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Lithuanian ProposalsSecure Support in SeoulPresident DaliaGrybauskaitė of Lithuaniaemphasized at theplenary session of theNuclear Security Summitin Seoul that stress testsunder the most adverseconditions should bemade mandatory forthe operating nuclearpower plants andnuclear utilities underconstruction. Lithuaniagained significant IAEAsupport to the NuclearSecurity CompetenceCenter underestablishment in Vilnius.Electricity to Cost More in Germanyand Still Remain NuclearGermany will soon mark a yearof living with a decision todecommission its nuclear powerplants (NPP). Thus we are ableto calculate the aftereffects ofthe shutdown of the first 8 NPPsand analyze the investmentsthat may be needed in thefuture, furthermore, Lithuaniacould possibly learn fromGermany’s experience, prof.Kęstutis Masiulis told delfi.ltnews portal.“I have been to Germany twice to discussenergy matters with politiciansand energy specialists. I heard theirpreoccupation with Germany’s plansto close the NPPs, as abandonment ofnuclear power was inevitably pullingup electricity prices, which will putan extra burden on manufacturerswhose production and services willlose competition. The abandonmentleads to increased dependence uponimports, lowers the degree of energysecurity and boosts gas imports,” saidMasiulis. Nevertheless, in his words,during discussions with members ofGreens’ and left-wing parties, the latterexpressed indignation over thecheapness of electricity generatedin NPPs, comparing them to moneyminting machines. They said it wouldbe unfair that Lithuania will producecheap electricity, while Germans shiftto the more expensive type.Lithuanian President DaliaGrybauskaitė underlinedLithuania’s active contribution tothe efforts of guaranteeing safeuse of nuclear materials.Electricity Prices Up in GermanyThe grief, fear and uncertainty of tsunamithat rippled across the globefrom Japan in March 2011 was probablythe most shaking effect uponGermany – the government of AngelaMerkel first declared a moratoriumand, after an overnight meeting, fullyreversed its earlier decision to extendoperations of nuclear utilities. Sevenoperational NPPs were brought tofull stop over a year. This led to nearlya 10% rise in energy prices in Germany.On average, prices went up byEUR 8 per megawatt-hour (MWh) toapproximately EUR 60. Nevertheless,decommissioning of other powerplants is expected by 2022. Scientificcalculations show that the pricepaid by Germans for a kilowatt-hour(kWh) in 2020 would higher by EUR0.047, on average. Consequently,the annual amount spent on electricityby an average family of fourwill stand at about LTL 604. The increasein price will cost EUR 28.8 blnfor whole country per year. The sumconsists of bigger grants for productionfrom renewable resources, higherprices for CO2 emissions and NPPdecommissioning costs. The sum willbe deducted from building of roadsand schools, as well as salaries.According to the calculations, therewill be an inevitable rise in electricityprices, along with prices for anyother goods or services to end users,Ways of ensuring safe use of nuclearsubstances and safe operation ofnuclear power plants were high onthe agenda of the Seoul summit.“Lithuania is acting in full compliancewith all safety standards at both theIgnalina nuclear power plant, whichis being decommissioned, and theplanned Visaginas nuclear powerplant. We expect neighboring countriesto carry out in a same manner,”the President emphasized.Lithuania’s initiative that stress testsbe carried out not only at nuclearpower plants operating in the EuropeanUnion, but also worldwide, receivedsupport from President of theEuropean Commission José Manuelas well as a drop in industrial competition.Neighbors Will BuildLast year, Germany imported 25 TWhfrom the neighboring France and theCzech Republic. Ironically, the twocountries generate electricity in NPPs.After deciding to give up nuclearenergy, Germany is accelerating theconstruction of other types of powerplants – renewable resources andnatural gas, which is imported fromRussia. The plan will require giganticinvestments – they could reachabout EUR 200 bln over the comingdecade. Investments will be requiredto new power plants and renovationand development of electricity networks.However, the Czech Republicand Poland have already announcedtheir plans to limit the imports ofelectricity generated in wind mills innorthern Germany due to a possiblydestabilizing effect upon their nationalelectricity networks and excessivefluctuations, which increase therisk of system stalling, in other words,if the system cannot withstand excessiveload amid powerful winds,the country or a region could be leftpowerless.Special phase-changing transformersdirect the unsteady wind electricityto Germany’s internal electricity networks,which are just as loaded.Barroso and most countries participatingin the Nuclear Security Summit.At a meeting with Grybauskaitė,Director General of the InternationalAtomic Energy Agency (IAEA) YukiyaAmano stated support to the NuclearSecurity Competence Centerthat is being founded in Lithuania.He also pledged assistance in thecreation and development of itsoperations. “In the future, the centercould become a regional bodyin order to bring the Nordic andBaltic competences and possibledonation in the Eastern Europeanregion,” the Lithuanian Ministry ofForeign Affairs said. Sources: Verslo Žinios,delfi.lt, lrytas.lt, bernardinai.ltEnergy SpecialistsSkepticalIS GERMANY READY TO GIVE UPNUCLEAR ENERGY?A survey of respondents from 90countries carried out by the WorldEnergy Council showed:• None of the surveyed expertsbelieve that Germany will meetthe objectives in time – give upnuclear energy and acceleratenatural gas and renewableenergy.• Merely one third of energyspecialists believe that Germanywill successfully implement itsenergy objectives or part ofthem with delays.• The majority of world energyspecialists are convinced thatchanges in Germany’s energypolicy will have negative effectsupon Germany’s economy – 78%of polled experts think theeconomy will be undermined by2020 and 48% believe the effectswill continue in later years.• The experts think that othercountries will also suffer fromnegative consequences of theGermany’s decision to give upNPPs:71% of experts believe this will lead toa price hike in other countries,62% think this will undermine safeelectricity supplies of the whole ofEurope.Source: World Energy Council2

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