Lake Resort Edition - Village of Pinckney

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Lake Resort Edition - Village of Pinckney

OUS MOTTO UM "ALL TH*

MKWS THAT'S FIT TO HUNT

Lake Resort Edition

OUR StfBiCUFTiON RATI IS f

•1^9 PER YEAR

VoL58 Pinckney, County, Michigan Wednesday, July 2. 1941 Jt No. 27

History of the Lake

Resort Development

A Surra? Shows th* Neighboring L*k* Resort Development to Have

BMO Comparitively R*contlyFew Cottages 40 Year* Ago

Some seven years ago the Dispatch

got out a Booster Edition for the

Fjnckney Board of Commerce, active

at that time, which went over with

a tang. This year we have determined

tv> duplicate this effort to s->me

extent. Pinckney undoubtedly lies

clotei to more lakes than any other

village or city in the state of Michigan.

Some years ago Brighton claimed

this honor with 50 lakes. Norman

Reason, champion fisherman, disputed

this, and compiled a list of some

5.S lakes, noun of which are mor"i

than 5 miles from Pinckney. This is

taken up in this paper in another

a»t rle.

Michigan is known as the "Land

of Lakes" not only on account of

the Great Lakes but also on account

of the many inland lakes of the

state. Geologists tell us that the retreat

of the glacier left an inland

sea but the persistent Huron River

cut t channel through the hills at

the southern ends of Ba.e and Portape

Lakes and the waters of the sea

poured forth to mingle with the

waters of Lake Erie, leaving in deeper

pools the many lakes that lend

ch«;rm to the landscape in this section.

This valley of lakes is 16 miles

long by 5 miles wide. It extends in

a southwesterly direction from the

western boundary line of Oakland

-ecunty, thjp4^|pjtfhern Livingston

and northern v^ashtenaw county.

After the war of 1812 this section

was inhabited mostly by wandering

Indians with only an occasicpft]

trading post or settlement. rh.2

crooked, winding, picturesque roads

now found in the lake regions were

fjimerly Indian trails. These Indians

sold their lands and moved further

west, once a year they went to Detroit

and Canada to collect bounty

money for the land. Older settlers

here remember when Indians passed

through here for that purpose. These

bounty payments were discontinued

about 1840.

The Indian usually travelled on

foot and followed the high land. The

lakes were favorite stopping places

for them as there, water, fish and

game were abundant and the Indian

cuiiied few provisions, living on the

couhtry as he went along. Many Indian

relics have been picked up on

the lake farms in this section. The

C'ark family at Silver L-ik? have

found many such relics on their

land, including some articles made

of Minnesota redstone, showing that

the Minnesota Indians either came

here or traded with Michigan Indians

The Indians who usually ranged

through here were Chippewas and

Powattomies.

In 1819 Gov.| Lewis Cass signed a

treaty with the Indians which deeded

all Michigan lands to the government

and moved them west. Still for

many years the settlement of Michigan

was alow. A geographical survey

about this time classified Michigan

aj a land of swamps and marshes

totally unfit for agriculture.

Many of the towns and cities here

were laid out about 1830 when real

settlement of Michigan started. The

f'jst lake development would aop:ar

to be about 1834 when Gardner Lillibridge,

a New York actor, purchafed

land oi the south side of Big

Portage Lake where Newport Bathing

Beach now stands and laid out

the city of Lillibridge. He put on a

high pressure campaign in which he

featured a boiling spring with remarkable

curative qualities and issued

a prospectus in which he called

Vi city The Saratoga of the

>o«t." He announced tha* the Uniytitity

of Hiehigan would be located

then and ht» literature showed busy

streets, university buildings etc.,

He soM many lot* t«4 the celebrated

actors Edwin Booth and Edwin

city was never built and all that remains

of it is the bubbling spring.

Numerous road houses sprang up

at the lakes where the proprietors

scid liquor and bartered with the

Ind'ens for furs. Christopher Liscomb

conducted such a place at

P itage Lake in a building now own.

ed by the Bock estate. This building

i.5 still standing although it has been

remodelled several times.

It is also claimed but never definitely

established that the French

explorer, LaSalle, on his journey

from Chicago to Detroit camped on

the iHfuron river between Base and

Fqrtage lakes.

THE DEVELOPMENT OF

THE LAKE RESORTS

With all these lakes available

there was hardly anv development

of them to speak of until the 90's

and then but slight. Howell, Brighton,

Dexter, and Pinckney all had

lakc-s or streams within their limits

and could see no reason for going to

the lakes and means of travel were

too poor to permit other people to

p J there.

The first development took place

as the roads were improved. Farmers

living around the lakes started renting-

boats to fishfng parties. This

pvoved profitable and more got into

it. Early pioneers in this business

were the Pisk, Doyle, and Chalker

families at Patterson Lake, David

Mowers and Wm. Cobb of Portage

Felix Dunlavey at Base and Sid

Thurston at Silver. During the winter,

persons out of work got the

habit of going to the lakes and living

by hunting, fishing and trapping.

They got permission of the land

owners to build shacks to live in.

Several such persons squatted on the

John Roberts farm at Base Lake.

Later the farm was sold and the

owner tried to get them off but was

unable to do so as they had been

there for 25 years or more.

Then these farmars started re.icing

land to people to build cottages

on The rental in so.r.c CMCS was

only $5 per year. Met Chalker inforn

ed us that his father, the late

.Tohn Chalker, leased land to a man

to build a cottage on at Patterson

for $35 a year and this lease did

njt expire until 1939, many years

after the death of his father.

The first development around here

would appear to have been in 1882

when Mike Fritz and a party of

friends from Ann Arbor built a club

house at Zukey Lake. Later club

houses were built at both Silver and

Bnse Lakes by Ann Arbor men.

£bout this time David Mowers, then

cwr.er of the Baughn farm, built rwo

cottages at T'ortage for rental pi-.vnoses.

John Teeple, John Jaldwell,

nnd Thomas Read also built cottages

trere on rented land. Thomas Birkett

at Portage rented land cor cottager

as did Wm. Cobb ,Felix Dunlavey

and George Sill at Base Lake

Sid Thurston at Silver and the

Doyles and Chalkers at Patterson

FnUerson Lake.

Still development was slow. Charier

Stanard, former Dexter postrr.^ter,

once informed us that he

was offered all the frontage on the

south side of Portage Lake, including

Fox Point by Wm. Cobb in th-

90's for $700 but could not raise

the money as the banks turned hands

down on it,

Zukey Lake was the only lake

with a railroad and for this reason

was the first to be developed, its resorters

being mostly Toledo and Ann

Arbor people. The Ann Arbor railroad

used to put on special trains in

the summer to handle the Take people

and the passenger traffic was

tremendous here over holidays and

week ends.

In 1902 Wm. Cobb died and his

w' ow sold the entire Cobb farm to

nlfrht men from Ypsilanti and Ann

Arbor. All of these men are now

Fotiest are said to ktv« bought lots

there. However, Aw Arte* got the ' dead. The price they paid was $7000

Univewtty, LillibridiVi mythical Dr. James, who died several yean

•*JJ*j>A

4-

ago, was one of the men^^Eho incor- t'< greatest share in the lake rciort

Pinckney Is Located

i _ J -_i _ 1 ^. • _ I_ i_ il I • . ._ !_•!_ 1 ] _•» _ i ..

porated into what* is knodn as the development, which h'ni its greatest

Portage Lake Land Co, He once in- boom along about 1921. The auto I

f'jrmed>us that when, he first came to alto furnished the means of building;

Portage Lake in, 1898 there were j yood roads and this was another!

but six cottages on what was known 'ontributing factor. It was the peo­

as the Cobb's resort. The number ple from the cities who developed

there now probably runs into the the lake resorts by the! aid of the in a Land of Lakes

hundreds.

auto and boom times which prevailed

The automobile undoubtedly had alter the world war.

Letter Published in 1925 ClaimsTha: Within a Radios of Five Miles

MOONLIGHT ON PORTAGE LAKF. TA '.EN

WELL COTTAGE

AN AIRPLANE VIEW OF ZUKEY LAK)"

IN FRONT OF CALD

THE SHORE LINE, PATTERSON LAKE, NORTH SIDE

THE SHORE LINE, HLLANDLAICE, NORTH SIDE

PEACH MOUNTAIN i name, although we are informed tath

Everyone who visits Ireland Is in the old days it was known as

supposed to kiss the Blarney Stone Prospect Hill. It is the highest point

and ir. a like manner, everyone who in southern Michcigan. For years it

visits the lakes in this section is sup-j has been a popular spot for weiner

pofced to climb Peach Mountain, located

just south of Portage Lake on

the Pinckney-Dexter road. A peach

ot chard once flourished on the

slope of this huge hill, hence the

roasts and Boy Scout hikes. Many

miles can be seen from its summit.

Directly at the foot of it is the site

of the city of Lillibridge, founded in

1834. T

tt rasssr" ,x -

t*

from Pinckney Are Located Fifty-Five Lakes

FINCKNEY LOCATED IN Upham

A LAND OF LAKES Mud

In 11)25 Brighton claimed to have NitfRer

more lakes per square mile than any blind

i/.her village or city in Michigan. Crystal*

1'inckney has always claimed this Cranberry

honor and Norman Reason, then re- These lakes are drawing people

raided as the leading fisherman of from all parts of the country and

this section, was called upon to ans- most of the desirable subdivisions

v/tr it. In the following article he are already taken. Pinckney is beh-is

-ome ~u> lakes that are located coming daily more noted as the cen-

3 mile* from Pinckney. Not all have ter of wonderful playgrounds.

l.een developed but in all good fisl.-i Yours truly,

h\g abounds. The lakes having sum- Norman Reason

mer resort development are marked ' ••" —• • •

with an *. POWER BOAT DEVELOP.

MENT ON THE LAKES

LAKES ... LAKES — LAKES

AND THEN — LAKES

According to W. C. Miller the

power boat development on the

The last issue of the Brighton Ar- lakes was slow in the 80's and 90\s.

cru-. reminding its readers of the (iasoline engines were unknown and

natural playground advantages says:'the boats on the lakes were sail

"'J his paper has mentioned beUv:< boats. As it took an expert to run

that we, the people of Michigan, do one, they never became very popular

ii'.L appreciate our natural advan- Thomas Birkett had one at Portage

tayes as a summer resort state. We wh'ih was named "The. C&t^raran."

haw not fully awakened to the r I r your insurance was all pnid it

suits that might be gained through j was alright to ride in it. The L»nstii

extensive advertising campaign.' comb boys had a side wheeler steam

The greatest advertising state in the J boat which burned wood or coal.

I ri'on is California. The people of Tnis sanl

lii- i'eat stale no'dr ceus^ :n •?,;• ;'

IKIV great natural advantages, such

i- < litnate, scenery, etc. If Michigan

'"'n-ld advertise in every way as Calfnnia

does, our resort trade wouh 1

k and is still on the bottom

or* the lake. In the 90"s the late

Ceorge Sigler built a steam boast.

Tnis was also a side wheeler and

burned wood or coal. After keeping

it on Portage Lake for several years

1 he sold it to John Potts who took it

•" vastly greater than it is now."

V) Lakeland and used it to carry

Which is very true The article

passengers from Lakeland to Port­

L'I-I'N on to say about Brighton:

age down the chain of seven lakes.

"We have more lakes to the square

. ,, .The first gaHO^.p*: launch was owned

m ihi in our adjacent territory than' .. _ t v. ., M

any other village . . . . in . . the state." . ..

The letter of Mr. Reason is

ft! lows:

Tditor, Pinckney Dispatch,

Dear Sir:

1 noticed in a recent issue of 1

by Mr. Stone of ipsilanti and Mr.

' Milier inform-* us th it he owned tin

second one. The outboard motor popularized

motor boating and during

the races at Portage Lake some

years ago there were probably 100

Hr-yhton Aigus the claim is made! or more such boats „«___» there.

.hat. Brighton has more lakes to the' HALF MOON LAKE

f;::are mile than any other village in I H&lf Moon Lake is one of the !at.

the >tate." I have fished on most ol p, Kubdivision8 and is iocated gout

the lakes within a radius of 2!i m.!r> l f Pinckney, The ,and around the

•.' thi; virm.ty and I do not hesitate \ ]ake WflS former,y the Cook farm

to say that Pinckney can claim more but i8 nQW Qwned fay Mfg> ^ ^

!5 lak^s within a distance of Not until 11*22 was the lake front

* miles from Pinckney. To verify subdivided. The cottages are mostly

this statement I hereby enumerate- built of logs and there are now SO

Hig Portage*

of them. It is a quiet, secluded re-

Little Portage*

stricted resort and especially popu­

Ease*

lar with persons who desire that sort

GaUagher - Rig*

of a place.

(i:ii'-igher -- Little*

Ccidley*

Lime*

SILVER LAKE

Silver Lake lies about four miles

Las,- ut Lakeland*

Rush*

*outh of Pinckney. Up to 1913 the

development consisted of a club-

Hooker

hou«e and several cottages built on

Villiewood Lakes 2

Loon

Strawberry*

rented land by Ann Arbor people.

During this year the late Thomas

Birkett, Dexter banker, presented

Zukey*

the Washtenaw county Y.M.C.A with

Island*

SO acres of land on Silver Lake as

Davis

a summer camp. On this a large mess

' i-;e (Stackable)

Tamarack

hall and numerous lodges were built

and several hundred underprivileged

Fullhead

Chambers

Lentley

K.ubour 2

Shehan

School Lot 2

Duck

Morgan

Mall ion

,

• boys are taken care of there every

! yar. Later the Clark family snbdivid*

| ed the lake frontage on the east side

; and Henry,

Bbsfl -- Baker Sub.

Hi-land*

Van Blaricum

M Carrol

Peaver

Keaj-on

Goslin

('rooked*

P.ound

i r.'

Patterson* J

Island* - Chalker

Half Moon*

Bruin

B!g Silver*

Little Silver

Clarke's

Black


m-

B •

i


7 TO 14 DEGREES COOLER

\ Users say: "It's like sleeping outdoorsi 11

r

T

v '***.

Sir*.,

This is NOT the best house-cooling method

in the world, but it's mighty good—as hundreds

of satisfied users will tell you. Attic

fan house-cooling has the virtue of being

simple and inexpensive ... and it achieves

surprisingly effective results. Even when

there is not a breath of air stirring outside,

you can often cool your house 7 to 14 degrees

in the evening, making your bedrooms

comfortable for sleeping.

Here is the way ft works: During the day,

the hot sun beating down on the roof converts

your attic into a huge oven, with temperatures

often reaching 130 degrees.

Much of this heat is transferred through

the ceilings to the rooms/fcelow, and at

night, this burden of hot air^tangs in the

house, even after the temperature outdoors

has fallen considerably.

An attic fan changes all this. After sundown,

open your windows and flip the

switch of the fan. Instantly its large, powerful

blades blow away the oppressive

blanket of heat in the attic and set up a

gentle circulation of air all through your

house. A flood of cool night air is drawn

in through the open windows, making your

rooms delightfully comfortable. An artic

fan costs only about Vic an hour to operate.

Prices range from $50 up (installation

extra).

Electrical dealers, department stores, and

fan dealers will gladly give you full information

about this low-cost method of

house cooling. Telephone today. The

Detroit Edison Company. (We do not sel

or install this equipment.;

CHANGES MADE IN DRAFT LIST

There have been a number of

changes made in the list of men to

be inducted into army service from

this county on July 7. Leonard Levilson

has been added to the list and

/William Dillon of Howell has been

fen 80 days deferment on busi-

• reasons and will not leave until

guat. John Rahn is now in Califraia

and also will not leave. The

thia month will be two men

«1 as only 17 instead of the relirtd

19 *HI stave. The shortage

m be ma* w* to tltt Aafutt draft

»wever.

COMMUNICATION

Los Angeles, Calif.,

June 26, 1941

Deal Mr. Curlett:

A few weeks ago Ed Howell was

poked with 300 others from Fort

Ord to come to Los Angeles to put

on the first all soldier show since

world war days. We had a fine visit

ith him and I was sure his many

! friends around Pinckney would be

_The PinckflcT 0 ; «*» ' Wednesday, July 2. 1941

NEIGHBORING NOTES

Tne StocKDndge school board has

jiired Paul Hensley of Mt. Pleasant

who taught at Crystal Falls as agriculture

and science teacher and Ron

aid I shell of Sun field as athletic

c< ach.

Mrs. James Hines, 77, died at

Stockbridge June 22. She is survived

by her husband.

The Brighton NY A baseball team'

is leading the league having won all [

games; victims being Pinckney and

Howell.

Both Howell and Brighton hatffc

oev M. E. ministers. Rev. Harry f

Young of Wayne is appointed to>

Howell and Rev. Floyd Porter, re- l

cently ordained, to Brighton.

Judge Joseph Collins granted f'Ve

divorces in circuit court at Howell j

last week. They wer« to Dortfcea

from Charles Caswell; Frances from '

Dewey Douglas; Helen from Robert ]

Parker; Lorena from Charles White;'

and Harvey from Doris Saltars. I

The Howell schppl ceniua showed

in increase of 29 over that of l*lt'

year.

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Caverly returned

home last week from a weeks

tour of several southern states. Their

son, Billy, remained at Paducah, Xy„

to visit relatives.

Donald Crego, 16, of Detroit was

drowned at Island Lake near Brighton

last Wednesday, making the sec-1

end drowning there in 8 day?. Hie

and Richard Wojchiechowski, 17, of I

Detioit had hitch-hiked put there J

and Crego became exhausted while '

swunming and drowned in 'six feet 1

of water.

Mil ford high school will have six

new teachers the coming term,

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Warner, Ann

Arbor both graduated together at

the U. of M. last week, receiving

Btttcheler of Law degrees.

SOFT BALL LEAGUE

In the Pinckney soft ball league

Singer won from Miller Monday 14

to 8 and on Wednesday the Married

Men won a close game from Ledwidge

11 to 12. The opening of the

fishing season made many absentees

in the ranks of the players and con- J

siderable substituting had to be done

Ed Meyer, Hulce, Lefty Reason and

Kevin Ledwidge hit homers last

week.

B. Singer, 3b

J. Lavey, If ..

Miller, p, 3b .

Haines, 2b

MUlet-

AB

4

4

4

3

Shirey, Is, p 3

Eiiis, lb 3

Widmayer, c 3

Daik rf 1

Griffith, rs :.. 3

L. Haines, cf 1

Singer

Afi

Amburgey, Is 2

F. Singer, lb 2

B. Singer, If 4

Gentile, If 4

Drown, 2b 2

R Reason, lb 3

Baughn, rs 3

S. Aschen., c 2

Ledwidge, cf 3

Clark, 1

Married Men

AB

Hulce, p 4

Meyer, 3b 4

Ambuigey, lb 3

Milkr, c 3

P. Singer, If 4

F Singer, 2b 3

Gentile, If 3

P.. Clark, cf 1

D. Clark, rf 3

II. Ledwidge, rs 3

Ledwidge

AB

J. Ledwidge, cf 4

Ellis, rs - 4

D?nkel, p 3

Lavey, lb 4

S. Aschen., 3b 4

R

0

2

3

0

0

1

0

1

1

0

R H

Lamb, c 3

glad to know he was wel and enjoy-\£ Amburtrev Is 4 0

inp; camp life. The 15th of June he Dark, cf 8

waa given HU corporals rating. Will M Clark, rf 4 0

you kindly print his address for his J. Aschen., 2b 1 1

friends

OfficUl Standings

Corporal E. D. Htowell,

W L Pc

Anti Tank Co.,

M.T ried Men 9 2 .81

32nd Infantry-

Ledwidge 5 6 .48

Fort Ord, California.

Miller 5 6 .4£

e are all well and like Southern

Singer ; _ 8 8 .87

Jfornia, but miss our Michigan

<

ds.

chigan will always be home to

Remember us to all our friend9.

Sincerely,

Evelyn Mowers

KICKS THE SPOOKS OUT OF

HAUNTED HOUSES

•ard Saint, special investigator

.ie Los Angeles scientified Phy-

Research Society, recalls . . . in

i American Weekly with the July j /^QII*

: rmcs Next Week.

Moi.day: Married Men va Singer

Wednesday: Ledwidge vs Miller

GUY KXJHN RE-APPOINTED

Senator Prentiss M. Brown sent

the name of Guy Kuhn to the Postmaxter

General with the recommendation

that he be re-appointed postmaster

at Gregory, Livingston County.

The Gregory office was advanced

from fourth to third class oi of July

issue of The Detroit Sunday Times J

. the werid case of the "Caressing

irit", and other expensive nuinces

that have wilted under his

special treatment. Be sure to get the ,

Detroit Sunday Times this week an


Hi-land Lake Subdivsion

Good Lake Front Lots For Sale

Cottages For Sale or Rent

580 Acre Secluded Section Quiet, Restful,

Restricted. Just the place for the

tired City Dweller

Mrst VanSickel, Prop.

PHONE 58F2 Pinckney. Michigan

IIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIUllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUii

[Parkers Hi-Speed Station}

| STARTING

| LIGHTING

IGNITION

i

WRECKER SERVICE

BATTERY

CARBURETER

TIRES

I Open Every Day in the Week. Night Calls Weloome |

I I

| Phone 88 E. L PARKER, Manager I

^HiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimi*uihiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir

COTTAGES

Built to Order. Also Repaired

ane Remodeled

Adrian Lavey

Pinckney, Michigan PHONE 75

Trucking

Local Long Distance

Gravel and Stone

Hauled

Erdley VanSickel

Pfnckney, Michigan PHONE 58F12

WINANS LAKE

Winans Lake is located east of

M. 3fi just past Lakeland and was

the home of the late Governor Edwin

Wvians. It was sold by his son,

George, to Detroit real estate men

who formed Pleasant Lake Golf and

Country Club. It has one of the best

courses in the state and a fine modem

club house. It enjoys a very

fine membership and patronage

BASE LAKE

This lake derives its name rrom

the fact that it is located on the

Washtenaw-Livingston county base

lire. Early owners of lake front here

were George Sill, a retired Dexter

haruware man. John Roberts and

Felix Dunlavey. The earlier cottagers

were, nearly all from Dexter

and Ann Arbor and built on land}

rented from Dunlavey and Sill. After

1920 Detroit people began to]

come out and have now replaced'

most of the Dexter and Ann Arbor j

resorters. The Sill and Dunlavey

families have long since sold their

land and many real estate dealers;

have plats here.

THE PINCKNEY MILL POND

The Pinckney Mill Pond is a body

of water 60 rods wide and about a

mile long. As Henry Ford controls'

the water right) there has been little •

envelopment here, althutgh Charles 1

Skinner has built several cottages on'

too south tide of the pond.

The fishing for small and big fish

hfjf always been excellent he e and

tfce mei And children of Pinckney

have used it as a swimming

for the past hundred years.

ISLAND LAKE

pod!

-- )

Island Lake, just this side of

Zukey Lake on M-36 is subdivided

on the west and north sides. Several

real estate companies own frontage^

here. T. L. Bourbonnais built several

ct ttages on the west side of the lake.

Toledo ice companies once had large

ice houses at both Island and Zukey

lakes but these have both been removed.

For years these houses furr.\

hed the men of this section with

employment during the winter

months.

OTHER LAKES

There are a number of other

lakes here which have never been

platted but where boats may be

rented for fishing. Among them are

the Schoollot lakes where the Hinchey

and Spears families own frontage.

Bently Lake where John Martin

and Mrs. Frank Mowers own

frontage and many others.

FRESH AIR CAMPS

In addition to the U. of M. Fresh

Air Camp at Patterson Lake which

handles 300 boys at a time there are

the Y.M.C.A. camp at Silver Lake

and Camp Robinson at the same

'.-ike. There is a Red Cross girls camp

on the soMth side of Silver Lake.

They have no buildings but camp Wi

tents. There are several Fresh Air

camps at North Lake and Dan

Noecker has one a* Ore Lake.

A >

.«*' f£Sk£k.Mi

/

The Pinckney Ditpfctt'i Wednexky, July 2. 1941

&

PATTERSON LAKE

Patterson Lake, 5 miles south of S

Pinckney, has a large development. 5

Some years ago there were 128 cot- 5

tages there not counting the building

of the U. of M. Fresh Air Camp

Burt Thomas, Dexter, bu^t the first

cottages there on land rented of

John Chalker. Later he purchased

frontage of Wm, Doyle which r

subdivided and sold. Following the

death of Tohr. Chalker, his sun, Met,

sold many lots and built a stole and

dance hall. This he later sold to Jo\n

Howell who operates but Met

lives at the lake.

still

Messrs Floyd Reason and Orloff

bought the 80 acre Gant farm on

the youth side which they platted and

sold.

The U. of M. Fresh Air Camp here

comprises 210 acres, formerly the

Dean Hartsuff, Dan Kaiser and

Chapman farma and is on the west

tide of the lake, Pharis Whetzel also

OWHS land on the north side of the

lake.

CORDLEY LAKE

Cordley Lake is bounded by the

Cordley Jnd Joe Placeway farms and

land of the Bross family. The Cordley

farm was subdivided in 1926. a

club house built and a golf course

laid out. The golf course is no longer

in operation. The stockholders

now operate it and hold dances and

parties there over the week end.

Thy are mostly Ann Arbor people.

The Placeway farm, later owned by

Ji-mes Shirey and now by Miss Eva

Melvin, abo has a number of cottages

on it. It is located about four

miles cast of Pinckney, just west of

K-86.

UUSH LAKE

The lake frontage on this lake

w:i= owned by Fred Teeple, T.oorTe

and Stephen VanHorn and George

Flintoft. The first cottage was built

here by Fred Teeple in 1927. Later

the VanHorn Bros, gold their farm?

co the Herndon Realty Co. of Detroit

who platted the lake frontage.

Now here are over 30 cottages there

Among them is a fine one owned by

Frank McKelvey of Prttsburgh,

Peon., a retired railroad engineer,

His cottage was the second one built

there and is distinctly modern. The

lake is shallow and for this reason

has always been popular for Sunday

school picnics and outings. The

.Noith Hamburg church for years

held their annual picnic there.

BASS LAKE

"here ar two Bass Laks, one lies

just east of Cordley Lake and its

iYontage is owned chiefly by the

lu'oss family. T h*re v:e a numbi.' of

cottages hero.

T v ,e other one lies and Co. Over 40 cottages were

built there the first year. A dam

was put in and the water raised to

form a good sized lake. The place

wac always noted for its excellent

b.utgill fishing. The subdivision is

now controlled by Mr* VanSickle

and Sherwood Bros, of Bedford.

4

¥V

:::1-.¾¾ 11

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Thos. Read Sons

Coal, Lumber and Building Supplies

| ONE OF THE LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE STOCKS OF LUMBER |

5

& BUILDING MATERIAL IN THE STATE

5

Pinckney, Michigan

I front Lots For Sale on Big Portage Lake |

$50© and Up

limiiiiiiu iiimiiiinHiiiminiuMiiiiininiiinimmiiuiiiiiiiii niimii iiiumum ^ - ' t , - . ^ / , ^ ½ ^

Automatic

Wat Systems

Septic Tanks and Plumbing

Installed and Repaired

ESTIMATES GIVEN ON JOBS

WELL DRILLING and REPJURNG

STANLEY

2

3

s

S

M


*

V

p.

ft* '

.-1

¢-4

i . •

. ^ •

;*>i--

'$ £' >.-

y

c''•'> i". -; ? w «... -y£.

IM

#:'

| HOW IMPORTANT IS

A BANK TO ITS

COMMUNITY

Picture a banklesa community

— no safe place for funds, no

place to borrow, no way to

transfer money quickly, none

of the countless convenienses

provided by modem banking.

Obviously, a progressive community

must have a progressive

bank. Our basic policy is

one of supplying services that

will adequately meet the community's

needs. We would like

to have you make our bank

your bank.

AUTO »•» LOAMS

Finance your new or late model

used car through this bank.

First National Bank

IN HOWELL

MMIW Federal Depo»U In-

•ttranc* Corporation. All De-

pMit* Insured Up To $5000

for Each Depositor.

•THE AVON THEATRE

Stockbridfe, Mich.

Fri., and Sat., July 4, S

Hava a Good Laugh at the

"HIT PARADE OF 1941"

Starring

KENNY BAKER, FRANCIS LANG-

FORD, HUGH HERBERT and

the HARMONICA RASCALS

«l*o

Information Please

Spojrtanvan'* Partner

Comedy - "Tugboat Annie"

Sun. and Tue*., July 6-8

A Hilarious Comedy

"MR AND MRS. SMITH"

Starring

CAROLE LOMBARD and ROBERT

MONTGOMERY

Newt

Coning: "Barnyard Follies ' (F.F.A.

Feature), /Doomed Caravan", "Remedy

for Riches", "Saint at Palm

Springs."

Cash

FOR DEAD OP. I/1 SAB LED

Hers* $3 Cattle$2

fr— Service on Small AnimaU

CALL COLLECT TO:

HOWELL 450

ANN ARBOR ¢866

Darling & Company

Successors to the

MILLENBACH BROS.

The Original Company To Pa||

for DeeJStoek

Phinfieid

Mr. and MM. Carl Topping and

fairly attended a picnic at Wall

iu« Power Co. of Jacksoi.

lake Thursday given by the Consu-

Miss Udora LUlywhite will itart

work this week in Ann Arbor.

Mr*. J. E. Kinsey and girls with

Mrs Norman Topping and Udora

LUlywhite were in Jackson Wednesday.

Miss Mary Jean LUlywhite was

guest Wednesday night of Miss

Mark Glenn.

Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Fisher and

children spent Saturday at Potter's

Park Lansing.

The Plainfield church is finished

except placing things back. There

will b church next Sunday.

Mrs. Edna Donohue was taken to

Stockbridge hospital last Tuesday

where the Is very ill.

Mrs Ira King is under the doctor's

ear* at her home.

Mr. and Mrs. Clare Holmes of

Lansing, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Glad-

E» and children were Sunday din*

goeets of (Mr. and Mrs. A. J.

sat, Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Picksi

and Aunt Jennie of Unadilla call-

•d in the afternoon.

Mrs. H. J. Dyer spent part of last

Ifj Ana Arbor and Detroit.

£r, and Mrs. Roy Johnson of UnaisasjH

Sunday guests of Mr. and

9MM Jacob*.

M4 Mrs; Birnay Roberts and

:«pM ottMe* stMfU Sunday of

;ws-

C^' ;

* • • / mm*

SYLVAN THEATRE

Air Conditioned

Michigan's Finest Small Town

Theatre

CHELSEA, MICH,

Fri., Sat, July 4, 5

'POT O' GOLD"

A Musical Comedy with

JAMES STEWART, PAUL-

ETTE GODDARD, HORACE

HE1DT and his Band

Passing Parade

News Cartoon

Sun., Mon., Tue*., July 6,7,8


A WOMAN'S FACE

A Drama With

JOAN CRAWFORD, MELV1N

DOUGLAS, CONRAD VEIDT,

and OSA MASSEN

Joan Crawford's Greatest

Dramatic Triumph 1

Cartoon -- Rookie Bear

Wed., Thurs., July 9, 10

"POWER DIVE"

A Melodrama with

RICHARD ARLEN, JEAN

PARKER, HELEN MACK

Plus

'THE FACE BEHIND

THE MASK"

A Drama with

PETER LORRE, EVELYN

KEYES, DON BEDDOE

Cartoon Picture People

The Howell Theatre

Thurs., Fri., July 3, 4

Special Matinee, July 4,

2 p. m continued

GENE AUTRY

in

THE SINGING HILLS*

SMILEY BURNETTE, VIR-

G1NIA DALE, MARY LEE,

SPENCER CHARTERS

with

Comedy "°" {t ?

Cartoon

News

Sat., July 5

BRIAN AHERNE

in

«• THE MAN WHO

LOST HIMSELF

with

KAY FRANCIS

also\

ROY ROGERS

*WMP * w*^;- 1 .*^' wr$!' wjfw^jwwsssa

The Pinckney Duptlco Wednesday, July 2. 1941

M

»»

in

ROBIN HOOD OF

THE PECOS"

Cartoon

Sun.," Mon., Tues., July 6,7,8

Mat. Sunday, 2 p. m. Cont.

CHARLIE CHAPLIN

.

Northern

3 Rolls 25

Junket 'C^EAM Mix 3

25

te

Campbell's Soups,


.[!"'

CASH SPECIALS!

fTorr

Soda Crackers

SUN-RAY

2&x 15 c

GoIdMedal Flour

ENRICHED ' KITCHEN-TESTED

The Pinckpav Pitpalch Wednesday, July 2. 1941

Fels Naptha

SOAP

24* Lb. B*s Q7pj6

BARS 25 C

Kellogg 9 1 Corn Flakes 2 J& T9 C

Kraft's Cheese 2 lb. box 49c

Cans Peas Coirn,Tomatoes 28 c

BlSQttlcK F0R DELICIOUS BISCUITS LGE. PKG. 29 C

Sugar Fine Orannlated to lbs. 58c

Bntter

GOLDENDALE

per lb. 39

Wheatles

Breakfast of Champions"

•rpkg, 10^

Coffee

CHASE & SANBORN

LB

BAG 25 c

Armour's Treet PERFECT LUNCH MEAT can 24 c

Campbell's Soaps ^^ ^ 3 cans 25 c

Rlnso % lge. pkg. 37<

Lux Soap Flakes lge, pkg. 19 c

Ritz Crackers lb 21c

Oleo z lbs. 25 c

Paper Towels 3 for 25 r

Catsup Bffius 9 c

BeansJ^^IOc

Kennedy

PHONE 23F3

Catholic Church

Rev. Francis Murphy

Fancy Rice 3fb.19 r J

Orange Juice 46 c^24 r '

Tomato' Juice 46 oz CAN | jc

Camay So p 3 bars 16c

R3d Salmon ^¾ 29c

McCLUSKEY

•Mis. Ella Stackable McCluskey,

75 >ears old, widow of the late John'

Edward McCluskey, died at her farm!

resilience in Putnam township, LivirgMon

county Sunday morning.

She was born June 24, 1866, and

was the daughter of Robert and

Mary Stackable, Brighton. She married

Mr. McCluskey Nov. 23, 1887.

UP cMed in August, 1924.

Survivors include four daughters,

Mrs. Ella Thorpe, of Grand Rapids;

Dr. K. Lucille, Chicago; Mrs. John

E. Nanry, Ann Arbor; and Dr. K.

Leora, New York; three sons, Gregory,

Chicago; Francis, Pinckney;

and Dr. Gerald, Howell; two sisters,

Mis. Albert Smith, Howell, and Mrs.

Henry Gehringer, Adrian; five

brothers, Joseph and Clarence of

Pinckney; James, Gregory; Edward,

Berkeley, Calif., and Dr. W. H.

Stnckable, Chicago; 22 grandchildren

two great grandchildren and several

nieces and nephews.

day night for William Lamb at the i of the week.

W. H. Meyer home. Among thoat pra BWy Shehan of Ann Arbrr a id

stnt were Miss Mary Spears and i Jlmmie Shehan of Jackson are visit-

Garry Elchman, the Misses Wllla ir« their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.

Mtyer and Poarl Cranston of Ann Will Shehan.

Aivor, Pat Bollinger, Shirley Rook- Last Wednesday night Mrs. Alta

well, Katherlne Bollinger and Jackie Meyer, daughter, Megan, Miss Doro-

Breniaer of Gregory, Jack iBEannett, thy Bixel and Francis Shehan at-

Cy AtLee of Pinckney and Pat Dil-t tended a 4-H club picnic at Howell

bn and Russell Glover of Howefl City Park,

Store

WE DELIVER

Walter Reason of Detroit was in

to>vn Saturday.

Mrs. Porter of Detroit is employ-


PAUL W. CURLETT PUBLISHER

Gerald Darrow was In Jackson

I.ibt Thursday.

Erwin Mann of Detroit caHea" oa

Gene Mann Sunday.

Gene Mann was in Detroit the

first of the week.

Thomas Slattery of Detroit visited

Gene Mann last week.

Mrs. Wm. Loll entertained her

card club last Friday p. m.

The Fred Read family is spending

the month of July at the lake.

Miss Lois i^avey of Gregory is

working in Chelsea this summer.

Miss Dorothy Brogan of Howell

spent Friday evening with friends

here.

The base ball game here Sunday

between Dexter and Pinckney was

ra ; ned out.

Miss Ruth Culver of Howell was

the guest of Miss Goldie Markos Saturday

night.

Mr. Harold Planck and friend of

Detroit called at the Henry Johnson

home Sunday.

C. O. White and wife and Cora

Webb of Detroit spent ciio week eni

with Gene Mann.

Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Kennedy of

Ho\vell called on Mrs. Pntsy Ken­

nedy Sunday a. m.

Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Caverly of

Howell were visitors at the R. K.

XlKott home Sundae*.

Mr. and Mrs. John Burg Sr. of

J*aNr.e visited Mr. and Mrs. John

Burg Jr. Sunday.

M>. and Mrs. Jack Reason have

mo' ed back to their hj ne in the

Kennedy apartments.

Mr. and Mrs. Dale Maple of Detroit

were week end guests of Mr.

and Mrs. Clare Miller.

Mrs. Walter Clark and children

and Mrs. Rose Hendee spent Monday

at 1)i(- Will Nash home.

Miss Ella Marie Burns has returned

from California where she drove

i now car through for rer uncle,

l)-;»nard McCluskey.

Leo Bettes has been called for

medical examination this week for

the selective service draft.

Bernard Dilloway has been transferred

from Camp Custer to Fort

Leonard Wood, Missouri.

Mr and Mrs. John Chambers ar-1

l'jrrnly were Sunday dinner guests of

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Johnson.

Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Gearhart of

Flint and Mrs. Rosa Gearhart of

Howell called at the Mark Nash home

Sunday.

Mrs. O. Heller and daughter,

Marie, and Harley Miller of Pontiac

were Sunday callers at the home of

\V. H. Clark.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kennedy and

friends from Detroit called on Mr.

Kennedy's mother, Mrs. Patsy Kenredy

Sunday p. m.

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Sampers of

Perry visited at the homes of Mrs.

I

Arctic

Ice Cream

17c PINT

CADILLAC ICE CREAM

25c PINT

. RESCRIPTIONS ACCURATELY FILLED

Kennedy Drug Store

JOE GENTILE

ICE CREAM. CANDY, CIGARS, TOBACCO ETC.

:: FOUNTAIN SERVICE::

Come In and Give Us a Try

Service with a Smile Open Every Evening

SWEET SIXTEEN 16 OZS. 5c

Standard Station

RED CROWN GASOLINE

For Quicker Starting

Chanpe Now to Summer 0*ls and Greases

Car Greasing Car Washing

Nat. Door Check & Mfg. Co.

FORD LAMB, Mgr.

Confessions from 7:30 to 8 a. m.

and Mass at S a. m. on the First Friday.

The Novena Devotions in honor

01 Our Lady of Sorrows Friday at

Samper's brothers, Rue and Ford Mr> Jame.s Roche and son, (ieorge W. C. Miller and son, C

8 p. m.

Lamb on Monday.

o, Fowlerville were Sunday dinner

Cr.techism classes meet Saturday

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Olderman guests in Dexter.

at 10 a. m. Confessions Saturday 4

spent Sunday at their farm east of Irving: Reynolds has finished his

to 5 and 7:30 to 9 p. m. Sunday is

df-iyhter, Pau'a, called at the C. B. t«wn. They have just moved from studies at Michigan State College

Communion Sunday for the ladies of

Alley home in Doxter Sandfly night. Cleveland, Ohio, to Toledo.

f.nd is working in Detroit.

the parish: the Altar Society. The

E*dley Van Sickle is tricking 15 Mrs. Cora Webb and Patrick

A. M. Roche of Lansing and Paul

Sunday Masses are at 6, 8, 10 and

tourist cabins from Detroit to Hi- I'. Jacobs, former editor of the

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Mercer and Dr. Clifford Cook, former Pinckney Brighton Argus, now living at Will-

and Mrs. Walter Mercer and son res'dent, has taken a six months i.tmtton, was a caller at the Dispatch

of;

Ea3t Lansing spent Sunday with Dr. j let-ve of absence from his duties as office Saturday.

Frank Mercer and family at Pontiac.) guard at Jackson prison and is work Mi-, and Mrs. George Bull is and

Last Thursday callers at .the Wm., >ng in Detroit.

Melvn Bruff of Iosco were Sunday

Mercer home were Mrs. Albert Buc-j Week end guests at the W. (' cllen- at the George Bland home.

her (Helen Graves) and children of- Miller home were Mr. and Mrs John Mrs. Mable Isham and daughter,

California and Mrs. Htelen Mac- Croupe of Howell and Mr. and Mrs. Joyce, called on Mr. and Mrs. Ver-

Gregor and children of Brighton. Fred Ternet of St. Louis, Michigan. ron Beattie and new born son at

A car driven by Wm. Darrow Sr. Sunday guests of Mrs. Weltha Howell Friday night.

and containing his wife and Mr. and

Porn to Mr. and Mrs# Vail and Miss Jessie Green v.-*rc

Gar Mc-

Mrs. Abel Haines of Pinckney was

C.illen of Dexter on July 1, a son#

Mr?. Flora S iyder of Horton t;r.d

wrecked Saturday night on Grand daughter, Mrs. Buttleman.

Mrs^ McGillen was formerly Kather-

River highway between Howell and

ine Roche of Pi»ckney#

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Franke of De­

Fowlerville<

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs.

troit visited at the Clare Miller home.

Sunday guests of Mrs. Eleanor

Pat King were Mrs, Cashmere of

last week Mrs. Miller and son re-j ^ ^ ^ Mr< ^ ^ Hm ^

Ledwidge were Mr. and Mrs. Hubert

turned to Detroit with them for a ^ ^ . ^ ^ ^ ^

Ltc'widge and Miss Clare Ledwidge

vlSlt

of Detroit. Mrs. Hubert Ledwidge " , L .J u v 11 • i„,t trl

expects to undergo an appendicitis

operation at Detroit this week.

Mrs. Don Swarthout inform us

that her father, T. L. Boutbonnnis

Sr., of ilfcmet. California, has suf '


&

*#

•jfc:

i»"

A*

ML

ti.

.. i

IF

"»*" ': -J

W Haller

"TOPS" IN

ECONOMICAL

TOP-BURNER

COOKING! *\

•fti^,«. ••^~**Ky' r TytW 7 J'!P**zi'

The Findcney DUnatch Wednesday, July 2. 1941


PROFESSIONAL CORNER

TVPtaclawyBitEateK Wednesday, July 2. 1941

NOTES of 50 YEARS AGO

C URRtNT

OMMEN I

"»» Ye Editor" *

I. !• • -*• '"• I T

STATE OF MICHIGAN STATE OF MICHIGAN

Dispatch of July 2, 1891

Come and catch the greased P»g

on July 4.

• ; > *

Dexter is trying to raise the wind The sudden and unheralded attack

ior a brass band.

on Russia by Germany last week

The Stockbridge race track is be­

The Pinckney Sanitarium MRS. WiM G. WELLS

caught the war forecasters flatfooted

ing made ready for the season. and they have been busy ever since

RAY M. DUFFY, M. D.

"Divine Healor"

E. G Tremain, local railroad agent trying to dope out the reason for

Pinckney, Michigan.

left Friday on a four week vacation. the swift Russian invasion With

714 N. West Ave Jacluon, Mich.

e

Office Hoot 4—

The first wool delivered in this

Hitler already engaged with fighting

ttOO to 4:00 P. M.

Phono 21563

village was brought in last Saturday.

on three fronts it was considered

7:00 to 9:00 P. M.

The Emmett Rifles of Jackson will

unlikely and the heighth of folly for

hoof it to their camp at Whitmore 1

him to start another battle with the

Lake, making easy marches. |

Cemetery Memorials

battle line of such excessive length

DR. G R. MeCLUSKEY

Laura, Mollie and Norman Wilson'

i. ARNETS

DENTIST

924 N. Main Ann Arbor Mich

112HX Michigan

Represented by

Phones

JOHN W. RANE

Office, 220 Res. 123J Whitmore Lake Phone 681

Evenings by appointment

HOWELL, MICHIGAN

JAY P. SWEENEY

CLAUDE SHELDON

Attorney at Law

HOWELL, MICHIGAN

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR

Phono 19F12 Pinckn«y, Mock

PERCY ELLIS

AUCTIONEER

Farm Sales a Special 13

Phone Pinckney 19-FM

1 - the Russian frontier. However, he

P 1 .tended the graduating exercises at crossed up the wise guys and seems

Lansing last week. , to have had all the better of it in

A band of four dagoes was in; I the first battles. Russia, however,

town Saturday with bagpipes "No' can match him man for man and is

1

Moi/, no Music".

supposed to have the implements of

Last Sunday was prison day and warfare, although it has been claim­

each inmate at Jackson prison re- ed that they are inferior to the Ger­

I'L'jvcd a flower and a scap ural man units. It may be that after the

oi.otal/on. 7 5'J nosegays were d>- element of surprise wears off, they

tf.'. a I.Q.

may drive the invaders from Russia

The board of supervisors has elect although many are now prophesying

el Louis Howlett, school commission­ that they have no stomach for warer

and J. B. Tazziman of Oceola fare and will sue for a speedy peace.

MARTIN J LAVAN and Charles Coste of Pinckney, Anyway this new theater of war is

Attorney at Law

school examiners.

bound to boom Great Britain's

W. E. Murphy, who has been chances and give them a breathing

Phone 13 Brighton, Mich. working in Chicago for the past 3 space. Now would seem the oppor­

ruH. F. Sigler and party, consist­

1 «r,n. Remember the Bible verses for

ing of Hollis and Donald Sigler, Mr.

roll call.

Brighton

&nd Mrs. Charles Stanard and daugh­

AB R

ter, Militant, Miss Martha Nichols,

Hyne, cf 4 1

Mrs. Villa Richards, Dr. and Mrs.

Jones, Is 3 1

W C. Wylie of DexteT and daughter

Rock, n * 0

Julia, and Mrs. George Read left

Aihcr, p 4 1

Frrjhour, If 4 0

Hartman, c 3 0

Hog&nson, 3b 3 Z

Youngs, lb ..„ 3 0

f. Hyne, 2b _ 3 1

Nana, rf 3 1

x k Northeast

1 North.

stroke of genius. Both rotagravure

The B Shaip club met at the home) sections of the Detroit News and the

Free Press carried two pages of

thpse whiskered men and hoop skirted

women last Sunday.

H V."e had some one the past week

1 Har to next v:eek when on the second

0 Phitothea," yet was able to interpret

0 thP meaning of "Philathea", coined

0 from two Greek words. He was inter- j Wednesday on an auto trip to Wash-

2 ectorl. to know of the "World Wide j ire:*on D. C.

0 Annual Convention" to be held in

1 T ., .--.1.- r..t.. 10-13, 1941. He The legislature passed a law per-

0 raid, "Then you belong to a world n ittfng deer hunting parties of 4 or

1 v.*!do movement! Do we realize the mor-

1 sec ope of our work?

1 of the

i of Section 14, Town

liange 6 East, Michigan.

Kinney and Adams

Attorney fc>r Plaintiff,

«lo Pontiac Bank Building,

Pontiae, Michigan.

CONSERVATION NOTES

The mild winter and the good

weather during nesting time presage

a food crop of pheasants, prairie

rV'-kens, grouse and waterfowl during

the coming hunting season. Phea

Mints are reported very numerous

In 52 years of farming near Clove'dale

in Barry county, John C/JY

ter has collected several hundred

sV>ne arrow heads, spear heads, a

htnd axe, a pipe, bowl, and two belt

buckles. Most of these were tu *nH

;n by the plow.

The forest fire record so far this

year is 573 fires averaging f» «VT

WIND DOES DAMAGE HERE

Finckney was in the path of local

thunder and wind storms over the

w.?ek end which did considerable

damage. Friday night the roof of a

large tarn on the Isham farm, owned

by V. Hamparian was blrwn off and

many trees blown down The home

of Ralph Hall, ,ust east of town,

was struck by lightning but not a

>reat teal of damage was d«,> e. Part

jf th? rn*ugc. OM the Bert Hooker

farm was also blown down and several

large trees there and on the

Tneodore Olderman form, next to

him. Hewell and Dexter report only

slight showers and no wind damage

done.

Mr. and Mrs. Harrin and family

to shoot one doe for camp use

onlv.

J In the Circuit Court for the County

cf Livingrton, In Chancery.

Tbr Probete Court for Xhm County

Alice E. Parker, by C. Bryan Kin­ of Livingston.

ney, Guardian for said Incompetent, At a session of said Court, held

Ku: ii tiff,

-u !hc Probate Office in the City of

vs.

Howell in said County, on the 24th

Warra Parker, Warren Parker, Sar­

Jay of June, A. D. 1941.

ah Parker, .Sarah C. Parker, Mary

1 resent: Hon. Willis L. Lyons,

W. Parker, Aaa Bly Jr., The Un­

Juage of Probate

known wife of Gilbert C. Bedell and

In tbe Matter of the E*Ute ef

their unknown heirs, devisees, lega-

Kollin G. Webb, Deceased

:eee and assigns, Defendant*.

I: appearing to the Court that the

No. 3442

'.::ne for presentaion of claima

aga

Order of Publication

At a session of said court held at

;.he court house in the city of Howell

in said County on the 2»th day of

April, A. D. 1941.

Fresent: Honorable Joseph H.Collin*,

Curejut Judge.

On reading and filing the bill of

complaint in said cause and the affadavit

of C. Bryan Kinney attached

thereto, from which it satisfactorily

appears to the Court that the defen

dents above named, or their unknown

heirs, devisees, legatees and

a-V^ns, are proper and necessary

raities defendant in the above entitled

cause, and;

it further appearing that after

d'ligx-nt search and inquiry it cannot

i.e ascertained, and it is not known

whether or not said defendants are

'i.^.g or dead, or where any of

them may reside if living, and, if

lead, whether they have personal

representatives or heirs living or

where they or some of them may refide,

and further that the present

wKcreabouts of said defendants are

ir.known, and that the names of the

peivons who are included therein

without being named, but who are

embraced therein under the title of

.nkcown heirs, devisees, legatees,

»nd assigns, cannot be ascertained

^fler diligent search and inquiry:

On motion of C. Bryan Kinney,

attorney for plaintiff, it is ordered

th\L said defendants and their unknown

heirs, devisees legatees, and

-.;Mijns, cause their appearance to be

entered in this cause within three

me 'ths from the date of this order,

»i,d .r. default thereof that said bill

ui compliant be taken as confessed

by the said defendants, their unknown

heirs, devisees, legatees, and

i'.-i.-'igns.

It is further ORDERED that withi..

lv. uiity days plaintiff cause a copy

ji Iti.s Order to be published in tho

I in kney Dispatch, a newspaper

j.r rted, published and circulated in

JUIU county, such publication to he

continued therein once in each week

I ;'or six weeks in succession.

Joseph H. Collins, Circuit Judge

Coui'tersigned:

Join. A. Haginan, Clerk of Circuit

Court:

'lake Notice, that this suit, in

which the foregoing Order was duly

'i.aufc, involves and is brought to

quiet title to the following described

pie*, e or parcel of land situate and

ooiNfc in the City of Howell, County

oi Livingston. State of Michigan

described as follows, to-wit:

Ail that part of the East \'-> of

.per

fire. L.i*t year a* this time the

i-ocord was 580 fires averaging 20

acres per fire

20 half acre patches are being

set out in the Tuscola wild life pro-

;er* of corn buckwheat, clover, rye,

and vetch to serve as food for pheas-ants

and rabbits.

Muskrat take reports for 1940-41

indicate a drop in the take from the

previous year of from 820,000 to

490.000 pelts.. There were 10,000

lers trappers licensed last season

than the previous year. The skunk,

opossum, racoon, and weasel takes

were also much smaller. Mink, coyote

and badger were about the same.

In 10 weeks of transplanting in

northern Michigan, 4,060 pike were

taken from duck nesting grounds

: ne said estate •hou'j be .united,

M\r< that a time and place ba appoin'ed

to rejeive, examine and aiji.*t

all claims and demands against

aid deceased by and before said

CjJit:

It i» Ordered, That ell of tne


•>•!&'

Fri«

July 4

Peanut Butter 2 J.,

Sugar **** c * n * iooI *$5.6S

Potatoes, new 10 Lbs 33

Clothes Line * 19

0Ft

Matches 6 Box "

Apple Butter «* Jar

to/

19

1T1 All]* Gold Medal ^½ LB. ^, 99'

Jersey Cream,!* F, " r 87'

Wednesday, July 2. 1941

j Michigan Mirror

State News Classtited

Read article in Jane 7 1MM of

Michigan Fanner, page 9-865 - than

call your Watsons dealer. I hare jaat

the kind of Duet and Dusters

bill Bugs is talking about

a t enwiett

Supply your Needs

fc- Want Ads

Well, folks, we're in the war!

I had to go to Canada to find it

ED-To eat hay on

Builder's Hardware, Shelf Hardware, Paint, Varhish, cut. For the past eight days I have

Amount. Julius

been touring Old Ontario from .Tor­

FOR SALE: Philco radio. Price $8.

WANTED TO BUT: A small organ

onto to North Bay and from Ottawa,

Roofing Plumbing Supplies, General Electric Refrig­ fie dominion's capital, to Niagara

Jack Hannett

or melodian. State condition

price. Box 108, Pinckney,

Fall*, as a guest of Canadian news­ HAY TO CUT: on share* or wttl sell.

erators etc.

papers 2nd the Province of Ontario.

F6k SALE: Uajestic fXOo

Albert Shalte, Pinckney

B. K. Elliott

While the junket was for tourist

promotion rather than for war prop-J

|» 1 have buyers and I JIT bo glad io Experienced chair oaner aneT fnr-

. or other < prop- 1

aganda, the latter persistently bob-J Aiat your farm, home

nitare refinisherv. Use beat grade of

bed up in speeches given by host of­

erty'for sale. I also hava lake ^ | ^¢/Price ,^ ]if9 ^ 1#| ^ »

ficials at luncheons and dinners, other farm homes and acreages for ] Satisfaction guaranteed. Bring your

American editors heard Premier sale.

chain and get a good job.

Inez Bodwiah, Gregory

Mitchell Hepburn at Toronto and J.l

Cecil Proaser, 415 West Main Street

.. Ralston, dominion minister of na-l a-f WANTED, FARMS: Have buyers Brighton, Michigan.

iional defense, at Ottawa. It can be for both large and small farms if Lse the modern

to get

stated without contradiction that Can iound reasonable.

Potato Bugs end other Garden In­

udn looks to the United States not

Ray Baker

sects. Get Watkins safe, activated

only as a friendly neighbor but as

129 West St, Northville dust Phone 93 a P. Hewlett

an ally in what the British Empire

FOB SALE—IceBa* hoi* §* DM.

primly regards to be our common

Ke replied with candor: "They of ice. Inquire at Dispatch Office.

"fight for freedom."

are symbols that are losing much of FOR

taaFaanttr with

' Slow Motion Dive"

their traditional meaning. We are furnace or cook

A newspaper editor at Midland,

havng more democracy today than Inquire at Dispatch office.

Ontario, aptly phrases the American

ever before, and we like rt Many FOR SALE— lee Box in, good eon-

position by the following simile:

Canadians would like to see Canada dition. very reasonable.

".You have left the diving board,

s me day a part of the United Sta­ Mrs, John Colonge, 200 Pearl St

but you haven't yet reached the

tes."

FOR aalJSTOata

vater. As a dive into war, it is the

world's slowest motion plunge in his­

Fiench Canadians

Y.

tory."

Everywhere in the province I WANTED—Washings and ironings

heaiu critical comment of the French to do. Mrs Russell Bokrus

This Canadian viewpoint is not

Canadians because of their alleged

wishful thinking.

FOR SALE—Outboard HotbrT"!

lukewarm interest in Canada's war wheel auto trailer and quantity

It merely reflects an acceptance

of

effort and of Prime Minister Mc- furniture. Lucius Doyle

without qualification of President Kenzie King's alleged disposition to

Roosevelt 's latest fireside chat. temporize with them because of po­

FOR SftXE-Tractor in good condi­

Inform you instantly

when and where the cur­

The President's picture appears litical reasons.

tion. Price |60. T. Bodia

rent is on. A new, excln*

beside the picture of Winston Churc- Both criticisms may be unjustified. 11505 Dexter-Pinkney Bead

sive G-E feature.

hi.l on highway billboards promoting But there seems to be some ground FOR SALE: 1934 Oldsmobile sedan.

2 SBiCT.A-SPKD CAltOD

sale of Canadian Victory Bonds. At for them in the fact that Canada fed­

Rue Lamb

COOKING UNIT. Five

Toronto Wendell Willkie was accord­

not

cooking heats from one

eral parliment at Ottawa has Approximately 28 acres of Alfalfa

ed a welcome whicch exceeded in

for

unit, with one switch.

enacted military conscription

Claw and Timothy hay crop for

popular enthusiasm the organized

3

overseas duty.

sale on the ground 1 mile south of

TSIPI-0VEN. Three

reception jjvtn to the King and

in a town on Patterson Lake Road. Noti­

ovens in one! 1—Speed

Home conscription exists

QUOIMI. DotH 1.-y Thompson, the Am

fy A. F. Brown, 16605 Grand River

Oven. 2 —Extra-large

1

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