is given to Old English and MiddleEnglish and those aspects most responsible for thepresent state of the English language.ENG 502 Linguistics and Literature - Threesemester hours. The close relationship betweenlinguistics and literature. Further, it shows how andunderstanding of one enhances the study of theother.ENG 503 Biography - Three semester hours. Astudy of either the history of biography or specifictrends, such as mythical patterns. Emphasis isplaced on critical analyses of examples.ENG 504 Criticism - Three semester hours. Astudy of literary criticism which may vary from asurvey of the history of literary criticism to criticismof a particular genre or period. Practical applicationof theory is stressed.ENG 505 The Novel - Three semester hours. Astudy of selected novels designed to stress historicaldevelopment of the genre, elements of the novel, ortrends of a particular period.ENG 506 The Essay - Three semester hours. Astudy of selected essays. The emphasis may varyfrom a historical study to a study of the categories,argumentation, description, exposition, andnarration.ENG 507 Drama - Three semester hours. A surveyof the historical development of drama orconcentration on the drama of a particular period.Includes critical analyses and reading plays asliterature and/or theatre.ENG 508 Shakespeare - Three semester hours. Astudy of at least eight plays with occasionalattention to the poems.ENG 509 Chaucer - Three semester hours. A studyof The Canterbury Tales and other major works.ENG 510 Milton - Three semester hours. A studyof Paradise Lost and other major works.ENG 511 Tennyson - Three semester hours. Astudy of In Memoriam and other major works.124


ENG 512 Sixteenth Century English Literature -Three semester hours. A study of thewriters in prose and poetry (exclusive of drama)with major concern given to the theory and practiceof lyric and epic poetry, romance, epyllion, and theverse essay.ENG 513 Eighteenth Century English LiteratureThree semester hours. A survey of the major worksof Pope, Swift, Johnson, Boswell, Goldsmith, andBurns. Writers of intellectual prose, includingHume, Gibbon, and Burke, are also studied.ENG 514 Twentieth Century AmericanLiterature - Three semester hours. A survey ofmajor figures and movements from Frost to thepresent. The emphasis varies from poetry to fictionto drama each time the course is offered.ENG 515 Bibliography - Three semester hours. Astudy of bibliographical practices with reference toliterary history, research, and criticism. This coursemust be taken by students who wish to write a thesisunder the direction of a member of the EnglishFaculty. It must be completed before the studentbegins research for a thesis. Students who wish tosubstitute this course for EDU 503 should petitionthe Dean of Graduate Studies.ENG 516 Poetry - Three semester hours. Elementsof poetry and intellectual developments as reflectedin poetry. This course may be approached as asurvey of poetic development or may concentrate ona particular period.ENG 517 Seventeenth Century EnglishLiterature - Three semester hours. Includes astudy of essayists, poets, and dramatists fromFrancis Bacon through John Dryden, withmajor emphasis on the currents of thought thatinfluenced the literature.ENG 601 American Literature Before 1900 -Three semester hours. A critical, historical andappreciative study of the English RomanticMovement. Attention is given to Blake,Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley,Mary Godwin, Mary Shelley, Dorothy Wordsworth,Hazlitt, Lamb and DeQuincy.ENG 602 Romantic Movement - Three semesterhours. A survey of American literaturefrom its beginning through the nineteenth century,concluding with Stephen Crane.ENG 603 Composition Theory and Rhetoric -Three semester hours. This course emphasizes thestudy of rhetoric and composition as a means offostering the development of writing abilities.Theoretical insights and practical approaches in theacquisition of composition skills will be explored.Special attention will be given to the relevant andcurrent pedagogy that will help to provide practicalapproaches in the teaching of composition.ENG 604 Shakespearean Tragedy - Threesemester hours. A study of one or more earlytragedies and five tragedies of 1602-1608, withattention to the most important critical and scholarlyapproaches.FOOD SCIENCEFAS 503 Food Microbiology - Four semesterhours. Theoretical and practical studies on the roleof microorganisms in foods pertaining to processing,preservation, spoilage and Pathogenicity.Quantitative and qualitative microbial evaluationprocedures applicable to food industry and science.Term paper and presentation of current topics in thesubject area are required. (Prerequisite: BIO 330 andBIO 330L) Fall.FAS 504 Animal Hygiene and Parasitology - Foursemester hours. This course has a comprehensivebackground in the housing and management of farmanimals, including parasitic diseases in farmanimals. The laboratory is intended to give practicaltraining in the identification of parasites.(Prerequisite: BIO 103, BIO 103L) Spring.FAS 505 Meat Science and Technology - Threesemester hours. Histological and physiologicalaspects of skeletal muscle affecting meat quality.Principles of processing and preservation of meatand meat products. Methods of studying andevaluating meat characteristics and composition.Selection, identification and utilization of wholesaleand retail cut of meat. Term paper and presentationof current topics in the subject area are required.Even Fall.FAS 507 Food Chemistry - Four semester hours.Provides a broad overview of the chemistry of foodconstituents and their contribution to functional,flavor and textural characteristics as well aschemical and physical changes in food componentsduring processing and storage. (Prerequisites: CHE301, CHE 301L or Consent of Instructor) all.125


FAS 508 Food Analysis - Four semester hours.Methods of analysis of foods and the application ofthese methods in the food industry. Analyticalprocedures using current equipment for thedetection and quantification of nutrients, antinutrientsand other components will also bediscussed. (Prerequisite: FAS 507 or Consent ofInstructor) Spring.FAS 521 Poultry Products Technology - Threesemester hours. Factors affecting poultry productsquality, their identification, control andmaintenance. Information on procurement,processing, packaging and distribution of poultryproducts will be disseminated. A term paper andpresentations of current topics in the subject area arerequired. Odd Fall.FAS 528 Physiology of Reproduction - Foursemester hours. A study of early fetal growth,differentiation and development of the gonads,secondary sex organs and the gametes. Comparativeanatomy and physiology of the male and femalereproductive tracts of the common domestic species;including mechanism of endocrine control ofreproduction, fertilization, cleavage, implantationand parturition. Advantages of cryo-preservingsperm, ova and embryos are also discussed. Spring.FAS 538 Fruits, Vegetables and Cereal ProductsTechnology - Three semester hours. The postharvesthandling of fruits, vegetables and cerealsincluding storage, preservation and utilization; postharvest physiology, controlled atmosphere storage,processing and preservation etc. will be discussed.Experience is provided in developing appropriateinformation and applying it to the decision makingprocess in the food industry. Odd Spring.FAS 550 Regulation of Food Safety and Quality -Three semester hours. History of food laws andregulations; various agencies involved in enforcingthe food laws; and how these agencies carry outtheir assigned duties. This course is open to othermajors. (Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor) Spring.FAS 551 Food Quality Assurance - Three semesterhours. Basic principles of quality assurance relatedto the food processing industry. Various attributesand characteristics of food quality and productquality evaluation methods will be presented to setforth examples of producers', processors',consumers' and regulators' concerns in maintainingfood quality. Odd Fall.FAS 553 Agricultural Biochemistry - Foursemester hours. Introduction to the fundamentals ofbiochemistry. Intermediary metabolism, mechanismof inheritance and gene manipulation techniqueswill be discussed. Accompanying laboratory dealswith basic techniques in biochemistry.(Prerequisites: CHE 204, CHE 301 or equivalent)Spring.FAS 561 Food Engineering - Four semester hours.Principles of elementary mechanics, physicalproperties of food and processing materials, heattransfer, fluid mechanics, psychrometrics,refrigeration and dehydration for design of foodprocessing systems. Steady and unsteady-state heattransfer problems. Analysis of different aspects of afood system from the engineering viewpoint.(Prerequisites: MTH 126 and PHY 103) Fall.FAS 572 Food Processing - Four semester hours.Application of basic principles and practices of unitoperations for food processing and preservation.Understanding of prediction methods for design offood processes such as canning, freezing anddehydration. Effect of processing on food quality,food storage. Class presentation and a term paperare required. (Prerequisite: FAS 461L/FAS 561)Spring.FAS 605 Special Problems - Two to three semesterhours. Involves a detailed experimental study of achosen problem in food science or animal science.(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor)FAS 611 Food Toxicology - Three semester hours.Principles and problems in evaluating thewholesomeness and safety of foods, foodcomponents, food additives and food contaminants;selective toxicity, detoxification mechanisms,structure and biological activity of food toxicants.Fall.FAS 615 Food Enzymes - Three semester hours.Even though the course will deal with properties ofenzymes in general, emphasis will be placed onthose properties of enzymes used specifically infood processing and practical application ofenzymes at the various phases of the food industry.Odd.FAS 617 Food Flavors and Pigments - Threesemester hours. A detailed study of the chemistryand organoleptic characteristics of flavorcompounds, food colors and pigments, their126


formulations, modification, methods ofincorporation and regulatory considerations. OddSpring.FAS 622 Advanced Livestock Judging - Twosemester hours. Advanced instruction and trainingfor prospective livestock judging instructors. Indepth study of criteria involved in accurateevaluation, objective and fundamentalmeasurements for assessing the breeding or marketvalue of different livestock species. Specialemphasis is placed on proper procedures for givingoral reasons in comparing beef cattle, dairy cattle,horses, poultry, rabbits, sheep, goats and swine.(Prerequisite: FAS 355 or Consent of Instructor)FAS 623 Quantitative Genetics - Four semesterhours. Advanced principles of animal and plantbreeding with emphasis on quantitative techniquesused to augment genetic improvement. Access tocomputer facilities and software programs, whichsimulate various selection strategies based uponbiological genetic systems, will be available.Spring.FAS 626 Ruminant Nutrition and Metabolism -Three semester hours. Principles of ruminantdigestion and metabolism with emphasis onnutritional factors in production and fundamentalsof evaluative research. Odd Spring.FAS 630 Advanced Reproductive Physiology ofVertebrates - Three semester hours. This coursepresents topics associated with relevant advances inmammalian reproduction and biotechnologyresearch. Topics include: physiology, morphologyand development of gametes; transport and survivalof gametes; fertilization, cleavage and implantation;experimental manipulation of embryos; the ovaryfolliculogenesis,egg maturation and ovulation; thetestes - spermatogenesis and androgen synthesis;maternal recognition and maintenance of pregnancy,induction of parturition and causes of abortion.(Prerequisite: FAS 430 or Consent of Instructor)Even Spring.FAS 632 Monogastric Nutrition and Metabolism- Three semester hours. Review of recent advancesin monogastric nutrition and metabolism.Discussion of nutrient requirements, balancedrations for livestock animals and balanced diets forhuman beings. Student seminars on current topics inmonogastric nutrition. Fall.FAS 640 Product Development and Research -Three semester hours. Art, science and technologyof developing and marketing new food productsthrough lecture and hands-on experience. Eachstudent will be responsible for submitting aproposed topic, literature review and proposedmethodology for manufacturing the product.Product models will be further tested. Spring.FAS 642 Minerals and Vitamins in Foods andNutrition - Three semester hours. Chemicalstructures and analytical methods applicable tominerals and vitamins. Role of minerals andvitamins in the food industry and their importance innutrition and diseases. Fall.FAS 644 Proteins in Foods and Nutrition - Threesemester hours. Supply of and the need for proteinsin the world; characteristics of proteins from animaland plants; processing and preservation of proteinfoods; unconventional protein sources; assimilationand importance of proteins in nutrition includingeffects of toxic proteins, peptides and amino acids.Fall.FAS 646 Carbohydrates and Lipids in Foods andNutrition - Three semester hours. Physical andchemical structures; analytical methods applicableto research; and reactions, interactions andmetabolism of carbohydrates and lipids in foodindustry and diseases. Spring.FAS 654 Food Microbiological Techniques -Three semester hours. An advanced laboratorytechniques course stressing analytical examinationof microorganisms in food systems. (Prerequisites:FAS 503 and FAS 507) Fall.FAS 657 Analytical Techniques andInstrumentation - Three semester hours. Review ofmodern techniques and instrumentation used inanalyzing and characterizing food components.Spring.FAS 658 Food Microstructure - Three semesterhours. Microstructure of foods will be studied usingscanning and transmission electron microscopy,light microscopy and fluorescence microscopy.Effects of various processing methods in relation tothe microstructure, identification andcharacterization of macromolecules and use of x-raymicroanalyses in evaluating mineral composition offoods will be covered. Preparation methods for foodsamples for studying microstructure, interpretationof micrographs, and identification of foodcomponents will also be covered. Even Spring.127


FAS 662 Food Rheology - Three semester hours.Concepts, principles and application of rheologywith focus on food and related biological materials.Study of standard rheological methods andmathematical relationships describing majorrheological variables. Relationship betweenrheology and texture. Principles and application ofextrusion to food materials. Fall.FAS 671 Introduction to Biotechnology - Threesemester hours. Provides an assessment of theaccomplishments and future of biotechnology andgenetic engineering and their application to humanhealth, food, plants and animals. The student willlearn the basic principles of recombinant DNAtechnology, plant and animal biotechnology, Federalregulation of biotechnology, job categories andmore. Fall.FAS 676 Food Processing and Nutrients - Threesemester hours. Deals with those principles thatrelate processing procedures to the nutritional valueof foods. The effects of various production,processing, storage and packaging techniques onnutrient availability and retention, includingnutrition labels on foods. FallFAS 686 Advanced Topics in Animal Science -One to three semester hours. Students may choose tostudy selected topics in animal breeding, animalnutrition, poultry production, animal physiology ordairy science. A comprehensive study of theselected topic will be made. SpringFAS 697 Seminar - One semester hour. A reviewand discussion of current literature in food scienceand animal science. Students will prepare apresentation to students, colleagues and faculty.Spring.FAS 698 Master's Report - Research Paper - Oneto four semester hours each.FAS 699 Research for Master of Science - One tosix semester hours each.FAS 701 Advanced Food Microbiology - Threesemester hours. This course is open to advancedgraduate students. Current literature discussions willinclude: newly emerging food pathogens and theircontrol, food spoilage microbes and the utility ofmicroorganisms in processing and preservation offood and their potential health benefits. EvenSummer.FAS 707: Advanced Food Chemistry - Threesemester hours. Recent advances in chemistry andbiochemistry of foods including chemical reactionsoccurring during food processing, storage andutilization by man. Even FallFAS 711 Advanced Food Toxicology - Threesemester hours. Review of recent advances in foodtoxicology including methodology of evaluation oftoxicants, detoxification mechanisms, biologicalactivities and regulatory and legal considerations.Spring.FAS 736 Advanced Sensory Evaluation - Threesemester hours. An experimental study of the effectsof variations in treatments on the quality of food,with an emphasis on panel training, productoptimization and correlations of sensory data withobjective measure of foods. Activities in sensorylaboratory are integral to instruction FallFAS 741 Advances in Nutrition - Three semesterhours. Discussion topics in this course willencompass advances in nutritional methodologies(heavy isotopes, noninvasive techniques), currentaspects of impact of food processing on nutritionand health, and other topics of interest to thestudents. Odd SpringFAS 761 Advanced Food Engineering - Threesemester hours. Thermodynamics, reaction kineticsand transport phenomena fundamentals in foodrheology, heat transfer, freezing and meltingprocesses, evaporation and dehydration, and otherphysical separation processes employed in foodindustry will be considered. Odd Spring.FAS 771 Advanced Food Biotechnology - Threesemester hours. Provides an assessment of theaccomplishments and future of food biotechnology.The students will study how specific genes areisolated, cloned and used to transform plants,animals and micro-organisms to enhance or producenew ingredients and how fermentation technology,genetic engineering, bioprocessing, and monoclonalantibody production can be of benefit to humanhealth and nutrition. FDA regulations and social andethical ramifications of biotechnology will bediscussed. Spring.FAS 772 Advanced Food Processing - Threesemester hours. Methods of food preservation andingredient manufacture by radiation, heatprocessing, dehydration and chilling with emphasison the unit operations including design and128


operation of the various food processing equipmentused in the food industry will be studied. SpringFAS 796 Advanced Topics in Food Science - Oneto three semester hours. Students may choose tostudy the selective topics in cereals, meats, foodproduct development and formulation, foodmicrobiology, sensory evaluation, dairy productstechnology or postharvest physiology andprocessing of fruits and vegetables. Acomprehensive study of the selected topics will bemade. Even SpringFAS 797 Seminar - One semester hour. Foodscience faculty and Ph.D. students reviewing currentdevelopments in food science and related topicsthrough visiting presenters and by reviews of currentliterature.FAS 799 Research for Ph.D. - Three to twelvesemester hours each. Individual researchwork towards dissertation requirements. EachSemester.FAMILY AND CONSUMERSCIENCESFCS 505 Curriculum Planning and Developmentin Family and Consumer Sciences - Threesemester hours. An overview of philosophies ofcurriculum development and the identification ofprinciples, practices, and internal/external forcesimpacting the curriculum development process.Special emphasis is placed on methods andtechniques of curriculum designed for specifictarget audiences in Family and Consumer Sciences.FCS 508 Trends and Issues in the Profession -Three semester hours. Designed to evaluate andsynthesize trends and issues of the profession andsociety as a whole, and their impact and/orimplications for the family and consumer sciencesprofession and various Family and ConsumerSciences related organizations.FCS 511 Administration, Leadership andSupervision in the Profession – Three semesterhours. Principles of administration and leadership toinclude an analysis of management/leadershipstyles, and roles and responsibilities of individualsin various supervisory positions.FCS 512 Technological Advances andApplication in the Profession - Three semesterhours. Critique of current technology used in thevarious program areas in Family and ConsumerSciences. Emphasis is placed on acquiring basiccomputer skills and computer integration andapplication in various specializations.FCS 514 Seminar - One semester hour.Presentation of thesis and comprehensive reports bygraduate students. A discussion of current researchtrends and issues in the various specializations isprovided.FCS 530 Special Problems - One, two, or threesemester hours. An investigation of problems in oneof the specialized areas of the profession, or issuesand problems related to family well-being.FCS 590 Research Methods in the AgriculturalSciences - Six semester hours. Thesis credit only.FCS 599 Master's Thesis - One to six semesterhours. An investigation of a research problem forthe completion of the master's thesis in an area ofconcentration (Apparel, Merchandising and Design;Human Development and Family Studies; orNutrition and Hospitality Management) under thesupervision of an assigned advisor.FCS 600 Program Planning and Evaluation -Three semester hours. Designed to acquaint studentswith the principal elements and steps necessary toplan and evaluate formal and non-formaleducationally-related Family and ConsumerSciences programs.FCS 601 Public Policy and Issues - Three semesterhours. An identification of the role of family andconsumer professionals in community, state andnational public policy issues related to the family.Analysis of how to develop interactions with relatedlocal, state and national organizations to facilitatefinding solutions to individual and family problemsand concerns.FCS 603 Philosophical Issues in the Profession -Three semester hours. A study of the theoretical andconceptual bases of Family and Consumer Sciences.FCS 610 Internship - Three semester hours.Supervised work experience.FCS 699 Thesis Research - Six semester hours. Aninvestigation of research problems for the Specialistdegree.129


FINANCEFIN 511 Financial Management and Policy -Three semester hours. This is an introductorygraduate course in the art of money and capitalmanagement at the level of the firm. Topics coveredinclude methods used to maximize the value of thefirm, financial statement analysis, capital budgeting,the cost of capital, working capital management,dividend policy, and lease financing. Themathematics of finance will also be explained to thestudent. (Prerequisite: MBA 506 or anundergraduate course in principles of finance)FIN 541 Security Analysis and PortfolioManagement - Three semester hours. A study ofthe various analytical techniques used to appraisethe value of various securities, including marketinganalysis and industry analysis. This course alsocovers the methods and practices used in selectingand administering the securities of institutional andlarge individual investors. (Prerequisite: FIN 511)FIN 542 Money and Capital Markets - Threesemester hours. A study of the theoretical conceptsand actual operations of money and capital markets,the central focus will be on interest ratedetermination, role of financial intermediaries, andthe operations of short- and long-term capitalmarkets. (Prerequisite: FIN 511)FIN 543 International Finance - Three semesterhours. A detailed analysis of the treasurer'sfunctions and controller's activities in managing thefinance function of multinational firms. Inparticular, flow of short-term funds, Euro and Petrodollars,floating exchange rates, and problems ofrecurring parity changes are emphasized.(Prerequisite: FIN 511)FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATIONFED 501 Foundations of Education – Threesemester hours. Bases of modern education studiesfrom the standpoint of their historical developmentand interpreted in relation to their social, economic,philosophical and psychological foundations.FED 502 Introduction to Educational Statistics –Three semester hours. The meaningand importance of statistics as a scientific tool ineducational investigation; measures ofcentral tendency, variability, and relation asdescriptive devices; the computation ofdescriptive measure; and the presentation of data ingraphic and tabular form.FED 503 Introduction to Educational Research –Three semester hours. Aims to givethe graduate student an introduction to the field ofresearch; includes practical training inresearch and writing techniques in the field ofeducation; bibliographical material;footnotes; and use of library resources. The course isdesigned for users as well asproducers of research projects.FED 521 Multicultural Education – Threesemester hours. Prepares the educator forperceiving, believing, evaluating, and behaving indifferent cultural settings. It shouldhelp the educator become more responsive to thehuman condition, individual culturalintegrity, and cultural pluralism in today’s society.FED 529 Computer-Based InstructionalTechnologies – Three semester hours. Thecourse is designed to help teachers developcompetency in the use of computer-basedtechnologies in educational and non-educationalsettings. This course will include ahistorical perspective of educational computing,computer terminology, proper techniques foroperating computer systems, and practicalclassroom applications of the computer like wordprocessing, spreadsheet, and databases. Studentswill have the opportunity to work with Macintoshand IBM formats. No prior computer knowledge orskills is necessary.FED 531 Current and Emerging InstructionalTechnologies – Three semester hours.The course is designed to help educators developskills in using desktop publishing, computergraphics, hypermedia environments,telecommunications, and optical technology.(Prerequisite: ELE 530 or an equivalent graduatelevel course)FED 532 Curriculum Integration of Technology– Three semester hours. The content will focus onthe following major areas: principles of instructionaldesign, techniques for integrating computers andrelated technologies into the school’s curriculum,designing and evaluating software and coursework,hypermedia for instructional uses, and repurposinginteractive video material. (Prerequisites: ELE 530and FED 531)130


FED 504 Evaluation of Teaching-Learning –Three semester hours. A complete exploration intothe pertinent theories, research, procedures, andproblems in learning and teaching evaluation.Various readings and experiments will be explored.Students will be required to do a terminal research.FED 600 Advanced Curriculum Development –Three semester hours. This course is designed toassist teachers, administrators, supervisors,curriculum directors, and other instructionalpersonnel in developing competencies asinstructional leaders. Two critical factors in aprogram of curriculum development andimprovement are examined: (1) an analysis offactors relative to the concept of change ineducation, and (2) the development of a concept ofleadership for instructional improvement.FED 601 Advanced Philosophy of Education –Three semester hours. Critical study in theexamination of the various educational theories andphilosophies of education, their relationships andimplications for teaching; applicable for classroomteachers, practicing school administrators, and othercertified, non-teaching school personnel.FED 603 Advanced Educational Research. Threesemester hours. An in-depth study of researchmethodologies and designs. Emphasis is placed onthesis preparation.FED 604 Advanced Evaluation of Teaching andLearning – Three semester hours.An in-depth study of the theories, processes andprocedures relating to the evaluation of teaching andstudent learning.FED 605 Qualitative Methods of EducationalResearch – Three semester hours. Throughreading, research, discussion, writing andpresentations students will learn the theoretical andpractical aspects of qualitative research. The coursecontent will cover ethics, IRB, letters ofpermission/consent, theoretical approaches, researchdesign, fieldwork, observations, interviews, surveys,questionnaires, data and analysis. Technical writing,thesis proposals and articles will be highlighted forform and content. Weekly projects will be requiredin this course. Surveys, interviews and observationswill be highlighted in this course. Each students willwrite a qualitative research proposal he or she mayexpand into a thesis proposal.FED 696 Action Research – This course will teachroles and skills necessary to be an effective ActionResearcher. This class will also give candidates theskills needed to work on problems specific to theirclassrooms and their schools. This course is alsodesigned to identify the theoretical foundations ofaction research, develop practical applications,investigate the applicability of action research in acurrent work setting, and develop an ActionResearch plan. Candidates will earn a letter-gradefrom this course.FED 967 Action Research II – The course isdesigned to guide candidates through thedevelopment of a problem, data collection, analysesand feedback. Candidates will also design a courseof action to address the issues, make implementationof the research and asses the results. Candidateswill earn a letter-grade from this course.GENERAL ENGINEERINGGEN 590 Special Topics– Three semester hours.This course focuses on topics based on moderntrends in materiel engineering. The specifics ofeach course will be identified prior to it beingoffered.GEN 600 Special Topics– Three semester hours.This course focuses on topics based on moderntrends in materiel engineering. The specifics ofeach course will be identified prior to it beingoffered..GEN 601 Life-Cycle Design Engineering– Threesemester hours. This course is intended to provideinsight and experience in theory and in practice indealing with product complexity associated withsuch design processes. Topics includecontemporary techniques such as product realizationprocess, robust design, design for six-sigma, anddesign for manufacturability. Also considered aresystems architectural principles; systemoptimization; standardization; and case studies inreal-life product design projects. Prerequisite:bachelor’s degree in engineering or admission toMateriel Engineering graduate program.GEN 602 Product Assurance Engineering– Threesemester hours. This course involves techniques forestablishing product specifications, process controlsfor quality assurance, compatibility analysis, andproduct reliability and maintainability. Topicsinclude system reliability; confidence intervalslimits;normal and exponential distribution; failureanalysis; the Weibull model in life testing; qualitycontrol; aging and system reliability; and case131


studies. Prerequisite: bachelor’s degree inengineering or admission to Materiel Engineeringgraduate program; basic knowledge of statistics.GEN 603 Analysis and Simulation Methods–Three semester hours. The course centers onstochastic search methods for system optimizationand the analysis and construction of Monte Carlosimulations. The focus is on issues in algorithmdesign and mathematical modeling, together withimplications for practical implementation. Finiteelementanalysis is also given major consideration.Prerequisite: bachelor’s degree in engineering oradmission to Materiel Engineering graduateprogram; capability in computer programming.GEN 604 Test and Evaluation Engineering–Three semester hours, lecture and laboratory. Thiscourse provides an intensive introduction to testmethods and evaluation techniques; statisticalconsiderations in measurement uncertainties;experiment planning, designing, debugging, andexecution; instrumentation for data acquisition;signal processing; techniques for data analysis andevaluation; methods for hardware verification andvalidation. Prerequisite: bachelor’s degree inengineering or admission to Materiel Engineeringgraduate program; basic knowledge of statistics andelectronic instrumentation.GEN 690 Materiel Engineering Project– Threesemester hours. The activity is initiated by aseminar covering the requirements, with anemphasis on reports typical in the engineeringprofession. The project subject must relate one ormore topics from core courses with a detailed topicfrom a specialty course, providing a state-of-the-arttreatment based on available literature.formulating the program implementation plan;operating and evaluating programs in juniorcolleges, colleges, and universities.HEA 624 American Education – Three semesterhours. Overview and historical development ofhigher education in America; social context, uniquecharacteristics, present status, scope, diversity, andcurrent issues and trends in American highereducation.HEA 625 Community college – Three semesterhours. Philosophy, history, organization,establishment and control, students, and curriculumof the two-year college; its teaching and learningenvironment, role in the community and careerorientation.HEA 626 Finance of Higher Education – Threesemester hours. Financial aspects of the operation ofjunior colleges, colleges, and universities.HEA 635 The Community College Curriculum –Three semester hours. Trends, problems, and issuesin the development of the Community JuniorCollege Curriculum, including vocational-technicaleducation, continuing education, and communityservices, are studied.HEA 680 Educational Supervision for thePractitioner – Three semester hours. This course isdesigned to provide specific, practical assistance toon-the-job supervisors in the successful realizationof their profession of instruction. The course dealswith task areas and a collection of accepted patternsfor supervision, definite procedures, techniques, anddevices.HIGHER EDUCATIONADMINISTRATIONHEA 622 Program Development in HigherEducation – Three semester hours. A study of thebackground and development aims, and problems ofthe curriculum in junior colleges and universities.HEA 623 Planning, Management, and Evaluationin Higher Education – Three semester hours. Thestudy of the basic principles, concepts, and modelsin the establishment of goals assessing andanalyzing needs; identifying resources andanalyzing alternative strategies and selectingstrategies; securing and allocating resources andHISTORYHIS 501 Historiography - Three semester hours.Development of historical thought andhistory as a discipline. It seeks to provide studentswith an understanding of the nature ofhistory by examining the evolution of historicalstudies and the trends in historical thought.HIS 509 Afro-American History - Three semesterhours. A survey course of Afro-American historywhich emphasizes the Afro-American experience inmodern American history. Post-Reconstruction isthe essential background for turn of the centurydevelopments and those events that have determined132


the present role of Afro-Americans in society andthe world.HIS 510 Foundations of American Civilization -Three semester hours. A detailed analysis of theorigin and development of American democracy,including economic and social institutions.HIS 512 History of the South - Three semesterhours. A reappraisal of the Old South and the CivilWar and Reconstruction Period with specialemphasis on the political, economic, and socialproblems of the New South.HIS 513 Constitutional History of the UnitedStates - Three semester hours. A reappraisal of theformation of the United States Constitution and itsoperation in the early years, with special emphasison recent interpretations by the United StatesSupreme Court covering current political, economic,and social problems.HIS 514 Contemporary American History -Three semester hours. Specific considerations of theproblems of the United States as a great worldpower, and the majorpolitical, economic, and social internal problems.HIS 520 Contemporary European History -Three semester hours. A detailed study ofthe current forces of nationalism, regionalism, andinternationalism operating within Europe, includingEurope's use of these factors in relation to the rest ofthe world.HIS 521 Modern Asia - Three semester hours. Theemergence of new independent nations of the FarEast, Middle East, and Near East will be analyzed asto their formation,development, and current problems, both foreignand domestic.HIS 522 African History - A survey course whichplaces special emphasis on modern Africa and seeksto understand the forces that have shaped Africansocieties and are playing an important role inAfrican history today.HIS 523 Latin American History - A surveycourse which places special emphasis on modernLatin America and seeks to understand the forcesthat have shaped Latin American societies and areplaying an important role in Latin American historytoday, including the Caribbean.HIS 525 Philosophy of History - Three semesterhours. A study of the principles of historicalinterpretation through an analysis of the majorspeculative theories of history and of the majorcritical issues in the field. Religious, secular, andscientific approaches to historical interpretation willbe considered, including but not limited to, those ofAugustine, Vico, Kant, Hegel, Herden, Ranke,Ricbert, Dilthey, Collingwood, Spengler, Toynbee,Sorokin, Huxley, and Chardin. (Prerequisite: HIS501)HIS 609 Selected Topics in Afro-AmericanHistory - Three semester hours. This course isdesigned to introduce students to some of the maintopics growing out of the Afro-Americanexperience. Although the Afro-American experienceis part of the general history of America, this courseplaces emphasis on those events that helped shapethe African's experience in America. The topicsdiscussed and analyzed, for the most part, are thosethat have reference to situations or issues posingunique and interesting problems, questions, orperspectives during major periods of Afro-Americanhistory.HIS 614 Selected Topics in 20th Century U.S.History - Three semester hours. Each semester thiscourse will focus on one major topic of 20thCentury U.S. History, which will be examined indepth, both the necessary background and,particularly, the nature of the issue and its currentdevelopments.HIS 615 Modern World History - Three semesterhours. Background and significance of selectedtopics in twentieth century world history (e.g., theemergence of Africa, the crisis in the Middle East,developments in Southern Africa, etc.).HIS 698 Individual Research in History - Threesemester hours. Independent reading or researchdirected by assigned faculty involving a survey ofexisting research on a given topic, an area of interestto the student or a report on the early stages of workon a thesis.GEOGRAPHYGEO 503 Geography of Asia - Three semesterhours. Physiographic and political divisions of Asiaand the development of present cultural activities ineach region. Reference is made to national andinternational problems in relation to the presentworld order.133


GEO 505 Cartography for Elementary andSecondary Schools - Three semester hours.Principles of map construction and interpretations asrelated to the teaching of the Social Science inelementary and secondary schools. Problems ofscale, projection, symbolization, and mapreproduction are considered.HUMAN DEVELOPMENT ANDFAMILY STUDIESHDF 500 Family Development and Culture -Three semester hours. A review of theoreticalapproaches in studying the family. Emphasis isplaced on the family life cycle and family systemsas impacted by culture.HDF 515 Social and Emotional Development ofChildren - Three semester hours. Concerned withhow family and community elements affect thesocial and emotional development of children.Topics will include the agents and outcomes ofsocialization, such as values, morals and selfesteem.HDF 517 Consumer Behavior - Three semesterhours. Topics will include facts important toindividuals as purchasing agents.HDF 518 Parenting Perspectives - Three semesterhours. An analysis of theories, practices andresearch related to parent-child interactions.Attention will focus on parenting with regard tofamily structure, goals, values, styles of parentingand the developmental characteristics of childrenfrom birth through adolescence.HDF 519 Child Development Programs - Threesemester hours. Provides an analysis of programsfor children from birth to six years of age.Concerned with the arrangement of the physicalenvironment in addition to the instructional programthat promotes children's physical, social, emotional,cognitive and language development.HDF 520 Family Resource Management - Threesemester hours. Explores the principles and methodsof managing family resources. The analysis,planning and management of resources will bestudied.HDF 521 Youth Programs - Three semester hours.Concerned with the developmental characteristicsand needs of children during the middle childhoodand teenage years. Emphasis will be placed on thedevelopment of appropriate activities for both inschooland out-of-school groups.HDF 524 Adults and their Relationships - Threesemester hours. Analysis of the stages of adulthoodand relationships during those years.HDF 526 Multi-Sensory Approaches to Learning- Three semester hours. The development of thesensory avenues and concomitant processes ininfancy and childhood, including conceptinformation.HDF 530 Special Problems - Three semester hours.An investigation of problems related to family andindividual child development.HDF 544 Support Systems for the Elderly - Threesemester hours. A study of ways to involve familyand community organizations in meeting the needsof the elderly.HDF 604 Readings in Child Development andEarly Childhood Education – Three semesterhours. This course provides a study of all facets ofchild growth, development and learning.HDF 610 Strategies of Parent Involvement -Three semester hours. Covers the importance andutilization of parents in programs that serve childrenand adolescents. Students will evaluate some of thepractices that are currently in use.INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGYMANAGEMENTINT 500 Manufacturing and Design Problems –Three semester hours. Advanced study of recentdevelopments in manufacturing, includingmechanical design procedures and problems ofmanufacturing. Critical path scheduling andmachine relations are also covered.INT 510 Computer-Integrated Manufacturing –Three semester hours. A laboratory-based coursedesigned to Integrate the total manufacturingsystem. Topics include flow line production,materials handling, group technology, and flexibleand computer integrated manufacturing.134


INT 512 Statistical Methods in AppliedEngineering, Technology, and Management –Three semester Hours. Application of problemsolvingtools and procedures for statistical analysisand interpretation of research data. Introduction toprobability, descriptive data analysis, distributionfunctions, confidence intervals, test of hypothesis,regression models, and analysis of variance.INT 515 Advanced Statistical Quality Control –Three semester hours. Analysis of advancedstatistical quality control techniques for achievingproduct quality and process improvements.Prerequisite: INT 512.INT 525 Management of Technology andOperations – Three semester hours. Principles ofoperations and managements as related to technicalresources.INT 530 Industrial Plant Operations andManagement – Three semester hours. Principlesand practices in managing a business or industrialenterprise; organization and management structure;procurement; quality and quantity control; researchand development; management science; personnelmanagement; labor-employee relations; andmarketing in industrial and manufacturing plants.INT 534 Quality Management –Three semesterhours. Tools and techniques to control quality ofproducts and services and improve businessperformance by ensuring quality of processes,systems, organization, and leadership. Prerequisite:INT 512.INT 535 Leadership and Supervision inTechnology Management – Three semester hours.An analysis of supervisors' job with respect to theirroles and responsibilities for supervising the work ofsubordinates and employing technology systems inthe production of consumer goods and services.INT 537 Industrial Safety Standards – Threesemester hours. A study of specific federal and statesafety and health standards as applied to buildingand facilities, materials and handling and storage,machines and machine guarding, welding, electricalhazards, construction, and transportation infactories and plants.INT 540 Industrial Automation – Three semesterhours. Principles and analysis of automatedmanufacturing systems, including CNC,CAD/CAM, PLC, cellular manufacturing systems,flexible manufacturing systems, transfer lines,robotics, and quality control systems.INT 541 Design of Experiments – Three semesterhours. Principles and procedures for usingstatistically designed experiments for product andprocess improvement as well as their applicationsfor improving quality and efficiency in systems.Prerequisite: INT 512.INT 543 Lean-Six Sigma – Three semester hours.Systems improvement and design based onphilosophies and principles for identifying andeliminating wastes or non-value-added activities intechnological operations. Prerequisite: INT 512.INT 550 Research Techniques for AppliedEngineering & Technology Mgt. – Three semesterhours. Research techniques, including collection,analysis, and interpretation of research data, inapplied engineering, technology, and managementfields. A final research report is required.INT 554 Industrial Ergonomics – Three semesterhours. Methods for designing tools, machines,tasks, and work procedures to meet physical(anthropometric and biomechanical) and mentalrequirements of human beings in working safely andefficiently.INT 560 Project Management – Three semesterhours. Theory and practice of managing projectsincluding the application of modern projectmanagement software.INT 570 Internship/Co-operative Education –Threes semester hours. Supervised work experienceand training in applied engineering, technology, ormanagement. A minimum of 45 hours ofemployment is required during the semester inwhich the student is enrolled. Individual writtenreport on work experience is required.INT 575 Engineering Cost Analysis – Threesemester hours. Practical approach for financial andtechnical decision making in evaluating theeconomic feasibility of engineering systems andprojects. Applied engineering economy techniquesfor cost reduction, continuous profit improvement,and financial management of contemporaryorganizations.INT 610 Applied Engineering, Technology, &Management Project – Three semester hours.135


Individual research project in lieu of thesis. Studentscomplete a faculty directed research project inapplied engineering, technology, or management. Afinal report will be presented in open forum. Mustbe taken by students who choose the non-thesisoption.INT 612 Special Problems– Three semester hours.Individualized research and investigation into areasnot covered in other classes. Prerequisite: Graduatestanding. Offered fall, spring, and summerINT 699 Master’s Thesis – Three semester hours.Required for a student working and receivingdirection on a master’s thesis. A thesis student mustenroll for 3 hours each semester, for a minimum of 6hours, while working and receiving direction on themaster's thesis. Prerequisite: Completion of 15semester hours.LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAINMANAGEMENTLSM 536 Logistics and Supply ChainManagement - Three semester hours. Criticalexamination of logistics and supply chainmanagement (SCM) role in both the commercial andmilitary sectors; strategic foundations that supportsupply chain and operational skills required todevelop and/or design an effective supply chain.The cross-functional integration of premier businessprocesses within the organization and across thenetwork of enterprises that make up the supplychain. Additional topics include demandmanagement, procurement and supply chain,performance based logistics, data warehousing,reverse supply chain logistics, transportationmanagement, supply chain logistics informationsystems, logistics outsourcing, third-party logistics,supply chain performance measurement, supplychain economics, and supply chain finance.LSM 572 Logistics and Supply Chain RiskManagement - Three semester hours. The focus ison global sourcing issues, risk and uncertainties,supply chain logistics vulnerability and disruption,enterprise-wide risk management, crisis responselogistics management, and Homeland Security’sglobal supply chain logistics measures within thecontext of the commercial and militaryenvironments. (Prerequisite: LSM 536)MASTER OF BUSINESSADMINISTRATIONMBA 503 Quantitative Methods for Business -Three semester hours. This course coversdescriptive and inferential statistical methods usedin business. Students would learn about theappropriate statistical techniques for describing andanalyzing data, as well as the interpretation of theresults. Statistical software will be used. Topicsinclude graphical and quantitative description ofdata, probability theory, important discrete andcontinuous probability distributions, estimation ofparameters, testing of hypotheses using sample data,analysis of variance, chi-square test, regressionmethods, and other quantitative decision-makingtools. (Prerequisite: Pre-calculus algebra)MBA 506 Foundations of Accounting andFinance - Three semester hours. This courseprovides non- business students coming into theprogram with a basic understanding of the conceptsof accounting and finance. It covers the techniquesof the preparation and use of financial statements,the basic concepts of corporate finance, the structureof financial markets, and the process of financialanalyses.MBA 507 Basics of Management and Marketing- Three semester hours. The primary objective forthis course is to introduce those MBA students wholack formal undergraduate courses in managementand/or marketing to the basic management andmarketing fundamentals before they plunge intoadvanced theoretical courses. The course is anexploratory one that will help students to answer thebasic questions: What does a manager do? What ismanagement? How did it evolve? What ismarketing? What is the marketing concept? What istarget marketing? What is the marketing mix?MBA 517 Global Issues in Business – Threesemester hours. This is an integrative course that notonly focuses on the study of the environment andmanagement of international business but also onthe strategy, environment-assessment, and crossfunctionalprocesses designed to implement astrategy as management deals with contemporaryglobal issues that confront the business such aslegal/political policies, socio-cultural differencesand social changes, financial and economicinstitutional development demands upon marketing,management, finance, accounting, and humanresources. (Prerequisite: ACC 512, ECO 514, FIN511, MGT 515, MKT 514)MBA 550 Independent Research in Business –This is for a major research project involving an indepthstudy of an issue in any of the business areas.136


The project, conducted under the guidance of aninstructor, will culminate into a detailed,comprehensive paper on the issue. (Pre-requisite:Consent of the MBA Director)MANAGEMENTMGT 510 Operations Management - Threesemester hours. This course covers the study of theconcepts and techniques related to the operationsfunction. The operations function is responsible forplanning, organizing, and controlling resources inorder to efficiently and effectively produce thegoods and services customers want, as well as meetthe goals of the organization. Topics includeoperations planning, forecasting, process analysis,quality management, materials management,scheduling, MRP/ERP, project management, just-intimeand lean techniques, supply chain management,and other decision-making tools for management.(Prerequisite: MBA 503 or equivalent)MGT 515 Organizational Theory and Behavior -Three semester hours. This course will deal with themacro and micro aspects of organizations. It willemphasize the behavior of people withinorganizations. The impacts of environment onhuman behavior are examined. Conditions oforganization viability and renewal, as well asstructures used in their internal and externalelaboration, are also considered. (Prerequisite: MBA507 or an undergraduate introductory course inmanagement)MGT 516 Strategic Management - Three semesterhours. This course is designed to develop anunderstanding of strategy, policy, and decisionmakingas applied to the overall management oflarge corporations or other formal organizationalstructures. The course objectives are achievedthrough the integration of economic, marketing,accounting, finance, and management fundamentals.The case method is used. (Prerequisites: (MBA 517)MGT 554 Training and Development - Threesemester hours. This course emphasizes thebroadening role of training in corporate life.Training is a systematic process of altering thebehavior of employees in a direction that willachieve organizational goals. Training anddevelopment is an attempt to improve current andfuture employee performance by increasing anemployee’s ability to perform through learning,usually by changing the employee’s attitude orincreasing his or her skills and knowledge.(Prerequisite: MGT 515)MGT 564 Human Resource Management - Threesemester hours. A critical examination will be madeof personnel functions, such as selection, training,placement, transfers and promotions, performanceappraisal policies, motivation, inventory of skills,and human resource development.(Prerequisite:MGT 515)MGT 565 Entrepreneurship/Small BusinessManagement - Three semester hours.Interdisciplinary course dealing with various aspectsof starting a small business; selecting promisingideas, initiating enterprises, exploiting opportunities,obtaining initial financing, site selection, andlicensing. (Prerequisite: MGT 515)MGT 566 Management and Labor Relations -Three semester hours. This course introducesstudents to substantive topics that define and explainthe relationship between labor and management. Itexamines the history of the labor movement and therights and duties of both parties as defined byvarious labor laws. It also examines the laborrelations process as it relates to negotiating andadministering the labor agreement, and resolvingissues related to employee discipline, rights andprerogatives of management and employee groups,wage issues, administrative issues and the use ofarbitration to resolve labor disputes and maintainlabor peace. Moreover, it examines how the laborrelations process works in the public, federal andnon-traditional sectors of the economy.(Prerequisite: MGT 515)MGT 545 Foundation of Database ManagementSystems - Three semester hours. This coursefocuses on the important process of database design.A highly useful methodology for designingdatabases is presented and illustrated through avariety of examples. On the completion of thiscourse, the student should be able to use databasemanagement systems such as Access to set up andmanipulate data files, query a data file, and format areport. The student should also be able to comparethe capabilities of a single file record managementsystem with database management system.(Prerequisites: MGT 502 or equivalent, or consentof instructor)MGT 580 Emerging Information Technologies -Three credit hours. This course examines variousmanagerial and technical issues associated with theintroduction of new information technologies within137


the firm. Topics include environmental scanning fornew Information Technologies (IT) developments,assessment of new IT, and legal/ethical issues.(Prerequisite: MGT 545 or equivalent, or consent ofinstructor)MARKETINGMKT 514 Management of Marketing Activities -Three semester hours. This course develops thesocietal, managerial, and strategic underpinnings ofmarketing. It presents concepts and tools foranalyzing any market and marketing environment todiscern opportunities, as well as principles forresearching and selecting target markets. It alsodeals with strategic marketing and describes howfirms can develop their marketing strategies. Inaddition, the course is concerned with tacticalmarketing, describes how firms handle each elementof the marketing mix, and examines theadministrative side of marketing, namely how firmsorganize, implement, and control marketing efforts.This course also features a unit on the globalenvironment and a unit on customer satisfaction.(Prerequisite: MBA 507 or an undergraduateintroductory course in marketing)MKT 532 Consumer Behavior - Three semesterhours. A review and evaluation of major theories ofconsumer behavior from the economics, behavioralscience, and marketing literatures, topics includebuyer behavior models, problem/need recognition,search behavior, information processing,involvement and motivation, learning theory ,cultural-lifestyle-social class influence, role ofconsumer perceptions and attitudes in decisionmaking, family decision making, adoption anddiffusion of innovations, consumer trends, andbehavioral influence strategies. (Prerequisite: MKT514)MKT 538 International Marketing and Logistics- Three semester hours. This course is an in-debtanalysis of the specific issues, factors, andconditions which affect the marketing and logistic ofproducts and services on a global, as opposed to adomestic basis. Attention will be focused on thechallenges of identifying and evaluatingopportunities in overseas markets, developing andadapting marketing strategies in relation to specificnational market needs and constraints, andcoordinating these strategies on a worldwide basis.(Prerequisite: MKT 514); cross-listed with LOG538.MATHEMATICSMTH 500 Quantitative Review for GraduateStudents – Three semester hours. This course isdesigned to develop basic understanding of collegealgebra, usage of concepts of quantification:arithmetic computation, linear and quadraticequations, inequalities, the geometry of elementaryfigures and similarity, measurement, set operations,coordinate systems, probability, and data analysis,including frequency distributions and descriptivestatistics. Credit for this course may not be countedtoward any degree requirement. Placement in thiscourse is determined by performance on astandardized test instrument.MTH 501 Mathematics Seminar I - One semesterhour. Investigation and discussion of problemsrelated to mathematics instruction and/or specialtopics in mathematics.MTH 504 A Survey of Higher Mathematics -Three semester hours. Concepts of sets, logic,probability, abstract algebra, and elementaryfunction theory.MTH 505 Selected Topics in Calculus andAnalytic Geometry - Three semester hours.Principal ideas and techniques of calculus andanalytic geometry from a contemporary point ofview.MTH 506 Computers and the Teaching ofMathematics - Three semester hours. A briefoverview of basic concepts in computer science;mathematics materials for computers andcomputing; laboratory practice in programmingmathematical curriculum materials.MTH 507 Abstract Algebra - Three semesterhours. Elementary theory of groups, rings,fields, vector spaces, and linear transformations.(Prerequisite: MTH 504 or Consent of Instructor)MTH 508 Linear Algebra - Three semester hours.Systems of linear equations, vector spaces, matrices,linear transformations, change of basis,determinants, characteristic roots and vectors.(Prerequisites: MTH 504, MTH 507 or Consent ofInstructor)MTH 525 Computer Theory and Programming -Three semester hours. Advanced concepts incomputer science; mathematics materials for138


computers and computing; and laboratory practicein programming mathematical curriculum materials.MTH 533 Foundations of Geometry - Threesemester hours. Euclidean geometry, non-Euclideangeometry, analytic geometry, finite geometry, andsimilarity in Euclidean space.MTH 552 Analysis I - Three semester hours.Functions, sequences, limits, continuity, uniformcontinuity, derivatives, intermediate value theorem.(Prerequisite: MTH 505 or Consent of Instructor)MTH 553 Analysis II - Three semester hours.Integration, bounded variation, series, convergences,elementary functions, and sequences and series offunctions. (Prerequisite: MTH 552)MTH 620 Topology - Three semester hours. Thetopology of the real line; Euclidean, metric, andtopological spaces; connectedness; compactness;and continuity. (Prerequisite: MTH 552 or Consentof Instructor)MTH 651 Mathematical Logic - Three semesterhours. Principles of logic and the elementarystructure of mathematics; connectives andquantifiers, sets and relations; negation; inductiveand deductive reasoning. (Prerequisite: MTH 504 orConsent of Instructor)MTH 665 Theory of Numbers - Three semesterhours. Divisibility, congruencies, residues,Diophantine analysis, sieve methods, and geometryof numbers. (Prerequisite: MTH 507 or Consent ofInstructor)MTH 673 Probability and Statistical Analysis -Three semester hours. Algebra of sets; empiricalfrequency distributions; combinatorics;mathematical expectation; discrete and continuousprobability distributions; probability densities;hypothesis testing; and estimation. (Prerequisite:MTH 504 or Consent of Instructor)MTH 681 Mathematics Seminar II - One semesterhour. A study, by seminar method, of additionaltopics in mathematics from the history ofmathematics, algebra, linear algebra, geometry, oranalysis.MTH 682 Mathematics Seminar III - Onesemester hour. A study, using research methods, ofcurrent topics in mathematics and/or mathematicseducation.MECHANICAL ENGINEERINGME 511 Power Plant Performance - Threesemester hours. Same as ME 411*. A study of thefundamentals of aerothermodynamics of propulsionsystems, cycle analysis, ideal Bryton air cycle, andreal turbojet and turbofan performance. Basic sizingtechniques, economy parameters, performancesimulation, and prediction will be covered.Introduction to power plant/airframe integration willbe introduced. Prerequisites: undergraduate coursein thermodynamics and power generationME 512 Analysis and Synthesis of Gas Turbinesand Components - Three semester hours. Same asME 412*. A review of aerothermodynamics ofpropulsion systems, characterization of power plantutilization, and operation cycle analysis. On-offdesign performance, component characterization,component design, component matching,optimization, and introduction to power plantintegration systems in a fixed or moving architectureare also covered. Prerequisite: ME 511 or theequivalentME 513 Rocket Propulsion - Three semesterhours. Same as ME 413*. A study of propulsionsystem requirements for terrestrial andinterplanetary flight. Basic principles andperformance of both solid and liquid chemicalrocket propulsion systems, elements of nuclearrockets, nuclear-electrical power systems, andelectrical propulsion systems are addressed.Prerequisites: undergraduate courses inthermodynamics and fluid mechanicsME 514 Gas Turbine Engine Design andManufacture - Three semester hours. Same as ME414 A study of synthesis of gas turbine designunder the constraints of power plant systemintegration or airframe integration. Definitions ofsystem requirements, preliminary configurationanalysis and engine sizing; inlet preliminary design;compressor, combustor, turbine and nozzle design;co-generation and heat recovery considered forstationary power plants.; engine on and off designperformance simulation; installed thrust and systeminterference effects; noise sources and noise controlare covered. Prerequisites: undergraduate coursesin heat and mass transfer and machine dynamicsME 515 Heating, Ventilating, Air Conditioning,Refrigeration - Three semester hours. Same as ME415. A study of refrigeration cycles, psychrometrics,139


thermal comfort, ventilation, duct design, equipmentsizing, energy recovery, and solar design concepts.Prerequisites: undergraduate courses inthermodynamics and heat and mass transferME 516 Gas Dynamics - Three semester hours.Same as ME 416*. A study of the fundamentaltheory of one-dimensional gas dynamics: Isentropicflow, flow in converging-diverging nozzles, shockpropagation, normal and oblique shock theory,Prandtl-Meyer expansions, Fanno line flow, andmeasurement methods. Prerequisites:undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluidmechanicsME 532 Design for Manufacture and Reliability -Three semester hours. Same as ME 432*. A study ofthe design synthesis and methods; strength design ofmechanical structures and components; optimizationand reliability principles; and computer-aided designtechniques. Emphasis is on modeling synergisticprocesses for manufacture. Prerequisites:undergraduate course in machine dynamics orconsent of instructor.ME 571 Systems Engineering - Three semesterhours. Same as ME 471. The systems engineeringprocess is defined and investigated in this course.Among the topics introduced and studied areconceptual, preliminary, and detail design conceptsusing modern tools such as CAD, optimization, andsystems test and evaluation in completing designsbuilt for increased reliability, maintainability, andsupportability. Environmental and social impact andlife-cycle costs are also introduced. Prerequisites:undergraduate courses in advanced engineeringmathematics.ME 572 Economic Evaluation of Design - Threesemester hours. Same as ME 472*. The concepts oflife-cycle costs and optimization of alternatives areinvestigated. The formal study of decision-makingand economic theory are applied to engineeringprojects. Case studies are used. Prerequisites:undergraduate course in machine dynamics orconsent of instructorME 573 Logistics - Three semester hours. A studyof the initial distribution and the subsequentsustaining life-cycle maintenance and support of asystem of products throughout the consumer usephase. Systems design will be re-evaluated withemphasis placed on maintenance and support, takinginto consideration reliability, maintainability, humanfactors, and life-cycle cost factors. Prerequisite:undergraduate course or experience in systemdesignME 581 Quality and Reliability Assurance -Three semester hours. Same as ME 481*. Anintroduction to probability and statistics.Quantitative techniques for establishing productspecifications and process controls for qualityassurance, ISO 9000; the role of reliability inmanufacturing operations; and so forth, are covered.Prerequisite: undergraduate course or experience insystem designME 582 Operations Planning and Scheduling -Three semester hours. Same as ME 482*. Analysisand design of production and control systems forboth intermittent and continuous manufacturing,inventory effects on production, and productioncontrol techniques review of Just In Timemanufacturing. Emphasis is given to extendingconcurrent engineering techniques and methods formanufacturing and product development.Prerequisite: undergraduate course or experience inconcurrent engineeringMUSIC EDUCATIONMUS 517 Conducting – Two semester hours. Areview of basic conducting coupled with a study ofadvanced techniques for choral and instrumentalensembles.MUS 520 History and Philosophy of MusicEducation - Three semester hours. A study of thehistorical development of music education in theUnited States, and the philosophies that encouragedmusic education’s growth.MUS 530 K-12 Music Curriculum – Threesemester hours. A course in the development andimplementation of the music education curriculum.MUS 543 – Advanced Keyboard Techniques –Three semester hours. This course is designed toimprove technical proficiency, pedagogical skill andstrategies for accompanying on keyboardinstruments, acoustic and electric.MUS 553 Advanced Vocal Diction – Two semesterhours. A survey course dealing with thepronunciation and enunciation of English, Italian,French, German, Latin and Afro-American Dialects.MUS 554 Advanced Vocal Diction – Two semesterhours. A survey course dealing with the140


pronunciation and enunciation of English, Italian,French, German, Latin and Afro-American Dialects.MUS 563 Advanced Woodwind BrassTechniques – Three semester hours.MUS 573 Advanced Woodwind Techniques –Three semester hours.MUS 583 Advanced Percussion Techniques –Three semester hoursMUS 593 Advanced String Techniques – Threesemester hours. Each of these courses is designed toinstruct and strengthen instrumental teachers inperformance, pedagogical skills, acoustics andliterature.MUS 610 Survey of Music Theory – Threesemester hours. A review of harmony and conceptsof form with a goal toward analysis, improving auralskills in the classroom and arranging.MUS 611 Analytical Techniques – Three semesterhours. An intensive examination of how musicalelements and concepts of sonata form are used inClassical and Romantic compositions. (Prerequisite:MUS 610)MUS 612 Analytical Techniques – Three Semesterhours. An intensive examination of how musicalelements and concepts of sonata form are used inClassical and Romantic compositions. (Prerequisite:MUS 610)MUS 620 Survey of Music History – Threesemester hours. A general survey of the History ofmusic from antiquity to the present.MUS 621 History of Musical Styles – Threesemester hours. An in-depth examination of musicfrom 1600 to 1860. (Prerequisite: MUS 620)APPLIED MUSIC – One semester hour each.Technique and literature stressed in accordance withthe student’s ability.MUS 533-534 - One hour VIOLINMUS 535-536 - One hour VIOLAMUS 537-538 - One hour CELLOMUS 539-540 - One hour DOUBLE BASSMUS 541–542 - One hour PIANOMUS 551-552 - One hour VOICEMUS 545-546 - One hour FLUTEMUS 547-548 - One hour OBOEMUS 547-548 - One hour SAXOPHONEMUS 571-572 - One hour CLARINETMUS559-560 - One hour FRENCH HORNMUS 561-562 - One hour TRUMPETMUS 583-584 - One hour TUBAMUS 589-590 -One hour TROMBONEMUS 581-582 - One hour PERCUSSIONNATURAL RESOURCESNRE 500 - Techniques for Teaching Horticulturein K-12 - Three semester hours. Provideshorticultural education as a supplement to generalscience and botany. Experiences with ornamentals,floriculture, fruits, vegetables and soil to improveunderstanding of nature and horticulture. Summer.NRE 501 - Floral and Garden CenterManagement - Three semester hours. Managementof garden centers, including financing, selection of alocation, design of the facilities, greenhouseconstruction, selection of plant materials, personnelmanagement, marketing, and maintenance of plantmaterials. Principles and practices of establishmentand management of a retail flower shop.(Prerequisite: NRE 101 or consent of instructor)Odd Spring.NRE 502 Scientific Writing - Three semesterhours. Preparation of scientific evidence for thethesis or dissertation or for publication in scientificjournals, parts of the scientific paper, graphical andtabular presentation of data, sources of funding tosupport research, writing research grants, theeditorial process, elements of style, and ethics(Prerequisite: ENG 304) Fall.NRE 503 Techniques for Land Judging - Threesemester hours. Fundamental principles of soilscience as related to land, differences in soils andtheir capabilities, methods of soil conservation and141


improvement, treatments to improve productivityand selection of suitable home sites. Summer.NRE 505 Instrumental Techniques for Plant andSoil Science - Three semester hours. The principlesand practice of Atomic absorptionspectrophotometry, Kjeldahl digestion, gaschromatography, amino acid analysis,electrophoretic separation techniques, inductivecouple plasma mass-spectroscopy (ICPMS),inductive couple plasma (ICP), ion chromatography(IC), scanning electron microscopy, thermocouplepsychrometry, porometry, and immunoassay. Onehourlecture with a four-hour lab per week.(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor) Even Spring.NRE 506 Soil Microbiology - Four semester hours.A study of the properties and classes ofmicroorganisms as related to soil and cropproduction. Effects of microorganisms on thefertility, and chemical and physical properties ofsoil. (Prerequisite: BIO 101, 102, 330) OddSpring.NRE 510 Forage Management - Three semesterhours. A study of the soil-plant-animal complex asit relates to the morphology, physiology andutilization of forages. Emphasis will be onagronomic practices and physiologicalconsiderations in forage management in Alabama.(Prerequisite: NRE 101 or BIO 203-204) OddSpring.NRE 511 Weed Science and HerbicideTechnology - Three semester hours. Phenology ofweeds, habitat management by cultural, mechanical,biological and chemical means, dissipation andphytotoxicity of herbicides. Application andphysiological relationships of herbicides and recentadvances in weed control problems. (Prerequisite:NRE 101 or BIO 204 and BIO 204L) Odd Fall.NRE 512 Field Research Techniques inAgronomy - Two semester hours. Principles offield plot research, Hypothesis and treatments,procedures in large/small plot experimentation, suchas laying out of experiments, size and shape of plots,border effects, selection of valid error term,parameters, technique of data collection, theirsummarization and publication of results or researchpaper (Prerequisite: Consent of instructor) EvenSpring.NRE 514 Crop Production Technology - Threesemester hours. Emphasis on techniques fordifferent soil, climate, moisture, and temperaturerequirements for successful crop production.(Prerequisite: NRE 101 and NRE 310) Even Fall.NRE 515 Seed Biology - Four semester hours.Biological and physiological aspects of seeddevelopment, maturation, longevity, dormancy,storability, invigoration treatments, and process ofgermination in agriculture (crop, vegetable, and treeseeds will be emphasized). (Prerequisites: NRE 440and consent of instructor) Odd Fall.NRE 517Sustainable Crop Production – Threesemester hours. Principles of sustainable agriculturewith modern crop production practices, managementof biological, physical, and human resources tooptimize field crop production in a sustainable andcost-effective manner. Emerging biotechnologies,precision agriculture, etc. are highlighted.(Prerequisite: None)Spring.NRE 521 Plant Propagation - Three semesterhours. Principles, processes, methods and materialsinvolved in sexual and asexual propagation ofplants. (Prerequisite: NRE 101 or consent ofinstructor) Odd Spring.NRE 522 Landscape Design and Construction -Four semester hours. Advanced landscape design,including finished drawings, selection andarrangement of plants, design of constructionfeatures, preparation of bills of materials, and costestimates. (Prerequisite: NRE 423) Even Spring.NRE 523 Ornamentals I – Trees and Shrubs –Three semester hours. Type, characteristics,adaptation, maintenance, and functional uses ofornamental plants used in landscape design with aspecial emphasis on trees, shrubs, vines andgroundcovers. (Prerequisite: NRE 101 or consent ofinstructor) Odd Fall.NRE 524 Horticulture Marketing andManagement - Three semester hours. An analysisof produce marketing, pricing, postharvest handling,supply and demand, and marketing crops throughproduce outlets and differing management andscenarios. Resource "game playing." (Prerequisite:Consent of instructor) Even Summer.NRE 525 Lawn and Turf Management – Methodsand principles of establishing and maintainingresidential lawns as well as special-purpose turfgrasses for commercial landscapes, golf courses orathletic fields, including weed and pest control.Even Spring.142


NRE 527 Ornamentals II – Flowers and FoliagePlants – Three semester hours. Identification,culture, and use of herbaceous annuals andperennials, bulbs, herbs and ornamental grasses.Flower bed and border preparation andmaintenance; selection, installation, and care oftropical foliage plants in interior settings; use oflight, plant acclimatization, growing media,fertilizers, containers, and pest control(Prerequisites: SPS 101 or consent of instructor)Even Fall.NRE 528 Fruit and Vegetable Production - Threesemester hours. Commercial fruit and vegetableculture, including site selection and preparation,classes of vegetables, species of fruits,establishment, pest control, and harvesting areemphasized. (Prerequisite: SPS 101 or consent ofinstructor). Even Spring.NRE 529 Statistics - Three semester hours.Concepts and methods of statistical data analysis.Descriptive statistics, probability distributions,estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing,chi-square, analysis of variance, simple linearregression, and correlation. (Prerequisite: MTH113) Fall.NRE 530 Principles of Experimentation - Threesemester hours. Principles in planning experimentsto minimize error variance and avoid bias. Designsand models to accomplish these objectives will beexamined in detail. (Prerequisite: SPS 529 orequivalent statistics course) Spring.NRE 531 Principles of Plant Breeding - Threesemester hours. Principles, methods and techniquesinvolved in plant breeding and its application tofield crops. (Prerequisites: BIO 203-204 and BIO311) Spring.NRE 532 Plant Disease Diagnosis - Four semesterhours. General principles and methods inidentification, epidemiology, etiology and control ofmajor plant diseases. (Prerequisite: Consent ofinstructor) Fall.NRE 533 Introduction to Molecular Genetics -Four semester hours. Prokaryotic DNA structureand replication, restriction analysis, sequencing,transcription, translation, gene regulation, and geneexpression. Co-requisite: must be taken with NRE533L (Prerequisite: At least one course each inbiology and genetics or consent of instructor) Fall.NRE 533L Introduction to Molecular GeneticsLaboratory – One semester hour. Basic techniquesused in molecular genetics and provides a step-bystepapproach and hands-on experience in the fieldof recombinant DNA technology. (Co-requisite:NRE 533) Fall.NRE 534 Cytogenetics - Four semester hours.Chromosome structure, mechanics and behavior,their significance for problems of genetics,evolution and the origin of species. Emphasizinginter- and intrachromosomal aberrations andheteroploidy. (Prerequisite: A course in genetics)Even Fall.NRE/CMP 535 Introduction to Bioinformatics –Four semester hours. An interdisciplinary coursemelding information from molecular biology andcomputer/information sciences. Structure andfunction of proteins and nucleic acids, retrieval andinterpretation of bioinformation, algorithms andsoftware use for sequence alignment, similaritysearching of nucleic acid/protein sequencedatabases, and exposure to JAVA and PERL. Fall.NRE 536 Regression Analysis - Three semesterhours. Analysis and interpretation of linear,multiple and polynomial regression models usingstandard computer programs. Correlation, stepwisemethods, and use of dummy variables included.Emphasis on application and use of analysis.(Prerequisite: NRE 529 or equivalent) Summer.NRE 537 Plant Tissue Culture Methods andApplications - Three semester hours. Applicationof tissue culture techniques for the improvement ofeconomic plants; hands-on laboratory procedureswill be emphasized. (Prerequisite: CHE 102, BIO204 and consent of instructor) Even Spring.NRE 538 Plant Genetics - Two semester hours.Both qualitative and quantitative gene actions areconsidered. Methods of testing hypotheses,chromosome mapping, selection procedures, gainfrom selection procedures, measuring heritabilityand other factors are covered. (Prerequisite: Acourse in genetics) Odd Fall.NRE 539 SAS-Programming - Three semesterhours. Statistical analysis of data using theStatistical Analysis System (SAS). Data entry andmanipulation, report writing, and effective use ofSAS manuals will be emphasized, along withselection and execution of important SASprocedures. (Prerequisite: NRE 430 or NRE 529)Spring.143


NRE 540 Seed Production Practices - Foursemester hours. Principles and practices in theproduction of pure seeds, with emphasis onharvesting, drying and storage, crop and weed seedidentification and laboratory practices in seedtesting, official rules for testing seeds, and seed lawsfor marketing. (Prerequisite: NRE 101 or NRE 310)Even Fall.NRE 541 Phyto-physiology - Four semester hours.A study of the environment-plant growth interactionin the physiology of plants with emphasis on wholeplant processes. (Prerequisite: NRE 101) Even Fall.NRE 545 Bioinformatics Applications – Threesemester hours. Analysis of genomic data, highthroughputsequencing, functional genomics, andproteomics. Emphasizes mastering of various toolsfor analyzing DNA, RNA, and protein data,understanding of underlying algorithms, and theirapplication to biological problems. SpringNRE 550 Earth Science – Three semester hours.Overview of earth science concepts, processes, andcategories, with emphasis on plate tectonics,volcanism, weathering and erosion, global weatherand climate, vegetation, and soil. Emphasis isplaced on human interactions and relationships withthe physical environment and resulting public policyand management conflicts, and strategies.(Prerequisite: None) Even Fall.NRE 551 Environmental Toxicology - Threesemester hours. Toxic effects of environmentalchemicals on living systems, the chemical andbiological characteristics of major pollutants, theirorigins and uses, and the exposure, transformationand elimination of toxic substances by biologicalsystems. (Prerequisite: CHE 102, CHE 302 orconsent of instructor) Odd Fall.NRE 552 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers – Threesemester hours. Relationship of soil chemistry,forms of nutrients in soils and role of plant nutrientsin crop production, and other factors associated withsoil productivity; basic concepts of fertilizerapplication and manufacturing. (Prerequisite: CHE102 and NRE 251) Even Fall.NRE 553 Hazardous Waste Management - Threesemester hours. The impact, technologies, problemsand issues associated with hazardous wastes andmanagement practices. Case studies of hazardouswaste spills, risk assessments, and remediationtechniques (Prerequisite: Consent of instructor)Odd Spring.NRE 560 Soil Chemistry - Three semester hours.Chemical and mineralogical composition of soils,fundamental chemical properties of soils, soilcolloids, exchange phenomena in soils, and soilreactions. (Prerequisite: CHE 102 and NRE 251)Odd Spring.NRE 561 Soil Physics - Four semester hours.Study of physical make-up and properties of soil,including structure, thermal relationship,consistency, plasticity, water, and how they arerelated. (Prerequisite: PHY 103 and NRE 251)Even Fall.NRE 562 Plant Pathology Techniques - Foursemester hours. General principles and methods ofisolation, culture and inoculation of plant pathogens(bacteria, fungi, nematodes, and plant viruses).(Prerequisite: NRE 101 or BIO 204) Even Spring.NRE 563 Plant Nutrition and Water Relations -Three semester hours. Mineral nutrition, functionand metabolism, ion and water relations,translocation in vascular plants, and physiologicalresponses to biotic stresses. Photosynthesis,respiration, and other aspects of plant metabolismare covered (Prerequisite: NRE 101 and NRE 251).Even Fall.NRE 564 Plant Growth and Development - Threesemester hours. A study of recent developmentsrelated to growth regulation and plant developmentas influenced by auxins, gibberellins, cytokines,ethylene, inhibitors, and environmental factors.(Prerequisite: NRE 441) Odd Spring.NRE 565 Applications of Geostatistics – Threesemester hours. Concepts and methods to describeand analyze environmental data. Use ofgeostatistical models in sampling experimentaldesign, mapping contaminant concentration, riskanalysis, remediation, planning and probabilityanalyses. Conceptual development of relationshipsbetween theory, research and action in managingnatural resources. (Prerequisites: MTH 112, MTH113, NRE 430 or equivalent) Even Spring.NRE 567 Plant Virology - Three semester hours.Principles and methods of detection, isolation,chemical constitution, replication, transmission, andcontrol of plant viruses. (Prerequisite: NRE 432 orNRE 562) Odd Spring.NRE 570 Soil, Plant and Water Analysis - Foursemester hours. Principles and application of144


chemical and instrumental methods in the analysisof soil, plant, and water samples; experimental anddescriptive inorganic and organic analyses;spectrophotometry, atomic and molecular absorptionand emission spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and fluorescence, gas and ionchromatography, and ion-selective electrodes (CHE102, CHE 202 and NRE 251) Even Spring.NRE 571 Aerial Photo-Interpretation - Threesemester hours. Detection, identification, andanalysis of objects or features from aerialphotographs. Sensing devices and other equipmentrelated to photogrammetry application.Interpretation of terrain, vegetation, and culturalfeatures. (Prerequisite: Consent of instructor) Fall.NRE Soil, Water and Air Pollution - Threesemester hours. Fate of chemical fertilizers,pesticides, and other agricultural and industrialpollutants in relation to environmental quality.Effects of these factors on checks and balances ofnatural terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.(Prerequisite: CHE 102 and NRE 251) EvenSpring.NRE 574 Quantitative Approaches in RemoteSensing - Three semester hours. A "hands-on"approach with computer analysis or remotely-senseddata, software design, classification algorithms, andimage pre-processing overlay and enhancement.Theory and concepts of field instrumentation will bedemonstrated and discussed. (Prerequisite: NRE476) Odd Spring.NRE 575 Principles of Wetlands – Three semesterhours. Wetlands as important environments, theirimportance to surface and ground water quality andto aquatic and terrestrial wildlife; use of constructedwetlands in waste treatment applications, andprinciples of wetland delineation. (Prerequisite:Consent of instructor) Even Fall.NRE 576 Remote Sensing of the Environment I -Four semester hours. The principles of remotesensor systems and their utility, natural resourceinventory and management, land use planning andenvironmental monitoring. Interpretation of colorinfrared photos, multispectral and thermal scanners,and radar imagery (Prerequisite: Consent ofinstructor) Odd Fall.NRE 577 Insect Biology and Pest Management –Three semester hours. Biology of insects,emphasizing taxonomy, basic structure and function,ecology and the management of insect pestpopulations. The course includes a weekly threehourlaboratory for developing skills inidentification and collection of insects.(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor) Odd Spring.NRE 578 GIS, Spatial Analysis and Modeling –Four semester hours. Provides theoretical andpractical skills needed for using GIS for analyzingspatial phenomena at different scales. Focuses onprinciples and methods of spatial analysis and theirapplication to different disciplines such as urbanplanning, environmental science, and naturalresource management. Prepares students foradvanced GIS course. Spring.NRE 580 Natural Resource Policy - Threesemester hours. Evaluation of land and forestproblems and policies in the United States; analysisof current social and resource characteristics thathave shaped policy (Prerequisite: Consent ofinstructor) Spring.NRE 581 Hydrology & Watershed Management -Three semester hours. Occurrence and movementof water over the earth’s surface. The hydrologiccycle, runoff relations, relationship of precipitationto stream flow with frequency analysis, unithydrograph theory, flood routing, and probability inhydrology, hydrologic simulation and stochasticmethods in hydrology. (Prerequisite: Consent ofinstructor) Odd Spring.NRE 582 Forest Tree Improvement - Threesemester hours. Practical problems, concepts andtechniques to genetic improvement of forest trees(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor) Even Spring.NRE 583 Forest Resource Economics - Threesemester hours. Discussion of the market, price, andcost affecting factors as they relate to timberharvesting techniques for determining the besteconomic alternative (Prerequisite: Consent ofinstructor) Fall.NRE 584 Ecological Processes - Three semesterhours. Review of ecological concepts andprocesses. Investigations into the ecological role offire and wetlands. (Prerequisite: NRE 374 orconsent of instructor) Odd Fall.NRE 586 Wildlife Techniques – Three semesterhours. Introduces students to broad range ofmethods and equipment used by wildlifeprofessionals to gather information on wild animalsand their habitats. Fall.145


NRE 587 Landscape Ecology – Three semesterhours. Study of ecological science with emphasison interactions between spatial patterns andecological processes characterized by spatialexplicitness and scale multiplicity. Providesintegrative theoretical basis, technical tools, andapplications for land management. Fall.NRE 589 Forest Ecological Management - Threesemester hours. Integrated management of forestresources including plant, site, and landscapeprocesses. Interrelationships of forestry practices,wildlife and range management, hydrology,recreation, and other demands. (Prerequisite: NRE373 or consent of instructor) Spring.NRE 590 Advanced Topics in Soil and PlantScience - One to three semester hours. Independentresearch on current advanced topics of interest in thearea of soil and plant science. Topics to be selectedby the student and work performed undersupervision of a faculty member. (Prerequisites:Graduate standing and consent of instructor) EachSemester.NRE 591 Graduate Seminar - One semester hour.(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor) EachSemester.NRE 598 Master's Report - Four semester hours.A literature review, survey or a report ofexperimentation. A requirement for all non-thesismajors.NRE 599 Master's Thesis - One to six semesterhours. Research work towards completing the thesisrequirements for M.S. in Plant and Soil Science.Each Semester.NRE 701 Applied Forest Ecology – Threesemester hours. Ecological and silviculturalfoundations for conservation and sustainable use offorest resources, enhancement of wildlife habitat,water and soil protection, and increase recreationalvalue of forest ecosystems with emphasis on upland,hardwood forest ecosystems. Even Fall.NRE 710 Plant Ecology - Three semester hours.Physical and biotic environment of crops in relationto crop culture, production, and geographicdistribution, relation among the human population,crop productivity, and the environment.(Prerequisites: NRE 251 and NRE 310) Odd Fall.NRE 715 Seed Biology - Four semester hours.Biological and physiological aspects of seeddevelopment, maturation, longevity, dormancy,storability, invigoration treatments, and process ofgermination in agriculture (crop, vegetable, and treeseeds will be emphasized). (Prerequisites: NRE 440or consent of instructor) Odd Fall.NRE 716 Modeling Natural ResourcesManagement – Three semester hours. This courseis designed to use computer models in managingnatural resources. Experience in modeldevelopment and validation will be provided(Prerequisite: Consent of instructor) Odd Spring.NRE 724 Horticulture Marketing andManagement - Three semester hours. An analysisof produce marketing, pricing, postharvest handling,supply and demand, and marketing crops throughproduce outlets and differing management andscenarios. Resource "game playing." (Prerequisite:Consent of instructor) Even Summer.NRE 725 Stress Physiology of Crops - Threesemester hours. Responses of plants toenvironmental stresses including drought, heat, cold,chilling, biotic and mechanical stress. Themechanism for adaptation or tolerance to thesestresses, the metabolic and hormonal responses toonset of stress (Prerequisite: NRE 541) EvenSpring.NRE 730 Applied Multivariate Analysis - Threesemester hours. Use of MANOVAs, canonicalcorrelation, discriminate analysis, principalcomponent analysis, and factor analysis. Emphasison applications and interpretation of computeroutputs (Prerequisites: NRE 530 and NRE 536)Odd Fall.NRE 731 Advances in Ecological Research –Three semester hours. Further develop graduatestudent’s knowledge, critical thinking, and researchskills in forest ecology. The course emphasizesscientific approaches, review of current issues anddevelopments in ecological research. Fall.NRE 733L Advanced Molecular GeneticsLaboratory - Two semester hours. RecombinantDNA technology, DNA and mRNA isolation,Genomic and cDNA cloning, physical analysis ofrecombinants, DNA sequencing, oligonucleotidesynthesis and design. (Prerequisites: NRE533/533L, NRE 663) Odd Spring.NRE 734 Cytogenetics - Four semester hours.Chromosome structure, mechanics and behavior,their significance for problems of genetics,evolution and the origin of species. Emphasizing146


inter- and intra-chromosomal aberrations andheteroploidy. (Prerequisite: A course in genetics)Even Fall.NRE 735 Advanced Soil Classification - Threesemester hours. Principles of the comprehensivesystem of soil classification and other classificationsystems, advanced study of soil formation, soilcharacterization and methods of studying soilgenesis. (Prerequisite: NRE 350) Even Fall.NRE 738 Plant Genetics - Two semester hours.Both qualitative and quantitative gene actions areconsidered. Methods of testing hypotheses,chromosome mapping, selection procedures, gainfrom selection procedures, measuring heritabilityand other factors are covered. (Prerequisite: Acourse in genetics) Odd Fall.NRE 750 Advanced Soil Chemistry - Foursemester hours. Surface chemical reactions ofcolloidal particles in the soil such as the adsorptionphenomenon, zeta potential and surface charge.Thermodynamics of soil reactions, action exchangereactions, and clay organic complexes andinteractions. A one credit hour lab included.(Prerequisites: NRE 460 and CHE 401-402) OddFall.NRE 751 Advanced Soil Physics - Four semesterhours. A mathematical study of the physicalproperties of the soil, to water flow in both saturatedand unsaturated soil, soil temperature and heat flow,internal drainage and water redistribution, solutetransport and their effects on water uptake by plants.A one credit hour laboratory included (Prerequisite:Consent of instructor) Odd Fall.NRE 763 Advanced Molecular Genetics - Threesemester hours. Molecular cloning by recombinantDNA, restriction enzyme and mapping, isolation ofrecombinant clones, isolation of MRNA fromeukaryotes, synthesis of CDNA oligonucleotide sitedirected mutagenesis, and state of the art DNAsequencing (Prerequisite: Consent of instructor)Even Spring.NRE 767 Plant Virology - Three semester hours.Principles and methods of detection, isolation,chemical constitution, replication, transmission, andcontrol of plant viruses. (Prerequisite: NRE 432 orNRE 562) Odd Spring.NRE 774 Quantitative Approaches in RemoteSensing - Three semester hours. A "hands-on"approach with computer analysis of remotely-senseddata, software design, classification algorithms, andimage pre-processing overlay and enhancement.Theory and application of field instrumentation.(Prerequisite: NRE 476) Odd Spring.NRE 775 Advanced Principles of GeographicInformation Systems - Four semester hours. GISapplications in environmental and natural resourceinventories and analyses; major components of GIS;raster and vector data structures; modules for datainput, verification, storage and output; digital terrainmodels; spatial analysis and modeling. (Prerequisite:CMP 409, URP 526 or their equivalent) EvenSpring.NRE 778 Remote Sensing of the Environment II– Three semester hours. Remote sensing of theenvironment and microwave remote sensing usingactive and passive sensors. Data analysis andinterpretation of the electromagnetic response of theradiometers and radars. Concepts of microwavebrightness temperature from passive systems, radarbackscatter and emission models. (Prerequisite:NRE 476 and NRE 576) Even Fall.NRE 779 Advanced Environmental Geostatistics– Three semester hours. Application of geostatisticsto environmental problems. Methods fordetermining number of environmental samples andtheir distribution. Extensive use of the U.S.Environmental Protection GEO-EAS andGEOPACK software for variogram analysis andKriging. (Prerequisites: MTH 170, NRE 529, NRE465 and NRE 565) Even Fall.NRE 781 Advanced Hydrology – Study ofphysical hydrological processes and interactionsamong hydrology, ecology, biogeochemistry, andhuman activities. Provides a hands-on experience invarious aspects of professional and researchhydrology.NRE 799 Doctoral Dissertation - One to sixsemester hours. Individual research work towardscompleting the dissertation requirements for thePh.D. in Plant and Soil Science. Each Semester.NUTRITION AND HOSPITALITYMANAGEMENTNHM 501 Advanced Maternal and ChildNutrition - Three semester hours. A study of thenutritional requirements in relation to the biologicaland physical changes during pregnancy, lactation147


and infancy through adolescence. Emphasis will beplaced on the analysis and application of dietarystandards relative to each population group andsurvey of the latest research.NHM 502 Advanced Quantity Food Production -Three semester hours. (Practicum Included.) Astudy of various quantity food system operations inrelation to food purchasing, storage, preparation andservice. Experience is gained in quantity foodpreparation and use of institutional food serviceequipment through a quantity food laboratory andpracticum assignments.NHM 503 Experimental Foods - Three semesterhours. Experimental studies of the effects ofvariation of ingredients and preparation treatmentson the quality characteristics of food.NHM 504 Breastfeeding and Human Lactation -Three semester hours. A comprehensive review ofthe theoretical background and the clinicalmanagement of breastfeeding and human lactation.NHM 505 Contemporary Problems in theHospitality Industry - Three semester hours.Consideration and analysis of relevant industryproblems and issues facing management personnelin the hospitality industries.NHM 511 - Nutrition Education ProgramPlanning and Implementation –Three semesterhours. The development and implementation ofnutrition education programs for grades K-12.Students will gain experience in developingprogram objectives, learning strategies, teachingmaterials and resource files for a nutrition educationprogram.NHM 530 Special Problems - Three semesterhours. An investigation of problems in nutrition oron issues and problems related to food and/ornutrition and family well-being.NHM 548 Workshop - Three semester hours.Topics will vary. Selected phases of food, nutritionand institutional management will be addressedfocusing on current trends and issues in the area.NHM 610 Current Trends in Food and Nutrition- Three semester hours. Critical evaluation ofresearch in food and nutrition.NHM 612 Adolescent and Geriatric Nutrition -Three semester hours. Nutritional problems ofadolescents and aging individuals, nutritionalrequirements and dietary requirements of these agegroups. The effect of nutrition on the developmentalprocesses of adolescents and the rate of biologicalaging.OFFICE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENTOSM 519 Managerial Communications - Threesemester hours. This course is designed to provideMBA students a broad range of managerialcommunication fundamentals. A review of thetheory of human communications, behavioralconcepts, communication through letters andmemos, and communication about employment willbe presented. Major emphasis will be oninternational business communications, includingdemographic diversity, the communicationtechnology revolution, oral communications, thereport process and research methods, andcommunication management.PHYSICSPHY 500 Analytical Mechanics - Three semesterhours. Generalized coordinates, ignorablecoordinates, conservative fields, velocity dependentpotentials, canonical transformations, andHamiltonian mechanics. Hamilton's equations ofmotion and application to simple dynamicalsystems. Hamilton-Jacobi theory, small oscillations,Larmor precession, asymmetrical top (PrerequisitePHY 321 or equivalent)PHY 501 Concepts of Modern Physics - Threesemester hours. Basic concepts; special theory ofrelativity, wave-particle duality. The Atom: atomstructure, introduction of quantum mechanics;properties of matter; physics of molecules, the solidstate; the nucleus, the atomic nucleus, nucleartransformation, elementary particles.PHY 502 Bio-Physics - Three semester hours.Some physical forces exemplified in man, matterwaves, sound and ultrasound, electromagneticradiation and matter, radioactivity; biologicaltracers, big molecules - structure of macromoleculesand living membranes, speeds of some processes inbiological studies on nerve and muscle, the languageand concepts of control.PHY 503 Methods of Mathematical Physics -Three semester hours. Vector analysis, matrixanalysis, functions of a complex variable, calculusof residues, differential equations, special functionsof mathematical physics, Fourier series, Fourier148


transforms, tensor analysis. (Prerequisite PHY 303or equivalent)PHY 504 Physics in Modern Technology - One tothree semester hours. Physical basis of computers,communication systems, propulsion and powergeneration; energy and environment, properties ofspecial materials, infrared detecting devices,satellites and long range weather predictions,transistors, chips and printed circuits. This coursewill be taught through seminars by invitedspecialists in each of the areas. However, there willbe a faculty member coordinating the course whowill design techniques for student participation andmethods for evaluation of student performance.(Prerequisite PHY 201 or equivalent)PHY 505 Electromagnetic Theory I - Threesemester hours. Maxwell's equations, electrostatics,magnetostitics, wave propagation, radiation, wavesin transparent and conducting media, resonantcavities, electrodynamic potentials, multi-poleexpansions, covariant formulation ofelectrodynamics. (Prerequisite PHY 331 orequivalent)PHY 506 Electromagnetic Theory II - Threesemester hours. Radiation from a moving charge,scattering, radiation damping and electrodynamicsin material media, special theory of relativity,motion of charged particle in electric and magneticfields. Cherenkov radiation. Bremsstrahlung,classical theory of dispersion and dispersionrelations, electrodynamics of moving media.Magneto- hydrodynamics and plasma physics.(Prerequisite: PHY 505)PHY 518 Thermodynamics and StatisticalMechanics - Three semester hours. A survey ofthermodynamics from classical and statisticalmechanics point of view. (Prerequisite PHY 341 orequivalent)PHY 519 Advanced Statistical Mechanics - Threesemester hours. Foundations of classical andquantum statistical mechanics, kinetic theory ofgases, Liouville and Boltzman H theorems,ensembles, quantum statistical mechanics, statisticsof independent particles, applications to magneticphenomena and cooperative interactions, nonequilibriumstatistical mechanics.(Prerequisite: PHY 518)PHY 521 Quantum Mechanics I - Three semesterhours. Postulates of quantum mechanics.Schrödinger equation. Simple systems, elementaryscattering theory, potential wells and tunneling,bound states, Hillbert's Space, matrix mechanics.(Prerequisite PHY 421 or equivalent)PHY 522 Quantum Mechanics II - Three semesterhours. Angular momentum, coupling, Wigner-Eckart theorem, Application to atomic spectra,elementary quantum theory of electromagneticfields; elementary perturbation theory. (Prerequisite:PHY 521)PHY 525 and PHY 600 Solid State Physics I andII - Three semester hours. Classification of solidsby forces, properties and symmetries, latticevibration and its quantization in terms of phonons,interaction of phonons with electromagnetic fields.Bloch theorem, band structure, optical, dielectricand magnetic phenomena. (Prerequisite PHY 451 orequivalent)PHY 531-532 Mathematical Methods in AppliedPhysics I and II - Three semester hours. Review ofanalysis in the complex plane, evaluation of definiteintegrals, contour integration, differential equationsand special functions. Green's function, Fourierintegrals, linear vector spaces. (Prerequisite PHY503 or equivalent)PHY 537 Advanced Laboratory - Three semesterhours. Selected experiments in optics, atomic andnuclear and solid-state physics, high vacuum andmachine shop experience.PHY 552 Problems in Physical Science - Threesemester hours. Physics of particles and aggregatephysics of fields, wave physics, quantum physics.PHY 610 Introduction to Solar-TerrestrialPhysics - Effects of solar disturbances on theEarth’s environment. Distinct modes of energy andmomentum transfer from the Sun’s surface to theEarth. Formation of solar wind. Interplanetarymagnetic field and magnetic sectors. Formation ofthe magnetosphere. Effects of quiet and disturbedsolar wind on the magnetosphere, ionosphere andthermosphere. Solar flares and coronal massejections. Effects on man-made facilities. Spaceweather forecast and prediction.PHY 612 Physics of the Sun and the Solar Wind -The structure of the Sun. Heat transport andconvection inside the Sun. The solar atmosphere andits structure: the photosphere, chromosphere andcorona. Solar spectrum and chemical composition.The Sun’s magnetic fields. Quiet and active Sun.Sunspots and solar cycle. Solar flares and particleacceleration. Coronal mass ejections. The solar149


wind, its dependence on solar cycle andheliographic latitude. The interplanetary magneticfield and its transport to the Earth. Solar events andspace weather.PHY 614 Physics of the Magnetosphere -Formation and structure of the magnetosphere. Coldand hot plasma in the magnetosphere. Electric andmagnetic fields and motion of charged particles inthe magnetosphere. Transverse and field-alignedcurrents in the magnetosphere. Magnetosphericconvection. Geomagnetic disturbances and storms.Waves and resonant oscillations in themagnetosphere. Geomagnetic pulsations. Particleacceleration and particle precipitation into theionosphere. Types of auroras and global distributionof auroral activity. Acceleration of particles to highenergies and generation of the radiation belts.Indices for geomagnetic activity, their meaning andimportance for space weather prediction.PHY 617 Physics of the Ionosphere andThermosphere - Survey of the upper atmosphereand ionosphere. Stratifications based oncomposition, temperature and ionization.Morphologies. Diurnal, seasonal, annual and solarcycle variations. Solar and geomagnetic control ofthe ionosphere and atmosphere. Effects of solarelectromagnetic and corpuscular radiation andcosmic rays. Neutral atmospheric and ionosphericmodeling. Active and passive remote sensing of theatmosphere and ionosphere.PHY 620 Radio Wave Propagation in theIonosphere - Historical perspective. Characteristicsof electromagnetic waves and plasmas. Propagationelectromagnetic of waves through homogeneous andinhomogeneous media, isotropic and anisotropicmedia, and dispersive media. Plasma properties.Motion of charged particles in electric and magneticfields. Magnetoionic theory and Appleton’s formula.Radio sounding of the ionosphere: ionosonde andincoherent scatter sounders. Topside sounding fromsatellites.PHY 625 Planetary Atmospheres andIonospheres - Atmospheres of inner planets(Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars) and outer planets(Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune):Composition, pressure and temperature structures.Circulation and convection. Similarities anddifferences. Photochemistry in Jovian atmospheres.History and evolution. Atmospheric escape.Atmospheric clouds. Ionospheres andmagnetospheres of inner and outer planets.Similarities and differences. Planetary spacecraftmissions. Atmospheres of Pluto, Titan and Triton.PHY 632 Elements of Materials Science - Threesemester hours. Engineering requirements onmaterials, arrangement of atoms in materials,metallic phases and their properties, ceramic phasesand their properties, multi-phase materials. Theeffect of macrostructure upon properties ofmaterials, corrosion and thermal behavior ofmaterials in service. (Prerequisite PHY 451 orequivalent)PHY 633 Physical Metallurgical Principles -Three semester hours. Principles underlying thestructure and behavior of metals, equilibrium andnon-equilibrium phase relations in metal and alloys,kinematics of diffusion and nucleation. Phasetransformations, heat treatment and hardenability.(Prerequisite PHY 632)PHY 634 Crystal Physics and Crystal Growth -Three semester hours. Description anddetermination of atomic arrangement in perfect andimperfect crystals, binding forces elastic waves insolids, photons and lattice vibration, Brilliouinzones, thermal properties of solids, X-raydiffraction, Fourier analysis in diffraction. Basicprinciples and phenomena involved in the growthand perfection of crystalline solids from melt,solution, vapor, electrodeposition, etc. Discussionof the merits of various preparation methods.(Prerequisite PHY 632)PHY 635 Magnetic and Optical Properties ofMaterials - Three semester hours. Dia-, para- andferro-magnetism, magnetic relaxation and resonancephenomena. Electronic and thermal conductivity ofmetals, superconductivity. Relationship betweenelectronic structure and optical properties of solids,magneto-optics infrared photoconductivity,excitations, infrared and Raman spectra due tolattice vibrations, impurity-induced latticeabsorption, spectra of ions in crystals. (PrerequisitePHY 632)PHY 636 Semi-conductor Physics - Threesemester hours. Semiconductor principles, electronband theory of solids. Electronic properties ofinsulators and semiconductors, Hall effect. Defectstates and interaction in semiconductors, elementaland compound semiconductors. Recombination andtrapping, organic semiconductors. (PrerequisitePHY 632)PHY 637 Special Topics in Materials Science -Three semester hours. Topics will be selected inaccordance with the special interest of students.150


(Consent of Instructor)PHY 638 Imperfection in Solids - Three semesterhours. General theory of imperfections, relation oflattice defects to the physical properties of crystals,point defects and their relation to transportproperties in metallic, covalent and ionic crystals,geometric and energetic aspects of dislocationtheory, relation between dislocation mechanics andmechanical properties of crystals, structure andproperties of interfaces. (Prerequisite PHY 632)PHY 639 Electron Spectroscopy and ElectronDiffraction - Three semester hours. Principles andtechniques of electron microscopy. Use andmaintenance of electron microscopes, preparation ofspecimens for electron microscopy by replicationtransmission, study of fine structures in hardenedalloys, demonstration of dislocation movements,distribution and identification as to type, Burger'svector. (Prerequisite PHY 632 or equivalent)PHY 640 Mechanical Behavior of Solids - Threesemester hours. Behavior of materials under stress,elastic/plastic deformation in single crystals, criticalresolved shear stress, microscopic yield, ductility,mechanical twinning, effect of temperature and rateof deformation, mechanical properties in tension,true stress-strain, work hardening compression,creep, fracture mechanics. (Prerequisite PHY 632)PHY 642 Materials for Energy ProductionDevices - Three semester hours. Material limitationsfor the operation of fossil fuel and nuclear powergeneration systems, microstructure and properties ofmaterials in terms of current and future demands ontemperatures, stresses and chemical and radiationattacks, possible future materials. Solar cells andselective solar radiation filters. (Prerequisite PHY632 or equivalent)PHY 644 Modern Composite Materials - Threesemester hours. Fundamental aspects of moderncomposite materials, particulate and fibrousreinforcement, micro-mechanics, failure modes,fiber- reinforced plastics and metals, inorganicparticulate composites and dispersion-strengthenedmetals, testing and analysis concepts. Ceramicmaterials and applications. (Prerequisite PHY 632)PHY 648 Advanced Laboratory in MaterialScience - Three semester hours. Experiments willbe conducted out of the following: X-ray diffraction,Hall effect and transport properties, Dielectricconstant measurement as a function of frequency.Study of dislocations using microscope, specificheat measurements with DSC-4.PHY 649 Geometrical Optics - Three semesterhours. Review of image formation, ray tracing,optical invariants, monochromatic and chromaticaberrations, geometrical image evaluation.(Prerequisite PHY 401 or equivalent)PHY 650 Instrumental Optics - Three semesterhours. Optical systems design, testing opticalcomponents, fabrication, coating, mirrors andprisms, introduction of Fourier Optics. (PrerequisitePHY 401 or equivalent)PHY 651 Spectroscopy - Four semester hours.Spectra of atomic and molecular systems, energylevels, vibrational and rotation levels, lifetimes,Raman spectra, molecular and atomic lasers.(Prerequisite PHY 401 or equivalent)PHY 655 Optics Laboratory - Four semesterhours. Selected experiments in interference,diffraction, optical imaging systems, holography,lasers, detectors, UV, visible and IR spectroscopy.PHY 657 Physical Optics and Interferometry -Four semester hours. Propagation and vector natureof light, dipole radiation, Lorentz atom, Rayleighscattering, dispersion, Coherence and interference,design and use of conventional two beam andmultibeam interferometers, evaluation ofinterferograms. (Prerequisite PHY 649)PHY 660 Quantum Optics - Three semester hours.Planck's radiation law and Einstein coefficients,quantization of radiation field, photon concept,photon statistics, interaction of radiation withmatter, spontaneous emission, Dicke super-radiance.(Prerequisite PHY 521 or equivalent)PHY 663 Electro-Optical Systems - Four semesterhours. Theory, design and use of electro-opticaldevices and system optical properties, performancecriteria, applications of electro-optics, magnetoopticand acousto-optic devices, behavior of electroopticdevices as circuit elements, modulatorsrotators, and isolators. (Prerequisite PHY 657 orequivalent)PHY 665 Lens Design - Four semester hours.Paraxial Optics, aberration theory, imageassessment, Fourier optics, merit function,mathematical methods, least squares, damped lestsquares, decent methods, metric. (Prerequisite PHY649 or equivalent)151


PHY 670 Non-Linear Optics - Three semesterhours. Photon echo, self-induced transparency, selffocusing,scattering of light, parametricamplification, harmonic generation, damage effects.(Prerequisite PHY 657 or equivalent)PHY 671-672 Laser Physics I and II - Foursemester hours. Density matrix-formulation ofinteraction of radiation with matter, laser thresholdcondition, optical resonators, pressure effects,survey of laser types and mechanisms. (PrerequisitePHY 657 or equivalent)PHY 675 Thin Films and Integrated Optics -Four semester hours. Semiconductor and metallicfilms, design methods of multilayer interferencefilter coating, guided waves in dielectric films andfibers, beam-to-guide couplers, survey of devicesfor integrated optics. (Prerequisite PHY 671 orequivalent)PHY 680 Holography - Three semester hours. TheGabor hologram, hologram as a zone plate, Fresnelimage, Fourier-transform and reflection holograms,applications to interferometry, information storage,and optical processing. (Prerequisite PHY 657 orequivalent)PHY 690 Introduction to Biophotonics – Foursemester hours. This is an interdisciplinary coursedealing with applications of laser techniques tobiology and medicine. Topics include fundamentalsof light matter interaction, principles of lasers andlaser technology, interaction of light with cells andtissues, bioimaging applications, optical biosensorsincluding fluorescence sensing and fiber-opticbiosensors, light activated therapy, tissueengineering with light, microarray technology forgenomics and proteomics, principle of laser tweezeraction and manipulation of single DNA molecules,Bionanophotonics and Biomaterials for photonics.PHY 692 Nanophotonics – Three semester hours.This will be an interdisciplinary course dealing withapplications related to fusion of nanotechnologywith photonics. Topics include nanoscale opticaland electronic interactions, near field opticalinteractions, quantum dots, quantum wells, quantumwires, metallic nanoparticles and metallicnanostructures, rare-earth doped nanostructures,epitaxial growth and nanochemistry, nanostructuredpolymeric media, photonic crystal sensors, nearfieldnanolithography, and bioderived materials.PHY 699 Thesis - One to three semester hours.Research work towards completing the thesisrequirement.PHY 701 and PHY 791 Applied Solid StateElectronics I and II - Three semester hours.Semiconductor devices, rectifier and amplifiercircuits, logic control, analog and digitaltransducers, optoelectronics, VLSI circuitfabrication memory devices, computer aidedengineering of VLSI systems, VLSI microprocessorsystem design. (Prerequisite PHY 451 or equivalent)PHY 703 Laser Systems - Four semester hours.Survey of a variety of laser systems, and preparesthe student to contribute to the design of new lasersystems. The course starts with a generaldescription of lasers and optical amplifiers in termsof relatively simple rate equations. Various classesof lasers (e.g., optically-pumped solid lasers, gaslasers, organic dye lasers, etc.). Designs of specificlaser systems from each class will be described indetail (e.g., CW Nd: YAG laser, argon ion laser,rhodamine 6G dye laser, etc.). Other topics, whichwill be covered, include: optical resonator modetheory, techniques for controlling and modifyinglaser outputs, and techniques for measuring thespectral and temporal properties of laser beams.(Prerequisite PHY 671 or equivalent).PHY 705 Solid State Diffusion - Three semesterhours. Fundamentals of diffusion in the solid state.Special emphasis to diffusion kinetics for atoms andcrystals. (Prerequisite PHY 634)PHY 710 Thermodynamics of Materials - Threesemester hours. Advanced treatment ofthermodynamic properties of inorganic materials.Introductory thermodynamics. Application of lawsof thermodynamics to chemical behavior ofelements, compounds and solutions. Discussion ofheterogeneous equilibrium, chemical reactions andthermodynamics of structural defects and interfaces.(Prerequisite PHY 518 or equivalent)PHY 712 Optical Phase Conjugation I - Threesemester hours. Conjugation by parametric mixingin transparent media, transient response of Kerr-likephase conjugation, degenerate four wave mixing,optical phase conjugation in photo refractivecrystals stimulated Raman scattering and Brilliouinscattering, wave front reversal, and phaseconjugation under stimulated scattering.(Prerequisite PHY 670 or equivalent)PHY 714 Optical Phase Conjugation II - Threesemester hours. Phase conjugation and high152


esolution spectroscopy by resonant degenerate fourwave mixing in semiconductors, wave front reversalby a reflecting surface optical resonator using phaseconjugate mirrors, applications of opticalconjugation. (Prerequisite PHY 712 or equivalent)PHY 715 Fiber Optics - Three semester hours.Basic principles of optical fiber communication andapplications, materials and fiber preparation,propagation in optical fibers, wave guides and theirfabrication, fiber optic cables and cable connectors,detectors and measurement techniques, semiconductorlight sources for optical fibercommunications, system design. (Prerequisite PHY657 or equivalent)PHY 720 Radiation effects in Crystalline Solids -Three semester hours. A unified treatment based ongoverning principles in defect structurethermodynamics and kinetics of equilibrium andnonequilibrium systems. Discussion of radiationeffects in metals and semiconductors. (PrerequisitePHY 632 or equivalent)PHY 725 Optical Fiber Communications - Threesemester hours. Basic concepts of fiber-opticcommunications, channel multiplexing andmodulation formats, light emitting diodes andsemiconductor lasers, receiver noise, bit-rate error,system architecture, local-area networks, dispersionbroadening, coherent lightwave systems,multichannel communication systems, multiplexingand demultiplexing, crosstalk, optical amplifiers,soliton communication systems, communicationsystems of future. (Prerequisite PHY 715 orequivalent)PHY 730 Solidification Process - Three semesterhours. Principles of control of structure, propertiesand shape in processes involving liquid-solid andvapor-solid transformations. Heat flow, soluteredistribution, nucleation, growth kinetics. Resultantstructures and properties. (Prerequisite PHY 634)PHY 735 Materials for Radiation Detectors -Three semester hours. This course will be moreextensive rather than intensive. Discussion ofmaterials problems for devices using ceramics,semiconductors and pyroelectric materials.Materials for detectors for ranges in x-ray, gammaray,ultra-violet, visible, near-infrared and far–infrared. (Prerequisite PHY 632 or equivalent)with lasers, Laser Raman as Brillouin Spectroscopy,High resolution sub-Doppler spectroscopy, trimresolvedlaser spectroscopy, optical Ramsay fringes,ultra-high resolution. (Prerequisite PHY 651 orequivalent)PHY 755 Optics Laboratory II (Sample List) -Three semester hours.(1) Growth and decay of holographic gratingformed in photo-refractive crystals withcoherent laser beams.(2) Optical phase conjugation throughdegenerate four wave mixing in photorefractivecrystals.(3) Laser photo acoustic spectroscopy of I2 usingN2 laser-pumped dye laser(4) Holography(5) Laser photo-acoustic studies in gases usingAr-ion laser(6) Optogalvanic spectrum of Ne using tunabledye laser(7) Laser-excited fluorescence in laser materialcrystalsPHY 771 Signal Processing - Three semesterhours. Fourier analysis and two dimensional line, asystems-scalar diffraction theory, Fresnal andFraunhofer diffraction frequency analysis of opticalimaging systems, optical filters, coherent opticalprocessing, incoherent optical processing, hybridprocessors, and linear and non-linear optical dataprocessing. (Prerequisite PHY 505 or equivalent)PHY 775 Thin Film and Integrated Optics II -Three semester hours. Optical wave guide modes,wave guide fabrication techniques: deposited thinfilms, molecular beam epitaxial crystal growth,substantial dopant atoms, wave guide losses, inputand output couplers, electro-optic modulators,acousto-optic modulators, semiconductor laser andmodulation, hetero-structure lasers, and integratedoptical detectors. (Prerequisite PHY 675 orequivalent)PHY 796-97 Advanced Selected Topics inMaterials Science - One to four semester hours.(Consent of Instructor)PHY 799 Dissertation - One to six hours.Individual research towards completing dissertationrequirements.PHY 750 Laser Spectroscopy - Three semesterhours. Turnable coherent light sources, Dopplerlimited absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy153


POLITICAL SCIENCEPSC 502 International Relations - Three semesterhours. An evaluation of all types of internationalorganizations and critical analysis of the foreignpolicies of the major nations and their relationshipwith each other. Particular attention will be given tothe emerging nations of Africa and Asia.PSC 511 American Political Thought - Threesemester hours. American political thought fromcolonial Puritanism to the present, including thephilosophies of John Cotton, Roger Williams,Thomas Paine, Jefferson, Hamilton, Garrison,Calhoun, Wilson, the Roosevelts, etc.PSC 610 Contemporary Problems in AmericanGovernment - Three semester hours. An inquiryinto the nature of recently emergent sociopoliticalphenomena and the fashion in which they impact thepolitical process in the United States. Problemsrelative to the functioning of traditional politicalinstitutions and processes, the advent ofunconventional modes of political activity, and theincreased importance of international affairs as aconstraint on political decision making, will beprincipal points of emphasis.PSC 698 Individual Research in Political Science- Three semester hours. Independent reading orresearch directed by assigned faculty involving asurvey of existing research on a given topic, an areaof interest to the student, or a report on the earlystages of work on a thesis.PHYSICAL EDUCATIONPED 501 Sociology of Sport and PhysicalEducation – Three semester hours. This course is acomprehensive study in the fields of physicaleducation with special emphasis on current issues,trends and problems. Students will also be providedwith a broad perspective on the economic, political,and social aspects of sports in the westernhemisphere. Prerequisite: none.PED 502 Fitness/Research Application andEvaluation – Three semester hours. Investigationand comparative analysis of the latest research incontemporary areas of education such ascompetency based education, school-basedmanagement, fitness and wellness concepts and totalquality education.PED 503 Advanced Exercise Physiology – Threesemester hours. In-depth background regarding thephysiological effects of physical activity on thehuman body. This course represents a contingencybasedapproach to developing additional backgroundinformation and skills specific to application,analysis, synthesis and evaluation levels of learningas required by the graduate program in physicaleducation.PED 504 Curriculum and Instruction in PhysicalEducation – Three semester hours. Designed toassist with the development of specific analyticalskills using various instructional constructs. Thedynamics of curriculum building, formulation of aplan of evaluation and how to differentiate itscomponents are discussed in detail.PED 505 Procedures – Three semester hours.Develop specific skills in the total approach to selfappraisaland student success. In addition, thestudent is required to research the following topicsand their interrelatedness: content, analysis, testitemanalysis, test-banks, behavioral accountability,evaluation and computer-based instructions, masterylearning and personalized systems of instruction.Special seminars are included.PED 506 Evaluation and Measurement inPhysical Education & Sport – Three semesterhours. This course is designed to enhance studentsunderstanding and ability to apply strategies used inevaluation and measurement of performance inphysical education and exercise science. Emphasiswill be placed on strategies appropriate for gatheringdata for research and assessment purposes.PED 507 Management in Physical Education andAthletic Programs - Three semester hours. Thepurpose of this course is to promote thedevelopment of skills in planning, organizing,budgeting, supervision, evaluation and otheressential management functions. Strategies forpurchasing and managing equipment and facilities,maintaining a legal environment and developingeffective lines of communication will also beexamined.PED 508 Psychomotor Foundations of Sport –Three semester hours. The course includes anoverview of the relationships between psychologicalfactors and motor performance; research methodsassociated with motor behavior and sportpsychology; and review of the literature and current154


issues regarding the psychomotor variables relatedto sports participation and competitive athletics.PED 509 Coaching Theory and Techniques –Three semesters hours. The course is designed toexpose the student to new and/or differenttechniques, theories and philosophies of coaching. Itincludes an in depth examination of the philosophiesfactors that impact individuals and theirperformance in the athletic setting. The student willdevelop intervention strategies, techniques and skillsto enhance their physiological effectiveness in theathletic domain.PED 512 Advanced Biomechanics – Threesemester hours. This course was designed to providethe student with a generalized, qualitative approachto mechanical kinesiology or biomechanics. Thiscourse will follow a systematic program to enablethe student to build a foundation for understandingthe science of motion.PED 595 Internship in Physical Education - Sixsemester hours. This course is an intensive fourteen(14) week, full-time supervised internship in apublic school. Weekly on-campus seminars are anintegral part of the course.PED 598 Research in Physical Education andSport– Three semester hours. Designed to providethe student with opportunities involving the use ofscholarly and scientific inquiry. Topics may beselected from various interdisciplinary areasassigned to teach education and more specifically,physical educationPSYCHOLOGYPSY 502 Descriptive & Inferential BehavioralStatistics – Three semester hours. Methods ofstatistics; the meaning and importance of statisticsas a scientific tool in social science research,including the following topics: sampling, frequencydistributions, central tendency, graphicrepresentation, reliabilities, hypothesis testing,standard deviation, regression, estimation, andapplicationPSY 507 Introduction to Rehabilitation CounselingThree semester hours. This course includes basicprinciples of rehabilitation; history of rehabilitationphilosophy and legislation; rehabilitation counselingethics; and disability conditions. Organizationalstructure of the vocational rehabilitation system,including public, private for-profit, and not-for-profitservice settings; laws and ethical standards affectingrehabilitation counseling practice, with examples oftheir application; and societal issues, trends, anddevelopments as they relate to rehabilitation and jobplacement in the world of work.PSY 508 Job Development and Placement - Threesemester hours. This course relates thepsychological meaning of work, the vocationaldevelopment theories of occupational choice, andlabor market information to current methods of jobdevelopment, job analysis, selective placement andfollow-up with workers who are disabled.PSY 509Vocational Assessment -This course is designed to provide students with anoverview of vocational evaluation and assessment,work adjustment, personal-social adjustment, andindependent living services for persons withdisabilities and special needs primarily as they areapplied in rehabilitation facilities. Field trips tofacilities providing evaluation are required.PSY 510 Rehabilitation High and Low TechnologyThree semester hours. This course provides anoverview of high and low technology focused onadaptive and assistive rehabilitation technology,including aids for daily living. This technology willassist individuals with disabilities to achieve theirmaximum potential, and provide training to studentsinterested in gaining expertise in the use oftechnology while working with people withdisabilities across the human lifespan.PSY 512 Adolescent Psychology – Three semesterhours. Study of the age period between 12 and 19.Physical, social, and psychological developmentduring this period will be investigated. Theoverlapping of several theoretical orientations willbe integratedPSY 514 Advanced Developmental Psychology –Three semester hours. Study of the physical,mental, emotional and social growth of theindividual and their relation to the learning processPSY 515 Experimental Psychology – Threesemester hours. Scientific investigation of motorlearning, verbal learning, psychophysics, andindividual differences.PSY 516 Physiological Psychology – Threesemester hours. A functional investigation of basic155


neural and endocrine processes and their correlationwith behavior.PSY 530 Individual & Family Therapy – Threesemester hours. Application of major theoreticalapproaches and models of treating individuals andfamilies with problems.PSY 553 Case Management for Rehabilitation -The case management process is taught, includingcase finding, service coordination, referral to andutilization of other disciplines, and client advocacy;planning for the provision of independent livingservices and vocational rehabilitation services;identification and use of community resources andservices in rehabilitation planning and report writing.PSY 554 Medical Aspects and Adjustment inRehabilitation -This course provides an orientation to the medicalprofession and related rehabilitation professions.Discussion of body systems and functions,malfunctions and common physiological anddiagnostic treatments and rehabilitative procedures aswell as implications of disabilities within the overallscope of the rehabilitative process including:rehabilitation considerations, vocational implications,clinical manifestations and functional limitations willbe discussed including all major areas of clientinformation. The course includes synthesis of clientinformation; rehabilitation plan development;knowledge of service delivery; identification ofcommunity, state, and local community resources,initiating, managing, and tracking individual clients.PSY 555 Personality Theory – Three semesterhours. Major theories of psychology andcounseling, their tenants of personalitydevelopment, psychopathological personalitydevelopment, and therapeutic interventionPSY 556 Group Dynamics - Three semester hours.Basic understanding of group development,dynamics, and counseling theories; group structure,group leadership styles, and group counselingmethods and skills. (Prerequisite: PSY 559)PSY 557 Organization and Administration ofGuidance Services – Three semester hours.Lectures, case methods, reading demonstrationprojects, group processes, and individual work usedto explore the philosophy of guidance services,functions, and programs.PSY 558 Use and Interpretation of Tests – Threesemester hours. Methods of selecting appropriategroup tests, understanding of individual tests andclinical reports, and application of testing results tolearning situations.PSY 559 Counseling/Techniques – Three semesterhours. Intensive study of basic theories andtechniques of counseling and psychotherapy, andtheir application in the counseling andpsychotherapy settings. (Prerequisite: PSY 555)PSY 560 Occupational Psychology – Threesemester hours. Study of basic career developmenttheories. Occupational and educational informationsources and systems; career decision-making andleisure counseling; career development andeffectiveness evaluation.PSY 561 Individual Testing – Three semesterhours. An intensive study of the construction,administration, and scoring of the Stanford Binet,the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, and theWechsler Intelligence Scale for Children.(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor)PSY 563 Learning Theory – Three semester hours.A study of the various learning theories and theirapplication in counseling and education.PSY 564 Independent Study – Three semesterhours. The student with the major advisor may electto study a particular problem area of breadth anddepth of knowledge. A research paper is required asa product outcome of such study.PSY 571 Abnormal Psychology – Three semesterhours. Study of behavioral disorders classified inthe Diagnostic and Statistical Manual.PSY 585 Research in Psychology – Three semesterhours. The design of research studies in psychologyand guidance. The student designs a study andcarries it out under the supervision of the instructor.Reports of research done by the student are read andevaluated by the instructor and suggestions are madeas to their improvement. (Prerequisite: PSY 502)PSY 587 Cognitive Behavior Psychology – Threesemester hours. The design of research studies inpsychology and guidance. The student designs astudy and carries it out under the supervision of theinstructor. Reports of research done by the studentare read and evaluated by the instructor andsuggestions are made as to their improvement.(Prerequisite: PSY 502)PSY 590 Personality Assessment – Three semesterhours. Develop assessment capabilities of the156


student in the clinical setting an d provide a basis forclinical intervention in the patient’s emotional.PSY 591 Psychosocial Aspects -Testing and assessment of the functional capacities ofindividuals with disabilities and appropriateintervention resources including assistive technologyas appropriate; psychosocial aspects of selecteddisabilities to include alcoholism, chemical substanceabuse, developmental delays, mental retardation, andmentally and emotionally disturbed. Issues to beaddressed will include the impact of disability on theindividual, family, and personal, social and culturaladjustment to life, and litigated disability cases. Theadministration of tests, test selection, test scoring &limitations as well as interpretation of test results, andresources for assessment will be a consideration.PSY 592 Professional Orientation/Issues- Threesemester hours. An introduction to the professionalpractice of psychology and counseling, including abroad survey of issues such as its history and trends,ethical and legal standards, preparation standardsand credentialing, roles and functions, goals andobjectives and organizations and associations of theprofession.PSY 594 Advanced Educational Psychology –Three semester hours. This course provides anexploration of the principles of psychology appliedto teaching and learning, techniques of educationalevaluation, and models of cognitive and socialdevelopment.PSY 595 Counseling Diverse Populations– Threesemester hours. Emphasis on developingknowledge, skills, and attitudes for more effectivecounseling with person different from the counselorregarding characteristics such as cultural race,gender, sexual orientation, physical disability, andreligious preference. Substantial attention is givento developing awareness of one’s own values,attitudes, and beliefs as they relate to counseling in adiverse society. Provides an understanding of howdiverse values and morals, interaction patterns,social conditions, and trends related to diversityaffect counseling.PSY 597 Practicum – Three semester hours. Thegoal of practicum is to provide students with asupervised counseling experience in individualgroup counseling. Emphasis will be placed on basiccounseling skills and application of knowledge.(Prerequisite: PSY 559)PSY 599 Master’s Thesis – Six semester hours.The presentation in proper format of an originalpiece of research. Four faculty members shall guidethe student in the completion of the thesis.PSY 602 Industrial Psychology – Three semesterhours. Psychology as a functioning instrument inascertaining work attitudes, motivations, jobsatisfaction, morale, production, potential, fitting theworkers to the job, and establishing workeremployerrapport.PSY 603 Introduction to School Psychology –Three semester hours. An introduction of thepsychologist to the school setting. The cognitiverole will be a major focus of attention.PSY 605 Psychopharmacology – Three semesterhours. Course designed to acquaint non-medicalmental health professionals (counselors, socialworkers, and psychologist) with the category andtherapeutic effects of drugs used to treat behavioraldisorders, as well as the adverse effects of bothprescribed and major illicit drugs.PSY 607 Human Sexuality – Three semester hours.An intensive study of the physiological,psychological, sociological, and ethicalconsiderations of human sexuality.PSY 610 Psychopathology – Three semester hours.Acquaints the student with the behavioral disordersin the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, and thegathering of clinical and psychometric data to makedifferential diagnoses.PSY 612 School Counseling Internship – Threesemester hours. This placement is in a schoolsetting consistent with the intern’s major area ofconcentration. The school’s philosophy,organization, and yearly calendar of counseling oractivities will be stressed. Academic, as well aspersonal-social counseling and vocationalexploration, will be emphasizedPSY 614 Introduction to VocationalRehabilitation Counseling – Three semester hours.Overview of the field of rehabilitation. It focuses onthe institutional approach to the problems of clients.PSY 616 Internship in Vocational Counseling IThree semester hours. Students spend a minimum of300 hours in the field working part time (20 clockhours) a week during normal working hours underdirect supervision of university faculty member and aselected staff member of a rehabilitation setting.157


PSY 61 Internship in Rehabilitation Counseling IIThree semester hours.Students spend a minimum of 300 clock hours in thefield working part time (20 clock hours) a weekduring normal working hours under direct supervisionof university faculty member and a selected staffmember of a rehabilitation setting.PSY 618 School Psychometry Internship – Threesemester hours. Satisfactory performance as aschool psychometrist in a full-time internship of theequivalent in a school or schools supervised by aqualified school psychologist. (Prerequisite:Consent of Instructor)PSY 620 & 621 Counseling Internship – Sixsemester hours. The first practicum experience isdesigned to acquaint the student with the workingenvironment. Emphasis is on the acquisition ofprocedural skills in the work environment. Thestudent is expected to learn the procedures for intakeand case openings and the record keepingprocedure, and to know all of the services of thecomprehensive mental health clinic, as well as to becooperative in carrying out assigned tasks.(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor)PSY 622 & 623 Clinical Internship –– Sixsemester hours. The student is expected to learn theprocedures for intake and case openings and therecord keeping procedure, and to know all of theservices of the comprehensive mental health clinic,as well as to be cooperative in carrying out assignedtasks. The student is expected to be a front-linetherapist, utilizing the therapeutic techniques calledfor by the history and present symptoms.(Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor)PSY 625 Personnel Psychology – Three semesterhours. The principles of employee selection,retention, promotion, and compensation are coveredin this course.PSY 626 Seminar in Personnel Psychology –Three semester hours. This course seeks to cover allaspects of the personnel administrator’s job. Topicscovered include affirmative action, health carecompensation packages, career ladder concepts,profit sharing, in-house educational programs, andcompany recreation programs.PSY 627 Organizational Psychology – Threesemester hours. Beginning and development oforganizations and the role they play in society. Itutilizes a systems approach to understanding thedynamics of an on-going organization.PSY 645 & 646 Internship in School Psychology– Six semester hours. Supervised experiences in theschool in actual professional situations as a schoolpsychologist.PSY 653 Counseling the Elderly – Three semesterhours. A study of the unique needs of the elderly asseen in therapy. Specific techniques that have beentried and evaluated for their appropriateness eitherthe elderly will be studied.PSY 660 Consultation – Three semester hours.Strategy for counselors functioning as consultantswithin elementary schools, secondary schools, postsecondaryschools, community agencies, and mentalhealth facilities.PSY 661 Needs Assessment – Three semesterhours. Various uses of needs assessment, such aspersonal environment, program planning andevaluation, and exploration of various models ofneeds assessment.PSY 665 Seminar in Psychology – Three semesterhours. Seminar designed to meet the educationalneeds of current students in Psychology andGuidance. Subjects of contemporary interest will beexplored in depth by students and reported to theclass. (Open to AA students only)PSY 682 Problems in Counseling withAdolescents – Three semester hours. Considerationof the special problems encountered in counselingwith adolescents. Methods of dealing with theseproblems and improving the counseling techniques(Open to AA students only)PSY 683 Problems in the Administration ofGuidance Services – Three semester hours.Dealing with the problem of administering aguidance service in educational or communityagencies. Problems of leadership programevaluation and planning. (Prerequisite: Course inOrganization and Administration of GuidanceServices. Open to AA students only)PSY 686 Advanced Social Psychology – Threesemester hours. Group structure, topology, anddynamics. Communications within and betweenpeople and the improvement of impairedrelationships. Group influence in changingbehavior.PSY 698 Field Research – Three semester hours.A quasi-experimental research project designed to158


evaluate or develop programs in schools. Aresearch design and methodology must be approvedas well as data analysis and techniques.PSY 699 Research Thesis/Project – Six semesterhours. An original research of sufficient magnitudeto warrant the conclusion that candidates showevidence of mastery of research tools, techniques,and understanding.READING EDUCATIONRDG 512 Language Arts Across the Curriculum- Three semester hours. This course providesstudents with the knowledge, skills, and dispositionsrequired of a teacher of language arts. Coursecontent includes the integration of the componentsof the language arts into the self-contained anddepartmentalized/content area classrooms at P-12levels. Knowledge and practical insights forteaching language arts will be gained by examiningscientifically based research and effective methodsof instruction. Topics to be covered include reading,writing, listening, speaking, spelling, vocabulary,grammar and usage, and handwriting.RDG 515 Content Area Reading – Three semesterhours. This introductory course provides studentswith the knowledge, skills, and dispositions requiredof a teacher to build comprehension in the contentareas at the P-12 levels through the activation ofprior knowledge; metacognitive strategies; schematheory; use of before, during, and after readingstrategies; amount of reading; text structure; deepdiscussion and questioning; vocabularydevelopment; writing connected to reading; andstudy skillsRDG 516 Assessing and Accelerating ReadingAbility – Three semester hours. Students will learntechniques for assessing reading ability anddesigning and implementing instruction to improvethe reading ability of students reading below gradelevel at the P-12 levels. Topics to be coveredinclude the role of the diagnostic teacher, gatheringdata formally and informally, designing diagnosticlessons, selecting appropriate instructionaltechniques and materials, and the role of technology.Cognitive, home, school, and other factors will beused to gather data to diagnose a student’s strengthsand weaknesses in reading and design a researchbasedprogram for acceleration of reading ability.RDG 517 Children’s and Adolescent Literature –Three semester hours. This course providesstudents with the knowledge, skills, and dispositionsrequired of a teacher relative to the various genres ofchildren’s and adolescent literature and theirrelationship to beginning reading, enhancement ofreading comprehension, and intervention instructionin the various content areas.RDG 595 Internship for Reading SpecialistCertification – Six semester hours. This internshipprovides students with opportunities to refine andimplement the knowledge, skills, and dispositionsrequired of a reading specialist in school andclassroom settings. Students will demonstrate theircompetencies in providing and/or assisting with theimplementation of effective, research-baseddevelopmental reading and reading interventioninstruction, literacy programs at the P-12 gradelevels, and professional development activities.RDG 700 Trends and Issues in Reading/Literacy– Three semester hours. Students will learn aboutthe historical movements (basal readers, wholelanguage, phonics, multicultural influences, etc.)that have affected current practices inreading/literacy research theories and instruction.Various aspects of reading will be traced back totheir beginnings.RDG 701 Assessment in Reading/Literacy –Three semester hours. Political, social, economic,and psychological implications of reading/literacyassessment are explored through examination of thetesting movement and of issues that have emergedfrom the movement.RDG 702 Quantitative Research Methods inReading/Literacy – Three semester hours.Students will learn quantitative research methodsthat are used to investigate reading/literacy. Studentswill work collaboratively with a faculty member incarrying out a research proposal by formulatingquestions, designing a study, creating testinginstruments and approaches to data analysis.RDG 703 Qualitative Research Methods inReading/Literacy – Three semester hours. Studentswill learn qualitative research methods that are usedto investigate reading/literacy. Students will workcollaboratively with a faculty member in conductinga research proposal by formulating questions,designing a study, creating testing instruments, andapproaches to data analysis.159


RDG 704 Curriculum in Reading/Literacy –Three semester hours. Students will investigateresearch and practice relative to various aspects ofreading/literacy such as teaching reading, writing,literature, grammar, usage, and spelling.RDG 705 Seminar in Reading - Special Topics –Three semester hours. This curriculum is designedto meet the individual interests of students relativeto topics in reading/literacy. Individually selectedtopics will be addressed in an in-depth manner.RDG 706 Advanced Seminar in Reading/Literacy– Three semester hours. Major topics inreading/literacy will be studied. Emphasis will beplaced on analysis, synthesis, and interpretation oforiginal research.RDG 707 Advanced Clinical Application inReading/Literacy – Three semester hours.This course will require the student to gain an indepthunderstanding of formal and informalassessments used in diagnosis of reading difficulties.Under close supervision, the graduate student willwork with children with serious reading problemsby assessing, establishing a program of acceleration,tutoring, and recording and reporting results.RDG 708: Leadership in School ProgramDevelopment – Three semester hours. In thiscourse students will examine leadership theory andresearch, leadership styles, coaching, and methodsfor affecting change in curriculum and instruction.RDG 709 Advanced Study in Content AreaReading – Three semester hours. Students willexamine the research that identifies the aspects ofcontent area reading, which impact studentachievement.RDG 710 Doctoral Dissertation Research inReading/Literacy – One, three, or six semesterhours. The graduate student will complete aproposal for a detailed research study, conduct thestudy, and defend the completed dissertation duringan oral examination.RDG 713 Family Literacy – Three semester hours.The course is intended to introduce the student toconcepts in Family literacy from a multidisplinaryperspective. A variety of topics will be exploredsuch as theoretical perspectives related to familyliteracy, specific practice and strategies used andstrategies used to promote family literacy incollaboration with schools and communities,explore diverse family literacy.RDG 720 New Literacies, Digital Technologiesand Learning – Three semester hours. This courseis designed to develop educators who are able to usea range of digital technologies as a seamless part ofliteracy instruction.RDG 721 Theory & Research Literacy – Threesemester hours. Doctorial seminar provides an indepthexploration of literacy theory, research, andpractice.SECONDARY EDUCATIONSED 521 English in the Secondary School – Threesemester hours. This course willconsider objectives of English in the secondaryschool, content and organization of theEnglish curriculum, and direction of learning in theEnglish program.SED 522 Secondary School Mathematics – Threesemester hours. Literature, research, and content inmathematics, current trends, experimental programs,graduation of subject matter, criteria for programevaluation, and basic issues.SED 523 Social Science in the Secondary SchoolCurriculum – Three semester hours.The course content, along with related material, willconsist of the examination of the basic purposes andobjectives of the social studies program in the juniorand senior high school and recent trends anddevelopments in the field, selecting and organizingcontent materials, planning various kinds of learningexperiences, and exploring effective ways ofteaching and learning democratic citizenship.SED 524 Science in the Secondary SchoolProgram – Three semester hours. For teachers andsupervisors of science in the junior and senior highschool. Units of subject matter presented throughassigned reading, lectures, demonstrations, anddiscussions will be studied. Students will participatein demonstrations, selected laboratory work, andfield trips. There will be a comprehensiveexamination covering of the content of generalscience.SED 527 Guiding Learning in the SecondarySchool – Three semester hours. Basic principles andtechniques of learning as related to the various fieldsand levels of Secondary Education.160


SED 530 The Secondary School Curriculum –Three semester hours. Principles of curriculumconstruction as they apply to the secondary schooland the various subject areas; will be a critical studyof recent efforts to combine fields of subjectmatters.SED 552 Independent Research – One, two orthree semester hours. This course is designed forand restricted to graduate students seeking themaster’s degree in Secondary Education and/orcertification. The content of the course is drawnfrom current research data. The students have anopportunity to identify and analyze areas of interest,study issues, trends, problems, procedures,implications, and innovative programs identified inresearch data. The course cannot be substituted forrequired courses.SED 699 Thesis – One, three, or six semester hours.Please consult the Teacher Service Center for a listof courses approved for the followingteaching fields (Approved Program Checklist):• Agriscience• Biology• Business/Marketing Education• Chemistry• English Language Arts• Family and Consumer Sciences• General Science• General Social Science• Mathematics• Physics• Technical Education• Career TechnologiesSPECIAL EDUATIONSPE 500:Teaching Secondary Students withDisabilities in General Classrooms – Threesemester hours. This course is designed to introducethe graduate level teacher to principles useful forworking with secondary students demonstrating avariety of academic, behavioral, and social needs.SPE 501: Introduction to the Study ofExceptional Learners – Three semester hours. Thiscourse provides an overview of the variousexceptionalities and an introduction to basic specialeducation services and procedures.SPE 515: Language Development – Threesemester hours. This course involves the study ofnormal language development, with emphasis on thedevelopment of the phonological, syntactic, andsemantic systems in children with disabilities.SPE 516: Collaborative Consultation – Threesemester hours. This course is designed to provideteachers with knowledgeable skills required tosuccessfully facilitate intervention strategies withgeneral education classroom teachers and othereducation support personnel in meeting the needs ofchildren with disabilities in an inclusive educationalsetting. Additional skills are designed to facilitateefforts of special education teaching personnel infacilitating intervention strategies with parents andcommunity agencies in assisting students withdisabilities to make a successful transition from theschool to employment and community livingactivitiesSPE 518: Application of Child Development toSpecial Education – Three semester hours. An indepth study of the principles and theories of childdevelopment from early childhood throughadulthood. Specific emphasis is upon theimplications of child development theory onteaching exceptional students.SPE 520: Learning Strategies for Adolescents –Three semester hours. This course is designed toprovide teachers of children with disabilities ingrades 6-12 with current strategies for assessingstudent learning styles and modifying instructionalmethods for optimal student learning.SPE 522: Learning Strategies for ElementarySchools – Three semester hours. This course isdesigned to provide teachers of children withdisabilities in grades K-6 with validated, researchbasedapproaches to plan for and incorporate studentlearning styles in inclusive classrooms to for optimalstudent learning.SPE 524: Sign Language – Three Semester hours.American Sign Language and Finger spelling willbe taught with opportunities for group practice,opportunities with children and adults who are deafand/or hard of hearing.SPE 525: Transitioning Students with Disabilities(Secondary) – Three semester hours. This coursethe historical development of career education,model programs for individuals with disabilities,techniques for developing and implementing acareer education program, and instructionalstrategies for providing career education toindividual students with disabilities.161


SPE 540: Teaching Elementary Students withDisabilities in Elementary Schools – Threesemester hours. This course is designed to providepre-service teachers an opportunity to plan methodsand materials to be used in inclusive settings,addressing the educational needs of students withdisabilities in upper elementary schoolSPE 541: Teaching Early Childhood Studentswith Disabilities In General Classrooms – Threesemester hours. This course is designed to providepre-service teachers an opportunity to plan methodsand materials to be used in inclusive settings,addressing the educational needs of students withdisabilities birth through grade three.SPE 545: Introduction to Early ChildhoodSpecial Education – Three semester hours. Thiscourse covers the rationale for early childhoodspecial education and provides a comprehensiveoverview of major principles and practices relatingto the provision of services to young children withdisabilities from birth through age eight.SPE 546: Parent and Family Assessment,Support, and Cooperation – Three semester hours.This course is designed to investigate methods offamily assessment and evaluation as well asmethods in training, counseling, and support ofyoung children with disabilities.SPE 548: Assessment in Early Childhood SpecialEducation – Three semester hours. This courseemphasizes the basic skills and knowledge that arerequired to analyze, select, and implement effectiveassessment practices with children with disabilities.SPE 549: Adaptive Techniques and Methods inEarly Childhood Special Education – Threesemester hours. This course involves the study oftechniques and methods that are requisites to adaptearly childhood curricula to the specialized needs ofyoung children with disabilities from birth throughage eight.SPE 550: Learning Strategies for YoungChildren with Disabilities – Three semester hours.This course is designed to provide teachers ofchildren with disabilities aged 0– 8 with currentstrategies for assessing student learning styles andmodifying instructional methods for optimal studentlearning.SPE 595 Internship In Early Childhood SpecialEducation – Three semester hours. This courseengages the candidate to practice learnedproficiencies in an educational setting by providingsupervised teaching experiences in an earlychildhood special education setting involvingchildren from birth to age eight. Candidates willdemonstrate competencies to develop andimplement instructional strategies under thesupervision of a certified teacher of children withdisabilities from birth to age eight in a setting ofservice delivery designed to maximize children’slearning potential.SPE 609: Seminar In Special Education – Threesemester hours. This course is designed to stimulatethe candidate's thinking in the field of specialeducation, current research, programminginnovations, curricular trends, and theoreticalperspectives to be discussed.SPE 641: Evaluation and Methods and Materialsof Special Education – Three semester hours. Thiscourse is designed to present innovative positionsregarding how children in special education may beaided in the learning process.SPE 643: Curriculum Planning--K-6 – Threesemester hours. This course focuses on the study ofthe philosophical and psychological foundations ofspecial education and designing curriculum specificto addressing the needs of individuals withdisabilities within an inclusive education setting ingrades K-6.SPE 644: Curriculum Planning --6-12 – Threesemester hours. This course focuses on the study ofthe philosophical and psychological foundations ofspecial education and designing curriculum specificto addressing the needs of individuals withdisabilities within an inclusive education setting ingrades 6-12.SPE 660: Advanced Collaborative Consultation –Three semester hours. This course is designed toprovide teachers with opportunities to successfullyplan and facilitate intervention strategies to beimplemented in a school-wide inclusion program.The focus is upon implementing strategies whichgarner teacher support for collaborative consultationwhile simultaneously meeting the needs of childrenwith disabilities.SPE 664: Supervising Collaborative ConsultationPrograms K-6 – Three semester hours. This courseis designed to provide opportunities for teachers ofyoung children with disabilities with practicalexperience in facilitating collaborative activities162


among special educators and general educators,families, and interagency personnel.SPE 665: Supervising Collaborative ConsultationProgram 6-12 – Three semester hours. This courseis designed to provide opportunities for teachers ofadolescents with disabilities with practicalexperience in facilitating collaborative activitiesamong special educators and general educators,families, and interagency personnel.SPE 667: Professional Writing (3)- This coursefocuses upon professional writing strategies andprocesses for professional educators. The courseemphasis is upon identifying funding sources,professional organizations, and refereed journals forwhich professional writing is appropriate.SOCIAL WORKSWK 500 Social Work Practice I - Three semesterhours. The course focuses on the history, foundationdomains and roles of social work practice. Itintroduces the generalist social work practice modelwith emphasis on an overview of the social workprofession, discussion of social work values andethics, and applications of the generalist model toindividuals and families. Required of all students inthe 60 hour degree program. (Prerequisites:Admission to the MSW program.)SWK 501 Social Work Practice II – Threesemester hours. Continuation of SWK 500.Explores further the roles, domains, philosophy androles of social work practice. Basic theory, values,ethics and methods generic to social work practiceat various system levels are presented with anemphasis on practice with mezzo and macro systems(e.g., families, groups organizations andcommunities). This course is required all studentsin the 60 hour degree program. (Prerequisites: SWK500)SWK 510 Social Welfare Policy & Services I -Three semester hours. Examines the historicalevolution of social welfare institutions; political,economic, religious, social and ideologicalperspectives will be analyzed. This course isrequired all students in the 60 hour degree program.SWK 511 Social Welfare Policy & Services II -Two semester hours. Continuation of SWK 510 -Social Welfare Policy & Services I. Emphasizesanalytic models of welfare policies and laysframework for decision making. Contemporaryissues will be discussed and international policiesexamined. This course is required for all students inthe 60 hour degree program.(Prerequisites: SWK 510)SWK 520 Human Behavior in the SocialEnvironment I - Three semester hours. Theoriesconcepts, and knowledge about human developmentand behavior within the context of the socialenvironment through the study of life cycledevelopment in the ecological system. Major socialand cultural institutions and their impacts on diverseindividuals, families, groups and organizations willbe examined. This course is required for allstudents. This course is required for all students inthe 60 hour degree programSWK 521 Human Behavior in the SocialEnvironment II - Three semester hours. This is thesecond of a two-course sequence dealing with adultdevelopment, including old age and death. Thesocietal impact of families, groups, andorganizations on the elderly and the elderlyinteraction with these systems and their diverseimpacts will also be discussed. This course isrequired for all students in the 60 hour degreeprogram. (Prerequisites: SWK 520, 500 and 510).SWK 522 Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Diversity- Three semester hours. This course will introduceand sensitize students to the major concepts ofculture, sub-culture, race, ethnicity and gender,cultural diversity, and pluralism and conflicts causedethnocentrism, discrimination and prejudice.Further, it will emphasize public policies as well asinterpersonal responses and the relationship betweenrace, ethnicity, gender, diversity and social workpractice. Emphasis is placed on the examination ofmajor ethnic sub-cultures as well as sub-culturalgroupings based on such factors as gender, race,ethnicity, religion, national origin, age, sexualorientation, physical and mental abilities and otherdifferences in human populations. The commonelements of oppressions are emphasized andprejudicial and discriminatory practices areevaluated from both micro - and macro theoreticalframes of reference. This is a course is required ofall students.SWK 523 Rural-Urban Social Work - Twosemester hours. Develop and apply theoreticalknowledge and skills used in Urban and RuralSocial Work Practice. Overall, the course assumesgeneral knowledge of basic concepts inissues/problems, policies, community organizations,163


administration, service delivery systems, resourceallocation, sociological knowledge, and programimplementation in both urban and ruralenvironments. Students will engage in projects thatinvolve assessing the needs of rural communitiesand suggest intervention strategies. Teamworkreflecting professional standards of individualperformance will be stressed as a means ofaccomplishing the objectives. Group and individualassignments will be used to assist students todevelop teamwork, personal practice skills andcompetencies in evaluating practice. Thus, a groupproject involving rural-urban issues and problems,policy formation, planning, implementation,evaluation and issues feedback is used as a mediumfor the application of knowledge and skills. Thiscourse is required of all students. (Prerequisites:SWK 500, 510, 520 or Advanced Standing).SWK 530 Applied Social Work Research - Threesemester hours. This outline covers the generalcontent and assignments included in the syllabus.During the regular academic year, completion ofthis course typically requires about 14 to 16 weeks.Successful completion requires the ability toconsume a great deal of written information, the useof complex thinking skills to understand social workapplications, and advanced conceptualization andorganization skills for preparation of theassignments. For most students this courserepresents and introduction to research but it is,nevertheless, a graduate level course. Therefore, allstudents are expected to perform accordingly. Forthese reasons, all assignments are required, andwork must be submitted in a timely manner. Thisoutline was prepared for students’ ease in movingtoward a successful completion of the course. Thisis the first of two research courses. This course isrequired of all students in the 60 hour degreeprogram.SWK 581 Field Practicum & Seminar I - Foursemester hours. This is the first practicum course inthe three-part practicum sequence. The purpose ofthis sequence is to expose students to theprofessional application of theory practice incommunity- based human service organizations.This course can be taken concurrent with orsubsequent to classroom instruction. The fieldpracticum courses must be taken in sequence and isa requirement for all students. (Prerequisites: SWK500, 510, 520, 522 and 530; co-requisites SWK 501,511, 521 and 523).SWK 587 Social Work Empowerment - Threesemester hours. This is a bridge course, whichstrengthens and assures a common core ofprofessional knowledge for all advanced standingstudents prior to the beginning of coursework inConcentration areas. It explores the foundations,domains, values, ethics, philosophy, and roles ofgeneralist social work. The foundations includehuman behavior in the social environment, socialwork and social welfare policy, practice, research,and fieldwork. Understanding the relationship ofeach of the foundation areas to the others, as well astheir impact and interactive effects on social workpractice will be important in this course. Thehistorical and contemporary use of empowermentand strengths perspectives will be examined alongwith the impact of factors such as race, sex, gender,class, and other diversity issues on practicedecisions made in these contexts. Classroomlearning and assignments will include application ofecological perspectives and problem solvingprocesses; assessment and planning skills;differential utilization of knowledge of the impact ofrace, ethnicity, class, culture, gender, sexualorientation, and varying abilities on social workrelationships. This is a required introductory courseexclusively planned for all advanced standingstudents. Other students may not take this coursewithout permission from the ProgramChair/Coordinator.SWK 600 Social Work Intervention StrategiesWith Vulnerable Clients - Three semester hours.This practice seminar focuses on relationshipbuilding,assessment and interventions withvulnerable individuals and families. Theories needs(e.g., mental illness, delinquency, and physicalhandicaps), foster care, and protected services forabused and neglected children. Social Work valuesand ethics will be infused throughout the course.This course is required of all students in the Familyand Child Welfare concentration. (Prerequisites:SWK 510, 511, 520, 521, or Consent of Instructor)SWK 613 Budgeting and Financial Management- Three semester hours. Basic knowledge andtheoretical underpinnings required to manage thefiscal and budgetary aspects of human serviceorganizations. The course emphasis is thedevelopment and administration of fiscal resourcesto effectively meet the mission and goals of theorganization. Along with the practical aspects ofbudget planning, development and implementation,the course will address major funding sources forhuman service organizations, and the strategies ofinfluencing and accessing these sources. The role ofpolitics and its impact on social services within oursociety will be explored, and students will be taught164


to manage with decreasing resources especially inrural areas. Required of all Policy, Planning andAdministration concentration students.(Prerequisites: All foundation year courses orConsent of Instructor)SWK 614 Principles of Planning and ProgramImplementation - Three semester hours. The focusof this course is on the concept of planning withinsocial welfare agencies institutions for the purposeof program implementation. Students acquireknowledge and understanding of planning concepts,strategies, and objectives for program development,implementation and evaluation. An ecologicalsystem perspective is applied to promoteunderstanding of the interrelationships amongindividuals (micro systems), families, groups(mezzo systems), organizations/institutions andcommunities (macro systems). Likewise, a problemsolving approach is used to provide content forunderstanding the differential strategies forresolving needs of individuals, families, and smallgroups, and larger organizational or communitysystems. Theoretical, empirical, and experimentalcontents are utilized to provide the student with anawareness of both comparative and contrastingaspects of systemic planning with other activitiesrequired in program implementation and programevaluation. Required of all Policy, Planning andAdministration concentration students.(Prerequisites: All foundation year courses orConsent of Instructor)SWK 615 Grant Writing - Two semester hours.Explores various grant writing theories and skillsand demonstrates practical application of theprocess. Students will assist agencies andorganizations to apply for local, state, federal, andinternational grants for their programs or projects.Required of all students in the Policy, Planning andAdministration concentration, (Prerequisites: Allfoundation year courses or Consent of Instructor)SWK 616 Issues & Policies in CommunityMental Health - Three semester hours. Examinesthe impact of policies on social work practice inmental health settings, including local, state andnational policies from which services are derived.Also examines the differential impact of race,ethnicity and social class on policy formulation andservice delivery in mental health settings. Thiscourse is required of all students in the CommunityMental Health concentration. (Prerequisites SWK500, 501, 520, 521, or Consent of Instructor)SWK 621 Family Theories and Processes- Threesemester hours. This advanced level practice courseexplores sociological concepts of marriages andfamilies in contemporary society; vulnerablefamilies; family preservation; and the assessmentand treatment of marriages and families. Treatmentmodels, techniques, and strategies are highlighted.Social work values and ethics, research onmarriages and families and the treatment thereof,and cultural diversity issues are emphasized. Thiscourse is required of all students in Direct Practice.(Prerequisites: SWK 500,501,520,521,601,602,610or Consent of Instructor)SWK 630 Needs Assessment and ProgramEvaluation - Three semester hours. This coursebuilds on foundation courses and the need forscientific problem-solving, decision-making andaccountability in professional social work practice.Knowledge of the social work research process isthe foundation upon which students will developneeds assessment and program evaluation skills.Understanding of social work knowledge, values,skills and ethics associated with practice, policy, andhuman behavior perspectives will be articulated inthe student’s conceptualization and development ofeither a need assessment or a program evaluation.Additionally, these skills will be applied to a varietyof social systems and social problems for thepurposes of promoting, sustaining, and enhancingindividuals, families, groups, communities, andsocietal well-being. (Prerequisites: SWK 530, orConsent of Instructor)SWK 631 & 632 Research Project/Thesis - Twoto six semester hours. This course offers studentsthe opportunity to prepare an empirically basedresearch thesis derived from a practice problem. Thethesis is designed to make a significant contributionto a special area of interest within the student’sconcentration. Upon approval by the student’sThesis Committee, or the research project panel, andacceptance by the Dean of the School of GraduateStudies (Graduate Bulletin, 1999-2000), studentscomplete their research and thesis under theguidance of a graduate faculty member and thesiscommittee. Upon completion of the research project,the thesis is defended before the student’s thesiscommittee. (Prerequisites: Completion of all firstyearcourses, or Advanced Placement status, andRegistration for SWK 631: Research Project)SWK 641 Crisis Intervention and Short TermPsychotherapy - Two semester hours. In-depthexploration of the history and theory of crisisintervention and brief therapies. Crisis intervention165


and short-term theoretical models and techniquesare applied to diverse and vulnerable populations.Also examined are social work values and relatedethical dilemmas, legal and professional issues andsocial work research, particularly the evaluation ofpractice effectiveness. (Prerequisites: SWK 500,510, 520 or Consent of Instructor)SWK 642 Sexual Abuse: Assessment &Intervention - Two semester hours. Issues ofsexual abuse and rape across cultures. The emphasisis on childhood sexual abuse, incestuous and nonfamilial,and its effects on the developing child andthe adult survivor. Protective service issues as wellas psychotherapeutic issues will be addressed.Course content includes: assessment of sexualabuse; treatment philosophies and techniques forchildren and adult survivors, including individual,family and group therapy; assessment of childhoodsexual abuse in custody and visitation cases; falsememory syndrome; offender treatment; and socialwork roles, including protective services worker,therapist, and witness. Building on the knowledge ofhuman behavior and diversity, social work practice,and social welfare policy acquired in the study ofthe core curriculum, this course emphasizes theapplication of this knowledge in the area ofchildhood sexual abuse and rape. It is an elective inthe Direct Practice concentration, and builds uponthis body of knowledge, especially SWK 600, 602,610 and 616. (Prerequisites: SWK 500, 501, 521 &522 or Consent of Instructor)SWK 643 Interventions with Children andAdolescents – Three semester hours. Provides anoverview of practice with emphasis on physical,psychological, and cultural developmentalengagement, processes and characteristics unique tochildren and adolescents. The course also exploresassessment and intervention strategies useful withchildren/adolescents in family, group, andinstitutional settings. Critically examines values,ethics, research and other issues regarding effectivepractice with this vulnerable population.(Prerequisites: SWK 500, 510, 520 or Consent ofInstructor)SWK 644 HIV/AIDS: Critical Issues in SocialWork – Three semester hours. This course focuseson the biological, social and psychological dynamicsof HIV/AIDS. It is designed to prepare social workmajors and students majoring in other disciplines tobe knowledgeable of HIV?AIDS and itsdisproportionate impact on African-Americans andpeople of color.SWK 652 Social Work and Law – Two semesterhours. This seminar examines the judicial systemand its relevancy to social welfare and social work.The focus is on skills and knowledge needed foreffective participation in the legal process as a socialwork professional. (Prerequisites are SWK 500,501, 510, 511, 520, 521 or Consent of Instructor)SWK 658 International Social Welfare andSocial Work – Two semester hours. Sensitizesstudents to the knowledge base required ininternational social welfare and social work practiceand international social work education. Further, itwill emphasize the significance of traditional andmodern ways of foreign welfare and social workpractices in developed and developing countries.Emphasis is placed on the examination of macro,mezzo and micro social systems and theirinteraction. Further, these concepts will be discussedin class: demography, social issues/problems,community development, community organization,transfer of technology, non-governmentalorganizations (NGOs), governmental organization(GOs) and the like. (Prerequisites: SWK 510, 511,520, 521 or Consent of Instructor)SWK 660 Personality Theories andPsychopathology - Three semester hours. In-depthfocus on assessment and diagnosis in social workpractice with some attention to change personalitytheories. Includes in-depth discussion and critique ofDSM-IV-TR and its use in social work practice.Information on assessment etiology and treatment ofmental illnesses is provided. Required of all studentsin direct practice concentrations. (Prerequisites:Completion of ALL foundation courses or Consentof Instructor)SWK 663 Substance Abuse – Two semester hours.Examines the impact of substance abuse onindividuals, families, groups,organizations/institutions and communities. Also,societal responses, contributing factors, socialproblems, policies, programs, services, interventionstrategies, and needed resources will be examined.(Prerequisites: SWK 500, 501, 520, 521, or Consentof Instructor)SWK 667 Social Work Practice with Aging - Twosemester hours. Discusses impact of mental illnesson the elderly. Focuses on demographic issues andproblems of the aged will be infused into the coursecontent with a special emphasis on Alzheimer’sdisease and other mental illnesses. Assessment andintervention strategies used by social workers will166


e examined. (Prerequisites: SWK 500, 501, 520,521, 522 or Consent of Instructor)SWK 680 Field Practicum & Seminar II - Foursemester hours. This is the second practicum coursein the three part sequence. (Prerequisites: ALLfoundation year courses, co-requisites SWK 600 or616 and 621)SWK 681 Field Practicum & Seminar III - Foursemester hours. This is the last course in the threepartpracticum sequence. (Prerequisites: SWK 680)SWK 689 Integrative Seminar - Three semesterhours. Focuses on social work as a profession andon integration of all curriculum areas in theprofessional practice of social work. Emphasis willbe placed on all aspects of professional social workpractice including methods, knowledge, values,ethics, skills and legal issues. This course isrequired of all students and should be taken duringthe semester that students are graduating from theprogram.SWK 698 Independent Study - One to threesemester hours. Students may register for one tothree hours of independent study with a professorcompetent in the area of student’s interest. Anapplication for Independent Study must beapproved by both the instructor consenting tosupervision and the MSW program coordinator. Anindependent study must not replicate another coursein the MSW curriculum.and Empowerment Strategies are addressed forvulnerable clients (e.g., persons living in poverty,survivors of violence, trauma and natural disasters,and survivors of abuse and neglect). Required of allstudents in the Family & Child WelfareSpecialization. (Prerequisites: ALL foundation yearcourses or consent of the instructor)SWK 601 Social Work Practice with Groups -Three semester hours. Methods and skills forengaging, assessing and intervening with task andtreatment groups are explored. Concepts and ethicsapplied to group work are emphasized. Alsodiscussed are therapeutic interventions and theoriesappropriate for group work. Required of all studentsin the Direct Practice Concentration. (PrerequisitesSWK 600, 602 or consent of the instructor)accountability in various practice settings.Engagement, assessment and intervention strategieswill be explored. Theoretical perspectives andtreatment models useful in mental health practiceare emphasized. Prerequisites: SWK 500, 501, 520,521 or permission of the professor. This course is arequirement for all students in the CommunityMental Health specialization.SWK 604 Theory and Practice of Social WelfareAdministration & Planning - Three semesterhours. Provides the knowledge base and beginningcompetency required for the mid-leveladministration of a social welfare organizationwithin the community. Theoretical perspectives onthe evolutionary development of administration andgrounded principles of management will bediscussed. Social Work ethics, values, methods,knowledge and skills introduced in earlier courseswill lay the foundation for additional work in theseareas. Contemporary issues impacting on modernorganizations, including but not limited to economicand social justice, diversity issues including race,women, gays and lesbians, and people who arephysically and mentally challenged, will bediscussed. The student will gain a comprehensiveview of Administration in the macro environment,and will solidify his/her perception on theadministrative style of choice. Course prerequisitesinclude ALL the foundation courses or consent ofthe instructor.SWK 605 Organizational Behavior andManagement - Three semester hours. This courseis predicated on the assumption that people are trulythe most valuable asset in any organization;therefore, management must demonstrate a realisticappreciation of workers, individually andcollectively. This course deals with the managementof people, inter-personal interactions, andrelationships within organizations including, but notlimited to, individual and group behavior,motivation, learning, leadership, supervisorybehavior, communication, role, status and conflictresolution. Professional social work values andethics including and abiding respect for the dignityand worth of the individual will be emphasized. Therole of diversity (ethnic, racial, sexual orientation,religious, physical and mental abilities and gender)and the social policy of affirmative action will bediscussed. 2nd year standing.SWK 602 Social Work Practice in Health &Mental Health - Three semester hours. This coursehighlights critical issues faced by social workerswithin the mental health system and the worker'sNOTE:Students must register for thiscourse in the Psychology Dept.(PSY 627) or the Department ofManagement (MBA 515).167


As a concentration course prerequisites include ALLthe foundation year courses or consent of theinstructor.SWK 610 Family & Child Welfare Policy - Threesemester hours. The predominant focus of thiscourse is to identify, discuss and integrate familyand child welfare issues and policy. Although thecourse discussions will be on child welfare policiesaffecting children and families in general, theemphasis will be on children and families withspecial needs, e.g. protective services, foster careand adoption. The concept of the “best interest ofthe child” will be analyzed in depth. This coursetraces the historical development of child welfareservices in the U.S. from the beginning of thetwentieth century until the present time. Five areasof services, programs and policies will be discussed:adoption, teenage pregnancy and parenthood,children with special needs (e.g., mental illness,delinquency, and physical handicaps), foster care,and protected services for abused and neglectedchildren. Social Work values and ethics will beinfused throughout the course. This course isrequired of all students in the Family and ChildWelfare concentration. (Prerequisites: SWK 510,511, 520, 521, or Consent of Instructor)SWK 613 Budgeting and Financial Management- Three semester hours. Basic knowledge andtheoretical underpinnings required to manage thefiscal and budgetary aspects of human serviceorganizations. The course emphasis is thedevelopment and administration of fiscal resourcesto effectively meet the mission and goals of theorganization. Along with the practical aspects ofbudget planning, development and implementation,the course will address major funding sources forhuman service organizations, and the strategies ofinfluencing and accessing these sources. The role ofpolitics and its impact on social services within oursociety will be explored, and students will be taughtto manage with decreasing resources especially inrural areas. Required of all Policy, Planning andAdministration concentration students.(Prerequisites: All foundation year courses orConsent of Instructor)SWK 614 Principles of Planning and ProgramImplementation - Three semester hours. The focusof this course is on the concept of planning withinsocial welfare agencies institutions for the purposeof program implementation. Students acquireknowledge and understanding of planning concepts,strategies, and objectives for program development,implementation and evaluation. An ecologicalsystem perspective is applied to promoteunderstanding of the interrelationships amongindividuals (micro systems), families, groups(mezzo systems), organizations/institutions andcommunities (macro systems). Likewise, a problemsolving approach is used to provide content forunderstanding the differential strategies forresolving needs of individuals, families, and smallgroups, and larger organizational or communitysystems. Theoretical, empirical, and experimentalcontents are utilized to provide the student with anawareness of both comparative and contrastingaspects of systemic planning with other activitiesrequired in program implementation and programevaluation. Required of all Policy, Planning andAdministration concentration students.(Prerequisites: All foundation year courses orConsent of Instructor)SWK 615 Grant Writing - Two semester hours.Explores various grant writing theories and skillsand demonstrates practical application of theprocess. Students will assist agencies andorganizations to apply for local, state, federal, andinternational grants for their programs or projects.Required of all students in the Policy, Planning andAdministration concentration, (Prerequisites: Allfoundation year courses or Consent of Instructor)SWK 616 Issues & Policies in CommunityMental Health - Three semester hours. Examinesthe impact of policies on social work practice inmental health settings, including local, state andnational policies from which services are derived.Also examines the differential impact of race,ethnicity and social class on policy formulation andservice delivery in mental health settings. Thiscourse is required of all students in the CommunityMental Health concentration. (Prerequisites SWK500, 501, 520, 521, or Consent of Instructor)SWK 621 Family Theories and Processes- Threesemester hours. This advanced level practice courseexplores sociological concepts of marriages andfamilies in contemporary society; vulnerablefamilies; family preservation; and the assessmentand treatment of marriages and families. Treatmentmodels, techniques, and strategies are highlighted.Social work values and ethics, research onmarriages and families and the treatment thereof,and cultural diversity issues are emphasized. Thiscourse is required of all students in Direct Practice.(Prerequisites: SWK 500,501,520,521,601,602,610or Consent of Instructor)168


SWK 630 Needs Assessment and ProgramEvaluation - Three semester hours. This coursebuilds on foundation courses and the need forscientific problem-solving, decision-making andaccountability in professional social work practice.Knowledge of the social work research process isthe foundation upon which students will developneeds assessment and program evaluation skills.Understanding of social work knowledge, values,skills and ethics associated with practice, policy, andhuman behavior perspectives will be articulated inthe student’s conceptualization and development ofeither a need assessment or a program evaluation.Additionally, these skills will be applied to a varietyof social systems and social problems for thepurposes of promoting, sustaining, and enhancingindividuals, families, groups, communities, andsocietal well-being. (Prerequisites: SWK 530, orConsent of Instructor)SWK 631 & 632 Research Project/Thesis - Twoto six semester hours. This course offers studentsthe opportunity to prepare an empirically basedresearch thesis derived from a practice problem. Thethesis is designed to make a significant contributionto a special area of interest within the student’sconcentration. Upon approval by the student’sThesis Committee, or the research project panel, andacceptance by the Dean of the School of GraduateStudies (Graduate Bulletin, 1999-2000), studentscomplete their research and thesis under theguidance of a graduate faculty member and thesiscommittee. Upon completion of the research project,the thesis is defended before the student’s thesiscommittee. (Prerequisites: Completion of all firstyearcourses, or Advanced Placement status, andRegistration for SWK 631: Research Project)SWK 641 Crisis Intervention and Short TermPsychotherapy - Two semester hours. In-depthexploration of the history and theory of crisisintervention and brief therapies. Crisis interventionand short-term theoretical models and techniquesare applied to diverse and vulnerable populations.Also examined are social work values and relatedethical dilemmas, legal and professional issues andsocial work research, particularly the evaluation ofpractice effectiveness. (Prerequisites: SWK 500,510, 520 or Consent of Instructor)SWK 642 Sexual Abuse: Assessment &Intervention - Two semester hours. Issues ofsexual abuse and rape across cultures. The emphasisis on childhood sexual abuse, incestuous and nonfamilial,and its effects on the developing child andthe adult survivor. Protective service issues as wellas psychotherapeutic issues will be addressed.Course content includes: assessment of sexualabuse; treatment philosophies and techniques forchildren and adult survivors, including individual,family and group therapy; assessment of childhoodsexual abuse in custody and visitation cases; falsememory syndrome; offender treatment; and socialwork roles, including protective services worker,therapist, and witness. Building on the knowledge ofhuman behavior and diversity, social work practice,and social welfare policy acquired in the study ofthe core curriculum, this course emphasizes theapplication of this knowledge in the area ofchildhood sexual abuse and rape. It is an elective inthe Direct Practice concentration, and builds uponthis body of knowledge, especially SWK 600, 602,610 and 616. (Prerequisites: SWK 500, 501, 521 &522 or Consent of Instructor)SWK 643 Interventions with Children andAdolescents – Three semester hours. Provides anoverview of practice with emphasis on physical,psychological, and cultural developmentalengagement, processes and characteristics unique tochildren and adolescents. The course also exploresassessment and intervention strategies useful withchildren/adolescents in family, group, andinstitutional settings. Critically examines values,ethics, research and other issues regarding effectivepractice with this vulnerable population.(Prerequisites: SWK 500, 510, 520 or Consent ofInstructor)SWK 652 Social Work and Law – Two semesterhours. This seminar examines the judicial systemand its relevancy to social welfare and social work.The focus is on skills and knowledge needed foreffective participation in the legal process as a socialwork professional. (Prerequisites are SWK 500,501, 510, 511, 520, 521 or Consent of Instructor)SWK 658 International Social Welfare andSocial Work – Two semester hours. Sensitizesstudents to the knowledge base required ininternational social welfare and social work practiceand international social work education. Further, itwill emphasize the significance of traditional andmodern ways of foreign welfare and social workpractices in developed and developing countries.Emphasis is placed on the examination of macro,mezzo and micro social systems and theirinteraction. Further, these concepts will be discussedin class: demography, social issues/problems,community development, community organization,transfer of technology, non-governmentalorganizations (NGOs), governmental organization169


(GOs) and the like. (Prerequisites: SWK 510, 511,520, 521 or Consent of Instructor)SWK 660 Individual Assessment - Three semesterhours. In-depth focus on assessment and diagnosisin social work practice with some attention tochange personality theories. Includes in-depthdiscussion and critique of DSM-IV-TR and its usein social work practice. Information on assessmentetiology and treatment of mental illnesses isprovided. Required of all students in direct practiceconcentrations. (Prerequisites: Completion of ALLfoundation courses or Consent of Instructor)SWK 663 Substance Abuse – Two semester hours.Examines the impact of substance abuse onindividuals, families, groups,organizations/institutions and communities. Also,societal responses, contributing factors, socialproblems, policies, programs, services, interventionstrategies, and needed resources will be examined.(Prerequisites: SWK 500, 501, 520, 521, or Consentof Instructor)SWK 667 Social Work Practice with Aging - Twosemester hours. Discusses impact of mental illnesson the elderly. Focuses on demographic issues andproblems of the aged will be infused into the coursecontent with a special emphasis on Alzheimer’sdisease and other mental illnesses. Assessment andintervention strategies used by social workers willbe examined. (Prerequisites: SWK 500, 501, 520,521, 522 or Consent of Instructor)SWK 680 Field Practicum & Seminar II - Foursemester hours. This is the second practicum coursein the three part sequence. (Prerequisites: ALLfoundation year courses, co-requisites SWK 600 or616 and 621)SWK 681 Field Practicum & Seminar III - Foursemester hours. This is the last course in the threepartpracticum sequence. (Prerequisites: SWK 680)SWK 689 Integrative Seminar - Three semesterhours. Focuses on social work as a profession andon integration of all curriculum areas in theprofessional practice of social work. Emphasis willbe placed on all aspects of professional social workpractice including methods, knowledge, values,ethics, skills and legal issues. This course isrequired of all students and should be taken duringthe semester that students are graduating from theprogram.SWK 698 Independent Study - One to threesemester hours. Students may register for one tothree hours of independent study with a professorcompetent in the area of student’s interest. Anapplication for Independent Study must beapproved by both the instructor consenting tosupervision and the MSW program coordinator. Anindependent study must not replicate another coursein the MSW curriculum.TECHNICAL EDUCATIONTED 560 Career/Technical StudentOrganizations – Three Semester Hours. Thiscourse provides the teacher with knowledge andunderstanding to serve as advisor to acareer/technical student organization. The courseemphasizes the relationship of student organizationsto the total career and technical education program;fundamentals and principles of the studentorganization. The course provide teacher withsupervisory skills to develop, publicize, andimplement a program of activities; election andtraining of local officers, development and conductof a public relation program, financial operation ofthe local chapter; and yearly evaluation of thestudent organization. The course also provide theteacher with knowledge to prepare students forparticipation in local, state, and national activities;assist students in advancing within the Open degreesof the student organization; assist students indeveloping and conducting appropriate award andrecognition programs; instruct students in leadershipand personal development; and include specialneeds students in career/technical studentorganizations. This course is not opened tostudents who have completed TED407Career/Technical Student Organizations or a similarcourse at another institution.TED 562 Classroom/Laboratory Management inCareer and Technical Education – ThreeSemester Hours. This course includes instruction onexcepted processes and practices of managingactivities in the career/technical educationlaboratories and shops. Emphasis is placed onequipment and supply selection; facilities planning;materials control; maintenance and records; safety;organizing personnel; budget preparation; orientingstudents to laboratory and shop activities; studentswith special needs/special populations; adultstudents in career and technical education programs;and incorporating basic skills in career and technicaleducation laboratory and shop activities. Thiscourse is not opened to students who have170


completed TED404 Classroom/LaboratoryManagement in Career/Technical Education or asimilar course at another institution.TGC 523L Applications of Statistical Methods –Three Semester Hours.Applications of statistical concepts and techniquesin system analysis. Topics include descriptivestatistics, confidence interval estimation, hypothesistesting, analysis of variance, and regression analysis.TTE 501 Teaching Curriculum Core Subjects inCareer/Technical Education – Three semesterhours. This course focuses on analyzing, selecting,and sequencing subjects to be taught in thecurriculum core course in career/technical educationat the secondary level. The candidate master teacherwill develop a course of study, units of instructionand lesson plans to be used in teaching andevaluating student performance in thecareer/technical education curriculum core course.Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Educationprogram in Technical Education; and completion ofTTE 302, TTE 305, TTE 404, TTE 406, and TTE409.TTE 502 Principles of Teaching Career andTechnical Education – Three Semester Hours.The course is designed to provide the career andtechnical education teacher with the requiredknowledge and understanding to design andpresent technical instruction in a career/technicaleducation program at the secondary and postsecondarylevels. This course is not open tostudents who have completed TTE 406 or asimilar course at another other institution.Prerequisites: Admission to master’s degreeprogram in Technical Instructor Development.TTE 503 Career Information and Guidance –Three semester hours. Course provides instructionon the foundations of career development; careercounseling, appraisal, and students with specialneeds; career development practices; organizingcareer development programs; understanding theworld of work; providing career guidanceinformation; and special setting future possibilities.The use of a variety of computer assisted guidancesystems to research career information is required inthis course. This course is not opened to studentswho have completed TED403 or similar course atanother institution.TTE 504 Classroom/Laboratory Management inCareer and Technical Education – Three semesterhours. This course includes instruction on exceptedprocesses and practices of managing activities in thecareer/technical education laboratories and shops.Emphasis is placed on equipment and supplyselection; facilities planning; materials control;maintenance and records; safety; organizingpersonnel; budget preparation; orienting students tolaboratory and shop activities; students with specialneeds/special populations; adult students in careerand technical education programs; and incorporatingbasic skills in career and technical educationlaboratory and shop activities. This course is notopened to students who have completed TED404 ora similar course at another institution.TTE 505 Coordination of CooperativeCareer/Technical Education – Three semesterhours. This course covers the responsibilities androles of the teacher-coordinator in a cooperativecareer/technical education program. It includesinstruction on establishing guidelines, policies, andprocedures for the program; managing theattendance, transfers, and termination of Co-opstudents; cooperating with administrators, faculty,and counselors in selecting students for participationin the Co-op program; securing training stations,developing training plans, and training agreements;coordinating on-the-job instruction, providingstudent general related instruction in the classroom,and working with other career/technical educationinstructors in providing technical related instruction;evaluating students on-the-job performance;supervise an employer-employee appreciation event;and maintain an office in accordance withestablished local and state rules and policies. Thiscourse is not opened to students who havecompleted TED405 or similar course at anotherinstitution.TTE 506 Principles of Teaching TechnicalSubjects in Career and Technical Education –Three semester hours. The course is designed toprovide the career and technical education teacherwith the required knowledge and understanding todesign and present technical instruction in acareer/technical education program at the secondaryand post-secondary levels. This course is not open tostudents who have completed TED406 or a similarcourse at another other institution. Pre-requisites:Admission to master’s degree program in TechnicalInstructor Development.TTE 507 Career/Technical StudentOrganizations – Three semester hours. The dutiesand responsibilities of the career/technical educationteacher in advising students in a career/technicalstudent organization. This course is not available to171


students who have completed TED407 or similarcourse at another institution. Prerequisites:Admission to the graduate program in TechnicalEducation.TTE 508 Functions of the Coordinator - ThreeSemester Hours. A study of the role andresponsibilities of theHigh School Program Coordinator; An examinationof areas essential to planning, organizing, andMaintaining cooperative career/technical educationprogram; and designing the related subjectcurriculum.TTE 509 Special Needs in Career/TechnicalEducation – Three semester hours. Course coversspecial populations in the workforce; learners withdisabilities; characteristics of other specialpopulations including educationally andeconomically disadvantages, single parents,individuals in correctional institutions; vocationalassessment; individualized education programs;curriculum modification; instructional strategies;evaluation strategies; career and technical studentorganizations; coordinated student services; andtransition process. This course is not opened tostudents who have completed TED409 or similarcourse at another institution.TTE 510 Foundations in Career/TechnicalEducation – Three semester hours. This coursecovers the economical, educational, historical,philosophical, and psychological foundations ofcareer and technical education and their impact oncurriculum and instruction in career and technicaleducation. Pre-requisites: Admission to GraduateSchool.TTE 512 Curriculum Development Systems inCareer/Technical Education – Three semesterhours. The course covers the systems approach todeveloping the curriculum for a career/technicaleducation program at the secondary orpostsecondary level. The student is required toemploy the curriculum development system todevelop a course of study for his/her specialty areain career/technical education. Pre-requisites:Admission to graduate program in Career andTechnical Education.TTE 514 Individual Studies in Career/TechnicalEducation - Three semester hours. Course providesan opportunity for career/technical educationstudents to develop additional knowledge andunderstanding of specific program areas incareer/technical education. Pre-requisites:Instructor’s permission required to enroll in thiscourse.TTE 521 Evaluating Students Achievement inCareer/Technical Education – Three semesterhours. Methods and procedures for developinginstruments to be used in evaluating student’sknowledge and understanding in a career/technicaleducation program setting. Candidate teachers willbe required to develop master test plans based onestablished course and program learning outcomes;knowledge and skills tests; procedures and standardsfor evaluating student performance incareer/technical student organization contests; andfollow-up studies of program graduates.TTE 525 Instructional Development Systems inIndustry – Three semester hours. This coursefocuses on the system approach to developingcourses for the development, training, andutilization of technical employees in the workforce.Students are required to employ the instructionalsystem approach in developing a technical coursefor use in industry. Pre-requisites: Admission toGraduate School.TTE 540 Supervised Occupational Development– Three semester hours. The career/technicaleducation teacher participates in technicalworkshops and seminars conducted by professionalorganizations and society, and work experienceprograms directly related to their career/technicalprogram area. This experience is designed to aid thecareer/technical education teacher in maintainingexisting knowledge and skills; improving existingknowledge and skills; or developing new knowledgeand skills. Instructor approved required prior toenrolling this course.TTE 550 Practicum in Technical Education –Three semester hours. Practical experience gainedin a career and technical education in a classroomsetting at the secondary or post-secondary level.Advisor’s approval is required to participate in thiscourse.TTE 599 Thesis Research – 6 semester hours.Enrollment in Thesis Research is limited to graduatestudents who have chosen the Thesis Option.Students must enroll in a minimum of two (2)semesters to complete the thesis. Students completethe thesis proposal during the first semester, andconduct the research and write the thesis during thesecond semester. This study is done under thesupervision of the thesis advisor and committee,with the approval of the department head, school172


dean, and dean of graduate studies. Pre-requisites:Completion of 24 semester hours of graduatecoursework and the comprehensive examination.TTE 600 Contemporary Issues and Philosophy inCareer/Technical Education – Three semesterhours. The course focuses on selected readings inthe profession with emphasis on current issues incareer/technical education; and significantphilosophies that shape developments and futuredirections in career/technical education.TTE 610 Research and Evaluation inCareer/Technical Education – Three semesterhours. An analysis of research and evaluationstudies on career/technical education; andrecommendations for program improvements incurriculum and instruction; administration andsupervision; and other program areas.TED 614 Individual Studies in Career/TechnicalEducation – Three semester hours. Course providesan opportunity for career/technical educationstudents to develop additional knowledge andunderstanding of specific program areas incareer/technical education. Pre-requisites:Instructor’s permission required to enroll in thiscourse.TTE 617 Postsecondary Career/TechnicalEducation Programs – Three semester hours. Ananalysis of the contributions of postsecondaryinstitutions to meet the career development needs ofthe adult population, developments in variousprogram areas including curriculum, instruction,finance, administration, facilities, and evaluation.Future directions in postsecondary career/technicaleducation programs are also considered.TTE 618 Administration, Leadership, andLegislation – Three semester hours. In this coursethe student will an analysis of public laws andpolicies at the federal and state levels; and theirimpact on career/technical education programs atthe secondary and postsecondary levels.TTE 621 Teaching Career/Technical Education –Three semester hours. This course is designed forcareer/technical education teachers who areinterested in improving the instructional processbased on the results of recent research studies andpractices in the following instructional area:planning, execution, evaluation, and management.TT E 625 Instructional Supervision – Threesemester hours. The professional role andresponsibility of school personnel in planning thestudent teaching experience and supervising studentteachers during their internship; and newlyemployed teacher.TTE 630 Career Education and WorkforceDevelopment – Three semester hours. This coursefocuses on trends and issues in the training,development, and utilization of a contemporaryworkforce.TTE 640 Supervised Occupational Development– Three semester hours. – The career/technicaleducation teacher participates in technicalworkshops and seminars conducted by professionalorganizations and society, and work experienceprograms directly related to their career/technicalprogram area. This experience is designed to aid thecareer/technical education teacher in maintainingexisting knowledge and skills; improving existingknowledge and skills; or developing new knowledgeand skills. Instructor approved required prior toenrolling this course.TTE 650 Practicum in Technical Education –Three semester hours. Practical experience gainedin a career and technical education in a classroomsetting at the secondary or post-secondary level.Advisor’s approval is required to participate in thiscourse. Pre-requisitesTTE 699 Thesis Research – Six Semester Hours.This is a requirement for graduate students in thespecialist degree program. Students must enroll in aminimum of two (2) semesters to complete thethesis. Students complete the thesis proposal duringthe first semester, and conduct the research andwrite the thesis during the second semester. Thisstudy is done under the supervision of the thesisadvisor and committee, with the approval of thedepartment head, school dean, and dean of graduatestudies. Pre-requisites: Completion of 24 semesterhours of graduate coursework in the specialistdegree program and the comprehensiveexamination.URBAN PLANNINGURP 500 Fundamentals of Planning - Onesemester hour. The course provides a fundamentalunderstanding of the field of urban and regionalplanning, the actors in the planning process, andcontemporary planning issues and methods forbeginning students. The parameters of planning andthe contexts within which the profession is practicedare stressed.173


URP 504 Internship - Three semester hours. Thepurpose of this course is to provide on-the-jobtraining for students who have not had any priorwork experience in the field for which they aretraining. Students perform a pre-determined workassignment under direct agency supervision of tenhours during fall and spring semesters, and 20 hoursduring the summer. Individual work plans andlearning outcomes are established to support theinternship experience. (Pre-requisite- six semesterhours in the MURP program)URP 506 Urban Economics - Three semesterhours. A study of the economic forces underlyingurban phenomena or problems; industrial andresidential location, urban transportation, wastedisposal and pollution, urban government finance,poverty, crime and income, maintenance programs.(Pre-requisite: ECO 232 or ECO 231)URP 510 Theory and History of Planning - Threesemester hours. This course examines the evolutionof the urban and regional planning profession. Itpresents alternative theories of planning andcritically examines procedural, substantive, anddecision-making theories of planning practice. Thecourse also explores the relationship of history andtheories of planning to equity, diversity, ethics andvalues issues in the society and in the profession.URP 511 Planning Research Methods I(Quantitative Analysis) - Three semester hours. Abasic graduate course on statistical concepts andmethods with applications in urban and regionalplanning. It is intended to give the student a broadunderstanding of the meaning, purpose, methodsand use of descriptive and inferential procedures inurban analysis and planning. It includes a review ofbasic mathematical concepts fundamental toquantitative methods, linear and nonlinear functionsfocusing on growth curves, data measurement anddisplay, descriptive statistics and probability, andintroduction to use of computer software packages(SPSS) as a tool in analysis of planning related data.URP 513 Urban Geography - Three semesterhours. This course analyzes the location, evolution(including decline and rebirth) of cities, andfunctional classification of cities. Urban growththeories and economic influence of cities over largergeographic areas are also studied.URP 515 Regional Development Theory - Threesemester hours. This course provides an introductionto regional development theory, issues and policy.The topics covered in the course include location ofeconomic activities, trade and other forms of contactbetween regions, processes of regional growth anddecline, reasons for different levels of economicdevelopment, relations between more or lessdeveloped regions, the effects of globalization ondevelopment, and implication for regional planningpolicy.US 519 Seminar of Social Policy Issues - Threesemester hours. This course provides the studentwith the opportunity to analyze demographicchanges, needs and ideological debates which affectsocial policy in the US compared with othersocieties.URP 520 Legal Basis of Planning - Three semesterhours. The course focuses on statutory law, policiesand the constitutional framework which support theauthority for planning and guiding urban andregional development. Through the examination ofenabling legislation models, general plans, zoning,development reviews systems, and planning law,this course provides an understanding of how lawand urban policy intersect and thus influence theplanning process.URP 521 Planning Research Methods II (AppliedResearch Methodology) – Three semester hours.This course presents a range of concepts whichprovide a foundation for the student to understandand apply appropriate research methods accordingto the research need. Both quantitative andqualitative research designs are explored along withtechniques of data collection, treatment, analysisand interpretation which support development andpreparation of professional plans and reports andtheir evaluation in the practice of planning. (Prerequisite:Instructor’s approval required)URP 525 Planning Studio I - Three semesterhours. This course focuses on local land useplanning and site design. It is designed to providethe students with practical experiences in urbandevelopment process, the basic methods and tools ofsite and land use planning, evaluation, andimplementation strategies. (Pre-requisite-Instructor’s approval required)URP 526 Computer Applications in Planning -Three semester hours. This course is designed forbeginning graduate students in urban and regionalplanning. It begins with an overview of excel andexploration of GIS web resources. It advances toapplication of Arc GIS desktop in local and regionalplanning. Approximately half of the class time174


during the semester is dedicated to teaching Arc GISwhile the other half focuses specifically on theapplication of Arc GIS in the development,preparation and presentation of a databasecontaining tables, maps and graphs typicallyrequired for the preparation of comprehensive plansin planning agencies. (Prerequisite- Instructor’sapproval required)URP 527 Planning Studio II - Three semesterhours. The course focuses on comprehensive planmaking at the municipal and multi-jurisdictional(regional) levels. It is designed to build on the skillsand concepts learned in Planning Studio I. Thecourse provides the students with practicalexperiences in integration and application of variouscomponents of the planning process into a holisticpolicy plan. It emphasizes the use of research,analytical, forecasting and evaluation methods inplan-making. Also both collaborative and individualstudent products are emphasized. (Pre-requisite-Instructor’s approval required)URP 529 Professional Practice - Three semesterhours. The purpose of the course is to assist studentsin understanding the professional responsibility ofthe practicing planner. The objectives are to teachthe concept of professionalism, to train students inthe ethical conduct of a professional planner, and toprepare students for careers as a practitioners withinprivate and public domains, and to meetrequirements of membership in the AmericanInstitute of Certified Planners (AICP). The courseteaches students how to develop, implement andplan projects; how to prepare budgets and how towork in a bureaucratic organization. (Pre-requisite –URP 500, URP 510, URP 520; URP 525 and URP527 OR Instructor’s approval)URP 531 Economic and Population Analysis forPlanners - Three semester hours. The courseexamines the interactive relationships betweendemographic, economic and other social processeswhich impact on the quality of life, and influenceplanning policies and programs. Topics covered inthe course include the vital processes of populationchange, economic processes and activityforecasting, and their cumulative impacts on urbanand regional structures and planning policies.URP 533 Land Use Planning - Three semesterhours. This course focuses on analysis of majordeterminants of land use, growth potentials and landuse alternatives for urban regions. Current policyissues, and approaches and techniques of land useplanning at the national, state and local levels, andtheir impact on community revenues and outlayswill also be explored.URP 534 Community Facilities Planning - Threesemester hours. This course is designed to set forthand explore the methods, techniques, analysis andplanning for the delivery of basic communityfacilities in terms of programs, policies, andphysical facilities. Areas of exploration includecommunity parks, water and sewage, airports, fireprotection, solid waste and related specialcommunity facilities. In addition, communityorganizational structures are also described as theyrelated to the delivery of services and facilitiesoperation.URP 535 Transportation Planning - Threesemester hours. This course is designed to providean overview of the transportation planning processtogether with a detailed understanding of thetechniques used to assess the transportation impactsof land development. Components of the long rangemetropolitan area transportation planning processwill provide an understanding as to how area widetransportation plans are generated tested, evaluated,and implemented. The course will focus on theproject level of land use and transportation systeminteraction.URP 536 Health and Urban Planning - Threesemester hours. This course examines federallegislation and legislative actions which haveinfluenced the broad spectrum of health planningservices, emergency medical services, nursing homestandards, health maintenance organizations andrelevant responsibilities of planners in thebroadening health planning field.URP 538 Transportation Modeling - Threesemester hours. This course is designed to presentan in-depth orientation to contemporarytransportation planning computer model packagesand analytical techniques. Practical applications areprovided to gain experience in transportation datageneration, data management, program executionand interpretation of computer output. (Prerequisite:URP 535)URP 539 Transportation Administration - Threesemester hours. This course will focus on a broadexamination of mass transit issues includinglegislation, funding, technology assessmentplanning, and planning process, implementation,and management of public transportation operations.175


URP 542 Environmental Planning - Threesemester hours. This course explores therelationship between the natural environment andphysical planning. Ramifications of federal, state,and local environmental analysis and impactassessment are also discussed. Broad aspects of theenvironment including physical, social, economic,cultural, and aesthetic are presented as a means ofensuring environmental stability for futuregenerations.URP 543 Housing Issues in Planning - Threesemester hours. This course provides an introductionto housing markets and existing housing programs.It examines the structure of the demand and supplyof housing and the various methods used by thepublic sector to intervene in the housing market. Thedifferent programs and policies used bygovernments at all levels to serve different housinggoals and how well they work are analyzed. Inaddition, it examines the methodology andtechniques for assessing housing conditions andneeds, and presents case studies of currentinnovative approaches for addressing communityhousing problems. (Pre-requisite URP 506)URP 544 Historic Preservation andNeighborhood Conservation - Three semesterhours. Overview of the historic preservation fieldincluding topics such as taxation, gentrification,minority displacement, aesthetic revitalization,structural rehabilitation, alternative uses and otherissues relevant to the conservation and preservationof historic facilities and neighborhoods areaddressed.URP 545 Environmental Assessment -Threesemester hours. This course focuses on how toassess the likely impacts of land use plans andprojects on the bio-physical and socio-economicenvironment. It examines federal, state and localenvironmental regulations with an emphasis ontranslating environmental assessment results intopublic policy, conceptualization of the mitigation ofidentifiable environmental conflicts.URP 553 Community Development Process -Three semester hours. Elements of communityresource development strategies based ondevelopmental practices of private investors andgovernmental agencies. Special attention is given tothe political, business and citizen organizationalstructure at the local level and their relevant impacton code enforcement practices and developmentalpractices.URP 555 Terminal Research ProposalPreparation - One semester hour. This course is theinitial development stage of the terminal researchpaper. The research proposal outlines the approachfor conducting the research, with focus on theresearch design. The proposal is developed underthe supervision of the student’s approved researchcommittee.URP 556 Independent Research - Three semesterhours. A formal presentation of an investigationdirected by an assigned faculty member within thedepartment with respect to the student’sspecialization. It is intended to meet the needs ofstudents for study in urban planning beyond theregularly scheduled courses. The research willconsist of either a survey of existing research on agiven and specific area of study, an area of thestudent’s interest beyond the scope of instructionalcourses or work on a problem approved by thefaculty of the department. Registration for thiscourse requires a written approval of the facultyadvisor and the Chairman of the department.URP 557 Terminal Research - Two semesterhours. Non-thesis, faculty guided research paperdeveloped independently by the student. The papermust thoroughly explore a relevant issue (topic orquestion) which shall be substantiated by dataderived from primary or secondary sources. Theresearch topic or issue must be related or derivedfrom the student’s specialty area. (Prerequisites:URP 511; URP 521; URP 555)URP 559 Planning Project - Three semester hours.This is an applied research focused on theexamination of a planning issue or problem underthe supervision of the student’s project committeeculminating in the presentation of a report on theplanning project. (Prerequisites: URP 511; URP521; URP 555)URP 560 International Program Management andEvaluation - Three semester hours. This course isintended to enable the student to gain anunderstanding of the principles, issues, processesand problems involved in the planning, managementand evaluation of international programs. Specificexamples are provided from projects and programssupported by the U.S. Agency for InternationalDevelopment (USAID) and other principle publicand private agencies.URP 561 Interdisciplinary Seminar in EconomicDevelopment - Three semester hours. The course is176


designed to provide a common understanding ofmethods and issues involved in planning foreconomic development. Emphasis will be placedupon national and international development.the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies andExtended Education. (Prerequisites: URP 511; URP521; URP 555 and Departmental faculty approval)URP 566 Global Environment and PopulationIssues in Planning - Three semester hours. Thiscourse will examine the main problems of globalenvironment change and world population dynamicsincluding population control, rural-urban populationflows and its impact, population and environmentissues. This course will also examine the challengesand problems involved in the national developmentprocess, where planning for effective utilization ofnational resources must incorporate elements ofenvironmental management in conjunction withnational economic goals. Contemporary andpotential environmental problems, such asdesertification, soil erosion, water, health, and urbanpollution are examined.URP 599 Thesis - Six semester hours. Preparationof a scientific research report evidencing asignificant contribution to the candidate’s specialarea of interest and study. The thesis is based on thecompilation and analysis of primary and secondarydata including actual “field related” researchapproved by the thesis committee and accepted byAdministrationHugine, Andrew, PresidentB.S. South Carolina State University; M.Ed. South Carolina State University; Ph.D. Michigan State UniversityRolle, Kevin, Chief of StaffB.S. Southern University; M. S. Southern University; Ph.D. Colorado State UniversityWims, Daniel, Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsB.S. Fort Valley State University; M.S. Ohio State University; Ph.D. University of MarylandVital, Allen, Vice President of Institutional AdvancementB.A. Southern University; M.Ed., University of Maryland-Eastern ShoreBurgin, Jeffrey, Interim Vice President for Student AffairsB.A. University of Cincinnati; M.Ed., Ohio UniversityKobler, Wendy, Vice President Marketing, Communication & AdvancementB.S. University of West FloridaJohnson, Ralph, Vice President of Business-FinanceB.S. Bradley University; MBA Tulane UniversityMorrow, Greg, Chief Information OfficerB.S. North Carolina A&T University; M.S. North Carolina A&T UniversityStewart, Juarine, Associate Provost for Undergraduate AffairsB.S. Knoxville College; Ph.D., University of Tennessee KnoxvilleNewkirk, Vann, Associate Provost for Academic Affairs and Dean of Graduate StudiesB.A. Barber-Scotia College; M.A. Winthrop University; M.S. North Carolina Central University; Ph.D. Howard University177


College DeansNewkirk, Vann, Associate Provost for Academic Affairs and Dean of Graduate StudiesB.A. Barber-Scotia College; M.A. Winthrop University; M.S. North Carolina Central University; Ph.D. Howard UniversitySarkar, Amin, Dean, School of Business and Public AffairsM.A. and Ph.D. University of California, BerkeleyMartin, Curtis, Dean, School of Education, Humanities and Behavioral SciencesB.S. Ashland University; MED and Ph.D. Ohio State UniversityGlenn, Chance, Dean, School of Engineering, Technology & Physical SciencesB. S. University of Maryland; M.S. John Hopkins University; Ph.D. John Hopkins UniversityWalker, Lloyd, Dean, School of Agriculture, Life and Natural SciencesB.S. and M.S., Prairie View A&M University; Ph.D., Texas A&M UniversityGraduate StudiesSaintjones, Marilyn, Enrolled Student Manager and International Graduate Student AdvisorB. S. Alabama Agricultural & Mechanical University; M. S. Alabama Agricultural & Mechanical UniversityTaylor, Beverly, Admission CoordinatorB. S. Tuskegee University; M.Ed. Michigan State University; AA Certification Alabama Agricultural & Mechanical Univ.Canady, Charlotte, Assistant to the DeanB.S. University of Alabama - BirminghamSimpson, Mylaka, Records Management ClerkFurther Study, Alabama Agricultural & Mechanical UniversityAlexander, Jeanette, Grant and Scholarship Coordinator for Graduate StudiesB.S Alabama Agricultural & Mechanical UniversityGraduate FacultyM.D. AGGARWALProfessor of PhysicsPh.D., Calcutta UniversityNESSAR U. AHMEDProfessor of Civil EngineeringPh.D., Vanderbilt UniversityJAMES G. ALEXANDERProfessor of Finance, Economics, & OSMPh.D., University of TexasMOHAMMAD A. ALIMProfessor of Electrical EngineeringPh.D., Marquette UniversityVENKATA ATLURIAssociate Professor of Computer SciencePh.D., Nagarjuna University, IndiaA.K. BATRAAssociate Professor of PhysicsPh.D., India Institute of TechnologySUDIP BHATTACHARJEEProfessor of Civil EngineeringPh.D., Worchester Polytechnic InstituteGATSINZI BASANINYENZIAssociate Professor of EnglishPh.D., University of IowaROBERT BEANAssociate Professor of Fine ArtsMFA, Louisiana State UniversityJOSEPH BEFECADUProfessor of AgribusinessPh.D., Oklahoma State UniversityKAMALA BHATAssistant Professor of ChemistryPh.D., Alabama A&M University178


FREDERICK BIGENHOProfessor of ReadingPh.D., Vanderbilt UniversityEDWARD L. BONDProfessor of Behavioral SciencesPh.D., Louisiana State UniversitySUSAN BROWNProfessor of EnglishEd.D., University of AlabamaBARBARA BUSHAssociate Professor of Psychology, Counseling,Special Education & CSDAUD., Pennsylvania College of OptometryBARBARA CADYProfessor of Psychology, Counseling, SpecialEducation & CSDPh.D., University of KansasVIRGINIA CAPLESProfessor of Family & Consumer SciencesPh.D., Iowa State UniversityHORACE CARNEYPROFESSOR OF Fine ArtsPh.D., University of IowaERNST CEBERTAssociate Professor of Natural Resources &Environmental SciencesPh.D., Purdue UniversityCHRISTOPHER CHACHAProfessor of Social WorkPh.D., University of AlabamaWILLIE CHEATHAMProfessor of AgribusinessPh.D., Iowa State UniversityROSANNA H. CHANGAssociate Professor of Sociology and CriminalJusticePh.D., Oklahoma State UniversitySHOWKAT CHOWDHURYProfessor of Mechanical EngineeringPh.D., Clarkson UniversityTOMMY l. COLEMANProfessor of Natural Resources & EnvironmentalSciencesPh.D., Iowa State UniversityJULIAO E. CORREAAssociate Professor of Food & Animal SciencesPh.D., Michigan State UniversityMICHAEL D. CURLEYAssociate Professor of PhysicsPh.D., Alabama A&M UniversityDERRICK DAVISProfessor of Curriculum, Teaching &Educational LeadershipPh.D., University of Southern MississippiCAROL DEAKINAssociate Professor of Psychology, Counseling,Special Education & CSDPh.D., Southern Illinois University ofCarbondaleLUBEN DIMOVAssociate Professor of Natural Resources &Environmental SciencesPh.D., Louisiana State UniversityMOSTAFA DOKHANIANProfessor of PhysicsPh.D., Alabama A&M UniversityEMEKA DUNUProfessor of Management & MarketingPh.D., University of North TexasSANDRA DURHAMProfessor of Finance, Economics, & OSMEd.D., Auburn UniversityLYNNE EDMONSONAssociate Professor of Physical Education &RecreationPh.D., Southern Illinois UniversityMATTHEW E. EDWARDSProfessor of PhysicsPh.D., Howard UniversityVANESSA EDWARDSAssistant Professor of PhysicsPh.D., Alabama A&M University179


ADNAN ELKHALDYAssistant Professor of ChemistryPh.D., Rajasthan UniversityMAGED ELSHAMYProfessor of MathematicsPh.D., University of GeorgiaKAREN FOSTERProfessor of Curriculum, Teaching &Educational LeadershipPh.D., University of Southern MississippiEDITH FRASERProfessor of Social WorkPh.D., Smith School for Social WorkRORY FRASERProfessor of Natural Resources & EnvironmentalSciencesPh.D., Pennsylvania State UniversityRUSSELL FRICANOProfessor of Community Planning & UrbanStudiesPh.D., Canisius CollegeYUJIAN FUAssistant Professor of Computer SciencePh.D., Florida International UniversityCEDEDONIO M. GAPASINProfessor of AgribusinessPh.D., Pennsylvania StateMOHAMMAD K. GHANBARIProfessor of Computer SciencePh.D., University of Alabama – HuntsvilleMALINDA GILMOREAssistant Professor of ChemistryPh.D., University of California at DavisEARL N. M. GOODINGProfessor of Community Planning and UrbanStudiesPh.D., Atlantic Union CollegeVENKATA R. GOTETIProfessor of Electrical EngineeringPh.D., University of Massachusetts, LowellMARSHA D. GRIFFINAssociate Professor of Management &MarketingPh.D., Louisiana Technical UniversityPADMAJA GUGGILLAAssistant Professor of PhysicsPh.D., Alabama A&M UniversityKAY HAMILTONProfessor of Physical Education, Health &RecreationPh.D., Vanderbilt UniversityRAZI HASSANAssociate Professor of ChemistryPh.D., New York UniversityKAVEY HEIDARYProfessor of Electrical EngineeringPh.D., Syracuse UniversityLINDA HOLLOWAYAssociate Professor of Psychology, Counseling,Special Education & CSDEd.D., Mississippi State UniversitySAMPSON HOPKINSONAssistant Professor of BiologyPh.D., Alabama A&M UniversityDANNY HUTSONAssistant Professor of Fine ArtsD.M.A., University of OklahomaCHUKUDI V. IZEOGUProfessor of Community Planning & UrbanStudiesPh.D., University of CaliforniaABDUL R. JALLOHProfessor of Mechanical EngineeringPh.D., University of ArizonaHOSSEIN JAMSHIDIAssociate Professor of Management &MarketingPh.D., University of Alabama, HuntsvilleRUBY JEWELAssistant Professor of Curriculum, Teaching &Educational LeadershipEd.D., University of TennesseeEDWARD L. JONESProfessor of Curriculum, Teaching &Educational LeadershipPh.D., Michigan State University180


JEANETTE JONESProfessor of BiologyPh.D., Ohio State UniversityJOHNSON KAMALUProfessor of Family & Consumer SciencesPh.D., Howard UniversityRAMESH KANTETYAssociate Professor of Natural Resources &Environmental SciencesPh.D., Purdue UniversityJITENDRA KAPOORProfessor of Social WorkPh.D., Lucknow UniversityMOHAMMED KARIMProfessor of MathematicsPh.D., Concordia University, MontrealLAMIN KASSAMAAssistant Professor of Food & Animal SciencesPh.D., University of Montreal, CanadaJONGHWA KIMAssociate Professor of ChemistryPh.D., Ohio State UniversityKOFFI KONANProfessor of Food & Animal SciencesPh.D., University of Picardie, FranceNICKOLAI KUKHTAREVProfessor of PhysicsPh.D., University of Physics, Kier, UkraineRAVINDRA B. LALProfessor EmeritusPh.D., Agra University, IndiaJOSEPH LEEAssistant Professor of Community Planning &Urban StudiesMURP, University of North CarolinaGOANG S. LIAWProfessor of Civil EngineeringPh.D., University of Alabama, HuntsvilleRENA LOTTProfessor of Early Childhood & ElementaryEducationPh.D., Texas Women’s UniversityGEORGE MAMBOLEOProfessor of Education & PsychologyPh.D., University of ArizonaCALVIN MATTHEWSProfessor of Education & PsychologyPh.D., Michigan State UniversityMONDAY O. MBILAAssociate Professor of Plant & Soil SciencePh.D., Iowa State UniversityEVERTON G. MCINTOSHProfessor of Psychology, Counseling, SpecialEducation & CSDPh.D., Howard UniversityJOANNE MCLINNAssistant Professor of Social WorkM.Ed., Tuskegee UniversitySRINIVASA RAO S. MENTREDDYProfessor of Plant & Soil SciencesPh.D., University of Tasmania, AustraliaFAYEQUE MIJIDAssociate Professor of MathematicsPh.D., University of Alabama, TuscaloosaAMIR MOBASHERProfessor of Mechanical EngineeringPh.D., University of Alabama, HuntsvilleVERNELL TRENT MONTGOMERYProfessor of Electrical EngineeringPh.D., University of Texas, AustinKOZMA NAKAProfessor of Plant & Soil SciencesPh.D., Virginia Tech UniversityERMSON NYAKATAWAProfessor of Plant & Soil SciencesPh.D., Alabama A&M UniversityLEOPOLD M. NYOCHEMBERYProfessor of Natural Resources & EnvironmentalSciencesPh.D., Penn State UniversityEMMANUEL E. OBUAHAssociate Professor Political SciencePh.D., University of Sussex, Falmer, UnitedKingdom181


JAMIU ODUTOLAAssociate Professor of ChemistryPh.D., University of Oregon, EugeneFLORENCE OKAFORProfessor of BiologyPh.D., University of NigeriaPAUL OKWEYEAssistant Professor of ChemistryPh.D., Alabama A&M UniversityJACOB OLUWOYEProfessor of Community Planning & UrbanStudiesPh.D., University of New South WalesDONALD OUTLANDProfessor of Community Planning & UrbanStudiesM.S., Urban Studies, Alabama A&M UniversityRUBY PACUMBABA JR.Assistant Professor of Plant & Soil SciencesPh.D., Kansas State UniversityCRAIG D. PATTONAssociate Professor of History & BehavioralSciencesPh.D., University of California, IrvineTONYA E. PERRYProfessor of Social WorkPh.D., University of AlabamaO. GUY POSEYAssociate Professor of Management &MarketingPh.D., University of North Texas, DentonROBERT POWELLProfessor of EnglishPh.D., Florida State UniversityDELORES A. PRICEAssociate Professor of Curriculum, Teaching &Educational LeadershipPh.D. Loyola UniversityXIAOQING (CATHY) QIANProfessor of Mechanical EngineeringPh.D., University of TennesseeARJUNA RANASINGHEProfessor of MathematicsPh.D., University of Alabama, HuntsvillePHILLIP L. REDRICKAssociate Professor of Curriculum, Teaching &Educational LeadershipPh.D., Ohio State UniversityHOPE C. REEDAssociate Professor of Psychology, Counseling,Special Education & CSDSLP.D., Nova Southeastern UniversityJAMES A. REIDAssistant Professor of Physical Education,Health & RecreationPh.D., Middle Tennessee State UniversityHARACE W. RICEProfessor of Management & MarketingPh.D., University of ToledoMOHAMMAD G. ROBBANIProfessor of Finance, Economics & OSMPh.D., Florida International UniversityRUBEN ROJAS-OVIEDOAssociate Professor of Mechanical EngineeringPh.D., Auburn UniversityPETER L. ROMINEProfessor of TechnologyPh.D., University of Alabama, HuntsvilleJOSEPH H. ROSHERAssistant Professor of Sociology and CriminalJusticePh.D., Mississippi State UniversityPABITRA K. SAHAProfessor of Civil EngineeringPh.D., University of Illinois, UrbanaELAINE SAMPSONPROFESSOR OF Education & PsychologyPh.D., University of CincinnatiOLA GOODE SANDERSProfessor of Family & Consumer SciencesPh.D., University of TennesseeAMIN SARKARProfessor of Economics & FinancePh.D., University of California, BerkeleyANDREW R. SCOTTAssociate Professor of Electrical EngineeringPh.D., University of Missouri-Kansas City182


MOAMMED A. SEIFProfessor (Chairperson) of MechanicalEngineeringPh.D., University of Central FloridaZACHARY SENWOProfessor of Plant & Soil SciencesPh.D., Iowa State UniversityANUP SHARMAProfessor of PhysicsPh.D., Columbia University, New YorkGOVIND SHARMAProfessor of Plant & Soil SciencesPh.D., Kansas State UniversityQIAN SHENAssociate Professor of Economics & Finance &OSMPh.D., Southern Illinois UniversityRHONDA SHERRODProfessor of Education & PsychologyPh.D., Jackson State UniversityNAHID A. SISTANIProfessor of Family & Consumer SciencesPh.D., Alabama A&M UniversityRONALD L. SLAUGHTERAssociate Professor of Behavioral SciencesPh.D., Atlanta UniversityCYNTHIA SMITHProfessor (Chairperson) of Family & ConsumerSciencesPh.D., Ohio State UniversitySCOTT L. SMITHAssociate Professor of Fine ArtsMFA, University of MiamiKHAIRY M. SOLIMANProfessor of Plant & Soil SciencesPh.D., University of California, DavisMARY SPORProfessor of Curriculum, Teaching &Educational LeadershipPh.D., University of PittsburgFREDDIE STEWARTAssociate Professor of Psychology, Counseling,Special Education & CSDEd.D., University of AlabamaJAMES STEWARTProfessor of PsychologyEd.D., University of TennesseeWilliam (WES) STONEAssociate Professor of Plant & Soil SciencePh.D., Utah State UniversityWUBISHET TADESSEAssociate Professor of Plant & Soil SciencePh.D., Alabama A&M UniversityARJUN TANProfessor Emeritus of PhysicsPh.D., University of AlabamaLESLIE TAYLORProfessor of Psychology, Counseling, SpecialEducation & CSDPh.D., Purdue UniversityENOCH C. TEMPLEAssociate Professor Emeritus of MathematicsPh.D., University of AlabamaRANATUNGA THILINIAssistant Professor of Plant & Soil SciencesPh.D., Purdue UniversityJAMES THOMPSONProfessor of ChemistryPh.D., University of DelawareWENDALL H. THOMPSONProfessor of Curriculum, Teaching &Educational LeadershipPh.D., Kansas State UniversityTHELMA TOWNSENDAssociate Professor of EnglishPh.D., Michigan State UniversityDOUGLAS TURNERAssistant Professor of Political ScienceM.P.S., Cornell UniversityMICHAEL O. VAUGHNAssistant Professor of HistoryM.S. and M.A., University of SouthernMississippi183


JENNIFER VINSONProfessor of Psychology, Counseling, SpecialEducation & CSDPh.D., Nova Southeastern UniversityMARTHA VERGHESEProfessor of Food & Animal SciencesPh.D., Alabama A&M UniversityJESSICA WALKERProfessor of EnglishPh.D., University of GeorgiaLLOYD T. WALKERProfessor of Food & Animal SciencesPh.D., Texas A&M UniversityHWEI CENG WANGProfessor of Accounting and Business EducationPh.D., Nova Southeastern UniversityJAI CHING WANGProfessor of PhysicsPh.D., University of MassachusettsYONG WANGProfessor of Plant & Soil SciencesPh.D., University of Southern MississippiKENNETH WARDProfessor of Plant & Soil SciencesPh.D., Mississippi State UniversityRUFINA WARDProfessor of Plant & Soil SciencesPh.D., University of California, RiversideJOE WASHINGTONAssociate Professor Fine ArtsMFA, School of the Arts Institute of ChicagoANNIE M. WELLSProfessor of Psychology, Counseling, SpecialEducation & CSDPh.D., University of Montana, MissoulaDARLENE TURNER-WHITEAssistant Professor of Early Childhood &Elementary EducationPh.D., Nova Southwestern UniversityTAMIKA WILLIAMSProfessor of Fine ArtsMFA, Memphis College of ArtCONSTANCE J. WILSONProfessor of Community Planning & UrbanStudiesPh.D., University of Alabama, TuscaloosaJOAN FOBBS-WILSONAssociate Professor of Psychology, Counseling,Special Education & CSDPh.D., Ohio State UniversityCHEN XIONGWENAssistant Professor of Plant & Soil SciencesPh.D., Northeast Forestry University, Harbin,ChinaALLISON P. YOUNGAssistant Professor of Family & ConsumerSciencesPh.D., University of MinnesotaTIANXI ZHANGProfessor of PhysicsPh.D., Nagoya University184


ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTProvost and VicePresident of AcademicAffairsAssociate VicePresident forAcademic Affairs andUndergraduate StudiesAssociate VicePresident forAcademic Affairs andGraduate StudiesCollege ofAgricultural, Life andNatural SciencesCollege of Businessand Public AffairsCollege of Education,Humanities andBehavioral SciencesCollege ofEngineering,Technology & PhysicalSciencesUniversityCollegeCenters for Excellencein Teaching andLearningGraduate SchoolBiological andEnvironmentalSciencesAccounting andLogisticsReading,Elementary/EarlyChildhood & SpecialEducationCivil andMechanicalEngineeringAcademicAdvisingCenter for Facultyand StaffDevelopmentLRC and StateBlack ArchivesCommunity andRegional Planning(General Studies)Finance,Agribusiness andEconomicsEducationalLeadership andSecondary EducationElectricalEngineering andComputer ScienceAcademicSupportHonorsProgramTestingCenterTRiOProgramsInstructionalTechnology DistanceLearning andExtended StudiesMilitary SciencesFood and AnimalSciencesFamily andConsumerSciencesManagement andMarketingSocial Sciences(Criminal Justice,Sociology & PoliticalScience)Social Work,Psychology andCounselingEnglish andForeign LanguagesVisual, PerformingandCommunicationArtsHealth Sciences,Human Performanceand CommunicativeDisordersEngineering,ConstructionManagement andIndustrial TechnologyPhysics,Chemistryand Math185


INDEXABOUT ALABAMA A&M UNIVERSITY,9ACADEMIC CALENDAR, 4ACADEMIC COMPUTING, 11ACADEMIC INTERGRITY, 23ACADEMIC PROBATION, 23ACADEMIC SUPPORT AND FACILITIES, 12ACCREDITATION, 2ACTION RESEARCH PAPER REQUIREMENTS, 29ADMISSIONS POLICIES, 15AGRIBUSINESS, (MS) DEGREE PROGRAM, 32ALABAMA A&M UNIVERSITY MISSION STATEMENT, 10ALABAMA A&M UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONALCHART, 185APPEALS/GRIEVEANCE PROCESS, 23APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION, 30ART EDUCATION, MED DEGREE PROGAM, 33ASSISTANTSHIPS/FELLOWSHIPS, 21AUDITING, 26BIOLOGY, (MS) DEGREE PROGRAM, 34BOOKSTORE, 14BULLDOG ACADEMIC RESOURCE CONNECTION, 12BUSINESS MANAGEMENT & ADMINISTRATION, (MBA)DEGREE PROGRAM, 37CAFETERIA SERVICES, 14CAREER DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, 11CATALOG RIGHTS AND EXCLUSIONS, 23CLASS ATTENDANCE, 24CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY,(MS) DEGREE PROGRAM, 39COMMUNICATIVE SCIENCES & DISORDERS, (MS)DEGREE PROGRAM, 40COMPREHENSIVE EXAM REQUIRMENTS, 28COMPUTER SCIENCE, DEGREE PROGRAM, 43CONFERRING OF DEGREE, 30COUNSELING & GUIDANCE, (MS) DEGREE PROGRAM, 45COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY, (MS) DEGREE PROGRAM,46COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, 101COURSE LOAD REQUIREMENTS, 18CREDIT HOUR REQUIREMENTS, 24CREDITS AND QUALITY POINTS, 26CROSS-REGISTRATION WITH THE UNIVERSITY OFALABAMA-HUNTSVILLE, 18DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 13DISMISSAL FROM GRADUATE STUDY, 23DISPOSITION OF APPLICATION MATERIALS, 18EDUCATIONAL TESTING SERVICE, 17ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, (MED/MS) DEGREEPROGRAMS, 48ENGLISH WRITING PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENT, 25FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES, (MS) DEGREEPROGRAM, 54FEDERAL REGULATIONS, 18FEES AND EXPENSES, 20FIELD RESEARCH REQUIREMENTS, 26FINANCIAL AID, 21FOOD SCIENCE, (MS) DEGREE PROGRAM, 58FOOD SCIENCE, (PH.D.) PROGRAM, 60FOREIGN TRANSFER CREDITS (ACCEPTANCE), 28GRADE CHANGES, 26GRADING POLICIES, 25GRADUATE FACULTY, 178GUIDANCE AND PSYCHOLOGY, MS DEGREE PROGRAM,63INCOMPLETE WORK, 26INDEPENDENT STUDY, 26INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY, (MS) DEGREE PROGRAM, 63INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP, (MED) DEGREEPROGRAM, 66INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS, 11LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER,11LOANS AND PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT, 21MATERIEL ENGINEERING, (MS) DEGREE PROGRAM, 68MATHEMATICS PROFICIENCY SKILLS, 25NON-DEGREE STUDENT REQUIREMENTS , 16PARKING, 13PHYSICAL EDUCATION, DEGREE PROGRAM, 71PHYSICS, (MS) DEGREE PROGRAM, 72PHYSICS, (PH.D.) PROGRAM, 74PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCE, (MS) DEGREE PROGRAMS, 77PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCE, (PH.D.) PROGRAM, 78PROBATION, 23PROGRAMS OF STUDY, 24QUALITY OF WORK, 23READING, (PH.D.) PROGRAM, 80READMISSION POLICY, 17REFUND POLICIES, 20REGISTRATION, 18REPETITION OF COURSES, 26RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS, 19SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS, 21SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS, 21SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES AT ALABAMA A&MUNIVERSITY, 10SECOND MASTER'S DEGREE, 30SECONDARY EDUCATION, (MED/MS) DEGREEPROGRAMS, 81SOCIAL WORK, (MSW) DEGREE PROGRAMS, 90SPECIAL EDUCATION, (MED/MS) DEGREE PROGRAMS, 94STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS FOR COURSE WORK, 24STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES, 13STUDENT IDENTIFICATION CARDS, 13STUDENT LIFE, 10TEST OF ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE (TOEFL), 17THESIS/DISERTATION REQUIREMENTS, 29CHANGING FROM THESIS TO NON-THESIS OPTION,30TRANSFER CREDIT INFORMATION, 27GRADUATE CREDIT FOR NATIONAL BOARDCERTIFICATION, 27TUTORIAL ASSISTANCE NETWORK, 12URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING, (MUP) DEGREEPROGRAM, 98VETERAN AFFAIRS, 13WITHDRAWAL, 22, 26WORLD EDUCATION SERVICES, 17186

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