List of Potential Session Topics for Woody Crops

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List of Potential Session Topics for Woody Crops

First Announcement and Call for PapersSHORT ROTATION CROPS INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE:BIOFUELS, BIOENERGY, AND BIOPRODUCTSFROM SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST CROPSHoliday Inn Select Minneapolis Airport Hotel – Mall of AmericaBloomington, Minnesota, USAAugust 18-22, 2008Most conferences about short rotation crops have primarily focused on EITHER agricultural OR forest crops,resulting in less integration and slower advancement of common underlying science and application. The goalof this conference is to initiate and provide opportunities for scientific exchange and full integration of thescience and application of producing BOTH agricultural AND forest crops for biofuels, bioenergy, andbioproducts. There is a substantial global need for development of such systems and technologies for thesustainability of short rotation crops across multiple temporal and spatial scales. This conference offers aninternational forum for discussion and scientific exchange on methods that can economically and sustainablyproduce large quantities of biofuels, bioenergy, and bioproducts.The abstract submission deadline is Friday, April 4, 2008. The main topic areas are (A) biological andenvironmental and (B) economic and policy implications of sustainable biofuels, bioenergy, and bioproducts.There will be a field tour during the conference to the University of Minnesota Southern Research and OutreachCenter in Waseca, Minnesota (http://sroc.cfans.umn.edu/index.html) to see both agricultural and forestryresearch projects. Opportunities for pre- and post-conference tours to biomass research and developmentprojects in the region will be offered.Registration ($350 US), hotel, and tour information will be available at http://www.cinram.umn.edu/srwcor by contacting RaeLynn Jones Loss (CINRAM) at +1 (612) 624-7418, raelynn@umn.edu orDean Current (CINRAM) at +1 (612) 624-3400, curre002@umn.edu.Sponsors:


First Announcement and Call for PapersBiological and Environmental Implications of Sustainable Biofuels, Bioenergy, and Bioproducts1. Breeding & genetics (quantitative; molecular/genomics; operational breeding)2. Ecosystem services (erosion control; wildlife; riparian buffers; carbon sequestration)3. Phytotechnologies (phytoextraction; phytoremediation; phytoaccumulation)4. Climate change (mitigation; adaptation)5. Production systems (establishment/management; harvesting/processing; pathology/entomology; soils)6. Physiology & anatomy (water relations; canopy dynamics; fiber characteristics)Economic and Policy Implications of Sustainable Biofuels, Bioenergy, and Bioproducts7. Conversion technologies & associated processes8. Costs & operational feasibility of production for transportation fuels (e.g., ethanol), electricity, &alternate markets (e.g., wood pellets)9. Environmental impacts & review10. Regional logistics contributing to alternative energy needs & potential sources11. Social factors & policy issuesAbstract Submission: Please submit abstracts (maximum of 300 words) in English using MS Word or Rich Text format toRob Mitchell or Ron Zalesny. The abstract deadline is Friday, April 4, 2008. This date is firm, because abstracts will bepublished in a U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station General Technical Report that will be distributed at theconference. Each abstract will receive at least two technical reviews. The abstract should be typed in 11-point Times NewRoman font with 1.9-cm margins. Please provide the title in bold, followed by authors’ names (indicate each correspondingauthor with an asterisk) and their institutional affiliations on separate lines, and the body of the abstract – all in 1.5-linespacing. Below the body, list keywords, complete contact information of the corresponding author, and your preferredsubject area (1-11 above) and presentation format (oral or poster). Indicate if potential poster should be included in thestudent competition described below. An example abstract is attached. Authors will be notified of presentation formatsduring late April.Please submit abstracts to:Rob MitchellResearch AgronomistUSDA-ARSGrain, Forage, & Bioenergy Research Unit314 Biochemistry HallUniversity of Nebraska – LincolnLincoln, NE 68583, USAPhone: +1 (402) 472-1546Fax: +1 (402) 472-4020Email: rob.mitchell@ars.usda.govRonald S. Zalesny Jr.Research Plant GeneticistU.S. Forest ServiceNorthern Research StationInstitute for Applied Ecosystem Studies5985 Highway KRhinelander, WI 54501, USAPhone: +1 (715) 362-1132Fax: +1 (715) 362-1166Email: rzalesny@fs.fed.usPublication of Research Papers: Peer-reviewed manuscripts describing the research as presented at the conference will bepart of a special issue of a biomass/bioenergy-based journal. The specific journal and submission deadline will beforthcoming.Field Tours: There will be a field tour during the conference to the University of Minnesota Southern Research andOutreach Center in Waseca, Minnesota (http://sroc.cfans.umn.edu/index.html) to see both agricultural and forestry researchprojects, with an emphasis on working landscapes, cultural practices commonalities, and opportunities for integration. Also,opportunities for pre- and post-conference tours to biomass research and development projects in the region will be offered.Specific information about all tours will be available at http://www.cinram.umn.edu/srwc.Student Poster Competition (sponsored by Phenotype Screening Corporation): Student posters will be judged, andprizes will be awarded for first, second, and third place. Student abstracts for the competition should be indicated as suchduring submission. For more information, contact Jill Zalesny at +1 (715) 490-1996.


Ecological Sustainability of Alternative Biomass Feedstock Production forEnvironmental Benefits and BioenergyRonald S. Zalesny Jr. * , Jill A. Zalesny, Edmund O. BauerU.S. Forest Service Northern Research StationThe incorporation of intensive forestry with waste management fills a much-needed niche throughout numerousphytotechnology applications. There is a growing opportunity to incorporate sustainable recycling of waste watersas irrigation and fertilization for alternative biomass feedstock production systems. However, the success of shortrotation woody crops is largely based upon the selection of genotypes that are productive on the sites where theyare deployed. Given the inherent genetic variability within the genus Populus and the availability of clonalmaterial beyond what is typically used, our current research activities include revising and combining crop andtree improvement protocols (i.e., using phytorecurrent selection) to select favorable Populus genotypes thatperform well across a variety of contaminants (generalists) or that can be used for specific concerns (specialists).The information presented highlights the results of numerous studies where we tested the: 1) establishmentsuccess of growing the trees for both environmental benefits and bioenergy, 2) efficacy of using waste watereffluent including landfill leachate to fertigate bioenergy crops, 3) uptake of nutrients/contaminants into tree root,woody (stems + branches), and leaf tissue, and 4) environmental impact of waste water fertigation on soil andwater quality. This collective effort helps scientists and resource managers acquire information about genotype ×contaminant interactions that contribute to deployment of closed loop energy systems that are ecologicallysustainable, while the general public maintains environmental quality and the natural resource base on which localand regional agriculture, forestry, and recreation depend.Keywords: hybrid poplar, phytoremediation, Populus, tree improvement, waste management* corresponding author:Institute for Applied Ecosystem Studies, 5985 Highway K, Rhinelander, WI 54501, USA;Phone: +1 (715) 362-1132; Email: rzalesny@fs.fed.usSubject Area: 3. PhytotechnologiesPreferred Presentation Format: Oral or PosterSample Abstract

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