4-Team-Development

engineering.utoronto.ca

4-Team-Development

Team DevelopmentHandbook for Student LeadersVision, Mission & StrategyMotivation & DelegationPersonal Development & Mastery—Team DevelopmentRecruitmentReflection & AwarenessTransition & SuccessionExternal RelationsLeadership StylesPurposeful Leadership


—Create space for others to take initiative. Watch for risksthat could lead to further conflict (and back to storming).5. Adjourning. This stage is about completion anddisengagement, both from the tasks and the groupmembers. Individuals will be proud of having achievedmuch and be glad for the enjoyable experience.Common Challenges Faced withOrganizational StructureAn important thingto remember aboutorganizational structureis that “it’s all made up.”Tasks were divided in acertain way at some pointin history, but it doesn’tmean they have to staythat way.1. Flow of InformationMany groups face the challenge of how to keepingeveryone in the organization informed withoutoverloading them with emails. How does information flowin your organization? Are the key people getting a chanceto talk to each other frequently? If not, what structuralchanges can be made?2. Decision Making ProcessesHow are the most critical decisions made? How muchweight does the president/chair have? Executives?General members? People are motivated by having realinfluence on decisions that affect the work they do withan organization, but does your structure allow for this? Auseful spectrum to help you evaluate yourself is to ask howcentralized vs. decentralized is your structure?Some student groups that are extremely centralizedfind that general members and even certain executivesfeel excluded from decision making and are thus lesscommitted to the group. On the other hand, verydecentralized groups have a difficult time seeing the“whole” of the group, and aren’t able to come to aconsensus on organizational decisions. Where on thespectrum does your group lie?Page 2 of 3 | Team Development | Handbook for Student Leaders


3. Matching People to PositionsAs discussed in the Motivation & Delegation sectionof the Handbook for Student Leaders, people oftencontribute their best when they truly care about theirrole and have the skills needed for success. This ideasurfaces some questions about the flexibility or rigidityof organization structures: Are role definitions set instone? Are people forced to change and adapt to matchtheir role? Is there space for redefining role and, shiftingsome responsibilities over to someone with strengths orinterests in that area? How often does the group structurechange, and how (if at all) are new positions created?These questions have very strong links to recruitment:New members are much more likely to stay engagedand commit themselves to an organization if they are in arole that suits their skills and interests. This often requiresflexibility and change in real time or else that person mayjoin a different club.An important thingto remember aboutorganizational structureis that “it’s all made up.”Tasks were divided in acertain way at some pointin history, but it doesn’tmean they have to staythat way.4. Collaboration and TeamworkWhile a constitution or organizational chart may definewhich executives need to collaborate and work with eachother, in reality these people may think very differentlyabout things. Team dynamics also complicate thinkingaround what the best organizational structure is—whatlooks more effective on paper may fail miserably becauseof uneasy relationships between executives.1Developmental Sequence in Small Groups – B.W. Tuckman, 1965. Psychological Bulletin,63, 384-399.Page 3 of 3 | Team Development | Handbook for Student Leaders

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines