1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10 Things Male Coaches Can Do

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10 Things Male Coaches Can Do

BOUT MVPmentors in violence prevention10 Things Male Coaches Can Do1234567891010Realize that gender violence is a men’s issue that affects girls and womenTo Prevent Teen Gender Violencethat you care about.Don’t remain silent-- confront sexist behavior of your student-athletes andcolleagues.Understand how your own attitudes and actions on and off the field mayperpetuate sexism and violence and work towards changing them.Gently offer your help and support if you suspect that a female studentathleteclose to you is being abused or has been sexually assaulted.Be a role model for your student-athletes. Respect women and treat them asequals.Get your team involved in preventing gender violence-- White Ribbon Daycampaigns, fundraisers, etc. are great ways to help support people workingto end gender violence.Approach gender violence as a men’s issue-- view your student-athlees notas perpetrators or possible offenders, but as empowered bystanders whocan confront abusive peers.Mentor and teach the boys you coach about how to be men in ways that donot invlove degrading or abusing girls and women.Challenge gender stereotypes-- do not equate poor athletic performance ofyour male student-athletes to girls and women.Refuse to purchase any magazines, videos, or music that portray women in adegrading or violent manner.Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) Program360 Huntington Avenue, 42 BI •Boston, MA 02115 •www.sportinsociety.org


ABOUT MVPmentors in violence preventionMVPThe Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) Program, founded in 1993 by NortheasternUniversity’s Center for the Study of Sport in Society, motivates student-athletes andstudent leaders to play a central role in solving problems that historically have beenconsidered “women’s issues”: rape, battering, and sexual harassment.What is MVP?Until recently, few campus or community-based programs have encouraged young mento work actively on these issues. The MVP Program motivates men and women to worktogether in preventing men’s violenceagainst women.Utilizing a unique bystander approach to prevention, the MVP program views studentathletesand student leaders not as potential perpetrators or victims, but as empoweredbystanders who can confront abusive peers.MVP TrainingsThe MVP Program, composed of male and female former professional and collegestudent-athletes, conducts gender violence prevention trainings for a wide variety of highschool, college, and community groups.Typically, the racially-diverse MVP staff provides both mixed-gender and single gendersessions. Both interactive sessions consist of awareness-raising activities and scenariosthat utilize the program’s key teaching tool, the MVP Playbook.The MVP Playbookmentors in violence preventionThe MVP Playbook consists of a series of real-life school and social scenarios rangingfrom sexual harassment to a potential rape involving alcohol. During interactive sessions,the MVP staff uses the Playbook to spark discussions that convey concrete options fornon-abusive men and empowered women to interrupt, confront, and prevent violence bytheir friends, peers, or teammates.By focusing on bystander behavior, MVP reduces the defensiveness and hopelessnessthat many men and women often feel when discussing men’s violence against women.Program participants develop leadership skills and learn to mentor and educate youngerboys and girls on these issues. MVP aims to construct a new vision of a society that doesnot equate strength in men with dominance over women.The Level of the Problem• Battering is the single leading cause of injury to women in the United States more thanrape, auto accidents, and muggings combined. (National Coalition Against DomesticViolence)• Girls and young women from various socioeconomic and racial backgrounds experiencesexual harassment on a daily basis. (Stein, Nan. Sexual Harassment in School: ThePublic Performance of Gendered Violence)• One in six college women reported being the victim of rape or attempted rape in thepreceding year. (National Victim Center)Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) Program360 Huntington Avenue, 42 BI •Boston, MA 02115 •www.sportinsociety.org

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