Speakers Match Handbook for Educators - Peace Corps

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Speakers Match Handbook for Educators - Peace Corps

Bring the Peace Corps ExperienceInto Your Classroom WithSpeakers MatchHandbook for EducatorsAMY AND GREG CLARK, RETURNED VOLUNTEERS FROM NEPAL


2 | SPEAKERS MATCH HANDBOOK FOR EDUCATORSTable of ContentsWelcome to Speakers Match 1Table of Contents 2Preparing for Your Speaker’s Visit 3Suggested Activities to Prepare for Your Speaker 5Suggested Activities for College Classrooms 7Extending Students’ Learning 8Celebrating Your Success 9Post-visit Teaching Suggestions 10Coverdell World Wise Schools website: www. peacecorps.gov/wws email: wwsinfo@peacecorps.gov


3 | SPEAKERS MATCH HANDBOOK FOR EDUCATORSPreparingfor Your Speaker’s VisitCommunicating with the SpeakerYour classroom visit will be most successful if you and the speaker both have clear goalsand expectations and communicate to develop a plan for the visit. The speaker might notbe familiar with the curriculum you teach, and might have questions about the interestsand abilities of the students in your class. Help the speaker prepare for your particularclassroom setting.Here are some issues you and the speaker should discuss in advance:Goals/Objectives:o What are your goals for the presentation? If the presentation is meant to tie-in toa particular unit of study, share the objectives of that unit so that the speaker cantailor his or her presentation to those goals.o What is students’ prior knowledge about the Peace Corps and the host country?About your Class:o What is the age/grade level of the students?o How many students are there?o Are there any special needs the speaker should keep in mind?Logistics:o How much time is available for the presentation, including questions andanswers?o What technology is available? Does the speaker need a projector, screen, etc?o Will the speaker be sharing music, photos, clothing, food, or other items from hisor her country of service?An easy way to plan the objectives of your event and to exchange pertinent informationwith your invited speaker is to use the Educator Planning Form, and to ask thespeaker to fill out the Volunteer Planning Form.Coverdell World Wise Schools website: www. peacecorps.gov/wws email: wwsinfo@peacecorps.gov


4 | SPEAKERS MATCH HANDBOOK FOR EDUCATORSPreparing Your StudentsThink about what students will need to know to be prepared for the speaker’s visit. Whatskills or knowledge are the students learning that will be enhanced by the speaker? Whatshould students know about the speaker’s host country and the Peace Corps in general,before the speaker visits?Activity SuggestionsWe have suggested some activities that may help prepare your students for the speakingevent. Feel free to use one of these activities or develop a pre-visit activity of your own.oGuide to prepare for your speakerAdditional Resources for Information about the Peace Corps and PeaceCorps Countries of ServiceTeach your students more about the Peace Corps:Resources on the Peace Corps:o General Peace Corps informationo Fact sheet and PowerPoint presentation about the Peace CorpsResources specific to Peace Corps countries of service:o General information about the Peace Corps by country, including aninteractive mapo Search for Peace Corps stories and lesson plans about Peace Corpscountries of servicePrepare your students for cross-cultural awareness and exchangeooUse the lessons in Building Bridges to build cross-cultural awareness andrespect.Remind students not to focus only on the details they find strange or“weird.” Encourage them to find similarities as well as differences.Coverdell World Wise Schools website: www. peacecorps.gov/wws email: wwsinfo@peacecorps.gov


5 | SPEAKERS MATCH HANDBOOK FOR EDUCATORSSuggested Activitiesto Prepare for Your SpeakerGeneralConduct small group researchon topics such as the government,economy, climate, religions, arts,and cultural groups within thespeaker’s country of service. Havestudents’ share their learningthrough a jigsaw activity or creativepresentations.Language ArtsWrite letters to the speaker priorto his or her visit. In the letters,students can ask questions aboutthe speaker, his or her countryof service, and the experience ofserving as a Peace Corps Volunteer.Read a book set in the speaker’scountry of service. Discuss thekinds of details that the storyreveals about the country, itshistory, and its culture.Listen to folk tales that comefrom the speaker’s country ofservice. Search the World WiseSchools website for examples.Discuss the characters and themesin the story, and the hints they giveabout the culture in which the folktale is set.Social Studies/GeographyStudy a map or globe withstudents. Find the United Statesand the speaker’s country ofservice. The Peace Corps’ WhereDo Volunteers Go? webpage maybe a useful resource. Researchthe climate and geography of thecountry, and compare these withyour own geographic area.Find online news sources fromthe speaker’s country of service.Read about current events in thecountry, and find informationrelated to your speaker’s servicesector (e.g., environment,education, health).ScienceResearch plant and animal lifewithin your speaker’s country ofservice. Learn about the ecosystemspresent in the country and theadaptations that allow local plantsand animals to live there.Find articles aboutenvironmental or healthissues facing the speaker’s countryof service. Discuss how theseproblems compare to issues inthe United States or in your localcommunity.Coverdell World Wise Schools website: www. peacecorps.gov/wws email: wwsinfo@peacecorps.gov


6 | SPEAKERS MATCH HANDBOOK FOR EDUCATORSMathAnalyze data relevant to thespeaker’s country of service (e.g.,data on population in urban andrural areas; data related to publichealth; data on economics andincome).Media/TechnologyView video clips about thespeaker’s country of service. TheWorld Wise Schools website andPeace Corps YouTube Channelhouse videos from many PeaceCorps countries.Listen to podcasts by PeaceCorps Volunteers who served in thespeaker’s country of service. Searchthe World Wise Schools website forexamples.Watch narrated slide showscreated by Returned Peace CorpsVolunteers for World Wise Schools.Hear personal accounts of theirservice projects and internationalexperiences.ArtMusicView photographs online fromthe speaker’s country of service,including images of landscapes,people, homes, food, urban andrural life, plants and animals.Imagine the feelings, sights,sounds, smells, and tastes youmight experience there. Discussthe sensory responses the imagesevoke.Listen to songs that are popularin the speaker’s country of service.If the song has lyrics in anotherlanguage, learn how to sing thelyrics or find a translation of thesong.World LanguagesResearch languages spoken inthe speaker’s country of service.If there are multiple languagesspoken in the country, find outwhere they are spoken and whospeaks them.Learn phrases or greetings ina language spoken in the speaker’scountry of service using the WorldWise Schools Language Lessonspage or other language resources.Coverdell World Wise Schools website: www. peacecorps.gov/wws email: wwsinfo@peacecorps.gov


7 | SPEAKERS MATCH HANDBOOK FOR EDUCATORSSuggested Activitiesfor College ClassroomsInviting a returned Peace Corps Volunteer(RPCV) to your classroom or lecture seriesis a wonderful way to internationalize yourcurriculum. RPCV speakers offer authenticfirst-person accounts of cross-culturalimmersion; experiences collaborating withcommunities around critical global issues;and insights on grass-roots, sustainabledevelopment.Your students will have the opportunity to:• Better understand globalinterconnectedness• Learn about the challenges andbenefits of cross-cultural experiences• Discover the excitement of becomingpart of a community through anotherlanguage• Reflect on their own commitment toservice and volunteerismThere are really no limits to the ways in whichreturned Peace Corps Volunteer speakerscould be used in a college setting; the mostimportant thing to remember is to communicateyour goals and expectations with the RPCV inadvance to ensure the best results.If you have any questions or are looking forsuggestions on how a returned Peace CorpsVolunteer speaker can contribute to yourcourse objectives, please contact World WiseSchools at wwsinfo@peacecorps.gov.Coverdell World Wise Schools website: www. peacecorps.gov/wws email: wwsinfo@peacecorps.gov


9 | SPEAKERS MATCH HANDBOOK FOR EDUCATORSCelebratingYour SuccessPlease tell World Wise Schools about your Speakers Match experience!Email wwsinfo@peacecorps.gov to tell us all about the visit. We use this feedback todevelop suggestions for other educators and RPCVs, and create useful materials tosupport the Speakers Match program.We may also spotlight your experience in an upcoming issue of our electronic newsletter,the World Wise Window.Please feel free to share the following information:o How many students participated? What grade?o What did students learn from the presentation?o What pre- and post-activities did you use?o How easy was it to find a speaker?o Do you have any recommendations for other educators who are using SpeakersMatch? Or for the World Wise Schools’ Speakers Match program?Coverdell World Wise Schools website: www. peacecorps.gov/wws email: wwsinfo@peacecorps.gov


10 | SPEAKERS MATCH HANDBOOK FOR EDUCATORSPost-visit Teaching SuggestionsGeneralConduct independent researchbased on questions that studentsgenerate during or after thespeaker’s visit. Use three reliableonline sources to find informationrelevant to the questions.ArtCreate an art piece in a stylepopular in the speaker’s countryof service. Research the culturalimportance of this type of art andfind examples created by nativeartists.Language ArtsWrite thank you letters to thespeaker. In the letters, studentscould write about the mostinteresting things they learned, ornew questions they would like toinvestigate based on something thespeaker shared.Read a book set in the speaker’scountry of service. Discuss the waysthe story portrays the country ofservice in comparison to the waysthe speaker portrayed the country.Write personal essays orcreative writingin response to the speaker’s visit.For example, students couldwrite about an experience in anunfamiliar culture or settings,or could write about what theyimagine life would be like in thespeaker’s overseas community.Service LearningOrganize a service learningactivity in your community orfor the benefit of a community inthe RPCV’s country of service. Forsuggestions and tips, you can visitthe World Wise Schools ServiceLearning webpage.Media/TechnologyView video clips about thespeaker’s country of service. TheWorld Wise Schools website andPeace Corps YouTube Channelhouse videos from many PeaceCorps countries. Or, view videosthat tell the stories of other PeaceCorps Volunteers.Coverdell World Wise Schools website: www. peacecorps.gov/wws email: wwsinfo@peacecorps.gov


11 | SPEAKERS MATCH HANDBOOK FOR EDUCATORSListen to podcasts by PeaceCorps Volunteers about theirservice experiences. Search theWorld Wise Schools website forexamples. Discuss the ways thatanother Peace Corps Volunteer’sexperience compared with yourspeaker’s experience.Watch narrated slide showscreated by Returned Peace CorpsVolunteers for World Wise Schools.Hear personal accounts of theirservice projects and internationalexperiences.Social Studies/GeographyFind online news sources fromthe speaker’s country of service.Read about current events in thecountry, and find informationrelated to your speaker’s servicesector (e.g., environment,education, health).MathAnalyze data relevant to thespeaker’s country of service (e.g.,data on population in urban andrural areas; data related to publichealth; data on economics andincome). Look for data specific tothe area of the country where thespeaker served, and discuss howdata from this area compare to thecountry as a whole.ScienceFind articles aboutenvironmental issues facingthe speaker’s country of service.Discuss how these problemscompare to environmental issuesin the United States or in your localcommunity.Research public health issuesfacing the speaker’s country ofservice. Discuss the major healthconcerns facing communities there,and how these compare to healthissues in the U.S.Generate and researchquestions related to naturalresources, health, or conservationissues in the speaker’s country ofservice.World LanguagesLearn phrases or greetings ina language spoken in the speaker’scountry of service using the WorldWise Schools Language Lessonspage or other language resources.Coverdell World Wise Schools website: www. peacecorps.gov/wws email: wwsinfo@peacecorps.gov


Bringing the World HomePeace Corps Coverdell World Wise Schools 1111 20th Street N.W. Washington, DC 20526Tel: 800.424.8580, ext. 1450 Fax: 202.692.1421 Email: wwsinfo@peacecorps.gov

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