Speaker Timetable for FoG 10th November 2012 - Rockwatch

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Speaker Timetable for FoG 10th November 2012 - Rockwatch

Speaker Timetable for FoG 10th November 20121. Professor Paul Bown 11.30-12.15Stories from the Ocean Drilling Programme2. Professor Rory Mortimore 12.30-1.15Using fossils in construction projects:London Tunnels to Stonehenge3. Professor Iain Stewart 2.00 - 2.45Seismic Faults and Sacred Sanctuaries4. Professor Jenny Clack 3.00 - 3.45Populating Romers’ Gap : rebuilding terrestrial ecosystemsafter the end-Devonian mass extinction.ABSTRACTS1. Professor Paul Bown 11.30 – 12.15Investigating the history of climate and life through deep sea drillingMuch of our modern understanding of ocean and climate history comes from the study ofdeep-sea drill cores. Over the last 50 years, starting with early attempts to drill to the Moho,Deep Sea Drilling Project (DPDP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and most recentlyIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) have brought together scientists from 24countries to study all aspects of ocean history, and collectively this ranks as one ofmost significant scientific endeavours ever. The talk will provide a glimpse of life onboardthe latest IODP drill ship, the JOIDES Resolution, describing the work carried out byaround 100 international scientists, technicians and crew during two recent expeditions,working 12 hours a day for two months. The Pacific and Atlantic expeditions IODP Exp.320 (March-May 2009) and 342 (June-July 2012) both focused on Paleogene scienceobjectives, particularly the interval when climate switched from very warmEocene ‘greenhouse’ conditions to the glacial climates of the Oligocene, but, as always,many surprises were encountered along the way, including beautiful examples of impactejecta beds at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary and black shales of the Cretaceous.Although work is ongoing after both expeditions, I will present some of our new findingson the climate and evolutionary history of the Paleogene interval.2. Professor Rory Mortimore 12.30 – 1.15Using fossils in construction projects: London Tunnels to StonehengeAbstract: Drilling boreholes, identifying the stratigraphy, and recognising the impact ofthe geology on design remain central issues in engineering geology. Fossils play a key rolein aiding this process as demonstrated by the investigations in the Chalk for LondonTunnels, the A303 around Stonehenge and the A354 Road Cuttings at Lower BincombeFarm, The Ridgeway, Dorset.


3. Professor Iain Stewart 2.00 – 2.45Seismic Faults and Sacred SanctuariesThe lands of Greece and Turkey are the most earthquake-prone part of Europe and the landsof Greece and are riddled with seismic faults. Little wonder then that many of the majorcities of the ancient Greek world lie on or close to active faults. However, archaeologicaland geological relations at some of the Aegean’s most renowned Classical sites suggest thatthere may be a more intimate relationship between seismic faults and past humansettlements. In particular, some ancient sanctuaries with special, sometimes oracular,functions, appear to have been deliberately positioned astride active fault traces.4. Professor Jenny Clack 3.00 – 3.45Populating Romers’ Gap : rebuilding terrestrial ecosystems after the end-Devonianmass extinction.At the end of the Devonian, a mass extinction event changed the faunal composition ofterrestrial, freshwater and marine faunas. The 20 million years that followed this extinctionevent has for more than 9 decades been seen as a fossil-poor interval, named ‘Romer’sGap’. The earliest Carboniferous Tournaisian stage, however, saw the re-establishment offully terrestrial ecosystems and the acquisition of terrestrial capability by tetrapods, asinferred from later Carboniferous Viséan stage fossils. Unfortunately, almost nothingwasknown from the fossil record about how this re-establishment progressed, or howterrestrial tetrapods evolved and diversified. For example, only two sites worldwiderecorded tetrapod fossils from Romer’s Gap, one in Nova Scotia and one in westernScotland. Now, for the first time anywhere in the world, abundant fossils of tetrapods andassociated fauna including arthropods and fishes from this period have been recovered fromeastern Scotland. This talk introduces some of these finds and their significance, and furtherwork that will take place to understand the causes and consequences of the end-Devonianmass extinction and the events that followed it.-----------------------------------------------------------------------

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