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Coral Health and Disease in the Pacific: Vision for Action

Coral Health and Disease in the Pacific: Vision for Action

Coral Health and Disease in the Pacific: Vision for

  • Page 5: TABLE OF CONTENTSTABLE OF FIGURES
  • Page 10 and 11: Though the proliferation of coral r
  • Page 12: years. Recent surveys conducted in
  • Page 18 and 19: priority right now. What’s I have
  • Page 23 and 24: As an initial step to identify and
  • Page 25 and 26: The four working groups identified
  • Page 27 and 28: able to understand the normal struc
  • Page 29 and 30: In the following section the PPWG i
  • Page 31 and 32: subspecies, thus limiting the abili
  • Page 33 and 34: (Baird and Babcock 2000; Muscatine
  • Page 35 and 36: (Yakovleva and Hidaka 2004). In an
  • Page 37 and 38: y disulfides (Richards et al. 1983)
  • Page 39 and 40: species of Octocorallia were report
  • Page 41 and 42: h. Availability and Processes for o
  • Page 43 and 44: Understanding of conditions that su
  • Page 45 and 46: Physiology & Pathology Working Grou
  • Page 47 and 48: Boehm et al. 1995b; Downs et al. 20
  • Page 49 and 50: B. Overall Strategic Objective: Imp
  • Page 51 and 52: Table B.1 CORAL HEALTH/DISEASE INDI
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    Strategic Objective B.2: Establish

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    Table B.3 INDICATORS OF CORAL HEALT

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    Table B.4 IDENTIFICATION OF RISK FA

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    Table B.4 IDENTIFICATION OF RISK FA

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    Assess potential reporting requirem

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    Figure B.2 Integrated Framework for

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    Challenges and Recommendations:The

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    Strategic Objective C.2: Develop a

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    on hold until specific guidelines c

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    Pathology of Disease Working Group

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    General efforts to mitigate anthrop

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    Challenges and RecommendationsThere

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    d. Identifying and mitigating manag

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    Strategic Objective D.1: Enhance th

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    known to be affected by specific co

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    A variety of natural and anthropoge

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    Recommendation D.3.2: Develop local

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    Strategic Objective D.4: Identify p

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    Management Perspectives Working Gro

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    I. INTRODUCTION—SETTING THE STAGE

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    more difficult to design management

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    Specialized ResourcesSeveral specia

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    STUDYING CORAL DISEASES; UNDERSTAND

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    egional decline of Acropora. Report

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    distributional maps. The GCDD inclu

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    Table 1. Diseases, syndromes, abnor

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    In a review article, Sutherland et

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    Table 2. Various white syndromes re

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    Dark spots disease was first observ

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    Table 4. Other Diseases, syndromes,

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    Fig. 1. Five major scleractinian co

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    Fig. 3. Number of diseases observed

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    ReferencesAbbott, R.E. 1979. Ecolog

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    Bythell, J.C., M.R. Barer, R.P. Coo

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    Friends of the Virgin Islands Natio

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    Knowlton, N. , J.C. Lang, M.C. Roon

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    Peters E.C., J.C. Halas, and H.B. M

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    Rutzler, K., D.L. Santavy, and A. A

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    WORLD BANK PROJECT: CORAL DISEASE W

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    Impact of fish farmsAs part of its

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    III. HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE--LESSON

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    overgrowing corals, and may prevent

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    agents have been proposed for sever

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    photosynthesis pigments. This inclu

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    located predominantly at the axial

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    Syndrome Diagnostics ReferenceYBDDS

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    The average prevalence of coral dis

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    A more virulent form of WP (WP-II)

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    Table 2. Prevalence, incidence and

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    coralicida; Denner et al., 2003) ba

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    Table 3. Causative agents and assoc

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    to areas where human activities hav

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    What have we learned from Caribbean

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    Condition Synonyms Host range Sourc

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    ReferencesAbbott, R.E. 1979. Ecolog

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    Croquer, A., C. Bastidas and L. Lip

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    Smith, and G. R. Vasta. 1999. Emerg

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    Richardson, L.L., and K.G. Kuta, 20

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    IV. STATE OF KNOWLEDGE IN THE PACIF

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    Fisheries:These great expanses of t

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    not under the U.S. flag have other

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    BASELINE LEVELS OF CORAL DISEASE IN

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    INTRODUCTIONFrench Frigate Shoals (

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    linear bands of unidentified granul

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    The mesoglea formed an arching stru

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    # ###R27####NC#R29## #R31#####TC1 R

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    178Figure 3. P. duerdeni. Note clea

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    Figure 4. M. capitata, note growth

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    Figure 5. P. lobata (A-D). Note clu

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    Figure 6. P. lobata (A-H). Coral wi

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    Figure 7. A. cytherea (A-D). Type 1

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    Figure 8. Blue-gray zooanthid (A-D)

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    Report 1. CORAL AND CRUSTOSE CORALL

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    Table 1. Coordinates of sites surve

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    Based on colony counts within trans

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    Histology (gross and microscopic fi

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    Figure 2. A) Goniastrea sp. with ba

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    Fish bites: This was manifested by

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    ABCFigure 7. A-B) Plating Acropora

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    ABFigure 9. A-B) Mucus sheathing in

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    5. There were differences in preval

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    Appendix I. Summary of coral lesion

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    Acropora Growth AnomaliesHistology:

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    Lobophyllia tissue loss syndromeHis

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    Report 2. JOHNSTON ATOLL REEF HEALT

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    Six locations were selected for spo

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    nematocyst). Other mesenteric filam

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    atrophied epithelium and absence of

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    Seapy 1998). Given the simple anato

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    Conference, Heron Island October. S

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    Figure 3: Dominant species of coral

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    ABCDEFFigure 5. A. cytherea. A) Pur

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    ABCDEFFigure 7. A-B) A. cytherea; D

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    Figure 9. Number of lesions in A. c

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    CORAL DISEASE ON THE GREAT BARRIER

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    incidence is changing through time

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    populations of ciliates, packed wit

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    Unusual bleaching patterns: Distinc

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    V. PATHOLOGY AND EPIDEMIOLOGYDISEAS

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    EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY AND DISEASE EM

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    For the reasons outlined above, eme

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    WILDLIFE DISEASE INVESTIGATIONS 101

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    animals, the leaves were the same b

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    examination by a state diagnostic l

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    In the spring of 2003 large numbers

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    VI. COMMUNICATION TO MAKE A DIFFERE

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    An “Ecoplex” conceptual framewo

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    Low stakeholder trust: defensive pa

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    skill level for in situ determinati

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    LEVERAGING POST-GENOMIC TOOLS AND S

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    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSWe would like to ac

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    grateful to the Working Group Chair

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    Baird, A. H., and P. A. Marshall. 2

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    Dizon, R. M., and H. T. Yap. 2006a.

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    Hayakawa, H., T. Andoh, and T. Wata

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    Kumar, V., A. Abbas, and N. Fausto

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    Permata, W. D., and M. Hidaka. 2005

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    Santavy, D. and others 2001. Quanti

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    Wilkinson, C. 2002. Status of coral

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    Appendix I. Meeting AgendaCORAL HEA

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    7:30 Dinner - Grand Salon Moana Sur

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    genomic tools, including the curren

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    Appendix III. Coral Model Species S

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    Melissa BosMelissa joined the Allia

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    SUNY College of Environmental Scien

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    collaboration between the College o

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    Jo-Ann LeongJo-Ann is Director of t

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    Amanda McLenonAmanda is currently w

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    Technical Advisory Committee on Lan

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    Meir SussmanMeir recently completed

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    Dana WilliamsDana earned her doctor

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    Cheryl WoodleyCheryl received her P

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    Qing Xiao LiUniversity of Hawaii195

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    Appendix VI.OPINION PAPER:Transmiss

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    314

Coral Disease Handbook - Coral Reef Targeted Research
Coral Disease Handbook - National Wildlife Health Center - USGS
Mapping of coral reefs health: towards a spatial ... - Planet Action
Social and economic values of Pacific Coral Reefs (PDF File) - CRISP
Jurisdiction-Specific Research Needs: Pacific Ocean - NOAA Coral ...
Field Manual for the Investigation of Coral Disease Outbreaks
Caribbean Reefs - Coral Reef Targeted Research
Status of Coral Reefs of the World: 1998
effects of global warming on coral disease outbreaks in the western ...
Chapter 2: Monitoring Coral Reef Health - NOAA Coral Reef ...
Pacific Region Cold-Water Coral and Sponge Conservation Strategy ...
Implementation of the National Coral Reef Action Strategy
Coral Reef Alliance, CORAL - Caribbean Tourism Organization
Satellites: an Eye on the Oceans Coral Reefs Crisis - Planet Action
EU Project Promotional Brochure - International Coral Reef Action ...
Jackson2013-Status and Trendsof Caribbean Coral Reefs
Status of Caribbean coral reefs after bleaching and hurricanes in 2005
Effects of global warming on coral disease outbreaks in the Western ...
Outbreak of the coral disease, Montipora White Syndrome in Maui ...
Coral Reefs & Sustainable Marine Recreation - NOAA's Coral Reef ...
Feb 2006 (PDF) - Caribbean Coral Reef Institute (CCRI)
Cesar2000-Economics of Coral Reefs.pdf
SPREP Annual Report 2002 - International Coral Reef Action Network
South Kohala Conservation Action Plan - Hawaii Coral Reef Strategies
FISH MOVEMENT IN MPAS ON CORAL REEFS IN ... - WCS Fiji
Deep Sea Corals - NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program
Fossil coral records of tropical Pacific climate over the last millennium
The Pacific Ocean: A Case for Coordinated Action - Okeanos ...
Australia's Coral Sea A Biophysical Profile - The Pew Charitable Trusts