Faculty Course Guide - Part II - Rotary Leadership Institute

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Faculty Course Guide - Part II - Rotary Leadership Institute

Recommended Schedules forPart I, Part II and Part III Courses2009-12Time Part I Courses Part II Courses Part III Courses8:30 Leadership/Characteristics Leadership/Goals International Service9:20Rotary Beyond The Rotary Effective Leadershipthe Club I Foundation II Strategies10:10 Break Break Break10:30Rotary Communication Effective LeadershipFoundation I Skills Strategies (continued)11:15Membership/ Ethics/Vocational Rotary OpportunitiesRetention Service (f/ Programs of Rotary)12:15 Lunch Lunch Lunch1:15Leadership/Team Membership/ Leadership/PublicBuilding Recruitment Relations2:15Service Analyzing Your Making aProjects Rotary Club Difference4:00 Adjourn Adjourn Adjourn


The Rotary Leadership Institute2) What makes a good goal? WHY?M – MeasurableA – AchievableC – ChallengingS – Shared3) What should be the time period for a goal? A year—more?“We can teach children tolove. We can teach them torespect themselves andothers. We can teach themto set goals and worktoward them. And in return,they can pass on these lifeaffirmingvalues to the nextgenerations.”4) The Club Leadership Plan calls on Rotary Clubs todevelop strategic plans. What is a strategic plan andhow does it relate to goal setting?1994-95 RI Pres. Bill Huntley— Address to 1995 President’sConference on Family Values andCommunity Service,Chicago, Illinois, USAa) Why do we need a strategic plan?b) What benefits are there for a strategic plan?c) How does the planning process differ from goal setting?A strategic plan is generally based on different time periods, e.g. where will yoube in one year, 3 years, 5 years, etc. It also contains a suggested WAY of gettingthere. Strategic plans are usually broader in scope than a short term goal.5) Let’s try to develop some goals as part of a Club Strategic Plan!!Divide the class into about 3 groups. Have each group develop five goals as part ofa strategic plan for a club and how the goal will be achieved. Have each groupreport one goal and describe how and why and continue this pattern until 10 minutesbefore the end of the session.6) Once the strategic plan has been created, how can it be implemented?a) How do we communicate the goals and how often should we communicate them?b) How can we follow up goals? When should reports be given?c) When should a strategic plan be revised? By whom?RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 3Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


Insert LG-1: Strategic Planning GuideThe Rotary Leadership InstituteRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 4Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 4


The Rotary Leadership InstituteRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 5Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 5


The Rotary Leadership InstituteRotary Foundation IISession GoalsReview the Mechanics of theSHARE processDiscuss the Importance of theSHARE Program to RotaryClubsWhat are the Forces AffectingSHARE and What Changesare Likely in the FutureMaterialsInsert RFII-1: DDF Account RegisterInsert RFII-2: DDF OptionsFull SHARE Kit (2010-11)TRF Quick Reference GuideSHARE SlideshowFuture Vision Plan (FVP) Comparison ChartFVP Quick Reference guideFVP SlideshowFVP Slideshow (2009 Update)Key: attached insert online article pptSession Topics1) Review of the SHARE Program. How does it work? Why is it important?2) What funds contributed in the district are eligible for the SHARE Program?a) What about restricted funds (e.g. Polio Plus Partners, Gates Challenge Grant)?b) What about Permanent Fund?c) Importance of EREY – Every Rotarian Every Year Campaign- adds Continuity &Scale3) Who makes the selections?Selections refer to DDF Funds returned to the district.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 6Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institute4) Let’s make some selections for our district. Divide into smaller groups for thefollowing exercise. Use pages 8 – 10 while developing this exercise.a) Group Exercises: (15 minutes total)i) Exercise I: The Annual Programs Fundcontribution for District XXXX for the relevantyear were $200,000. What are the DDF Funds?Make your selections. Discuss the reasons foryou selections and be ready to present yourreasons to the group.ii) Exercise II: The Annual Programs Fundcontribution for District YYYY for the relevantyear were $300,000. What are the DDF Funds?Make your selections. Discuss the reasons foryou selections and be ready to present yourreasons to the group.iii) Exercise III: The Annual Programs Fundcontribution for District ZZZZ for the relevantyear were $400,000. What are the DDF Funds?Make your selections. Discuss the reasons foryou selections and be ready to present yourreasons to the group.b) Present selections to the larger group & discuss thereasons for the particular selections (10 min. total)c) What should our priorities be in Foundationprograms?Humanitarian vs. Educational/Cultural Programs“Rotary International’smasterpiece is The RotaryFoundation….It transformsour most daring dreams intothe most splendidrealities….The Rotary worldand even the political worldare already aware that TheRotary Foundation is themost generous expression ofRotarian generosity — agenerosity that not onlybrings benefits, but alsobrings help and cooperationto solve the problems thataffect mankind….Only Godachieves the impossible, butThe Rotary Foundationachieves the best thatmankind can possiblyachieve.”1990-91 RI Pres. Paulo V.C. Costa— Address to 1996 Rotary Conventiond) Programs funded by the World Fund - What is it and what are the Programssupported by the Fund? List on flip chart5) How can our clubs take advantage of DDF Funds for Humanitarian projects?Matching grants6) What percentage of total SHARE Funds are allocated subject to District and/or Clubdecisionmaking? 50 percent?, More? How?7) What are our Rotary Foundation’s priorities for service to others? Is SHARE anefficient way to target our Foundation’s money resources toward those priorities? Isthere a better way? What external and internal forces affect SHARE? What is theFuture Vision Plan and is it a solution? If time permits.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 7Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteInsert TRFII-1: DDF Account RegisterDDF Distribution 20____ through 20____Starting Balance$__________Donation to PolioPlus Fund - Rotary's US$200 MillionChallenge$__________Scholarships Qty $__________Amabassadorial Scholars $25,000 $__________Multi-year 0 $25,000 $03 mo. Cultural 0 $12,000 $06 mo. Cultural 0 $17,000 $03-5 mo. University Teacher 0 $14,000 $06-10 mo. University Teacher 0 $25,000 $0Group Study ExchangeAdditional GSE $13,000 $__________Additional Neighboring Country GSE $7,000 $__________Additional Team Member $3,000 $__________Additional NC Team Member $2,000 $__________Team Orientation/Language TrainingDSG Request$__________$__________$__________Matching/ existing 3H Grants Qty Type DDF Amt $__________(Description)(Description)(Description)(Description)Donation to Fund PoolsRotary CentersScholarships for Low Income CountiesOther DonationsTotal DistributionRemaining Balance$__________$__________$__________$__________$__________$__________RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 8Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteInsert TRFII-2: SHARE DDF Options **Matching Grants — sponsor portion: Support Rotary clubs and districts as they work withinternational partners to address humanitarian conditions that benefit communities in need.District Simplified Grants: Support the service activities or humanitarian endeavors in whichdistricts engage in local and international communities. The total maximum DSG allowance isequal to 20% of DDF based on 50% of Annual Giving three years prior.3-H Grants: Phased out July 2009 except for Existing Grants & certain USAID Water/SanitationGrants.*Academic-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship: (US$25,000): An Ambassadorial Scholar fromyour district or a non-Rotary country receives a flat grant of US$25,000 to study for oneacademic year in another Rotary country during 2010-11.*Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship: (US$25,000): Phased out July 2009. AnAmbassadorial Scholar from your district or a non-Rotary country receives a flat grant ofUS$12,500 or its equivalent per year for two years of study in another Rotary country during2010-12.*3-Month Cultural Ambassadorial Scholarship: (US$12,000): Phased out July 2009. AnAmbassadorial Scholar from your district or a non-Rotary country engages in intensive languagetraining and cultural immersion for three months in another Rotary country during 2010-11.*6-Month Cultural Ambassadorial Scholarship: (US$17,000): Phased out July 2009. AnAmbassadorial Scholar from your district or a non-Rotary country engages in intensive languagetraining and cultural immersion for six months in another Rotary country during 2010-11.*3-5 Month Rotary Grant for University Teacher: (US$14,000): Phased out July 2009. AUniversity Teacher from your district receives a flat grant of US$14,000 for three to five monthsof teaching service at a university or college in a low-income country during 2010-11.*6-10 Month Rotary Grant for University Teacher: (US$25,000): Phased out July 2009. AUniversity Teacher from your district receives a flat grant of US$25,000 for six to ten months ofteaching service at a university or college in a low-income country during 2010-11.*Group Study Exchange Team: (US$13,000): Districts in good standing are entitled to a WorldFund GSE every year at no cost to the district, but may also send one additional GSE teamthrough the use of DDF. Paired Rotary districts both send and receive a team of four non-Rotarians plus a Rotarian team leader for a four- to six-week study tour to learn how theirvocations are practiced in another country. Exchanges are completed in one Rotary year. A GSEteam funded with DDF may partner with a district that is funding their GSE through DDF or theWorld Fund. GSE World Fund awards many not be donated from one district to another. Also,districts may not accumulate GSE World Fund awards from year to year. 2010-11 and 2011-12Teams are limited to one team every other year from the World Fund.*Neighboring Country Group Study Exchange Team: (US$7,000): Follows the same guidelinesas a standard GSE, but is an exchange between any two districts located in countries that have acommon border or exist in close proximity. In multi-country districts a Neighboring Country GSEteam must be based on travel between localities that have a common country border or exist inclose proximity.*GSE Additional Team Member: (US$3,000): Districts may add up to two additional non-Rotarian team members through SHARE, contingent upon the written approval of districtRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 9Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institutegovernors from both districts. Additional Team Members must meet all eligibility requirements.Program subsidies remain the same regardless of the number of team members.*Neighboring Country GSE Additional Team Member: (US$2,000): Districts pursuing aNeighboring Country GSE may also add up to two additional non-Rotarian team membersthrough SHARE, contingent upon the written approval of district governors from both districts.All other requirements remain the same.GSE Team Orientation: (maximum of US$1,000): Districts may use DDF to offset costsassociated with planning and conducting orientation programs for out-bound GSE teams.GSE Language Training Subsidy: (any amount): This option is available to your district tosupplement the Standard Language Training Subsidy of up to US$1,000 offered by theFoundation.DonationsPolioPlus Fund: An opportunity to donate DDF to PolioPlus, Rotary's priority program, tosupport the most essential components of polio eradication activities such as NationalImmunization Days, including house-to-house vaccination campaigns in priority countries, anddisease surveillance. The Rotary Foundation received a US$355 million grant from the Bill andMelinda Gates Foundation. During the 2008-09, 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12 Rotary years, weare challenged to raise US$200 million to match the Gates Foundation’s gift. A district’s 2010-11DDF donation to PolioPlus will be counted towards matching the Gates Foundation ChallengeGrant.DDF Donation: A contribution of DDF is made to a Rotary district of your choice. The receivingdistrict may use the donated DDF for any available SHARE option it chooses.World Fund: The World Fund is vital to the continuation of the Foundation’s programs. TheTrustees use the World Fund to offer programs such as, Group Study Exchange awards, theFoundation’s matching portion of Matching Grants and pilot programs.Permanent Fund: The Permanent Fund ensures The Rotary Foundation’s ability to meet theurgent needs of the future through an endowment. Spending of investment earnings from DDFcontributions to the Permanent Fund will be used for the World Fund. (DDF donations intopooled endowed funds for the support of Rotary centers are not accepted.)Rotary Centers for International Studies in peace and conflict resolution program: Donationssupport the pool of funds that provides up to 60 Rotary World Peace Fellowships for master’sdegree study and up to 50 Rotary World Peace Fellowships for professional developmentcertificate study, offered annually on a world-competitive basis for study at the seven RotaryCenters. Rotary World Peace Fellows obtain a master’s degree in international relations, peacestudies, conflict resolution, and related areas or a professional development certificate in peaceand conflict studies.Scholarships Fund Pool for Low-Income Countries: This fund provides AmbassadorialScholarships to be awarded annually to students from low-income countries.NotesDDF Program Options that are marked with asterisk (*) may also be donated to other districts.** Districts selected as a pilot district for the Foundation’s Future vision Plan will be providedwith a different list of Trustee-approved SHARE DDF spending options.For further information regarding the aforementioned programs, please consult the 2009-10 QuickReference Guide at http://www.rotary.org/RIdocuments/en_pdf/219en.pdf.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 10Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteCommunication SkillsSession GoalsIntroduce the basicelements andimportance ofeffectivecommunicationsDiscuss the role ofcommunications inRotary leadershipMaterialsInsert CS-1: Sample Biography of District GovernorInsert CS-2:10 Tips for Public SpeakingInsert CS-3: Communication Skills, (Page 3) Excerptedfrom Leadership Development: Your Guide to Starting AProgram. 250-EN-(308)Insert CS-4: Leadership Styles, (Page 4) Excerptedfrom Leadership Development: Your Guide to Starting AProgram. 250-EN-(308)Effective Public Relations 257-EN-(707)10 Biggest Public Speaking MistakesThe 10 Commandments of CommunicationKey: attached insert online article pptSession Topics1) What opportunities exist for a leader or any member of a Rotary Club tocommunicate with the members? Use flip chart.Talks at club meetings and boards of directors, newsletter articles, personal talkswith individual members, club flyers for events, websites, mailings, introductions,committee reports, etc. Do your club leaders and members utilize all thateffectively?2) What makes a good speech? When developing a speech, report, introduction, howshould you approach that?Think about your audience. What would they like to hear from you? Think aboutwhat result you are looking for. This is very important for speeches and articles.3) What do believe an audience wants to hear or not hear from a speaker at:a) a Graduation;RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 11Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Instituteb) A toast at a wedding;c) A shareholders’ meeting;d) The presentation of an award?4) Think about speeches, reports, introductions, etc. inyour club or in Rotary generally.a) What do you remember about them?“Rotary’s greatest strengthwill always be the individualRotarian. No otherorganization has suchpowerful humanresources.”Past RI President Glen W. Kinross---- President’s MessageTHE ROTARIAN, July 1997b) Do you remember facts and figures?c) Do you remember stories/jokes, etc.?d) Do you remember the main point(s)?5) How many major points should a speaker or writer make in a communication? Talkabout some different circumstances.6) When is a written or oral communication too long? Is a very short communicationsometimes effective?7) How would you go about preparing for a talk/speech?Encourage discussion – people do things differently.a) Would you practice?RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 12Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Instituteb) Would practice help you in a specific situation or in the future?c) Would an outline help or is it easier to just talk “off the cuff?”d) Would you use a joke for your talk?8) How would you go about preparing for an introduction of a Dignitary or Speaker?Divide into two groups. Ask the first group to work in pairs. One person interviewsthe other to prepare to introduce him/her as a guest speaker to the full group.Introductions should take no more than one minute.The second group will work on question #9.a) What are the elements of a good introduction?b) How would you introduce a visiting district governor for his/her official visit?c) Have you heard some good introductions in your club?d) What makes them good or bad?9) Practice introducing a district governor on an official club visit. See biography belowgiven to you by the District Secretary. How can you design an effective introduction?Would having the governor’s biography help? A sample governor’s biography isattached as an Insert.Develop a one-minute presentation of the District Governor based on the samplebiography on page 14.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 13Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteInsert CS-1: Sample Biography of District GovernorJoe Rotarian is the District Governor of District 4999. He is an insurance consultantwith the firm of Mountjoy and Lufkin of Council Bluffs, Iowa. He was born inOmaha, Nebraska and went to public schools there until the family moved to Lincoln,Nebraska. He was a member of his high school football team, playing as an offensivetackle. Unfortunately, his team lost the Conference tournament in his senior year ofhigh school. He then went on to Mullville Community College where he earned anassociate degree in psychology and then completed his education at PhillipsSeminary, also in Mullville.After spending two years in the U.S. Army, Joe worked as a road crew supervisor forMullville Construction Company for eight months and then supervised a shift at theFord Motor Company plant in Wobegon, Michigan. Unfortunately he was laid offduring a slowdown at the company. He then got a job as an insurance salesman andnow is an insurance consultant for various businesses.Joe joined Rotary in 1990 and quickly became the 50/50 committee chair. Afterholding other important club positions, he became club president in 1991. At thedistrict level, Joe was District Chaplain, District Sgt. at Arms and Assistant Governor.He was nominated for Governor in 1998 and attended the Rotary InternationalAssembly in San Diego, California.He is married to Melissa Rotarian and has three children—Joe, Jr. who is in the 4 thgrade in the Washington School, Annemarie, who is married and lives in Des Moines,Iowa and Martin who is at home. The family lives at 549 Mulberry Street in CouncilBluffs and he can be reached by email at joe@yahoo.comRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 14Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteInsert CS-2: 10 Tips for Public SpeakingFeeling some nervousness before giving a speech is natural and evenbeneficial, but too much nervousness can be detrimental.Here are some proven tips on how to control your butterflies & give better presentations:1. Know your material. Pick a topic you are interested in. Know more about itthan you include in your speech. Use humor, personal stories andconversational language – that way you won’t easily forget what to say.2. Practice. Practice. Practice! Rehearse out loud with all equipment you planon using. Revise as necessary. Work to control filler words; Practice, pause andbreathe. Practice with a timer and allow time for the unexpected.3. Know the audience. Greet some of the audience members as they arrive. It’seasier to speak to a group of friends than to strangers.4. Know the room. Arrive early, walk around the speaking area and practiceusing the microphone and any visual aids.5. Relax. Begin by addressing the audience. It buys you time and calms yournerves. Pause, smile and count to three before saying anything. ("One onethousand,two one-thousand, three one-thousand. Pause. Begin.) Transformnervous energy into enthusiasm.6. Visualize yourself giving your speech. Imagine yourself speaking, your voiceloud, clear and confident. Visualize the audience clapping – it will boost yourconfidence.7. Realize that people want you to succeed. Audiences want you to beinteresting, stimulating, informative and entertaining. They’re rooting for you.8. Don’t apologize for any nervousness or problem – the audience probably nevernoticed it.9. Concentrate on the message – not the medium. Focus your attention awayfrom your own anxieties and concentrate on your message and your audience.10. Gain experience. Mainly, your speech should represent you — as an authorityand as a person. Experience builds confidence, which is the key to effectivespeaking. A Toastmasters club can provide the experience you need in a safeand friendly environment.Free resource from www.Toastmaster’s.comRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 15Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


Insert CS-3: Communication SkillsThe Rotary Leadership InstituteRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 16RLI Rev. Undergraduate 2009-07-30 bww60 Curriculum: Part II Page 16


The Rotary Leadership InstituteInsert CS-4: Leadership StylesRLI Undergraduate RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Curriculum: Part Part II II Page 17 Page 17Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteEthicsVocational ServiceSession GoalsExamine the conceptof “VocationalService” and why is itImportant to RotaryClubsReflect on whetherRotarians can affectBusiness Ethics andhowDiscuss theVocational Projectsthat Rotary Clubsperform and theImpact that they haveMaterialsInsert EVS-1: The Guiding Principles of RotaryArticle: The Four Way Test Means Business (0709)Applying the 4 Way Test. 502-EN-(495)Organizing a 4 Way Test Essay. www.4waytest.orgVocational Service MonthRotary Volunteer Handbook. 263-EN-(1007)E-Learn Vocational ServiceKey: attached insert online article pptSee Faculty Notes on page 19A through 19H.Session Topics1) What is “vocational service”? Why is vocationalservice important?2) Was Rotary really founded on the principle ofvocational service?“Working to find peace inthe world is a familyproblem. It is not too big aproblem to deal with if werealize that we are all fromthe same family.”1982-83 RI Pres. Hiroji Mukasa— Building Bridges of Friendship inthe CommunityTHE ROTARIAN, August 1982a) How did the principle of one’s vocation shape early Rotary ideals and practice?b) What relationship existed between the early vocational principles of Rotary andethics, and how was this relationship influenced by the then prevailing businessstandards?RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 18Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institutec) Rotary rapidly evolved into a “service organization”. How did this evolutionaffect the early vocational principles of Rotary as applied within the club and inthe community?d) What early ethical and vocational principles carry over into the doctrine oftoday’s Rotary organization and into the practice oftoday’s Rotary clubs?3) Can Rotarians raise the ethical standards of business?a) Is ethics something we can take for granted orshould we have an actual, concrete plan of service tofurther ethics in business?“Example, good or bad, iscontagious….If we set agood example, seeing us,others may do likewise. Allof us have more influencethan we sometimessuppose.”1966-67 RI Pres. Richard L. Evans— The Appearance of ThingsTHE ROTARIAN, May 1967b) In ethics, is a Rotary program of heightened ethical awareness enough?c) With ethics in mind, how can we utilize our professional and business expertisefor the community?4) What does your club do in vocational service? What does your club do for Youth?Club Members? Your Community?5) Do you see an impact from the vocation service your club performs? If so, what?Who does it affect?6) How do you measure results?7) If clubs are not involved in any vocational service activities, how can we encouragesome activities?RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 19Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteFaculty GuidePart II Course: Ethics / Vocational ServiceGoals of the Session• What is “vocational service” and why is it important to Rotary Clubs?• Can Rotarians affect business ethics? How?• What vocational projects do Rotary clubs perform and what impact do they have?Materials• Attachment 1: The Guiding Principles of RotarySession Timeline• Introduction & What is “Vocational Service”- 25-30 minutes• Rotarians & Business Ethics – 10 minutes• Club Vocational Projects, Impact & Conclusion – 15 minutes• Recommended Session Length: 55 minutesSession TopicsNote on Effective Facilitation Techniques: Due to time constraints, a maximum of twosuggested facilitation techniques should be used per session. Leave time for discussion. It isnot necessary that all material be covered. The detail included in the Faculty material isbackground.1) What is “vocational service”? Definition: According to Webster’s Dictionary: vo·ca·tion;Etymology: Middle English vocacioun, from Anglo-French vocaciun, fromLatin vocation-, vocatio summons, from vocare to call, from vox voice, Date: 15thcentury(1)(a) a summons or strong inclination to a particular state or course ofaction ; especially : a divine call to the religious life; (b) an entry into the priesthood or areligious order;(2)(a) the work in which a person is regularly employed: Occupation (b) the personsengaged in a particular occupation;(3) the special function of an individual or group. Generally a person’s employment, work, occupation or “job”. To serve or provide a benefit to another in their vocation could involve, amongother things: (1) vocational awareness, (2) vocational financial assistance, (3)vocational training, (4) vocational re-training (after job loss), (5) vocationalRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 36Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60Page 19A


The Rotary Leadership Instituterehabilitation (after injury, etc.), (6) vocational placement assistance, (7)vocational recognition.2) (a) Why is vocational service important? It is something we all have in common. A person’s vocation is an outlet for their unique skills and talents. A person’s job defines much of his or her life. A significant portion of a person’slife is spent engaged in their vocation. A Service organization that meets vocational concerns will affect and appeal to abroad cross-section of society and their community. All useful occupations are worthy of recognition.Session Topics 1-2 Effective Facilitation TechniquesEffective Facilitation Technique #1: Paul Harris Monologue: Faculty Member uses theFaculty information set forth in this Session Topic to “become” an older Paul Harris for a5 minute monologue, reminiscing on his small town upbringing, seeing the world,establishing his practice in Chicago, the corrupt business climate he encountered, the startof “Rotary” including the early “exchange of business”, resulting problems from thispractice, and eventual transformation of Rotary’s mission to one of “service”.Recommended Reading: A Century of Service, pages _______ - ______. Monologue (5Minutes), Debrief with last question: What early ethical and vocational principles carryover into the doctrine of today’s Rotary organization and into the practice of today’sRotary clubs? (15 minutes)(Total: 20 minutes)Effective Facilitation Technique #2: We are the First Rotarians: Divide up into smallgroups of 4, representing the first four Rotarians. We are starting a club and need toaddress the following issues for our fledgling organization: (1) How do we pick the“best” of every vocation in town, (2) we are going to “exchange business” with eachother, how do we value the relative services or products exchanged by each member, (3)In our “business exchange” club, how often do members need to “exchange business”and how do we address members who are not being fairly or regularly included due totype of service or product, or economic issues, and (4) draw up a job description for our“Club Statistician”. (15 minutes) Double assignments to groups as necessary or expand to5 members. Report ideas to group and discuss. (15 minutes) )(Total: 30 minutes)Effective Facilitation Technique #3: Where Did Our Guiding Principles Come From?:Either do a brief “history lesson” or monologue per Facilitation Technique #1 to providebackground. (5 minutes) Divide out to small groups for Questions (2)(a)- (2)(e), (5minutes) debrief by flipchart (10 minutes). Then mix & assign each group one of the fourGuiding Principles on Attachment 1. Have them speculate on historical factors that mayhave influenced the formation of specific parts of each principle (5 minutes), and discussamong the class (10 minutes). (Total: 35 minutes). Cut 10 minutes by assigning GuidingPrinciples to groups with Questions (2)(a)-(2)(e) at the beginning of the exercise.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 37Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60Page 19B


The Rotary Leadership InstituteRotary was founded on the principle of vocational service. 1905. First Rotary Club Meeting led by Paul Harris (attorney) with Gus Loher(mining engineer), Hiram Shorey (merchant tailor), and Silvester Schiele (coaldealer) involved persons from different vocations. It was decided that only oneperson from each profession would be admitted to the new club. There were initially 2 purposes: fellowship and business exchange. Rotarianswould agree to do business with other Rotarians. A “Statistician” was an earlyclub position who kept track of the value of business exchanged among Rotarians.For detail see A Century of Service by David Forward. Paul Harris was a small town (Vermont) raised boy who valued the feel andcommunity of local merchants dealing with each other, but was in a rapidlyindustrializing and urban Chicago. He saw the benefits of merchants dealing withpeople they knew.(2)(b) How did the principle of one’s vocation shape early Rotary ideals and practice? Fellowship occurred naturally at meetings, so vocational “activities” were thefocus of the early meetings. The exclusivity of one person per profession made membership desirable. The exclusivity of inviting the “top” representative in a profession to join the clubmade membership desirable. Perceived financial advantage of being in the club made membership desirable.(2)[c] What relationship existed between the early vocational principles of Rotary andethics, and how was this relationship influenced by the then prevailing businessstandards? The concept of “Ethics” in business is different now than in 1900s era Chicago,USA. In 1900s era Chicago, self-dealing, collusion, and anti-trust issues were notprohibited and were not legal or ethical concerns for many business people. Government and business corruption was rampant. There was no legislation prohibiting unfair or deceptive acts or practices affectingtrades or commerce. There was no legislation or warranty requirements protectingconsumers from unscrupulous business practices, sham or defective products, orfalse advertising. It was a “wild west” atmosphere, with “caveat emptor” – “buyer beware” beingthe business attitude. “Ethics” as defined by the moral or religious codes of the day was largelydivorced from business or vocational concerns.(2)(d) Rotary rapidly evolved into a “service organization”. How did this evolution affectthe early vocational principles of Rotary as they applied within the club and in thecommunity? Difficulties soon occurred in each member providing or receiving their “fairshare” of business opportunities with fellow members,RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 38Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60Page 19C


The Rotary Leadership Institute Members disagreed with the process for “accounting” or “valuing” businessopportunities for exchange. It soon became apparent that the business exchange model of Rotary wasunworkable as the basis for keeping a club together. The ideal of “community service” was introduced by new Rotarian Don Carter in1907. This began club discussion on the value of their club membership, andwhether the focus of the club should be on performing outward acts of charityversus an internal business exchange benefitting the members of the club. The first two “community service” projects of the Rotary Club of Chicago havevocational aspects, namely the horse bought for a local clergyman to allow him toperform his work, and then a “Comfort Station” (public restroom) in downtownChicago that served the workers and visitors to the city.(2)(e) What early ethical and vocational principles carry over into the doctrine of today’sRotary organization and into the practice of today’s Rotary clubs? Much of what was learned during the first several years of the “Rotaryexperiment” is reflected in today’s vocational service emphasis in Rotary. Using your vocation as an opportunity to serve others (not yourself). Placing a premium on “high ethical standards in your business and profession” islargely a reaction against the unethical environment in which early Rotarianslived including Fairness to others (Non-Rotarians) in business dealings. Adhering to community expectations, professional codes of conduct, and yourown moral codes within all of your professional dealings. Dignifying your vocation by your actions and example, and honesty incommunications with the public. Doing community service projects that emphasize vocational concerns.Session Topics 3-4 Effective Facilitation TechniquesEffective Facilitation Technique #4: Small Group Discussion: Rotarians & The EthicalWorkplace: Divide out to small groups for Questions (3)(a)- (4), (5 minutes) debrief bydiscussion (10 minutes). Tie together using Josephson & Devlyn quotes. (Total: 15minutes)(3)(a) Can Rotarians raise the ethical standards of business? Historically, Rotarians have raised the ethical standards in their business andprofessions. Early Rotarians helped lead reform and legislative movements in the UnitedStates to address unfair and deceptive trade acts or practices. As Rotary has been introduced in other countries, there have been efforts toreform business and trade laws and legislation. Day-to-day, ethics is like character: “Character is what we do when we think noone is looking.“ H. Jackson Brown, Jr., Life’s Little Instruction Book.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 39Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60Page 19D


The Rotary Leadership Institute Rotarians publicize high ethical standards in their workplace, i.e., post The FourWay Test Co-workers, colleagues and the public often associate Rotary with high ethicalstandards. Rotarians think generationally, and develop sound vocational attitudes in youngpeople.(3)(b) Is ethics something we can take for granted or should we have an actual, concreteplan of service to further ethics in business? Any service activity, whether community, international or vocational, is morelikely to be focused on real needs, identify appropriate resources, involve andmotivate more Rotarians, be more likely to succeed, and able to have its successbe measured if a plan is in place, so why not in the “ethics in business” area. “Ethics” is sometimes regarded as a “philosophical” issue, and thus deemed notpractical or not important enough for businesses or individuals to spend theirtime, effort or money. There will likely be an erosion of ethical conduct in business if its importance isnot continually stressed. Reknown ethicist Michael Josephson spoke to the Rotary InternationalConvention in Los Angelos, California USA in June 2008. To paraphrase, Mr.Josephson said that Ethics are easy if we never wanted to do things we know arewrong, but there is always a struggle between our “wants” and what we shoulddo. Businesses want larger profits, businessmen want financial reward andproject success, so sometimes our “wants” overpower ethical responsibilities.This often happens a little bit at a time, thus the erosion in ethics occurs. Formore on Michael Josephson see www.charactercounts.org.(3)[c] In ethics, is a Rotary program of heightened ethical awareness enough? The 2000-2001 RI President, Frank Devlin’s Annual Theme was “CreateAwareness, Take Action” under RI President Frank Devlyn of Mexico. Thefollowing is a portion of his President’s Message explaining the theme:“Our first step must be to identify and become aware of the problems that our clubs arefacing, our communities are facing, our world is facing. Awareness of a problem is theessential first step towards its solution. As long as people remain unaware, no action willbe taken, and problems will remain unsolved. Being aware is not always easy. We maywant to believe the situation is not as bad as some people say it is, and that it will simplyresolve itself in time. In our desire to do something about the problems we face in clubs,communities, and the world at large, we find that it is always necessary to CREATEAWARENESS.Once that crucial first step is taken, there is no turning back. Creating awareness opensRotarians’ eyes to a problem. When Rotarians are made aware of a problem, we begin totalk and discuss and debate the best course to take. We seek out non-Rotarians and othergroups to join our cause, draw up feasible plans, and then we TAKE ACTION.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 40Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60Page 19E


The Rotary Leadership InstituteFor Rotarians, these two functions are inseparable. Awareness is futile without action,and action is not possible until we have gained awareness. By uniting awareness andaction, Rotarians can ensure that critical needs in our clubs, our communities, and ourworld will be identified and addressed. And with awareness guiding our action, we canbe certain that we are directing our resources and energy where they are most needed.” In the area of ethics, it is sometimes difficult to find an “action” step. However,raising awareness can be an “active” and not merely “passive” activity. “Active”awareness campaigns need to include high levels of Rotarian involvement inactivities, interaction with target groups such as business leaders, other civic orcommunity organizations, or youth groups. “Involvement” may be as important as“action” in the area of ethics awareness.3) With ethics in mind, how can we utilize our professional and business expertise forthe community? Mentoring Youth Mentoring young professionals or business people, whether as part of a Rotaryprojects or through other organizations that do this type of work, such as SCORE“Counselors to America’s Small Business” or like organizations. Serve as a Rotary Volunteer: Volunteer opportunities are available onProjectLINK at www.Rotary.org , a valuable resource that lists many vocationalprojects that clubs and districts can also choose to support financially or withdonated goods. Serve as a speaker at a Career Fair or Career Day in local schools or community. Use your vocational talents to assist your club or a particular club project.Session Topics 4-8 Effective Facilitation TechniquesThis section is about Participants describing their own club’s activities, so keep it movingand don’t let a single Rotarian slow down the process.Effective Facilitation Technique #5: Vocational Dartboard: On a flipchart or chalkboard,draw a bullseye with three equal segments (or otherwise divide up the space into 3 areas).Mark one as “Y” (Youth), “R” (Rotarians) & “C” (Community). Prompted by Question4, have class write on post-its or sound out Vocational Service Projects, and Faculty putthem in the correct part of the chart. (10 minutes) Follow up with Questions 6-7-8 as timeallows, and write responses in different color on chart. Make connections as they occur.(5-15 minutes),Effective Facilitation Technique #6: Vocational Speed-Round: Make it a contest betweeneach half of the class, and ask 3 questions using “Game-Show Host” voice: (1) In 30Seconds name the most Vocational Projects you can think of involving youth; (2) In 30Seconds name the most Vocational Projects you can think of inside your own club; (3) In30 Seconds name the most Vocational Projects you can think of involving your adult oryoung adult community. Have neutral party flipchart on either side of divided flipchart.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page Page 19F 41Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institute(5 minutes) After completion reward the “winner” and then use open-ended questions tomake select points about the projects listed using Questions 6-7-8. (5-15 minutes).4) What does your club do in vocational service? Classification Talks or Mini-Classification Talks: The purpose of these talks is topromote vocational awareness among Rotarians and help them recognize theworthiness of all useful occupations Programs on the Four-Way Test, Declaration of Rotarians in Business andProfessions, or The Object of Rotary. Recite the Four-Way Test at Meetings. Observe Vocational Service Month.5) What does your club do for Youth? Club Members? Your Community? Youth: Mentoring, Career Fairs or Days, Four-Way Test Contests, Literacyprojects, Dictionaries to Students projects, Donate a magazine subscription to TheRotarian to a school class, school library or public library. Club Members: Classification Talks, Recite 4 Way Test, Give out 4-Way TestCertificates or Desk Placards, Recite Four-Way Test, Greeter, Serve as RotaryVolunteer, Opportunities to increase individual leadership skills such as publicspeaking, communication, organization, planning, team-building, teaching, fundraising,and develop professional networking opportunities. Community: Seminars on Vocational Topics, Mentoring Young Adults, SCOREvolunteers, Literacy Volunteers, Recognize Community Vocational Leader withAward or Recognition, Recognition Dinner or like for particular underappreciatedvocational group, i.e., law enforcement, firemen, etc.6) Do you see an impact from the vocation service your club performs? If so, what?Who does it affect? Hand-on Vocation project is best- where you can see results on individuals. Youth projects are particularly exciting. Most Vocational projects have immediate and long terms impacts.7) How do you measure results? Very difficult to measure many project results except anecdotally. Photographs and Publicity compound the impact of projects. Teachers, School Administrators, Librarians can provide feedback for Youthprojects. SCORE mentoring has evaluation and tracking process. With most Rotary projects, the results are often as profound with the givers aswith the receivers of the project. Maximum Rotarian involvement in Vocational project will result in a positiveclub service outcome. Follow-up projects with same group or repetitive project with different group areeasy to structure with many Vocational projects. Numbers of persons assisted can be tracked.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page Page 19G 42Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institute8) If clubs are not involved in any vocational service activities, how can we encouragesome activities? Invite District Resources such as District Vocational Service Chair or network tofind another active club’s Vocational Service Chair for a club program. Invite community expert to talk about a local vocational need, and build aresponsive community service project around that need. Join with a successful Rotary club’s vocational project in your community. See successful projects at ProjectLINK at www.Rotary.org. This site includesexamples of successful vocational service projects that Rotary clubs can model asthey plan their own activities. Encourage a project with a club member’s children or grandchildren’s gradeschool class. Poll the Club and find out what type of Vocational Service Project they would beinterested in performing. Have club Rotarian(s) attend Vocational event or project of another, and reportback to the club on the impact, etc. Celebrate Vocational Service Month in October of each year.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 43Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60Page 19H


The Rotary Leadership InstituteInsert EVS-1: Guiding Principles of RotaryThe Object of RotaryThe Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster theideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, inparticular, to encourage and foster:FIRST. The development of acquaintance as an opportunityfor service;SECOND. High ethical standards in business and professions,the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations, andthe dignifying of each Rotarian's occupation as an opportunityto serve society;THIRD. The application of the ideal of service in eachRotarian's personal, business, and community life;FOURTH. The advancement of international understanding,goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of businessand professional persons united in the ideal of service.The Four Avenues of ServiceBased on the Object of Rotary, the Avenues ofService are Rotary’s philosophical cornerstone and thefoundation on which club activity is based:Club Service focuses on strengthening fellowship andensuring the effective functioning of the club.Vocational Service encourages Rotarians to serve othersthrough their vocations and to practice high ethicalstandards.Community Service covers the projects and activities theclub undertakes to improve life in its community.International Service encompasses actions taken toexpand Rotary’s humanitarian reach around the globeand to promote world understanding and peace.The Four-Way TestFrom the earliest days of the organization, Rotarianswere concerned with promoting high ethical standardsin their professional lives. One of the world's mostwidely printed and quoted statements of business ethicsis The Four-Way Test, which was created in 1932 byRotarian Herbert J. Taylor (who later served as RIpresident) when he was asked to take charge of acompany that was facing bankruptcy.This 24-word test for employees to follow in theirbusiness and professional lives became the guide forsales, production, advertising, and all relations withdealers and customers, and the survival of the companyis credited to this simple philosophy. Adopted by Rotaryin 1943, The Four-Way Test has been translated intomore than a hundred languages and published inthousands of ways. It asks the following four questions:"Of the things we think, say or do:1. Is it the TRUTH?2. Is it FAIR to all concerned?3. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTERFRIENDSHIPS?4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?"Declaration of Rotariansin Businesses and ProfessionsThe Declaration of Rotarians in Businesses and Professionswas adopted by the Rotary International Council on Legislationin 1989 to provide more specific guidelines for the high ethicalstandards called for in the Object of Rotary:As a Rotarian engaged in a business or profession, I amexpected to:Consider my vocation to be another opportunity to serve;Be faithful to the letter and to the spirit of the ethical codes ofmy vocation, to the laws of my country, and to the moralstandards of my community;Do all in my power to dignify my vocation and to promote thehighest ethical standards in my chosen vocation;Be fair to my employer, employees, associates, competitors,customers, the public, and all those with whom I have abusiness or professional relationship;Recognize the honor and respect due to all occupations whichare useful to society;Offer my vocational talents: to provide opportunities for youngpeople, to work for the relief of the special needs of others, andto improve the quality of life in my community;Adhere to honesty in my advertising and in all representationsto the public concerning my business or profession;Neither seek from nor grant to a fellow Rotarian a privilege oradvantage not normally accorded others in a business orprofessional relationship.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 20Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteMembershipRecruitmentSessionGoalsExplore theImportance ofRecruitment to ourClubsDiscussApproaches toRecruitmentReview AvailableRecruitmentResourcesMaterials(108)Insert MRII-1: The Membership Process ChartMembership Development Resource Guide. 417-EN-(408)New Member Orientation: A How-To Guide for Clubs. 414-EN-Rotary Basics. 595-EN-(508)How to Propose a New Member. 254-EN-(1205)New Member Bulletin. EN (1008)Club, District & RI: Partners in Membership Development.641-EN-(0708)Club Membership Committee Manual. 226-EN-(706)Welcome to Rotary Video athttp://www.rotary.org/RIdocuments/video/welcome_to_rotary.wmvE Learn Member Recruitment SlideshowMore Recruitment Resources online athttp://www.rotary.org/en/Members/RunningAClub/DownloadLibrary/Pages/ridefault.aspxKey: attached insert online article pptSession Topics1) Rotary International says that 90%–95% of Rotarians have never sponsored a newmember. Why do you think that is?2) What are the benefits of recruiting new members?RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 21Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institutea) Benefits to the new member?b) Benefits to your Rotary Club?c) Benefits to your community?d) Benefits to the international organization?e) Benefits to the world?Using the flip chart, list the categories in columns soclass can visually see benefits.3) Rotary membership is open to business, professionaland community leaders. How do you find leaders ineach group to join Rotary?“If we want to see anothercentury of Rotary, we mustmake Rotary attractiveto young people. Manyyoung people share ourbeliefs.To get them involved inRotary, we mustconcentrate on activitiesthat capture their attention,so they are willing to makea commitment.It is not the responsibilityof young people to come toour clubs. It is ours to invitethem.”1993-94 RI Pres. Robert Barth— Address to 1994 RotaryConvention, Taipei, Taiwana) How is a classification survey a useful tool?b) Are there other resources for identifying potential members?This is a good time to discuss the object of Rotary which is on the last page of thissection.4) Some Rotary leaders have said that in our membership recruitment efforts, we shouldseek out quality rather than quantity. Is this elitist? What is “quality”?5) What can you do to have your club reflect the diversity of your community?6) Why do people join a Rotary Club?Using a flip chart, list responses.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 22Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institute7) Take a look at your club!!a) Is it attractive to potential members? How so?b) What is the first impression when a prospective member visits your club?Using the flip chart, ask class to brainstorm on any ideas to increasemembership.8) Let’s develop a membership campaign—divide insmaller groups.Use flip chart to list responses.Allow 10 min. to develop the campaign.Allow 5 min. to present (3 sentences or less ofwhat campaign is).Allow 5 min. for discussion.9) Resourcesa) Role of Club Membership Committee“When a tree stops growing— it is ready to die….A Rotary club is like that: It ismoving ahead only when it isgrowing. When the growingends, the knife-and fork clubbegins.”1957-1958 RI Pres. Charles G. Tennent— Little Lessons in Rotary (ThirdEdition), March 1978b) Role of District Membership Committeec) Regional Rotary International Membership Zone Coordinatord) Resources available through www.Rotary.org10) Ideas11) SummarizeRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 23Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


Insert MRII-1: Membership Process ChartThe Rotary Leadership InstituteRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 24Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteGuiding Principles of RotaryThe Object of RotaryThe Object of Rotary is to encourage andfoster the ideal of service as a basis of worthyenterprise and, in particular, to encourage andfoster:FIRST. The development of acquaintance as anopportunity for service;SECOND. High ethical standards in business andprofessions, the recognition of the worthiness of alluseful occupations, and the dignifying of eachRotarian's occupation as an opportunity to servesociety;THIRD. The application of the ideal of service ineach Rotarian's personal, business, and communitylife;FOURTH. The advancement of internationalunderstanding, goodwill, and peace through a worldfellowship of business and professional personsunited in the ideal of service.The Four-Way TestFrom the earliest days of the organization,Rotarians were concerned with promoting highethical standards in their professional lives.One of the world's most widely printed andquoted statements of business ethics is TheFour-Way Test, which was created in 1932 byRotarian Herbert J. Taylor (who later served asRI president) when he was asked to takecharge of a company that was facingbankruptcy.This 24-word test for employees to follow intheir business and professional lives becamethe guide for sales, production, advertising,and all relations with dealers and customers,and the survival of the company is credited tothis simple philosophy. Adopted by Rotary in1943, The Four-Way Test has been translatedinto more than a hundred languages andpublished in thousands of ways. It asks thefollowing four questions:"Of the things we think, say or do:5. Is it the TRUTH?6. Is it FAIR to all concerned?7. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTERFRIENDSHIPS?8. Will it be BENEFICIAL to allconcerned?"The Four Avenues of ServiceBased on the Object of Rotary, the Avenues ofService are Rotary’s philosophical cornerstoneand the foundation on which club activity isbased:Club Service focuses on strengtheningfellowship and ensuring the effective functioningof the club.Vocational Service encourages Rotarians toserve others through their vocations and topractice high ethical standards.Community Service covers the projects andactivities the club undertakes to improve life inits community.International Service encompasses actionstaken to expand Rotary’s humanitarian reacharound the globe and to promote worldunderstanding and peace.Declaration of Rotarians in Businesses andProfessionsThe Declaration of Rotarians in Businesses andProfessions was adopted by the Rotary InternationalCouncil on Legislation in 1989 to provide morespecific guidelines for the high ethical standardscalled for in the Object of Rotary:As a Rotarian engaged in a business orprofession, I am expected to:Consider my vocation to be another opportunity toserve;Be faithful to the letter and to the spirit of the ethicalcodes of my vocation, to the laws of my country, andto the moral standards of my community;Do all in my power to dignify my vocation and topromote the highest ethical standards in my chosenvocation;Be fair to my employer, employees, associates,competitors, customers, the public, and all those withwhom I have a business or professional relationship;Recognize the honor and respect due to alloccupations which are useful to society;Offer my vocational talents: to provide opportunitiesfor young people, to work for the relief of the specialneeds of others, and to improve the quality of life inmy community;Adhere to honesty in my advertising and in allrepresentations to the public concerning my businessor profession;Neither seek from nor grant to a fellow Rotarian aprivilege or advantage not normally accorded othersin a business or professional relationship.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page Page 24A 44Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteAnalyzing Your RotaryClubSession GoalsEvaluate your own RotaryClubReview Possible Areas ofImprovementDiscuss Why SpecificImprovements Should beMadeMaterialsInsert ARC-1: Rotary Club Self-Evaluationand ReviewWe Care ProgramClub Culture SlideshowKey: attached insert online article pptSee page 25A and 25B For Discussion OptionsSession Topics1) How does your club rate in each area?2) How can improvements be made?3) Why should they be made?4) What things have been learned at the RotaryLeadership Institute that might be helpful?5) The Club Self-Evaluation is attached“…There is so much pleasurein Rotary activities. Thebreakfast, luncheon, or dinnerevery week brings you incontact with your fellowmembers. Their diverseinterests and knowledgestimulate your interest in yourcommunity…The planning forservice projects both close byor across some distant horizoncarries us out of our own selfinterestinto the wonderfulworld of service to others…[and the] pleasingparadox…that we grow instature when we give of ourtime and talent to improve thequality of life for someone else.How strange that when we givedignity to someone else, wegrow in dignity ourselves…”1989-90 RI Pres. Hugh M. ArcherTHE ROTARIAN, July 1989RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 25Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteOption 1:• Note: This session is intended to be a learning experience and NOT a criticism of any club or itsactivities.• After explaining the purpose of the exercise, give the group adequate time (approx. 20 minutes) to fill outthe questionnaire that is attached. Then discuss the results using the session topic question.Option 2:A. Explain to the group that the self-evaluation form is intended to be a learning experience, not a criticismof any club or club member. The forms will not be collected.B. The self evaluation form is divided into five sections (have scribe list on flip chart):1. Club Administration2. Membership3. The Rotary Foundation4. Service Projects5. Rotary Publicity and Public RelationsPost the goal and complete the above introduction in FIVE MINUTES.Give the group 5 minutes to complete as many answers in the Club Administration section as time willallow. Then discuss their answers, item by item as far as time will allow but not longer than 15 minutes.Example of discussion techniques for 3 Club Administration questions:Ask the class how many had 5 points for questions one? How many had 0 points? Encouarge a discussionon why the Club Leadership Plan should or should not be adopted. Take as much time as needed because atthe end of the discussion participants will at least know what the Club Leadership Plan is all about. Have ahandout ready to give to the group on the Club Leadership Plan.Next discuss written By-laws which is question two. Take a county, then lead a discussion on the pros andcons of a club having written by-laws. Have a scribe list all positive answers on a flip chart. Allow thediscussion to follow its own path to completion.Take a count on the Board of Directors meeting regularly (question 3). Ask the group to tell you Who,What, Why Where, When and How regarding Board of Directors meetings in their clubs. This shouldpromote quite a lively discussion.Continue the above procedure and go as far as time will allow. When the time is up the clas will at leastleave with a lasting memory of what should be done, what could be done, and perhaps what they will getdone as a future leader of their club. It is the job of the discussion leader to create an atmosphere where themembers of the class will participate.Allow class members to answer as many questions in the Membership section as long as 5 minutes willallow. Then have the class participate in a Discussion item by item for the next 15 minutes.Move along to The Rotary Foundation (5 minutes to record answer and 15 minutes to discuss answer).RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page Page 25A 45Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteNext to Service Projects and last to Rotary Publicity and Public Relations using the same format andtime schedule.Encourage the class to complete the form on their own time and then take a look at the last page to see justhow their club rates. Ask, what action should they take if their club ends up with a score of 400 or lower.To quit is not the answer, to change is the answer.Congratulate the class on completing Part II of the RLI and trust they will consider Part III the next timearound. Distribute a Division Brochure to each member. Remind group to turn in the evaluation formbefore they leave.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 25B 46Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteInsert ARC-1Rotary Club Self-Evaluation of Performance and OperationsThis form is to conduct a self-evaluation and review of your club’s current performance and operations. It is NOTintended to “grade” your club, but rather provide a mechanism to discover the strengths of your club and identify areasthat might be improved. Many questions will require a degree of reasonable appraisal. Please be guided by the FourWay Test and your best judgment in answering the questions.Club AdministrationScorePlease rate the following: Yes= 5 pts No=0 ptsDon’t Know = DK1. Our Rotary Club has adopted the Club Leadership Plan. _______2. The club has written By-laws that are available to each member. _______3. The club Board of Directors meets on a regularly announced basis. _______4. The club has developed both a long-term and short-term plan of action. _______5. The club has an e-mail address and/or web page with current information on it. _______6. The official Rotary International Directory is available to the members. _______7. The club publishes a roster listing the officers, members, committees and chairs. _______8. The club plans social events for members and partners throughout the year. _______9. The club makes an effort to contact absent or ill Rotarians _______10. The club has received a Presidential Citation within the last 3 years. _______11. The club has an annually prepared budget that is approved by the members. _______12. The club receives a financial report of all income and expenses at least once a year. _______Please Rate the Following: Excellent= 5, Good= 4, Satisfactory=3, Fair=2, Poor=1 Don’t know= DK13. The club meeting location site or area is _______14. The food provided during the meal at the club meeting is _______15. The quality of speakers and club programs are normally _______16. The meetings start and finish on time and the use of an agenda is _______17. The Board of Directors report to the club about their actions is _______18. The club’s communication of important Rotary information to the members is _______19. The payment of club dues by the members in a timely fashion is _______RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 26Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institute20. The payment of district and International dues in a timely fashion is _______21. The information and content of the club newsletter/bulletin is _______22. The club’s use of sound systems, lecterns, decorations, flags, banners and otherRotary related items are23. The operation of the club committee system with regards to meeting regularly andreporting to the board of directors and/or the membership is24. The club’s promotion of district assemblies, conferences, conventions andspecial meetings are25. The club’s use of RI Themes and knowledge of the RI President’s messageand initiatives are____________________________26. The club’s greeting and treatment of visiting Rotarians is _______27. The special recognition given to visiting guests during club meetings is _______28. The information and topics presented at a club assembly is _______29. The club’s treatment and reception of the District Governor’s official visit is _______30. Fellowship encouraged by the use of singing, “happy dollars,” raffles, etc. is _______31. The degree of Rotary spirit and friendly fellowship that exists in the club is _______32. The club’s efforts to recognize special individuals with “Rotarian of the Year”,“Citizen of the Year”, etc. is_______33. The desire of the Rotarians to sit at a different table each week is _______34. The club’s recognition of special events, birthdays etc of the members is _______Please rate the following:35. Our club has a speaker weekly (5 pts), monthly (3 pts), never (0 pts). _______36. The club newsletter is published weekly (5 pts), bi-weekly (3 pts), monthly (1 pt),none (0 pts) .37. The club holds regular club assemblies monthly (5 pts), quarterly (3 pts)semi-annually (1 pt), never (0 pts).38. The Rotary International rules on attendance are always (5 pts), usually (4pts),occasionally (3 pts), seldom (2 pts), never (1 pt) strictly enforced.39. The club members are always (5 pts), usually (4 pts), occasionally (3 pts),seldom (2 pts), never (0 pts) reminded to make-up for absences____________________________RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 27Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institute40. The club gives special recognition regularly (5 pts), occasionally (3 pts),once in a while (1 pt), never (0 pts) to individuals who have perfect attendance._______41. My club has sponsored a District Governor candidate within the last 1-5 yrs (5pts),6-10 yrs (4 pts), 11-15 yrs, (3pts), 16+ yrs (0 pts), don’t know (DK). _______42. My club has provided an Assistant Governor (AG’s) candidate within the last1-5 yrs (5 pts), 6-10 yrs (3 pts), never (0), don’t know (DK). _______43. The following number of Rotarians from my club attended the last Rotary InternationalConvention- 5+ (5 pts), 3-4 (4 pts), 1-2 (2 pts), zero (0 pts), don’t know (DK). _______44. The following number of Rotarians from my club has attended the most recentdistrict conference- 10 + (5 pts), 5-9 (4 pts), 2-4 (3 pts), 1 (2 pts), none (0 pts).________45. The following number of club leaders attended the most recent district assembly-5+ (5 pts), 2-4 (3 pts), 1 (1 pt), none (0 pts), don’t know (DK). _______46. Generally 10 or more (5pts), 5-9 (3 pts), 1-4 (1 pt), no (0 pts), Rotarians frommy club attends special functions (i.e. dinners, seminars, service events,celebrations, etc) sponsored by the district.47. The current president-elect always (5 pts), sometimes (3 pts), seldom (1 pt),never (0 pts) attends PETS (president-elect training seminar).______________Please add the totals points for questions 1-47Club Administration ___________Don’t knows _______MembershipPlease rate the following:1. The average monthly club attendance figure is 90-100% (5 pts), 80-89% (4 pts),70-79% (3 pts), 60-69% (2 pts), 50-59% (1 pt), don’t know (DK) _______2. The average age of the club membership is 35-40 (5 pts), 41-50 (4 pts), 51-60 (3 pts),61-70 (2 pts), 71+ (1 pt), don’t know (DK). _______3. Last year, the club’s membership- increased (5 pts), remained the same (3 pts),decreased (0 pts), don’t know (DK)._______4. This year the club membership is likely to increase (5 pts), remain the same (3 pts),decrease (0 pts), don’t know (DK)._______5. The club has sponsored a new club within the last 1-3 yrs (5 pts), 4-8 yrs (4 pts),9-12 yrs (2 pts), longer or never (0 pts), don’t know (DK). _______6. When a member relocates to another community, the club always (5 pts), sometimes(3 pts), never (0 pts) notifies the nearest Rotary club of the move. _______7 New members are always (5 pts), sometimes (3 pts), never (0 pts) encouraged toRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 28Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institutebecome active in the club8. The club frequently (5 pts), often (4 pts), seldom (2 pts), never ( 0 pts) holds specialmembership drives (cocktail, wine & cheese parties, meet & greet, etc) to identifyand attract potential new members.9. The club always (5 pts), sometimes ( 3 pts), seldom (1 pt), never (0 pts) hasinformation or materials about joining Rotary at its fund raisers or events._____________________Please rate the following: Yes= 5, No= 0, Don’t know= DK10. The club has an active membership chair that makes regular reports to the club. _______11. The club has and uses a membership classification system. _______12. The club has developed a membership interest survey form. _______13. The club assigns new members to committees based on their interests. _______14. The club annually sets measurable and reasonable membership goals. _______15. The club has and uses a “Mentoring” program. _______16. The club has developed a welcoming package for new Rotarians. _______17. The club has a special program (red badge, greeter, etc.) to make new membersfeel welcome._______18. The club conducts new member orientation meetings _______19. The club pays for new Rotarians to attend the Rotary Leadership Institute. _______20. The club conducts an “exit interview” to determine why members leave. _______21. The club systematically asks each new member for a referral. _______22. The club provides non-Rotarian speakers with information about Rotary. _______Rate the following: Excellent=5, Good=4, Satisfactory= 3, Fair=2, Poor=1, Don’t know= DK23. The club’s promotion of membership issues is _______24. The club’s use of the classification list is _______25. The club membership balance and representation of the community businesssegments and general population are26. The club’s attempts to invite qualified members of any race, gender or ethnic groupto join the club is______________27. The club’s new member orientation meetings are _______RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 29Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institute28. The club’s induction ceremony of a new member to the club is _______29. The club’s “mentoring” program is _______30. The club has a specific retention program that is _______31. The club’s participation at district membership seminars is _______32. The effort to encourage all members to attend the Rotary Leadership Institute is _______33. Overall, the club’s efforts to attract and keep new members is _______Please add the total points for questions 1-33 Membership ______________Don’t knows ___________The Rotary FoundationPlease rate the following: Yes = 5 No = 0 , Don’t know = DK1. The club has an active Foundation chair that makes regular reports to the members. ______2. The club sets and achieves its Foundation giving goal each year. _______3. The club encourages individuals to become Paul Harris Fellows on their own. _______4. The club matches contributions made by members to the RI Foundation. _______5. The club makes a special presentation of a new Paul Harris Fellowship _______6. The club publicly posts a list of all the Paul Harris Fellows. _______Please rate the following:7. Most (5 pts), many (4 pts) some (3 pts) few (2 pts) none (0 pts) of the club membersunderstand that money given to The Rotary Foundation returns to the district for its usethree years later______8. Information about The Rotary Foundation is provided to the club every month (5 pts),every three months (3 pts), every six months (1 pts) never (0 pts)_______9. All ( 5 pts), most (4 pts), many (3 pts), some (2 pts), few (1 pt), none (0 pts) of theclub members know about Paul Harris Fellows and how to become one._______10. Most (5 pts), many (4 pts), some (3 pts), few (2 pts), none (0 pts) of the club memberscontribute each year to The Rotary Foundation under the Every Rotarian EveryYear program. (EREY)._______11. My club has sponsored a GSE team member, an ambassadorial scholar, a universityteacher or a peace scholar within the last 1-3 yrs (5), 4-6 yrs (3), longer or neverRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 30Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institute(0 pts), don’t know (DK). _______12. My club has hosted a visiting GSE team within the last 1-5 yrs (5 pts), 6-8 yrs (3 pts),longer or never (0 pts), don’t know (DK).______13. My club has applied for a Matching Grant with an international partner within the last1-3 yrs (5), 4-6 yrs (3), longer or never (0 pts), don’t know (DK). _______14. My club has applied for a District Simplified Grant within the last 1 yr (5 pts),2-3 yrs (3 pts), longer or never (0 pts), don’t know (DK) . _______15. My club has applied for a Rotary Volunteer Grant or 3-H Grant withinthe last 1 yr (5 pts), 2-4 yrs (3 pts), longer or never (0 pts), don’t know (DK).16. Most (5 pts), many (4 pts), some (3 pts), few (2 pts), none (0 pts) of club membersare Paul Harris Fellows17. Most (5 pts), many (4 pts), some (3 pts), few (2 pts), none (0 pts) of club membersare Paul Harris Sustaining Members18. Most (5pts), many (4 pts), some (3 pts), few (2 pts), none (0 pts) of club membersare bequest donors to The Rotary Foundation.19. Most (5 pts), many (4 pts), some (3 pts), few (2 pts), none (0 pts) club membersare benefactors to The Rotary Foundation20. Most (5 pts), many (4 pts), some (3 pts), few (2 pts) none (0 pts) of club membersare Paul Harris Society members21. Most (5 pts), many (4 pts), some (3 pts), few (2 pts), none (0 pts) of club membersare Major Donors to The Rotary Foundation.22. Most (5 pts), many (4 pts), some (3 pts), few (2 pts), none (0 pts) of club’s existingPaul Harris Fellows make subsequent contributions to The Rotary Foundation________________________________________________________Please add the total points for questions 1-22Foundation____________Don’t knows___________Service ProjectsRate the following: Excellent=5, Good= 4, Satisfactory= 3, Fair= 2, Poor=1, Don’t know= DK1. The club’s attempts to promote vocational service are _______2. The promotion of the 4-Way Test in the club and community are _______3. The use of career development programs by the club in local schools to helpstudents with career choices is_______4. The club’s efforts to promote high ethical standards, professional dignity or serviceRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 31Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Instituteperformance in the club and community are_______5. The club’s effort to conduct one new community service project each year is _______6. The club’s efforts to conduct one new international service project each year is _______7. The club’s use of input, talents and resources of the members for service projects is _______8. The club’s use of input, talent and resources from community leaders for service is _______9. I consider the club’s activities regarding service, locally and internationally, to be _______10. The club has conducted an active program or project in the following areasPlease credit 3 pts for each service project that your club has done within the last 3 years____________________________________________________________________________________Drug use prevention or rehabilitationPolio eradication or other community immunization projectEnvironmental activitiesLiteracy projectsClean water programsProviding food for the hungryAssisting the community’s handicapped or elderlyProviding health or medical care locally or InternationallyProviding recreational opportunities for the communityHelping the poor or needy of the communityImproving the community’s economic or social quality of lifeConducting career opportunity programsAssisting or guiding the youth of the communityCreating or supporting a Rotoract or Interact ClubWorking with other local service groups on a common projectWork with other Rotary Clubs on a common projectWork with community educational facilitiesTraffic or highway safety programs or projectsAnimal safety or care programsDisaster assistance program or projectOthersTotal points for question 10_______Please rate the following: Yes = 5 No= 0, Don’t know= DK11. The club conducts various fund raisers to support its service programs. _______12. The club relies mainly on financial contributions from the members to fund itsservice programs._______13. The club has participated in an International Service project within the last 2 years. _______14. The club participates actively in the Youth Exchange Program. _______15. The club regularly invites the local Youth Exchange students to its meetings. _______RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 32Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institute16. Club Rotarians normally act as the host parents for the visiting Youth Exchange _______17. The club is aware of and planning to institute or cooperate with the new mandated“Background Checks” for the Youth Exchange program._______18. The club annually recognizes outstanding students or student leaders’ _______19. The club sponsors at least 1 World Community Service project a year. _______20. The club participates in or recognizes the Rotary UN day at the United Nationsheadquarters._______21. The club has participated within the last 3 years in a Rotary Friendship Exchange. _______22. Within the last 3 years, the club has participated in a Twin Cities, Sister Club, orMatched Club program with 1 or more Rotary clubs around the world.23. The club, within the last 3 years has sponsored a student(s) with a Rotary YouthLeadership Award (RYLA).______________Please add the total points for questions 1-23Service Projects __________Don’t knows ____________Rotary Publicity and Public Relations1. Our club always (5 pts), often (3 pts), seldom (1 pt) never (0 pts) has articlesor pictures of our activities in the local media.2. Our club always (5 pts), often (3 pts), seldom (1 pt), never (0 pts) uses the PublicAccess channels to promote or publicize our activities.3. The members of the club always (5 pts), often (4 pts), seldom (1 pt), never (0 pts)wear their Rotary pins.4. Our club has many (5 pts), some (3 pts), one (1 pt) no (0 pts) road signs at theentrances to the community announcing the day, time and location of our meeting.5. When the club provides financial support to other organizations, it always (5 pts)often (4 pts), seldom (1 pt), never (0 pts) asks the other organization to publicizethe donation in the local media.___________________________________Please rate the following: Yes= 5pts No= 0 pts Don’t know=DK6. Our club has a visible sign that “Rotary Meets Here” at our meeting site. _______7. The club has used advertising (billboards, newspapers, community brochures, etc.within the last 2 years._______8. Local Rotarians have been interviewed about the club on radio or TV within theRLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 33Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership Institutelast year._______9. Representatives from the media are active members of the club. _______10. The club has a brochure describing the club and its projects available for handout. _______11. The Rotary logo and club identification is visible for completed community serviceprojects._______Please add the total points for questions 1-11 Rotary Public Relations __________Don’t knows __________Please forward the totals for all the questions to the last pageBonus Questions1. I receive the Rotarian magazine each month. (Y=5, N=0) _______2. I have received or am familiar with the District Governor’s newsletter. (Y=5 N=0) _______3. I have brought in a new member to the club within the last 2 years. (Y=5 N=0) _______4. I understand the SHARE System of The Rotary Foundation. (Y=5, N=0) _______5. I am a Paul Harris Fellow or a Sustaining Member. (Y=5, N=) _______6. I have worked on or contributed to service project within the last 2 years. (Y=5 N=0) _______7. I visit the club, district or Rotary International websites daily (5 pts), weekly (4 pts)monthly (3 pts), occasionally (2 pts), never (0 pts)_______8. I always (5 pts), sometimes (3 pts), never (0 pts) make-up for a missed meeting. _______9. I, personally have served on a district committee within the last 1-5 yrs (5 pts),6-10 yrs (3 pts), longer or never (0 pts). _______10. I, personally attended the district conference or International convention withinthe last year (5 pts), 2-5 yrs (3 pts), longer than 5 yrs ( 1 pt), never (0 pts)_______11. I have contributed to The Rotary Foundation within the last 1 year (5 pts),2-3 years (3 pts) 4 years or more (1 pt), never (0 pts). _______Please forward the total points for questions 1-11 to the last page total _______ScoringYour scoreDK’sClub Administration (47 questions)Membership (33 questions)___________ out of 235 points _______(38)___________ out of 165 points ________(29)RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 34Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60


The Rotary Leadership InstituteThe Rotary Foundation (22 questions)Rotary Service (23 questions)___________ out of 110 points ________(10)Your scoreDK’s___________ out of 173 points ________(22)Publicity & Public Relations (11 questions) ___________ out of 55 points ________(6)Bonus Points (11 questions)Total pointsTotal Don’t Knows (DK)____________out of 55 points___________ out of 793 points___________ out of 105 questionsGrand Total700 points plus = Outstanding600-699 points = Excellent500-599 points = Very Good/Average400-499 points = Could be improved300-399 points = Caution- club may need assistanceless than 300 points – The club is in need of serious and immediate assistancePlease do not make any adjustments to the total point final figure for the DK’s. . The followingis for reference only.1-10 DK’s = 5 to 50 additional points - Normal11-20 DK’s = 55 to 100 points – Caution- should be concerned about the lack of knowledgeabout your club.21-35 DK’s = 105 to 175 points – Critical- you need to learn more about your club.36 or more – Unacceptable- Unless you’re a new member, you need to seriously learn moreabout the functioning of your club.This is a non-weighted, unscientific analysis of your club and the resultsshould only be used to identify areas that either you or the club might belacking. It should not be taken as a negative reflection on the activities ofthe club or its Rotarians.A “clean copy” of this survey for duplication is contained online atwww.RLI33.org under the “Downloads” section.RLI Undergraduate Curriculum: Part II Page 35Rev. 2009-07-30 bww60

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