1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 LX II IE r

localhistory.wilmlibrary.org

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 LX II IE r

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36TH YEAR NO. 3 PUB. NO. 635-340 WILMINGTON, MASS., JANUARY 16,1991 Copyright 1991 Wilmington News Co., Inc. (508) 658-2346 28 PAGES

Local redistricting

could affect Prec. 3

by Arlene Surprcnant

As a result of November's elec-

tion and the passage of Question

One abolishing the state census,

Wilmington and other Massachu-

setts' towns will be redrawing their

precincts based on the 1990 federal

census.

Local census forms have just been

mailed out to all Wilmington

residents and should be returned to

Town Clerk Patty Ward no later

than February 1.

Ward told Wilmington selectmen

at their meeting Monday night, any

possible changes are on hold until

legislation is passed to spell out

how to go about redistricting'and

counting the number of citizens in

a community. The federal census is

typically done by blocks with

streets used as boundaries. Ward

said the federal government will

provide software to make the job

easier. For local rcdistrictidng

purposes, residents of institutions

like colleges, prisons, hospitals,

and military bases who are not

local registered voters will not be

included in the population.

Under present requirements, no

more than 4,000 inhabitants arc

allowed in each precinct. There is

room for a five percent leeway

either above or below the average.

Ward said the only one of

Wilmington's six precincts that

would be affected by the re-

districting would be Precinct

Three, which is over the limit. She

said about 435 people would be

affected. Some of those people

would have to be added to Precinct

Four, Ward said. She explained

the overflow is due to new

construction in subdivisions like

Patches Pond and Towpath Lane.

"We should be able to adjust the

whole town without any big

changes," Ward said.

Once the redistricting is complete

for use in the 1994 state elections,

there won't be anymore changes

until the next federal census in

2000, said Ward.

Selectmen approve

Desert Shield flag

Wilmington will soon be flying a

third flag on the town common in

honor of local servicemen sta-

tioned in the Persian Gulf.

Selectmen agreed Monday to

purchase and fly the flag below

American and POW flags already

on the flagpole.

Steve LaRivee provided the im-

petus to lake the action. LaRivee

suggested the town purchase the

flag from a police officer in

Reading or borrow his own flag to

run up the flagpole. The flag is

white with a yellow ribbon in the

middle and the words "We support

ourtroops. Come home soon."

As LaRivee petitioned the board,

he noted this was only a temporary

measure until the troops do indeed

come home.

Postmaster urges

snow, ice removal

Postmaster Jake Quinn has

requested that all postal patrons in

Wilmington keep all areas leading

to mail boxes free and clear of all

ice and snow. These areas must be

shoveled, sanded and properly

maintained in order for the letter

carriers to safely deliver mail. The

safety of carriers must be a number

one priority. Slips, trips and falls

can be effectively reduced or

eliminated this winter with the

cooperation of the residents of

Wilmington.

Quinn has instructed all carriers

to execute their deliveries in a safe

Vigil for peace

manner and-to return any mail to

the post office if areas leading to

mail boxes present a safety hazard.

Patrons whose mail is on "snow

hold" will have to pick it up at the

post office.

Postal patrons who have curbside

delivery must have enough area

cleared for the postal vehicle to

enter and leave the mailbox in

order to maintain delivery service.

Quinn said, "I'd like to thank all

people of Wilmington in helping us

complete our appointed rounds

safely."

Post card

from Iraq

J -

In an irony of timing, this post card was found last Thursday in a suitcase of old photos. It is

a scene in the city of Basra, or Rasrah, in southeast Iraq, about 25 miles north of the Kuwaiti

border. Located on the Shatt al Arab (river), the city is the principal seaport for Iraq. The

postcard was sent by Capt. Lprz Ncilson to his then-future mother-in-law, Mrs. A.T, (Winifred)

Norton, in August 1940. Now the publisher of the Town Crier. Capt. Neilson was (hen'hr the

Merchant Marine. At (he time he was in Iraq, the Germans were bombing London and sinking

ships throughout the North Atlantic.

Trash plant owner seeks $15m

by Arlene Surprcnant

Though tipping fees for local

trash disposal remain at a flat fee of

$61.50 a ton, NESWC (NorthEast

Solid Waste Committee) Executive

Director Francis Hopcroft warned

Wilmington selectmen Monday

that could change if the owner of

the trash facility obtains a fee

adjustment. Wilmington has been a

member of NESWC since 1981,

four years before the plant went on

line.

Wheclabrator Environmental Sys-

tems is the owner of the North

Andover plant used by the 23

member communities belonging to

NESWC. Hoperoft explained, in

the past 10 months, NESWC has

been "vigorously defending"

against an attempt by Whcelabrator

to raise the operating and main-

tenance fee of the facility by $3

million a year. In addition, Whec-

labrator claims that the NESWC

communities owe Wheclabrator al-

With the Persian Gulf crisis foremost in everyone's mind, several Wilmington

residents attended a Vigil for Peace at the St. Elizabeth's Chapel on Forest Street.

Organized by the Wilmington Council of Churches, the 12-hour vigil included

services throughout the day led by clergy from various churches. The group

above is singing a hymn, concluding a prayer group led by Sister Catherine Lee

of St. Thomas Church. A brochure staled that the Vigil for Peace was not a

political statement but a statement of faith, praying for God's intervention.

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most $15 million in back payments

from 1985 to the present. That

would total almost $75 million in

additional tipping fees for NESWC

members over the remaining 15

years of the NESWC service

agreement, said Hopcroft. Since

NESWC maintains the claims have

"no merit," the whole issue is slated

to go to arbitration in May or June.

If NESWC loses, its members

could reportedly face "significant"

cost increases i:i (he near future.

Hopcroft said he was confident that

NESWC would win, but that he

wanted officials to be aware of the

possibilities.

Wilmington was one of the first

wants to build

affordable units

by Arlene Suqirenant

A local bank last week set a

precedent by being the first bank to

offer to build affordable housing in

Wilmington.

Everett Olsen, president of the

Commercial Bank and Trust Co,

approached members of the

Wilmington Housing Partnership

Thursday to get a consensus on a

proposal for property the bank

owns at 4IB Lake St. The bank had

foreclosed on the 21,800 square

foot lot last fall. There is currently

a vacant home and a garage on the

lot. But neighbors said, with

flooding problems,due to frozen

pipes, broken windows, and

break-ins by vandals, the property,

poses a danger to'area children and

ought to be condemned. Building

Inspector James Russo, who also

serves on the WHP, promised to

inspect the premises the next day

and make a recommendation.

Building affordable homes isn't

new to the Commercial Bank and

Trust Co. The bank also financed

the development of a low income

home on Everett Avenue, which

was built under the auspices of the

Wilmington Community Development

Corporation.

During discussion Thursday, Olsen

said the construction of one or

two affordable homes on the site

could prove beneficial to both the

town and his bank. Board members

agreed unanimously to act on the

proposal. However, they were

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uncertain as to what the best

approach would be. Since the lot is

in an R10 zone, it would be big

enough for two homes. But

members noted that would be

nearly impossible with only 45 feet

of frontage. Russo asked why they

couldn't build a duplex on the site,

once they got a comprehensive i

permit from the board of appeals.

Bruce MacDonald suggested

building two dwellings off a

common driveway. Olsen said, if it

was feasible, he'd rather sec two

affordable homes instead of only

one and one market rate unit.

Chairman Carole Hamilton said

the best route would be toVhavc a

"marriage" between the bank and a

-developer rather than go through

town meeting to obtain funds to

buy the property.

"We don't really want to recom-

mend the town shell out money to

buy property," said Hamilton.

Several neighbors were present at

the meeting. They said they were

concerned that the lot would be

subdivided. They also asked that

the present struciurcs-.vbc taken

down in the interest of safely and

aesthetics.

"Any improvement will be a

blessing," said abuttor Larry

Brewer adding "ten years ago that

was a nice little home."

The board asked Planning

Director Lynn Duncan to work

with Olsen and come up with a

detailed proposal.

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Seniors $1 0.00 Of f with this

communities to join NESWC. Ac-

cording to selectmen, the decision

to go with the group was made

when town officials realized that

landfills were closing and there

were few places left to dispose of

residents' trash.

Selectmen were concerned Mon-

day with the potential increase in

tipping fees. They said one reason

they elected to go with NESWC

was to keep a set fee. According to

Chairman Bob Doucctte, the town

originally paid Sll a ton to

NESWC. Doucctte called current

costs "phenomenal" arid asked if

fees could reach Si00 a ton soon.

Hopcroft said yes but added

NESWC was looking into other

alternatives, such as rehnancing

some bonds, to keep costs down. He

explained that a legislative bill to

transfer ownership of the land

under the plant to NESWC was

pulled at the end of last year

because of a wording change. That

bill, however, has been refiled.

Selectmen noted the one bright

spot in the whole picture is the

savings being realized through

Wilmington's recycling efforts.

That savings came to about

S50,000 last year, said officials.

Miceli

re-assigned

The change in leadership in the

Mass. House of Representatives has

resulted in a change of committee

assignments for many Democratic

legislators. The new speaker,

Charles Flaherty, announced the

new positions on Monday.

Among the many reps with new

committee assignments was Rep.

Jim Miceli, who has been re-

assigned to two committees. Public

Service and Election Laws. He had

previously served on the pres-

tigious Ways and Mean Committee.

His phone number at the Stale

House is still 617-722-2380.

Two other representatives for

Wilmington, freshmen Rob

Krckorian and Marianne Brcnton,

being Republicans, will receive

their committee assignments from

the minority leader.

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Ainsworth Road

hearing continued

to Feb. 5

by Arlene Surprenant

Over 50 neighbors of a proposed

commercial subdivision off Ains-

worth Road in Wilmington

expressed frustration Tuesday with

potential impacts if the project is

approved by the town. Neighbors

asked so many questions at the

planning board's public hearing

that the original hour session

stretched to two as residents sought

.justification of the project being

developed by owner Robert Corey

and Sunshine Investment Realty

Trust.

Ken Lcavitt seemed to sum it up

best. "This whole concept of a

development in this area is

ridiculous. This project really

shouldn't fly," he said, referring to

the probability of drainage.

problems, increased traffic in the

Andover Street area, possible

danger to neighborhood youth and

the town's water supply once the

lots are sold and fully built up.

Later, he asked the board if there

was any way to "kill" the project.

Planners told him anyone can build

anything as long as it's within the

town's zoning bylaws.

After reviewing two drafts of

covenants and restrictions restrict-

ing the use of the project site and

spelling out design restrictions, as

well as a recent decision by the

Department of Environmental

Protection, the board agreed to

continue the hearing yet again, this

time to February 5. Chairman

Dave Clark suggested the hearing

be continued to allow input from

the board of health and to give

planners time to research and

discuss six waiver requests and

possible tradeoffs in infrastructure

improvements. The applicant is

seeking waivers for such things as

sidewalks, roadway grade, and

roadway width.

Much of the evening's discussion

centered on a request for a waiver

to reduce the width of Ainsworth

Road from the required 42 feet to

32 feet. Area residents claimed the

waiver, along with traffic pro-

jections of approximately 420

vehicle trips per day during after-

noon rush hour into Ainsworth

Road would create safety prob-

lems. Planner Carole Hamilton

admitted the board was "between a

H

rock and a hard place" over the

roadway width. She explained a

wider road would be safer and go

along with subdivision regulations

but would have a more detrimental

affect on wetlands. She said her

board was now in the negotiation

process with proponents to

determine the best route to go.

Whatever the board's final

decision, both the developer and

abuttors have the right to appeal,

Hamilton said. Neighbors would

have 20 days from the filing date

with the town clerk to file an

appeal.

Paul Lindholm, engineering

consultant for Corey, told the

board he would prefer a decision

on the waivers soon because that

decision would affect a decision by

the DEP. The DEP is currently .

looking at several drainage and

wetlands issues with the project.

All information furnished by DEP

centers on the 32 foot wide

roadway, which has yet to be

approved by the planning board,

and not on the regulation size road.

In a letter to the board, the

conservation administrator sugg-

ested planners postpone their de-

cision until information requested

by DEP is furnished by the ap-

plicant. The administrator said

DEP's decision will be "criti-

cal"since it could change such

things as the layout of the road.

Lindholm disagreed. He said only

the size of a culvert under

Ainsworth Road could impact the

roadway.

Neighbors also spoke out on

drainage. Some homeowners, like

Mr. Judson, wondered where wa-

ter runoff will go once much of the

site is paved. Hamilton explained

once the road is in place, the lots

will be developed separately and

each lot will" be reviewed'by her

board and the. Conservation

Commission. By law, there can be

no increase in runoff on each lot,

Hamilton said.

During discussion, Lindholm

pointed out the water department

won't let proponents put in side-

walks by the water department land

by Ainsworth Road. Lindholm

added he suggested sidewalks there

to minimize impact to the wetlands.

Wall

art

Tom DcLctter of Pineridge Road, Wilmington

returned to his elementary school recently for a bit

of art work. Now a graduate of the Art Institute of

Boston, he painted several murals in the gymnasium

of the Woburn Street School. Tom works for a

silk-screen company in Salem.

Water, sewer commissioners

ponder record keeping change

The Wilmington Water & Sewer

Commissioners are pondering a"

change in record keeping. They

received, last week, a proposal for

a computer system from the firm

of Weston & Sampson.

The proposed computer system

has geographic information and

mapping capability which will

enable it to map every houselot,

eyejey business establishment and

every unused parcel of land in

Wilmington. Water mains and

sewer mains throughout the town

will be shown. The point at which

those mains enter the building will

also be delineated.

There arc about 6,000 water

connections (services) in

Wilmington. There arc about

3,000 parcels of land, some quite

large, without buildings. Walcr

and sewer connections are shown

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Antenna

locations

*

by Arlene Surprenant

The pros and cons of a proposal

to locate a Cellular One tower on

Lopez Road were aired at

Monday's board of selectmen's

meeting.

According to Town Manager

Michael Caira, a request was made

to grant an exemption from- the

zoning bylaws in order to locate

the tower on Lopez Road off

Concord Street. The Wilmington

Board of Appeals denied the

request but it was granted by the

State Department of Public

Utilities. The town then appealed

the DPU decision, said Caira, and

cellular filed its own appeal. The

appeals are now at the Supreme

Judicial Court.

, Cellular One provides power for

car phones. Cellular One spokes-

man David Burnett told selectmen,

in order to be effective, trans-

mission towers have to-be above

the treeline and an equal distance

from each other, as well as close to

1-93. He said the site on Lopez

Road was deemed the best spot for

the tower since it met all the

criteria.

Original plans called for a 190

foot tower. However, in an attempt

to cooperate with the town,

company officials proposed the

following: to reduce the height

David Burnett of Cellular One points to an

antenna site on a map of the Cellular One service

area. The company hopes to locate a 150 to 190

foot antenna on a site it has leased on Lopez Road,

off Concord Street in Wilmington.

TOWN CRIER, JANUARY 16, 1991.

Shawsheen Tech awarded state funds

Shawsheen Tech has been awar-

ded $2,709,955 in state funds as

reimbursement for previously

approved bond issues. The SBAB

(School Building Assistance

Bureau) grant will provide 65

percent reimbursement for two

bond issues for recent building

renovations and a 1987 roof

repair. Under the terms of the

grant, Shawsheen Tech will receive

$286,841 per year from FY'92

through FY 96 and S255.150 per

year from FY 97 through FY

2001.

The grant will pare about

$43,000 from Wilmington's

assessment in FY 1992, according

to committee treasurer John Gillis.

The town's assessment, however

will rise due to other factors,

including a cut in slate aid and

changing enrollment figures.

Gillis told this paper die award is

the direct result of efforts by Supl/

Director Charles Lyons;-who met

with the state Department of

Education to free up SBAB funds

and change legislative language

allowing the awarding of funds

prior to January, 1991. The de-

partment approved the grant at its

December 18 meeting. Shawsheen

Tech was«listed number six and

seven on the state's priority list for

the monies.

"I'm ecstatic. In these times it's so

hard to get even a nickle," said

Gillis, adding, "It was his (Lyons')

hard work. He kept plugging

away."

On a recommendation by Lyons,

the school committee voted last

Tuesday to use the money to reduce

Selectmen debate pros and cons

of transmission tower

from 190 to 150 feet; to provide

the police and fire departments

with antenna and equipment space

and electrical and backup gen-

erator power at no charge; to test

alternate locations proposed by the

town; and to construct a self

support tower without guy wires.

They also agreed to erect a testing

tower at 150 feet for visibility to

show how the tower would fit into

the chosen neighborhood.

Selectmen explained though the

tower would be in an industrial

zone, it could be seen by residents

living a few hundred yards away

across the railroad tracks. Bob

Cain said it might be worth the

effort to find a better location, such

as on the new water tower in the

town forest. That tower is by

conservation land and it would

reportedly require an act of

Legislation to. put the transmission

tower there.

Selectman Dan Ballou was against

the whole proposal.

" I don't think this project

enhances the, town of Wilm-

ington...and I care about the way

our town looks," he said.

Selectmen Chairman J Bob Dou-

cette told fellow members he didn't

have a problem with it and he

preferred to settle the matter out of

court in the interest of saving

nn nn

money. Burnett said he, too,

preferred to work cooperatively

with the town. He promised the

company would try to minimize

the tower's height by planting trees

■ around it. Afterward, Burnett told

this paper it would be difficult to

start over in anothcj location. He

said his company has a lease

agreement for the land and has

been paying -rent for the last year.

In addition, if they had to change

their plans, Cellular One could be

working on the project for another

two years.he said.

Selectmen asked Burnett to work

with Caira in erecting the

temporary tower so officials and

neighbors could visualize what it

woud look like. Area residents will

be notified of the exact date when

Ihe tower would be in place and

also the date of a later public

hearing on the whole issue.

Sewer contract

signed

A contract has been signed by the

Board, of Water & Sewer

Commissioners of Wilmington and

the engineering firm of Fay,

Spofford & Thorndikc, for the

repair of a sewer main in the

railroad right-of-way, near the

town farm bridge in Wilmington.-

The commissioners signed January

10.

Engineers, some weeks ago

discovered that a "dip" existed in

the sewer. They had opened up the

sewer and floated a camera

nn

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downstream IO discover the dip.

This led to a controversy with the

Conservation Administrator of

Wilmington who maintained that

there should have been a public

hearing before the sewer was

opened. Chairman Arthur Smith

then discussed the controversy wilh

a town manager.

There will probably be no

controversy in this repair job.

Engineers from Fay, Spofford &

Thomdike arc to be present while

the repair work is being done.

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All Doors

Available in 6'6"

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NORTH HEADING

164 Chat Nil S>»l

assessments to the five member

towns. In a letter to the committee,

Lyons said, "I recommend redu-

cing assessments by the entire

amount of the additional reim-

bursement, due to the fact that local

munici"?! finances aic. difficult,

SINCF

1972

and due to the fact that it was our

communities who strongly sup-

ported us in 1989 when our school

committee requested funds for

needed repairs and equipment

modernization."

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\-


■»

4 TOWN CRIER, JANUARY 16, 1991

Opinion

editorial

Treatment of women in Iraq is surprising

__ by Capt. Larz Neilson

Saddarn Husseiri and the country of Iraq arc today first in the line

of thoughts of nearly every person alive. The writer, from

personal experiences and other knowledge can make sonic

comments.

Back before the days of World War 1 the Sultan of Turkey was an

ally of Germany and Austria. The Sultan of Turkey ruled from the

Black Sea to the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea, as well as what is

now Egypt, in North Africa. Before that the Turks had ruled

Greece, Mediterranean Islands, and what is now Yugoslavia.

Part of the lands ruled by Turkey included what is now Israel,

and Jerusalem. Three of the principal religions of the world would

meet in Jerusalem.

For many centuries differences of religion have led to wars. Such

was the case where Turkey ruled over Jewish and Christian holy

sites.

World War 1 to many people is a history of fighting in the

trenches of Fiance.

World War I, for the 3ritish, was to attack the enemy from as

many places as possible. This included the Dardcnellcs, by the

Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, Arabia, by Lawrence of

Arabia, Israel b> forces under Allanby, and Mesopotamia, a vast

area at the head of (he Persian Gulf, by a British Army whose

name the wrier has forgotten.

Mesopotamia is today the Iraq about whom everyone has been

reading. Itjs possibly one third of ihe size of the United States. The

British succeeded in freeing Mesopotamia, and it became Iraq, an

independent country.

Now ruled by Saddam Hussein, Iraq differs from other Muslem

countries. Saddam has poison gas, and is believed to have used it to

kill 10,000 of his subjects. He has pressed for development of

nuclear weapons, and the possibility of his having them frightens

many people. In other words, he is not a nice guy.

Saudi Arabia, further south, is deemed to be a belter place, by

many who have never been there.

Saudi Arabia has a "thought police" organization. The women of

Saudi Arabia do not expose any parts of their bodies, other than

their eyes, to the ga'.c of mankind.

Oh, yes, the National Geographic has had nice stories, by

American female writers, of life for woman kind in Saudi Arabia.

Twice, during the past four or five weeks, this writer has read of

the Saudi "thought police" striking women with whips, and not

gently, because the heels of their shoes were visible.

That doesn't seem to be the rule in Iraq. Possibly it is because of

ulnum&GIrier

tl»ktburj - ■ilmmgkm

Publication No. 635-340

An independenlly-owntd nswspapar published every

Wednesday by:

.The Wilmington New* Company, Inc.

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(508) 658-2346

Tewkabury addresa: P.O. Box 68, Tewkabury, MA 01876

(508) 851-5091

Publisher Capt. Larz Neilson Advertising Manager C. Stuart Neilson

Editor Larz F. Neilson Circulation Manager Cathy Pacini

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die effects of television, which seems lo be common. ■•-

One instance, about two weeks ago, showed a battalion of female

warriors, automatic rifles on their shoulders, marching in

Baghdad.

Their dress was European. Theii hair tumbled down to their

shoulders. It was an impressive sight.

Just a few days past the local tv stations were showing the vote of

the legislative body in Baghdad. The US tv called it a "rubber

stamp" vote - the reply to the recent US Congressional vole lo

support George Bush.

Some of the Iraqi legislators were female. They wore European

dress.

Saddam Husscim, according to the US news reporting, is a

monster. But Saddam Hussein seems to be the only Moslem ruler

from that part of the world who is opening the door lo the females

of his country.

Paul on pols

School consolidation: a

matter of dollars and sense

by Paul Sullivan

For the past two years we have been told by that we are in for

tough financial limes. These warnings have come from both the

leaders of Tewksbury and Wilmington. As a result of this, we have

heard the horror stories of how our educational system is going to

be devastated. During this time we have seen our elected officials

work within the present educational system and take steps that

would attempt to prioritize our programs and cut waste out of the

budget.

Their actions, though laudable, are simply not going lo be

enough. It is time that our elected officials take steps that are not

within the present system. Further, towns can not solve their

problems alone. It is time thai Tewksbury and Wilmington got

together and solved their budget problems together, and

consolidate certain educational programs.

The first program I would consolidate is the two high schools.

The present enrollment of both schools do not merit having two

full schools. Two full schools means two full administrators, two

cafeterias, two buildings to heat, two heads of each department and

so on. Now I know lhat there is going to be reluctance to break the

long standing tradition of parochial school systems. But isn't it

more important to have a first class system that to maintain a long

out-dated system of parochial education?

Just imagine for a minute taking all the monies that are saved and

putting them into teachers salaries and to direct services to the

students. There are some shining examples of successful regional

high schools in this area. Concord - Carlisle and Acton- Boxboro

come to mind. Both schools have been cited for excellence and are

very comfortable with their set up.

This idea could lead to other innovations within the school

system. The present high school that would be abandoned due the

consolidation could be leased to a private college. This would be

particularly attractive to one of the many Boston private colleges

seeking to move out of the city for both security reasons and an

opportunity to cash in on their property td expand their

endowment. A partnership with the consolidated school would

make great strides to promoting excellence in education.

Before you discard the idea as foolhardy remember that, based

on the financial projections, both Wilmington and Tewksbury are

facing possible layoffs of their work force. Wouldn't it be a shame

to have to Jay off some of the good young teachers that are in both

school system when there is a real alternative.

Another advantage lhat a regional high school would have is the

consolidation of both towns would give a great pool of talent which

could be called on for educational advocacy. Not to mention the

fact that the new regional school committee would most likely be

made up of members of the present school committees. Not to

sound mushy but I can't think of a better pool of people to call on

to initiate such an ambitious plan.

I hope someone takes this theory seriously, because there is one

sure way to have our education system go downhill and that is to

do nothing.

One thing I haven't figured out. What am I going to do

Thanksgiving morning? *"

t*r f

i

i-

C

fV'd wahi

speamng

by Kevin John Sowyrda

This is the week I declare war... on the Registry of Motor

Vehicles.

My grief with them goes back to the early days when I would

watch Registrar McGlaughlin, Ed King's appointee and a

retired army general, lecture us through television ads about

some new registry requirements. But you couldn't really

understand'what the registrar was saying as his numerous

jowels prohibited his proper pronounciation of English.

I didn't have a car at the time so that was the only irratation

the Registry could provide me — dumb commericials.

Then came the punishments of adulthood, chief among them

dealing with the Registry.

When I voted for a new governor this year I had one mandate

in mind — abolish the Registry. The Registry doesn't work.

It bothers all of us. It stinks to high Heaven, actually.

This week I'm declaring war.

My registration expires at month's end and its time to pay

more cash to the registrar, now a rather amiable fellow named

Hutchinson.

Some say Hutchinson is the perfect guy for the Registry and

that he's instituted an array of reforms.

I disagree. Hutchinson is much too nice a guy to be working

at the Registry. He's not at all nasty enough and doesn't have

half the jowels of old General McGlaughlin.

Anyway, my new registration is roughly fifty bucks, plus

paying up on the parking tickets I own Ray Flynn.

First, I stand by my parking tickets in Boston and am proud

of them. In the true spirit of Gerry D'Amico I willingly

parked at meters without filling them with quarters. And even

if I did plug in a bucks worth the red arrow would reach zero

long before my business in town was done. But the meters are

made to do just that so that the Hub may extract a quick fifteen

bucks from your pocket.

And state law says that if you don't pay within 21 days a

fifteen dollar ticket can become a 35 dollar ticket.

In the North End they call that Mafiosa loansharking. ■

At the Registry one clerk called it, "General Law Chapter 90,

section such and such".

It's all part of the game. You bust people at every turn so

[that keeping a car on the road becomes prohibitive at best.

Anyway, my declaration of "war involved fighting with

pennies. To show my contempt for a state and Registry which

increasingly makes driving a car financially forboding, I

called to sec what would happen if I showed up at the Registry

office in nearby Reading and paid my registration fee in

pennies.

"State law says we don't have to take them. People have tried

that before," said the clerk on the other end of the phone.

So much for that idea. I lost this battle.

But the continual headaches of the Registry of Motor

Vehicles should make us ask why we have one in the first

place?

Why do we have to rc-rcgistcr our cars annually?

What gives this state government the right to rape me

annually of about fifty bucks to keep my car on the road?

Why do licenses expire every four years? Why is it so much

to get a new one? Why do we pay a "penalty" of five bucks

when we register our vehicles in person as.opposed to by

mail-in registration?

We all pay tolls, a prohibitive gas tax, obnoxious insurance

rates, and God knows what else.

It's all reached the breaking point for middle-class

Massachusetts.

While Governor Bill Weld is still in his reformer mode

(having just proposed abolishing the Metropolitian District

Commission) he might take a quick look at the Registry on

behalf of all of us.

It's time to abolish the Registry.

The entire concept of the Registry is bad because it's

bvercentralization at it's best. A better idea would be a

complete breakup and localization of all Registry services.

Licenses could be issued locally, and instead of renewal being

required once every four years the time should be extended to

something more like ten. As for registration, that should

occur once. Period. Until you sell it or get a new car your

registration business will be done.

The annual budget for the Registry is $300 million. This

money could be divided proportionally among the 351 cities

and towns to supplement the new administrative costs

accompanying localized motor vehicle registry services.

A plan to abolish the registry comes up on Beacon Hill each

year, usually from the desk of State Representative Peter

Blute. In past years it's been ignored as reactionary.

But in this year of reform a new proposal to get rid of

Registry headaches could have broad base political and

popular support.

Briefly in politics ...

Rep. Jim Miceli's demise as the local member of the Ways

and Means Committee may be only half his woes. Miceli's new

committee chairman will be his long time foe on Beacon Hill

Rep. Kevin Blanchette (D - Lawrence). Blanchette chairs

the Committee on Public Service and first came to

loggerheads with Miceli over the special retirement bill for

Tewksbury Building Inspector George Nawn.

Ironically, House Speaker Charles Flaherty, who

stripped Miceli of his State House powers this week,

contributed $1,000 to the Miceli re-election campaign in 1990.

The freshmen Republican reps are still awaiting their

committee assignments from Minority Leader Peter Foreman.

Cheryl Layne Busch, a member of the Tewksbury

Planning Board, is said to be considering a run for selectman.

One Busch supporter said, "Cheryl is a known quantity and a

proven vote-getter".

New Register of Probate Donna Lambert is taking on the

old boy network in Middlesex County, and the old boy

network is taking on Donna Lambert. No sooner did Lambert

take the oath of office that she received a terse memo that her

salary would be $49,266.54. Chief Admininistrative Justice

Arthur Mason has legal control over the payroll at

Lambert's office and axed her pay immediately. Lambert's

predecessor, Tom Larkin, had been paid $57,000 annually.

Said Lambert, "The old boy network in the county is going to

find out I don't roll over so easy.""


K?f&

<


6 TOWN CRIER. JANUARY 16, 1991

HOME

SWEET

HOME

Your new home can be "Home Sweet

Home" more quickly after a WELCOME

WAGON visit.

Tips about good places to shop.

Useful gifts and invitations you can re-

deem for more gifts from civic minded

businesses. That's what my visit is all

about - and it's FREE!

A WELCOME WAGON call is easy to

arrange and is such a special treat. We've

been greeting people for over 50 years.

Just call me.

wucofHer wtuxyi\

TEWKSBURY

Marie Risitano 475-2703

WILMINGTON

Jean Hartka 658-6211

Established

1935

N

\

s

s

•..

DYSON

Piano & Organ

Buys • Sells - Tunes

NEW - USED

Consoles, Grands, Player

Pianos, Used Organs. Easy

credit terms - Bank-rates

Rt. 110, Dracut, MA

453-3824

CANDLEPYNS

Open &

League Bowling


CANDLEWOOD

LANES

35 Main St., (Rt 28)

No. Reading

664-3145

CUTTER & CUTTER

Attorneys - at - Law

Evening Appointments Available

Automobile Accident Claims

Personal Injury Claims

Workman's Compensation Claims

No Charge Unless Successful

Free Consultation on Above

Wilmington - 43 Church SI

658-2277

Wakeliold - 5 Fairlane Rd

245-7726

WILLS $50

DIVORCE:

Very Reasonable

CRIMINAL DEFENSE

Flowers • 3ailoons • Fruit Baskets

3 IcMloru

FLOWER


Coming events

datebook

Register now: For Wil. Ski

Club ski trip to Colorado scheduled

for Feb. school vacation. Call

694-6060 or 694-6040. v>

Wed., Jan. 16: 7 p.m., WHS

Pac second in a series on teenagers

and alcohol featured on WCTV,

Channel 30.

Thurs., Jan. 17: 10 a.m., Wil.

Women's Club meets at United

Methodist Church.

Thurs., Jan. 17: 7 p.m., West

Int. Pac meets in the school library.

Fri., Jan. 18: 6:30 p.m.,

Council of Churches potluck dinner

at Wil. Congregational Church.

Conceit with Jon Polce follows.

lues., Jan. 22, 23, 24: Star

Share fundraising program for Wil.

Family Counseling.

Jan. 22 and 29: 6 to 10 p.m.,

fust aid course at Reg. Health Cntr.,

Wil. Call 617-756-2220.

Tues., Jan. 22: 9:30 a.m. to

2:30 p.m., Wil. Aim meets at K of C

Hall.

Wed., Jan. 23: 7 to 9:15 p.m.,

open house for eighth graders and

parents at Shawsheen Tech.

Thurs., Jan. 24 to April 11:

8:30 p>m., Learn to Lose program

at Reg. Health Cntr., Wil. Call

617-756-2220.

Thurs., Jan. 24: 7:30 p.m.,

Wil. Garden Club meets at 4th of

July Hdqtrs. Call 657^766.

Thurs., Jan. 24: 7:30 p.m., in

the high school gym; WHS fashion

show. Call 658-8256 or 658-5932.

Fri., Jan. 25: Title I family

night at Shawsheen Elementary

School.

Fri., Jan. 25: 7 p.m., Winter

General Pac meeting at Shawsheen

Elementary School, Wil. will

include Chapter 1 Family Night.

Sat., Jan. 26: 8:30 a.m.,

Entrance exam at Austin Prep. Call

944-4900.

Sat., Jan. 26: 8 p.m., Singles

Dance at K of C Hall, Wil. Call

(617) 942-0165.

Mon., Jan. 28: Kindergarten

switchover in Wil.; morning

students attend in the afternoon;

afternoon students attend in the

morning.

Tues., Jan. 29: Woburn Street

School second graders field trip to

NJ5. Aquarium.

Wed., Thurs., Jan. 30-31:

Armenian Days at Shawsheen Tech

dining room. Call 667-2111 for

reservations.

Sat, Feb. 2: 7 p.m., Through

the years with Wil. Chamber of

Commerce gala 30 celebration.

Call 657-7211 by Jan. 25.

Sat., Feb. 2: 8 p.m. to

midnight^t Villanova Hall, Chinese

Picnic Scholarship Dance sponsored

by St. Thomas Women's Club. Call

658-4665.

Feb. 2 and 3: Wil. Jehovah's

Witnesses will convene at

convention hall, 85 Beacon St.,

Natick.

Sat.,.Feb. 9: 8 p.m.. Comedy

Night at Wil. Sons of Italy Hall. Call

657-4141.

Fri., Jan. 25: 8 p.m.. Singles

dance at K of C Hall, Main St.,

Tewks.Call 617-729-4664.

Sat., Jan. 26: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.,

Growing Up Male seminar at Reg.

Health Cntr., Wil. Call 617-

756-2220.

Sat., Jan. 26: 7 p.m. at Sons of

Italy Hall, Wil. Boosters scholarship

dance. Call 658-4769.

Thurs., Jan. 31: 7 to 8:30 p.m.,

Concerned Persons Workshop .at

High Point, 2580 Main St., Tewks.

Call 800-332-4478.

Sat., Feb. 2: 7 p.m., Wil.

Chamber of Commerce to celebrate

30th anniversary at Aleppo Temple.

Call 657-7211 from 9 to 5.

Feb. 4 and 6: 6 to 10 p.m.,

Pcdiatric and infant CPR course at

Reg. Health Cntr., Wil. - Call

617-756-2220.

Sat., Feb. 9: 7 p.m.,

Valentine's Dance to benefit Kevin

O'Brien Scholarship Fund;

Franciscan Friars Center, River

Rd., No. Tewks. Call 851-7146.

FrL, Feb. 15: CCA Valentine

Dance at Tewks. Senior Center.

Tues., Feb. 12: 5 to 8 p.m.,

Body composition,analysis seminar

at Reg. Health Cntr., Wil. Call (617)

756-2220.

Armenian Days

at Shawsheen Tech

The Ram's Head Dining Room at

Shawsheen Tech will be

transformed into an Armenian

restaurant on Wednesday, January

30 and Thursday, January 31

during "Armenian Days" at the

dining room.

Students in the culinary arts

program, studying to be chefs,

bakers and restaurant managers,

will plan', prepare and serve a

menu that includes such delicacies

as boerag (layered pastry with

cheese filling), dolma (stuffed

vegetables), kufta (Armenian

meatballs), pilaf, lahmajoon (meat

pies), yalanchi dolma (stuffed

grape leaves), and for dessert,

pakhlava (nut filled dessert pastry)

and simit (Armenian cookies).

Chef instructor Al Mazman is

showcasing a different ethnic

cuisine once a month to expose

students to a larger variety of

dishes and offer the public the

opportunity to sample international

foods at the Shawsheen restaurant.

Special dinners this fall have

featured entrees from Italy, Greece

and England.

Both traditional American and-

continental cuisine is featured in

the student run dining room on

other days, with a variety of soups,

appetizers, entrees and desserts

offered daily on days school is

open.

For reservations call the school

after 9:30 a.m. on the day

reservation is requested - (508)

667-2111 or (617) 935-3632.

Guests are also invited to take

home gourmet lake out items, from

a frozen food menu that is

distributed to lunchtime diners or

others who request the menu at the

dining room door. Items include

full dinners, as well as soups,

appetizers, and fresh puddings and

salad dressings.

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

L ASSRpQM

UTUR

Council of Churches

to sponsor

Polce concert

In observance of the Week of

Prayer for Christian Unity,

January 18-25, the Wilmington

Council of Churches will sponsor a

potluck dinner at 6:30 p.m. and a

concert with Jon Polce at 7:30 on

Friday, Jan. 18 at the

Congregational Church in

Wilmington.

The public is invited to either or

both of these events. For the dinner

people are asked to take either a

main dish, a salad or a desert to

share. A free will offering will be

received at the concert. The week

of Prayer for Christian Unity,

which comes this year on the week

of January 18-25, is observed

annually by most major Christian

denominations, under the

leadership of the Graymoor Friars,

in Garrison, N.Y. and the National

Council of Churches.

Jon Polce is a singer, songwriter,

and guitarist who shares an

ecumenical Christian message in

song. A native of Providence, R.I.

and from a Romdk Catholic

background, Jon's music focuses

Chamber

Dance

.Feb. 2

On Saturday, Feb. 2, 1991, the

Wilmington Chamber of

Commerce will hold a gala 30th

anniversary dinner dance

celebration at Aleppo Shriners Fez

Room, Fordham Road, beginning

at 7 p.m. Tickets are S30 per

person and may be reserved by

calling 657-7211 by January 25.

"Through the Years," the

Wilmington Chamber of

Commerce has been, the voice of

the business community. On April

21,1961, the Chamber received its

corporate charter from Secretary

of State Kevin White, and became

officially the Wilmington Chamber

of Commerce, Inc.

Trivia: Ten names, out of the

original 12 board of directors

appeared on the corporation's

charter, the names were: Robert

Sumbcrg, Avco, Wilmington;

LcRoy Bedell, Jr., Bedell Brothers

Insurance Agency, Inc.; Lillian

Woodside and A. Melville

Woodsidc, Wilmington Center

Pharmacy; Alan Altman, attorney;

Davenport Davis, Middlesex

County. National Bank; John

Cafiso, Silver Lake Hardware Co.;

John Lucci, Lucci's Market; John

Laganas, Scolty's Donut Shoppe;

and Herman Moc, Moc Real Estate

Co. The other two original

directors were Simon Cutter,

attorney and Robert Evans.

Four of these companies have

remained members "through the

years,'' Avco Wilmington (now

Textron Defense Systems); Bedell

Brothers Insurance Agency Inc.;

Lucci's Market, and Middlesex

County National Bank (now

BayBank Middlesex).

Jean's

Curl n' 6wirl

2122 Main St.

Tewksbury, MA

658-9333

at Shawsheen Valley

Technical High School

100 Cook St. Billerica

OPEN HOUSE

for 8th Graders & Their Parents

Weds, Jan 23, 7-9pm

(Snow date Jan 24)

following a dramatic change in his •

life, he turned to original Christian

music. Since that time he has

served as a full time music minister

for 15 years, and has recorded six

albums of his music including the

Call in 1975; Your Love is

Changing the World, 1978; Here is

My Servant, 1981; Lord I Believe,

1988, Heal My Heart. 1989 and the

Greatest Gift, 1989. Jon's songs

have also been recorded by such

artists as the Fisherfolk, and his

personal friends Dion and

Crossroads.

His music is published in many

countries, including England,

Germany, China, Australia and

Ireland. He has also ministered

with this music ecumenically,

throughout the northeast, parts of

the south and midwest; has done

full radio and tv programs; and

performed for several major

church and charismatic renewal

conferences. His music will be

appropriate indeed given the theme

of this year's Week of Prayer for

Christian Unity, "Hallelujah,

Praise God All You Peoples;"

(Psalm 117).


TOWN CRIER. JANUARY 16, 1991.

WCTV schedule

Thursday, Jan. 17: 1 p.m.,

Original poetry by Willa Brigham;

1:30 p.m., Talk to WCTV repeat

no calls please; 2 p.m., Teenagers

and alcohol; 4:30 p.m., How to Get

your Community Organization

Involved in Access Cable

Television, presentation to WHS

Pac; 5 p.m.,Woburn Street School

grade three manatee projects; 6

p.m., Witaington United

Methodist Church service; 7:15

p.m., Teenagers and Alcohol.

Friday, Jan. 18: 1 p.m.. How

to get your Community

Organization Involved in Access

Cable TV, presentation to WHS

Pac; 1:30 p.m., Woburn Street

School grade three manatee

projects; 2:30 p.m., Wilmington

United Methodist Church service;

3:45 p.m., Teenagers and Alcohol;

5 p.m., "The New You."

Sunday, Jan. 20: 1 p.m.,

Wilmington United Methodist

Church service; 5 p.m.,

Wilmington United Methodist

Church service.

Monday, Jana, 21: N o

programming.

Tuesday, Jan. 22: 7 p.m.,

Christian teaching and worship

center sponsored by Bruce Hcim.

Wednesday, Jan. 23: 6 p.m.,

Talk to WCTV-Live; 7:30 p.m.,

Live Wilmington School

Committee meeting.

Thursday, Jan.' 24: 1 p.m.,

Talk to WCTV, repeal, no calls

please; 3 p.m., Wilmington School

Committee meeting of 1/23; 6

p.m., Wilmington United

Methodist Church scrviccj 8 p.m.,

Wilmington School Committee

meeting of 1/23.

Reading workshop

Jan. 25

The Winter General Parent

Advisory Council meeting will be

held at 7 p.m. Friday, January 25.

(snow date Feb. 8) at the

Shawsheen School. Dr. Brendan

Walsh will be the guest speaker for

parents. Dr. Walsh is in his fifth

year as a lecturer to audiences

representing all of New England.

He speaks of reading aloud from

the perspective of both parent and

educator. "The Wonders of

Reading Aloud" is a workshop

which informs, encourages and

challenges parents and teachers to

read aloud regularly v.'i'.h children.

Dr. Wash is entertaining and his

message is valuable.

Chapter 1 students and siblings

will make puppets and engage in

puppetry activities while their

parents arc with the guest speaker.

They will participate in a parade of

their puppets. During Chapter 1

class time, students will write plays

using their puppets.

A "fabulous sundae smorgas-

bord" will be held following the _

evening activities. Chapter 1

teachers will be available for

conferences with parents.

US VEGAS WITE

Sponsored by the Wilmington Lions Club

Friday, Jan. 18 7 p.m. -12 midnight

. Wilmington Knights of Columbus Hall

ALL INVITED

CASH BAR $3.00 donation REFRESHMENTS

V>om& Ue/dtate'with ow/

Through the Years

1961-1991

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2,1991

WILMINGTON CHAMBER

^>F COMMERCE^^-

Gala 30 th Anniversary

Dinner Dance

Aleppo Temple Shriner's Fez Room

Cocktail Hour 7 p.m.

Full Course Roast Sirloin of Beef Dinner 8 p.m.

Music by: J.P. Monte Productions - dancing HI midnight

>f

DOOR PRIZES - RAFFLE ■ SURPRISES!

$80 per person

Tables of 10 may be reserved

FOR RESERVATIONS PLEASE CALL

657-7211 %££?

Gna^iM 30 A e/w/uveuatw A&w euP £&t$Mtm> G/nemitu

AAA CART Ea CLEANING SERVICES

AAJTRAva.MC

AGFA COMPUGRAPHIC DIV6ION

APVGAULN.HC

ABSaUIEMCROSYSTEMS. INC

ALEPPO TEMPLE SHRINERS

ALTRON. HC

AMBRIT.INC

AMERICAN HOMES ■ BALLOU REAL ESTATE

AMERICAN TRAVaiEfl.HC

AMETEK AEROSPACE PRODUCTS. HC

AMNAS TAILORING

ANALOG DEVICES SEMICONDUCTOR

ANDERSON-DRSCOLl HSURANCE AGENCY. NC

ANOOVER MAILHG SERVICE, HC

ANNE MAHONEY REALTY

ANTIQUE CONTHENTAL LMOUSHE SERVICE

APOLLO DESIGN SERVICES. INC

BA0A0VERT6ING AGENCY

JAMES F BANDA.ESO

BAYBANK MIDDLESEX

BEDai BROTHERS NSURANCE AGENCY. NC

BOOMERS

JOYCE K BR6B06.C PA

JANICE COPP BURNS, 0 C.

PAL': K BUTT.BULDER

CCH COMPUTAX. HC

FRED F CAIN. HC

ROBERT J CAH HSURANCE AGENCY

CAMEO C0UTURES.NC

CAMPflaL-S RESTAURANT

ELENA CARNABUa. RE

GAM (H AM

PAULF CASaLE.D D S

W S CAVANAUGH t SON FUNERAL HOME

CENTURY 21 STARWOOD ASSOCIATES. HC

CERIC FABRICATION COMPANY, HC

CHAH CONSTRUCTION CORPORATION

CHARLES RIVER LABORATORIES

CHARLIES AUTO BODY 1 SALES

CHESTNUT BUIDERS

CLEANWAY

COLDAR BUSHESS SERVICES '

COLONIAL DATA PARTNERS

THE COLRANE COMPANY

COM ta NEW ENGLAND. HC

COMMERCE. BANK 1 TRUST COMPANY

COMPUBli.lNC

COMPUTER MATE

CONTHENTAL GABLEVISION

COOMBS FURNITURE COMPANY. HC

COP LABS. MC

COPY PRO. NC.

CURRIER EXPRESS.HC

DID LOCK < HARDWARE SUPPLY COMPANY

D4 DSIRVCE.INC

DAS ADV tn TtSNG'CONSUl TING

OAWSON-MCDONALD COMPANY. INC

DAYS HOTEL AN DOVER

DaCROSTA FLOflSTS

JOHN R ODSLHGER. C P A

ANTHONY J 0*UCA, ACCOUNTANT

DIAMOND CRYSTAL SPECIALTY FOODS. HC

DIANO CORPORATION

D0CKTOR PET CENTERS. INC

JAY J DONOVAN I ASSOCIATES. INC

DONUT MAKER

DYNAMICS RESEARCH CORPORATION

EASTERN MICOFSF) FAMLY Y MC A

EDWARDS HIGH VACUUM INTERNATIONAL

UN0A DOYON EMONDC P A

EXECUTIVE EXCHANGE COMPLEX. HC

FAR AUTO SUPPLY CORPORATION

FANTASY PHOTO. NC.

FARMER AND THE DEL'

1W1 REALTY INC

STANLEY M FUPEK. DOS

FK.TERFRESH COFFEE SERVICE

FIRST EASTERN MORTGAGE CORPORATION

THE FLOWER STOP. HC

FORREST StRVICE CENTER. HC

H B rULLER COMPANY

GEORGIA PACIFIC CORPORATION

THE HAMPSHIRE PRESS. HC

GH HARMJM.HC

HARRHGTONS ROAST BEEF AND SEAFOOD

HARVARD COMMUNITY HEALTH PLAN

hARWICK CHEMICAL CORPORATION

HATHORNE ENTERPR6ES. HC

HAYOtN MCA COMPANY. HC

DOROTHY M HESELTON, HYPNOTHERAPIST

HIGH POINT

HCUYWOOOMOVIELAND. HC

HOME REPAIR SERVICE

HOWLAN0 OEVaOPMENT COMPANY

ICI HE SINS US

OS FHANClAl SERVICES. NC

HDEPENDENT CEMENT CORPORATION

HGOLD ELECTRO0ES. HC

HSURANCE STOP AGENCY, NC

NOTATIONS GALOREI

JET-COM. HC

KEENE UGH TNG PRODUCTS

KBLEV • KOMPANY

KaiEY ELECTRIC COMPANY

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS MM!

KOCH MEMBRANE SYSTEMS. HC

IIG ENTERPRISES

LARRY'S OL 1 BURNER SERVICE. HC

W. G LEAVTTT ( SCN HSURANCE AGENCY. NC

JAMES J LEONARDO. MSPT

LONGWOOO TRAVEL

LOWELL FIVE CENT SAVINGS BANK

LUCCI S SUPERMARKET

MANCIWS RESTAURANT

MASS8ANK FOR SAVHGS

MCCARTHY COMPANIES

MCNAMARA TIRE COMPANY

RAYMOND J MERCURIC PA

MERRLMACK VALLEY ADVERTISER

MERRLMACK VALLEY UNITED FUND

MICHAa'S PLACE

K J Ml L( F COMPANY. INC

MOORE EMPLOYMENT. HC

NAPA D6TRBUTI0N CENTER

E G NASH ASSOCIATES. HC

NEW ENGLAND COPY SPECIAL6TS. INC

NEW ENGLAND HOUSHOLD UPKEEP

NEW ENGLAND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH CTR

NOR TH WLMHGTON SHELL

NORTHEAST PODIATRIC

NORTHEASTERN DEVaOPMENT CORP

NOWLAN STUDIOS. NC

OFFTECH.INC

PAD ASSOCIATES

PCHEALTH CENTER

E M PARKER COMPANY

PETERSON 1HARKNESS. ATTORNEYS AT LAW

KATHLEEN L PETRILO. R D .

PHUK RECOVERY

POLYMER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

PONI EXPRESS PRINTHG

PR! CISt BOOKKEEPING SERVICES

PREC6E TYPE

PREMIUM TRAVR SERVICES. NC.

PAESIOENTIAL DEVaOPMENT CORPORATION

PRHT CRAFT

PRO SERVICES. INC

R B II BC

RJ NHEATNGSERVICE

RAHBOW FUEL COMPANY

RALPHS AUT0M0T ME CENTER. HC

REAOHG COOPERATIVE BANK

REAOHG MUNICIPAL LIGHT DEPARTMENT

REALTY WORLD FOREST CONANT REALTY. NC

REGIONAL HEALTHCENTEP.WHCHESTERHOS

PTTAL

REMAX CASALOT REAL ESTATE

RCCCO-S RESTAURANT

ROYAL 0YNASTY RESTAURANT

SCREENPfUNTJjC

SCULLY SIGNAL COMPANY

THE SEWHG BIRD

J F SHAW COMPANY NC

SHAWMUT BANK N A EAST GATE PLA2A

SHAWMUTBAN* NA WIMING10N PLAZA

SHtaD SECURITY SYSTEMS

SIGN STOP. HC

ARTHUR R SMITH. JR. NC

SPNaU HSURANCE AGENCY. NC

STEUOS FAMLY RESTAURANT. NC

A STUWATER COMPANY

STONEHAM COOPERATNE BANK

SUBURBAN NEWS

SUPERHTENOENT OF SCHOOLS

SWEETHEART CUP COMPANY. HC

TAMBONE CORPORATION

TEXTRON DEFENSE SYSTEMS

3 M CORPORATION

TRANS MEO USA HC

WARREN TRASK COMPANY HC

TRUMPF HDUSTRIAL LASERS. HC

TUTELA ENGHEERING ASSOCIATES

REGHA UGOLNI. REALTOR. GRI

UNKXIE BASKETS

UNITED SHOE MACHNERY CORPORATION

UPTOWN DEU

V T N NORTHEAST. HC

PHYLLSA VIEIRA.J P

WAGSTAFPSAUTOMOTIVE GARAGE

PRSCIUR 'PAT WARD J P-TOWNCIER'.

WENER REALTY COMPANY

EDWARD C WHITNEY » SON. HC -

WLMHGTON BULDERS SUPPLY

WLMHGTON COMMUNITY DEVaOFWENT

CORPORATION

WLMHGTON COMMUNITY'FUND INC

WLMHGTON FAMLY COUNSELING SERV. NC

WLMHGTON GRAN IBULDING MATERIALS

COMPANY. NC

WLMHGTON INSURANCE AGENCY NC

WLMHGTON MUSIC CENTER

WLMHGTON NEWS COMPANY (TOWN CR'ER]

WLMHGTON OFFICE SUPPLY HC

WLMHGTON PUMP SUPPLY. NC

WLMHGTON TAXI

WLMHGTON WOODS NURSNG CARE CENTER

WLMHGTONS OUALITY CAR WASH. HC

WNDHAM PEROFESSICNALS

WOBURN FIVE CENTS SAVNGS BANK

WHKUT RECTRC CCAPANY

YANKEE HOME CLEANHG SERVICE. HC

2

V


8 TOWN CRIER, WILMINGTON, MASS., JANUARY 16. 1991

Wilmington senior topics churches

Blood pressure/diabetes

The nurse will be at the Center

Thursday, January 17. She will be

checking blood pressures and

giving diabetes test starting at 1:30

p.m. As you enter the Center give

your name and take a number if

you wish the services of the nurse.

Risk assessment test

At the nurses officcin the Town

Hall she will give any senior the

risk assessment test. This test

includes cholesterol, triglyceride,

and glucose. These are the main

causes of heart attacks and strokes.

Now that the holidays arc over and

we have stopped eating all those

foods that may bring all of the

above mentioned problems a little

too high, in our bodies, it is lime to

put our minds at case and have the

test. If it is loo high it's back to the

diets or back to the doctor

depending on how high it is.

Hearing aid specialist

On Friday, January 18, Fred, the

hearing aid specialist will be in the

center! He will' be, testing the

hearing of seniors and if your

hearing aid is not performing to

your satisfaction he will also check

it for you. It is also necessary to

give your name at the desk and take

a number as you enter if it is to

have his services.

Warm winter so far

All of us should be very grateful

to Mother Nature for giving us a

very warm winter so far. We have

only had short spells of real cold

days. But on the whole the

temperature has cooperated in

keeping our heating bills low. For

those on the fuel program, it is a

God send. With the drastic cut in

the allotments this year many more

would have run out of money. That

was helped by not only the

unseasonably warm weather but

also the cut back in the price of oil

as we moved into the month of

December

Allotment used up?

If you have used up all your

allotment and have no money at all

to pay and no children to help you

living or family members able to

help you by filling up your oil tank

call the Salvation Army Good

Neighbor Fund in Lowell

(458-3396). They may be able to

help you with a fillup. Many

churches set aside funds to help

those in need. Most of the churches

in Wilmington do not care what

your religious affiliation is or if

you do not go to church. If you

need food or fuel, they will be

INSTALLATION SPECIAL! $4.95

TO ORDER CALL (617) 932-4700 or (508) 694-1010

OFFER EXPIRES 2/15/91

§0j Continental Cablevision

there for you.

Be careful with Medication

Taking medication incorrectly is

becoming a problem with over

dosing for many elderly people.

We have been advised by the

Department of Elder Affairs to

inform seniors of some steps to

^take if you arc taking a number of

medications.

1. Before taking any medicine

make sure you have the right

bottle, do not take a medication in

the dark; 2. always follow the

directions. If in question, call your

doctor; 3. check the expiration date

on all medications, throw away

botUes out of date; 4. if you have a

problem with your sight ask the

pharmacist to print large labels on

bigger bottles; 5. some medicines

cannot be mixed with any kind of

alcohol, check with your doctor; 6.

some medicines have to be taken

with food or liquids, either before,

during or after meals. Make sure

you follow these directions; 7.

never take a larger dose without

your doctor's permission; 8. if you

have any new symptoms after

starting.a new medicine, call the

doctor immediately; 9. never share

medicine and try to get all

prescriptions from the same

pharmacy.

Medicine calendar

Many doctors, hospitals or

pharmacy will give you a medicine

calendar where you can list your

medications daily for morning,

afternoon, early evening and

bedtime.

Center closed Monday

Monday, January 21 is the day

Martin Luther King's birthday will

be celebrated which is a holiday.

The Center will be closcd.Plcase

make appointments accordingly as

the minibus will not be on the road.

Meals will not be delivered or

served as schools will be closed. If

you arc a shulin and do not have a

family member to make you a meal

you can order an extra one during

this week. Make sure that if yoirarc

not going to eat the meal that day to

refrigerate it right away as it could

spoil.

DPW recovers

Christmas

ornaments

As part of the town's ongoing

recycling effort public works

personnel have been collecting

Christmas trees at curbside. The

trees are run through a chipping

machine and converted to mulch.

Mulch can be used for landscaping

purposes by the town and residents.

Public--works'""personnel have

been careful to check the trees for

decorations and ornaments. A few

decorations have been turned in to

Jeff Hull, assistant town manager at

the town hall. One ornament is a

round gold leaf ornament with the

words" Merry Christmas Special

Friend 1987." A second ornament

is a gold leaf metal in the shape of

an angel with the name "Gregory"

inscribed on it. A third ornament is

a gold leaf in the shape of .a.

Christmas tree with the words

"Baby's First Christmas Brian"

inscribed on it-.

If these sound like your

ornaments, stop into the town hall

and check them out. Contact Jeff

Hull.

If You're Looking for Safety

w.

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X

-

IvSTABUSIIlin IN 1872 Member I'DIC/DII M

Wilmington Council

of Churches

The Wilmington Council of

Churches, at its meeting of January

10, unanimously agreed to issue a

call for all in our community to

offer continual prayers for peace

in the Middle East, given die grave

international crisis and the

possibilities of a devastating war in

that part of the world.

The call was shared from many

Wilmington pulpits on Sunday,

January 13, along with an

announcement of the Council's

support of a 12 hour prayer vigil

for peace, which was being planned

by the congregation of St.

Elizabeth's Episcopal Chapel. The

vigil was held at St. Elizabeth's on .

Tuesday, Jan. 15, the day of the

United Nations and U.S. supported

deadline for Iraqi withdrawal fiom

Kuwait. To show their desire for

peace, and their support of the

vigil, clergy from many

Wilmington Churches participated

in the prayer vigil services along

with St. Elizabeth's vicar, the Rev.

Tansy Chapman. Members of the

other churches were also invited to

attend the prayer vigil.

Many at the Council meeting

where the call to prayer was

adopted expressed great concern

for me devastating consequences of

a Middle East war on our world.

Council members recalled Biblical

passages which call us to be

peacemakers, and to lilt our

prayers to God, as well as the

Prayer of St. Francis of Assissi

which begins "Lord nuke me an

instrument of they peace: Where

hate rules, let me bring love..."

A pamphlet given to worshipers

at the vigil expressed the views of

many who participated as well as

the position of the sponsors. It

read, "A vigil for peace is not a

political statement, but a statement

of faith. Wc conic to pray to our

God, the God of Abraham and

Sarahs Isaac aiuPRckk.-ih', Jacob

and Rachel: The God of the"

Hebrews, the" God of the

Christians, the God of the

Moslems. For all our roots return

to 'Abraham. In solidarity with

people everywhere who desire

peace, we* pray for God to

intervene in the current crisis in

the Middle Fast. We do not ask a

military victory, but a

reconciliation. God's victory.

Love."

*

Wilmington United

Methodist Church

The Rev. Michael Stotts, pastor,

658-8217; Caroline Anderberg,

asst. to tho-pastor; church office,

658-4519. Wilmington's United

Methodist Church is accessible to

handicapped individuals.

Friday, Jan. 18: 6:30 p.m.,

Wilmington Council of Churches

potluck supper and program with

Jon Polce, singer, at Con-

gregational Church, Wilmington.

Saturday, Jan. 19: 6 p.m.,

AdulfFellowship leaves church for

cross country skiing.

Sunday, Jan. 20: 8:15 a.m.,

Informal communion service; 9:15

a.m., Sunday School for all ages;

10:30 a.m., Family worship

service, infant and preschool care;

11-11:30 a.m., Children's activity

time (Grades one through six); 1

p.m.. Videotape telecast of 10:30

worship on Channel 30, WCTV

(time to be announced), Junior

High youth group; 6 p.m., Senior

High youth group; 7:30 p.m., staff

meeting; 8:30 p.m., Al-Anon.

Monday, Jan. 21: 12:30 p.m.,

Al-Anon.

Tuesday, Jan. 22: 3 p.m., Play

group; 7:30 p.m., Choir practice;

8:30 p.m., Alcoholics Anonymous.

Wednesday, Jan. 23: 10 a.m.,

Bible study; noon, Alcoholics

Anonymous, Esther Circle; 7:30

p.m., Worship and Education

Commissions.

Thursday, Jan. 24: 7 p.m.,

Junior Girl Scouts; 7:30 p.m.,

Pastor-Parish Relations

Committee. .

Cat's owner

sought

The Wilmington animal control

officer is looking for the owner of

a large Maine Coon Cat, seen

frequently in the Clark Street

area. One resident describes the

cat as the largest she's ever seen.

The cat, wearing a blue collar

with bells, is obviously someone's

pet. People who have seen the cat

arc concerned lest it be hit by a

car.

The owner apparently lets the cat

out, whereupon it goes to visit

neighbors.

The animal control officer may

be contacted at 658-7845.

Wilmington police news

During the week ending January"

15, Wilmington police officers

responded to 34 alarms, made 15

bank escorts, and four arrests.

Other departments were assisted on

three occasions, six reports of

disorderly conduct were checked

out and two larcenies were

investigated.

One missing person report was

taken, medical assistance was

rendered twice, a threat complaint

was logged and two non-criminal

complaints were taken.

Seventeen public services were

performed, along with 18 traffic

services; 13 traffic accidents were

investigated as were 11 incidents of

vandalism. Eleven motor vehicles

were recovered and alert

neighbors reported six incidents of

suspicious activity.

Arrests

Tuesday afternoon Officer Jim

Cuoco arrested Louis Harrington

at the Concord Police Station.

Harrington was picked up on a

warrant charging him with

uttering a false instrument and

receiving stolen properly. Insp.

Chris Neville investigated

originally and obtain the warrant.

The suspect was bailed for a

Wednesday court appearance.

Juvenile Officer Pat King

arrested a local 15-year-old

Tuesday afternoon charging him

with receiving stolen property, to

wit a stolen car from Mcdford and

using a motor vehicle without

authority.

Lcllic Settles of Lowell was

arrested at 1 a.m. Wednesday by

Officer Chris Neville who charged

her with operating after suspension

of her drivers license. She was

bailed for an appearance in

Woburn Court Friday, Jan. 11.

Later on Wednesday, Officer Jim

Hanlon arrested Christopher

Bcrton of North Reading while on

Lowell Street. Bcrton was charged

with operating after revocation of

his drivers license due to a prior

oui arrest.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE

and SERVICE CENTER

ONE LOW $295 MONTHLY RATE

INCLUDES FURNISHED OFFICE, RECEPTION, MAIL &

TELEPHONE ANSWERING SERVICES, CONFERENCE

ROOM, PLENTY OF PARKING, ALL UTILITIES

AND TAXES. -

In addition, SECRETARIAL and COMPLETE BUSINESS

SUPPORT SERVICES are available on site (including word

processing, typing, fax, copying, and correspondence).

The Center is ideal for SALES REPRESENTATIVES, IN-

DEPENDENT BUSINESS PEOPLE or PROFESSIONALS in

need of turn-key office space. Full services are available as

needed, thus reducing costly overhead expenses by elimi-

nating the need for full time staff.

Individual offices are available at Village Landing,

885 Main St., (Rt 38), in Tewksbury

CALL 858-0637 TODAY"

i '

.

St. Elizabeth's

Chapel

Corner of Forest Street and

Aldrich Road, Wilmington. The '

Rev. Tansy Chapman, vicar;

508-658-2487. The chapel is

accessible to handicapped

individuals.

All Sunday services are at 10 a.m.

First Sunday of each month is

morning prayer; all other Sundays

are Holy Eucharist. Nursery and

Sunday School arc held during

service. Coffee hour follows.

Thursday, Jan. 17: noon, holy

communion.

Sun., Jan. 20: 8 a.m., Men's

Fellowship; 10 a.m., Holy

Eucharist; Epiphany 3 sermon:

The Rev. Tansy Chapman.

Tuesday: 9:30 a.m., women

with small children group.

Thursday: noon,, holy

communion; evening, the Rev.

Chapman will take part in a panel

discussion: "Adolescence and

Alcoholism" on Wilmington Cable

TV time will be announced,

Sun., Jan. 27: 10 a.m., Holy

Eucharist - sermon: The Rev.

Tansy Chapman; Epiphany 4.

Wilmington

Congregational

Church

220 Middlesex Avenue;

658-2264.

Thursday, Jan. 17: 6:15 a.m.,

morning prayer and communion;

10 a.m. Women's Bible study; 3:30

p.m., Junior Girl Scouts; 6:15

p.m., senior handbell; 7:30 p.m.,

Chancel Choir, Wilmington

Council of Churches meeting at St.

Elizabeth's Episcopal Chapel; 8

p.m., N/A.

Friday: 6:30 p.m., Pet luck:

supper; 7:30 p.m., Concert wiih

Jon Polce sponsored by

Wilmington Council of Churches,

public welcome.. -_

"" Saturday:^: 15 am., The Bush

League, men's life study.'

Every Sunday: 9:30 a.m.,

Sunday Sctjool lor all ages; 10:30

a.m., Worship service followed hy

coffee hour; 11:45 a.m., Junior

Choir, K-8; 5 p.m.. Youth group.

Monday, Jan. 21: Martin

Luther King's birthday; 7:30

Women's Prayer and Praise.

Tuesday: 6:30 p.m., 4-H; 7

p.m., Boy Scouts.

ELI A'S

COUNTRY STORE

Route 62 North Wilmington

Open 8 to 10 Mon thru Sat

8 to 8 Sunday

A little bit of nostalgia

Last week a customer came in to

our store and recognized one of

our meat cutlers. She asked Bob if

he had worked in another store.

Bob said yes and he mentioned

where he had last worked and she

said no, that wasn't it. She asked if

he had ever worked at Stevens'

Market. Wc were both surprised

that she remembered, because it

was at least 25 years ago that Ste-

vens' Market closed. (For those of

you who arc new to town, Stevens'

Market was located across from

Silver Lake where the pharmacy is

now.)

Bob had worked for George

Stevens since he was about 12

years old. He won't say how old he

is now, but I have been cutting

meat since I was about 12 years old

at my father's store and that was

almost 47 years ago... Bob was

ahead of me at the old W.H.S....

So if you are looking forcxperi-

anccd meat cutters wc have them.

Ian is no slouch cither. He has

been cutting for about 15 years,

starting at the old Shurfinc store in

Tyngsboro.

EXTRA-LARGE

D0Z. 99*

BUD $799

12 PACK PLUS DEPOSIT

P.E.I. $C99

POTATOES JLfiK

DELMONICO $499

STEAK B


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win

column

The Tewksbury High School

boys' Varsity basketball squad

finally broke into the win column

last week with a 71-61 victory over

the Dracut Middies. It was the first

TMHS' victory of the season

against eight losses.

Senior center Ron Tarentino led

the attack with 23 points, while

senior guard Scan Mackey also was

solid with 15. Senior forward Alex

Millspaugh rounded out the attack

with 10 points.

The Wilmington Wildcats were

also impressive in MVC action last

week, throwing a real scare into

unbeaten Lawrence before falling,

60-55, before posting a 57-51

victory over Mcthucn later in the

week.

John Lynch and Greg Maiella

hooped 14 points apiece in the

tough loss to Lawrence.

The Methuen win featured a

second half WHS comeback

sparked by the play of Maiella (21)

and Lynch (10).

MVC girls'

WHS

girls win

first

The Wilmington High School

girls' varsity basketball squad went

through a tough week in MVC

action, losing games to Methuen

(68-26) and Lawrence (61-55)

after breaking into the win column

against the Billcrica Indians

(63-41) the previous week.

Tri-captain Ginny Cosgrovc

paced the Wildcats in the Billerica

victory with 18 points, seven assists

and five steals.

Senior tri-captain Allison Curtin

was next with 17 points and

tri-captain Emily Ficociello also

helped the cause with 12

Wilmington points.

Sophomore Lynelte Bcrger

played outstanding defense, while

Leah Mazzoni contributed

outstanding rebounding and

defense for the winners. •

The Wilmington junior varsity

also posted their first win of the

season with a 39-12 rout of the

Indians.

Kristcn Lubanski paced the

Wildcats with .10 points followed

by Jen Pratt (six) and Jancl

Holloway (five). Lecann and

Carrie Tarantino both played

superb defense for Wilmington.

The Wilmington freshmen girls'

basketball squad held on to nip the

Andover frosh, 20-19 in recent

action.

Lynette Sbano was high scorer

for the frosh with nine points,

getting help from Slacey Gillis

with six points. Angela Caira and

Arlenc Pilchcr both played solid

defense for Wilmington.

In other MVC girls' varsity

action last week, the TMHS squad

pulled the upset of the season with a

41-34 victory over Andover.

Amy Beaurcgard paced the

stunner with 13 points, nine

rebounds and four blocked shots.

Danielle Langlois also helped the

attack with eight points.

Your Personal

Service Bank

\

Lancers slip

past Wildcats

■*s. ' .

\

~>

Wilmington High School's Mike Hawley (55) slips this layup under a leaping

Lawrence defender late in last week's exciting 60-55 loss to the undefeated Lancers.

The Wildcats bounced back later in the week with a win over Methuen.

River Valley basketball

Wildcat girls still perfect

The Wildcat basketball girls,

sponsored by the Sons of Italy,

brought their record to a perfect

4-0 in River Valley League play

with fine efforts last week.

This is the first year the division

has entered a fourth and fifth grade

combined team. The team is

coached by Peter Sbano and Jay

Neale.

The Wildcats' first win was

against the Reading C team. The

team won easily over the

inexperienced Reading squad. Jill

Lojek was Wilmington's high

scorer with 12 points and Jannic

Eldridge had eight points. A good

defensive effort by Kim Johnson

and Lauren Sencsi.

In the second game, Wilmington

defeated North Andover (17-14).

It was a hard fought game

throughout. Jill Lojek was the high

scorer for the Wildcats with eight

points and Meagan Graham had six

points.

North Andovcr's offense was

held in check by a great defensive

display by Catherine Townsend

and Rebecca Rogers.

The third game provided an easy

win by the Wilmington girls as

they rolled over St. Monica's of

Methuen.

The offensive attack for the

Wildcats was led by Meagan

Graham with six points and Rcnec

Sbano-, five points. Playing solid

defense for the Wildcats were

Emily King and Jeanccn Neale.

The girls latest effort resulted in

a solid 19-8 win over the Reading

B team.

The annual Knights of Columbus

foul shooting, contest will take

place Saturday, January 27 at 1

p.m. in the WHS gym. Ages are 10

through 14 as of January 1, 1991.

Girls compete against girls and

READING

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The Wilmington high scorers

were Jill Lojek with eight points

and Jackie Eldridge with four.

Good defense by Emily Prall and

Melissa Alonardo caused many

turnovers and kept the Reading

offense in check.

• Congratulations to the filth grade

team from the entire girls'

basketball staff.

A special congratulations to

Rcnce Sbano for winning her

division in the Elks Free Throw

contest.

boys vs. boys.Winners move on to

regional and slate competition. The

shootout has been rescheduled

from January 12 due to the snow

storm.

To Look Your Best...

See us for

TAILORING

and ALTERATIONS

Don't replace your

garments, repair them!

NO JOB TOO BIG OR

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for our on- premises

TAILOR

MEN'S ■ LADIES'

COLONIAL

PARK MALL

35 Lowell St

Wilm. 657-8535

r

TOWN CRIER, JANUARY 16, 1991 .9

Wilmington Recreation Basketball

Alabama edges

Georgia, 22-13

Southeast Division

Alabama 22 Georgia 13

Top scorers for Alabama were

Catherine Townsend and Kclley

Barden with seven points each and

Emily King with six.

Top scorers for Georgia were

Rebecca Rogers with eight points,

Jaclyn Eldridge with four and

Rcnee Sbano with one.

Alabama was too hot to handle in

the big victory over the previously

unbeaten Georgia team. Alicia

Paquin and Katie Nichols sparked

the Crimson Tide, to victory. The

Bulldogs were led by Emily

Gorman and Kristen Kacamburas.

LSU20 Florida State 10

Top scorers for LSU were Karen

MacArthur and Kristen Walsh with

four points each and Megan

Sullivan with two.

Top scorers for Florida State

were Kimbcrly Surprenant with

four points, Karen Hardy and

Lauren Sasso with three points

each.

The Langone sisters, Kristie and

Kara, ignited their team in a big

win over a struggling Florida Slate

team. The Johnson sisters, Julie and

Kimbcrly, got many rebounds for

Florida State in the loss.

Big East

Syracuse 22 BC 11

Top scorers for Syracuse were

Malt Coyne wilh eight points, Peter

Bamberg and Adam DiPasquale

widi six.

.. Top .scorers for EC - were Pat,

Cucinotta with four points and

Mark Rappoli wilh three and

Kenneth Stokes with two.

A strong Syracuse team led by

Jonathan Bamberg and John Belts

defeated a struggling BC team.

Jason Thresher and Bryan Malher

played a great game for Boston

College.

Pittsburgh 30 St. John's 20

Top scorers for Pittsburgh were

Jim O'Donncll wilh 20 points,

Brian LcBlanc and Tom

Southmayd with four each.

Top scorers for St. John's were

Kevin Forgclt wilh nine points,

Darren Arcicro with six and Sean

Cahill with five.

The Smith brothers, Tommy and

Malt, led Pittsburgh to a big win

over St. John's. Chris Ramsdell and

i'tb Garrclt were awesome on the

boards for St. John's.

Villanova 12 Seton Hall 10

Top scorers for Villanova 1 were

Doug Burns with eight points,

Daniel Sweet and Joseph Kane with

two each.

Top scorers for Seton Hall were

Giancarlo Romagnoli with six

points, Andrew Myers and Mark

Boudreau with two each.

Georgetown 22

Providence 12

Top scorers for Georgetown

were Kevin Riley with nine

points.Tim Riley with four and

Derek McLaren wilh three.

Top scorers for Provincetown

were Jason Tildslcy, Chris Maglio

and Marty Tildslcy with four

points each.

Big 10 Conference

Michigan 26 Ohio State 11

Top scorers for Michigan were

Paul Tcntindo with six points,

Mike Pinkham and Mike O'Toolc

with four each.

Top scorers for Ohio State were

Tom Baratla and Paul Cauldwell

with four points each and Rob

Houlc with two.

Michigan routed a hapless Ohio

State club with outstanding

performances by Joel McKenna

and Pat O'Toolc. Jeff Arciero and

271 CAMBRIDGE ST.

BURLINGTON _

(617) 272-7939 ^T

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Jake Alosco of Ohio Stale made key

steals in their effort.

Indiana 22 Minnesota 14

Top scorers for Indiana were

Paul Mahone, Jeff Ricse and Brian

Thresher with six points each.

Top scorers for Minnesota were

Mike Gargan wilh seven points,

Dave Senarian wilh three and Eric

Mehigan with two.

Indiana's Tom Hcigham and

Mike Gianetti led a balanced attack

win their victory over Minnesota.

Malt Kacambura and Alex Webber

of Minnesota played great defense.

Iowa 23 Illinois 11

Top scorers for Iowa were Billy

Harrison with 11 points, Sean

Kerrigan wilh four and Mike

Warford wilh two.

Top scorers for Illinois were

Rory Ballou with six points, Alex

At lianas siou with three and George

Phillips wilh two.

Jim Butler and Mike Kellcy of

Iowa showed great promise in their

win over Illinois. Anthony

Forester and Ryan Mallon of

Illinois grabbed many rebounds.

MSU 18 Northwestrn 12

Top scorers for MSU were Vinny

DiMaura with eight points, Eric

McKenna with six and Scott

Fullerton with four.

Top scorers for Northwestern

were Malt Roux with five points,

Tim Gillis wilh four and Chris

Graves wilh two.

In the defensive gem of the week,

MSU outlasted Northwestern. The

efforts of Craig McLaren and

Chris Burns were the difference

for MSU. Mike Willcox and Brian

Godin hustled all the way for

Northwestern.

Pac-10

Oregon 43 Stanford 40

Top scorers for Oregon were

Jaime Forgett with 19 points, Jen

Pratt with 12 and Nancy Pote with

10.

Top scorers for Sianford were -

Michelle Ciaramaglia with 26

points, Laurie Johnson with eight

and Nicole Ciaramaglia with two.

Jaclyn Harrison, Tracy Sclig and

Heather Scott played an all-around

great game for Oregon. Michelle

White, Kerry Scifio and Kristcn

LaVavasscur pulled down key

rebounds for Stanford.

Washington 42 UCLA 37

Top scorers for Washington were

Lynelte Sbano with 25 points,

Michelle Castronovo with eight

and Angela Caira with four.

Top scorers for UCLA were

Jcnna Neale with 15 points, Lcanne

Harris with 10 and Jackie Hayden

with six. Erin Gilhooly, Deb

Barysky and Erica Solas played an

important role in the victory for

UCLA.

NBA

Lakers 46 Bulls 27

Top scorers for the Lakers were

Tom Zaya, Kevin MacArthur and

Todd Dennis with 11 points each.

Top scorers for the Bulls were

Dan Kivlehan with 10 points, Malt

Penny wilh six and Brian Meads

wilh five.

Buddy Pratt, Jack Warford and

Seung-Kim played great defense

for the Lakers. Mike LaCorcia,

Eric Robbins and Paul Bruno

husded on defense for the Bulls.

Spurs 50 Warriors 45

Top scorers for the Spurs were

Rick Blizzard wilh 13 points, John

MacKinnon with 12 and Derek

Fullerton with six.

Top scorers for the Warriors «

Hoop

(page 10)

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Daniel DiTucci, owner/operator Spencer Cleaners says:

"Don't Be Fooled - There Is a difference between

Professional Dry Cleaning & discount cleaning!"


1 ° TOWN CRIER, JANUARY 16. 1991

Where they stand

MVC Boys' Basketball

Large School

W L

Lowell 6 0

Andover 4 1

Haverhill 5 2

Chelmsford 3 3

Central 3 4

Billerica 0 6

Overall records

Lowell (9-1), Andover (6-3),

Haverhill (6-4), Chelmsford (5-5),

Central (6-5), Billerica (0-8).

SmalfeSchool

W L

Lawrence 6 0

Methucn 3 3

Wildcats 2 4

Dracut 1 6

Kidmen 1 5

Overall records

Lawrence (9-0), Methucn (4-5),

Wildcats (3-7), Dracut (2-8),

Redmen (1-8).

Commonwealth Boys'

Basketball

Large School

W L

Gr. Lawcncc 5 0

Gr. Lowell 5 1

Tyngsboro 4 1

Lynn Tech 4 1

Chelsea 2 3

Overall records

Greater Lawrence (7-2), Grcalcr

Lowell (7-1), Tyngsboro (8-1),

Lynn Tech (8-2), Chelsea (3-4).

Small School

W L

Shawsheen 3 3

Whittier 1 4

Northeast 1 4

Gr. Lowell Catholic 1 5

No. Shore 0 6

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Breakfast

' Overall records

(2-7), Northeast (2-8), Chelsea

Shawsheen (5-3), Whklier (0-9).

(3-4), Jlortheasl (1-8), Greater

MVC Hockey

Lowell Catholic (1-7)

Shore (2-6).

North

Large School

WL T P

MVC Girls' Basketball Billerica . 4 0 0 8

Large School

Central 3 1 0 6

W L Chelmsford 2 2 0 4

Haverhill

Chelmsford

7 1

7 1

Lowell 0

Haverhill 0

2

2

1 1

0 0

Andover 6 2

Small School

Lowell 3 5

W L T P

Billerica 0 8 Wildcats 2 0 2 6

Overall records Redmen 2 0 1 5

Haverhill (9-1), Chelmsford (8-2), Andover 1 1 2 4

Andover (8-2), Lowel (3-5), Mcihucn 1 3 0 2

Billerica (2-8).

Dracut 0 4 0 0

Small School

Commonwealth Hockey

W L

W L T P

Mcihucn 7 1 Shawsheen 4 0 0 8

Redmen 4 4 Northeast

3 1 0 6

Lawrence 3 5 Whittier

2 1 0 4

Dracut 2 6 Pope John

2 1 0 4

Wildcats 1 7 Lynn Tech

1 2 0 2

Overall records

Gr. Lawrence

1 2 0 2

Methucn (8-2), Redmen (4-6), Minutcman 0 0 0

Lawrence (3-7), Dracut (3-7),

MVC Wrestling

Wildcats (1-8).

Large School

Commonwealth

W L T

Girls' Basketball

Lowell 4 0 0

W L Chelmsford 2 0 0

PMA 7 0 Billerica 2 0 0

Tyngsboro 8 1 Central 3 2 0

Lynn Tech 6 1 Haverhill 0 2 1

Gr. Lowell

Small School

Gr. Lawrence H

W L T

Dracut 3 2 1

Shawsheen 2 6 Wildcats 2 2 0

Whittier 2 8

Northeast -

Redmen 1 4 n

2 8 Lawrence

0 1 0

Chelsea 0 8 Methucn 0 3 0

Overall records

Commonwealth Wrestling

PMA (10-0), Tyngsboro (9-1),

W L T

Lynn Tech (8-2), Greater Lowell Greater Lowell 2 0 0

(7-3), Greater Lawrence (5-5), Shawsheen

1 1 0

Shawsheen (3-7), Whittier Tyngsboro

0 0 0

Gr. Lawrence 0 0 0

Whittier

Minutcman

0 0 0

0 1 0 Lawrence

MVC Boys' Track

W L T

rejection

Chelmsford 4. 0 0

Central

3 0 0

Lowell

3 1 0

Andover

2 2 0

Billerica

2' 2 0

Lawrence

1 2 0

Methucn

1 2 0

Redmen

1 2 0

Haverhill

1 3 0

Wildcats

0 4 0

MVC Girls' Track

Large School

W L T

Andover 3 0 0

Lowell

0 0

Chelmsford 2 0

Billerica 1 0

No. Andover ' 1 0

Ipswich 0 0

Masco 0 0

Small School

W L T

Redmen

2 0 0

Methucn

1 0 0

Reading

1 0 0

Haverhill

1 0

Lawrence

1 0

Wilmington Wildcats

Boys' basketball a

. Friday, Jan. 18: Chelmsford at

Wilmington (7:30).

Tuesday, Jan. 22: Dracut at

Wilmington (7:30).

Girls' basketball

Friday, Jan. 18: Wilmington at

Andover (7:30).

Tuesday, Jan. 22: Wilmington

at Dracut (7:30).

Wrestling

Wednesday, Jan. 16: Dracut at

Wilmington (6:30).

Saturday, Jan. 19: Billerica at

Wilmington (12 p.m.).

Wednesday, Jan- .23:

Wilmington at Methucn (6:30).

Hockey

Wednesday, Jan. 16:

Chelmsford at Wilmington

(Ristuccia Expo, 8:15).

Lynnficld

2 0

Wildcats

2 0

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& Daily Speicals

Racquetball

tourney

The Greater Lowell Family

YMCA will hold its' annual

racquetball tournament January

25,26 and 27 at the YMCA.

This tournament is a singles

tournament with divisions for

men's and women's novice,

intermediate and advanced players.

T-shirts will be awarded to the first

24 entrants and awards will be

given to the first and second place

finishers in each division.

Entry forms arc available at the

YMCA. Entry deadline is

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 1991. The

entry fee is $12 per person. Call

Stephen Komanccky for more

information at (508) 454-7825.

Wilmington's Greg Maiella (22) has his shot blocked in the second half against

Lawrence last week. Derrick Stokes (12) watches the play develop. Maiella played a

solid game with 14 points.

Where action is

were Rob Brisbois with 13 points,

Dave Godin with 12 and Joe

Langonc with six.

Greg Johnson, Ryan Lee and Jeff

Chin hustled on defense for the

Spurs. Jim LaCassc, Dave Maglio

and Dennis Godin pulled down key

rebounds for the Warriors.

Pistons 52 Celtics 38

Top scorers for the Pistons were

Dave Oatis with 17 points, Brent

Carbonc with 12 and Brian Gargan

with eight.

Top scorers for the Celtics were

Steve Smith with eight points, Mike

Alonardo and Randy Johnson with

five points each.

Beau .Birmingham, Rich

DcLucia and Rob Bently played an

important role in the victory for

the Pistons. Scott Mackenzie,

Charlie Kacamburas and Paul

FIGHT THE RECESSION!

JT\S-T-R-E-T-C-

!**-

Saturday, Jan. 19:

Wilmington at Central.

Wednesday, Jan. 23:

Haverhill at Wilmington (Ristuccia

Expo, 7:15).

Gymnastics

Friday, Jan. 18: Wilmington

girls at Billqrica (7 p.m.).

Monday, Jan. 21: Wilmington

girls at North Andover (4:30).

Track

Monday, Jan. 21: Haverhill vs

Wilmington boys (Methucn High

School, 4 p.m.).

Tewksbury Redmen

Boys' basketball

Friday, Jan. 18: Billerica at

Tewksbury (7:30). *

Tuesday, Jan. 22: Tewksbury

at Lawrence (7:30).

Girls' basketball

Friday, Jan. 18: Tewksbury at

Billerica (7:30).

Hoop (from page nine)

Ware scored" key hoops for the

Celtics.

Ivy League

Dartmouth 52 Brown 39

Top scorers for Dartmouth were

Dave DcSanlis with 27 points,

Dave Peddle with 16 and Pal

Mallon with five. $

Top scorers for Brown were

Rob Parker with 19 points, Jeff

Driscoll with 10 and Gregg Young

with four.

Steve Holland, Dave Stewart and

Scott Ferguson played aggressive

defense for Brown. Ryan Hoffman,

Dave McLaughlin and Bob Kelley

played an important role in the

victory for Dartmouth.

Columbia 27 Penn 20

Top scorers for Columbia were

Chris Gill with 10 points, Jay

< Early bird special - 1 week delivery

Tuesday, Jan. 2: Lawrence at

Tewksbury (7:30).

Wrestling

Wednesday, Jan. 16:

Tewksbury at Lowell (6:30).

Saturday, Jan. 19: Tewksbury

at Woburn Invitational (10 a.m.).

Wednesday, Jan. 23:

Chelmsford at Tewksbury (6:30).

Hockey

Saturday, Jan. 19: Billerica at

Tewksbury (12 noon).

Wednesday, Jan. 23: Lowell

at Tewksbury (6 p.m.).

Track

Thursday, Jan. 17:

Tewksbury boys vs Billerica

(Lowell High School, 4 p.m.).

Saturday, Jan. 19: Tewksbury

girls at State Coaches Meet (9

a.m.).

Iannachino with eight and Paul

Heighman with six.

Top scorers for Penn were Mark

DiJulia with six points, Mike Caira

with five and Luke Mackic with

four.

Rich Gillis, Gregg LaVasseur

and Dave DePasquale played an

important role in the victory for

Columbia. Mark Trinchera, Rob

Eldridgc and Tom Early played an

inspired game for Penn.

Princeton 46 Yale 27

Top scorers for Princeton were

David Hawley with 19 points, Dan

King with 13 and Dylan Rogers

with six. -

Top scorers for Yale were Kevin

O'Leary with 12 points, Ryan

Hoop

(page 12)

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College Comer

■#

Local duo leads Bentley

After a month off for exams,

holidays and the semester break,

the Bentley College hockey team

will return to action Sunday night,

Jan. 13, with a 7:15 p.m. game at

Quinnipiac College.

Injuries plagued the Falcons

during the first half of the

schedule, which ended with coach

Tom Apprille's cluB sporting a

4-7-l#record.

At least four regulars missed

considerable playing time with

various ailments, but Apprille is

hopeful most will be available

when the season resumes.

Bentley also had problems

maintaining a lead during the first

half of the campaign. In four of the

seven losses, Bentley had the lead at

the end of the first 20 minutes.

Against Skidmore, the Falcons

Jiad a 4-1 lead after the opening

period, but had to settle for a 5-5

tie.

The bright spot for Bentley

vr

during the first 12 games was

senior forward Brian Shechan of

Tewksbury/Central Catholic High

School. The co-captain leads the

EC AC South in scoring with 14

goals and 13 assists for 27 points.

He's climbed from 13th to fifth on

Bentley's all "time scoring list and

needs just four points to reach the

100 career plateau.

Sheehan, who has 45 career

goals, has posted hat tricks against

Si.Michacl's and Tufts and he also

had a four point game against

Villanova.

Bentley's other double figure

scorers are senior co-captain Brian

Femia and sophomore Matt

Kennedy. Femia has six goals and

nine assists for 15 points, while

Kennedy has 12 points (five goals

and seven assists) in the first six

games before being sidelined by

injuries.

Sophomore Ray Mercuri of

Wilmington is second to Sheehan in

goals with seven, including two

against Amherst.

Sophomore Jamie Pastcrnick has

handled the bulk of the goal tending

duties for the Falcons. He's stopped

over 86 percent of the shots he's

faced and is allowing 5.11 goals a

game.

Bentley's first four games of

1991 are away from the team's

home rink, the Watertown Skating

Rink. The Chowder Cup, with

Suffolk, Tufts and Curry joining

the Falcons, will be contested at

Arlington Skating Rink Jan. 19 and

23, and Bentley will play it's first

home game in nearly seven weeks

Jan. 26 against New Hampshire

College.

Bentley Briefs: Bentley has

outscored the opponents 23-14 in

the opening period this season.

However, they've allowed 10 more

goals than they've scored in the

second stanza (17-27) and seven

more in the third (17- 23).

Wild The Wilmington High School basketball cheerleaders react to a wild comeback staged

Comeback bv tnelr ,eam ' n Merrlmack Valley Conference action last week.

Mader ready behind the plate

Still smarting from two one-run

losses to the University of Tampa

in the NCAA South Regional last

year, the Rollins College baseball

team began it's spring workouts

Monday, Jan. 7 with a mission- get

back ato the NCAA II World Series

in June.

Coach Boyd Coffic, who begins

his 20lh season at Rollins

(563-390-6), saw his Tars move to

within two hits of advancing to

Montgomery, Ala. for the second

straight year, lost five veterans

from last year's 38-19 club.

Second Team A#-Americans

Harry Ball (.402/11 HR/14 2B/43

SB) and Mike Lynch (11-4/124

K's/2.47 ERA) are gone as are

Doug Dvorak (.282/8 HR), Darrell

Card (.296/60 hits) and Gary

Roberts (7-4/38's 4.33 ERA).

The top returnee is Carmine

Capuccio, a second team

Ail-American who hit .404, had 17

doubles, eight homers and 91 hits.

Cappucci will be watched heavily

by pro scouts this year along with

opposing coaches. Other veterans

are Jim Barnick (.283 SS), Mike

Cacerc (.291 C), Trey Coffic (fifth

year senior .253), Fred Seymour

(.318 CF) and Chris Madcr of

Tewksbury (JR C).

The Tars open the season

Saturday, Feb. 2 in the first game

of the Orange County Classic with

the University of Central Florida at

1:30 p.m.

The Knights come to Rollins

Sunday, Feb. 3. Rollins will host

the 4th annual baseball week

tournament March 11-16 and

Evansvillc, Wake Forest and

Rhode Island highlight the field.

The Tars open Sunshine State

Conference action Tuesday, March

20 by hosting Florida Southern.

Redmen, Wildcats

s battle for top

The TMHS hockey squad

continues to roll on unbeaten

(6-0-2) behind the play of goalies

Rob McGrath and Bob Ernest.

Last week the Redmen lied the

surprising Wilmington Wildcats,

1-1 before ripping Haverhill, 6-0.

McGrath was the star of both

games, stopping 30 of 31 shots for

the Redmen.

The Wildcats are in first place in

the Small School Division of the

MVC with a 2-0-2 slate and are

3-3-2 overall.

Hockey

(page 12)

NORTH WILMINGTON SHELL

361 Middlesex Ave. (Rte 62) Wilmington

658-9498

HOURS: Mon - Sat 6 a.m. - 11 D.m.; Sun 7 a.m. - 10 D.m.

evenings

5 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Most cars, foreign & domestic

Inspection Stickers Too!

General Auto Repair

• Tune Up

• Brakes (Foreign & Domestic)

■ Exhaust v

• Alignment

(2 & 4 Wheel Alignment)

Wc now have

INSTANT GAME

LOTTERY

TICKETS

Lube, Oil

& Filter

Too busy during the day?

Get your sticker TONIGHT!

CIGARETTES

Lowest Price in Town!

Most Convenient, too!

In & Out Quick -

no parking problems!

0=

TOWN CRIER, JANUARY 16, 1991 ....11

McCline has Wildcat varsity basketball coach Jim McCune signals a play In recent action. McCune

("•its flvino lias llis team P'"y' n £ exciting basketball this season.

Shawsheen Tech swimming programs

The following swimming

programs will be held at

Shawsheen Tech this winter:

Shawsheen swim school:

Instruction is offered every

Monday and Wednesday in half

hour sessions at 3, 3:30,4 and 4:30

p.m. Classes are taught by trained

Shawsheen students under the

direction of a certified Red Cross

water safety instructor. Starting

date is Monday, Feb. 4, eight

lessons; register by phone at

667-21 ll.ext, 126, - ,

Fitness swim: Residents and

people who work in the Shawsheen

area are invited to participate in a

lap swimming program that is

offered Tuesday through Friday at

the following limes: 6 to 7 a.m. and

8 to 9:30 p.m.; running currently;

$18 per person per month, $5 per

month for residents over 65 years

of age. Members may join at the

first session they attend.

Toddler lessons: Tuesday and

Thursday at 8:30, 9 , 9:30 and 10

a.m. toddlers may use the pool with

the help of a Red Cross trained

instructor. Children arc taught

aquatic adjustment, swimming

readiness, and finally actual

swimming strokes. All participants

must be toilet trained. Starts

January 31; $24 for eight lessons;

register by phone at 667-2111

Monday through Friday from 1:10

to 2:10 p.m.

Family swim: Monday through

Friday, from 8 to 9:30 p.m. This

program is for adults and children

accompanied by their parents. The

pool is divided to provide

opportunities for lap swimming,

diving and recreational swimming.

Cost, $18 per month for the

family, $15 for an individual or $2

per swim. Special rate for senior

citizens. Register at the door the

night you wish to swim.

Senior citizens swimming:

Every Wednesday from 10 to 11

a.m. all seniors 50 years of age and

older are invited to use the pool

free of charge. This program runs

during the entire school year, and

is offered free of charge to

qualified residents. Currently

running, seniors may pay at the

door.

Competitive swimming and

diving: Anthony Fiorc and Rick


• 12 TOWN CRIER, JANUARY 16, 1991

Hall of Fame

induction

Saturday

The first Wilmington High

School Athletic Hall of Fame

induction ceremonies is set for this

Saturday, January 19 at the Sons of

Italy Hall.

The committee will induct the

following athletes, coaches and

benefactors.

Robert Foye, "40; Joe Woods,

'40; Gerry O'Reilly, '51; Jeanne

Ashworth, '56; Win" Fairficld, '58;

Rick Froton, '62; Jack Bowen, '62;

Jim Gillis, '63 Joan Cushing

Buckley, '70; Mike Esposito, 71;

Jim Irwin, 71; Joan Bcllissimo

Axclrod, 73;

Rick McCully, 75; Jim Stewart,

77; Janet Zambernardi Nickerson,

79; Gary Hastings, '80; Fred

Bcllissimo, Jan Cassidy, Frank

Kclley, Alice McCarthy, John

Ritchie, Jim Cushing, Larry

Cushing, Sr., Dr. Gerald Fagan,

and George Spanos.

Tickets for the 7:30 p.m.

induction dinner and ceremonies

arc $20.00 per person, and may be

purchased from Committee Chair-

man Al Caira (658-8284) or High

School Principal Paul Fleming

(694-6060).

WELCOME WAGON WANTS TO VISIT YOU

Just engaged? New parent? Moved'' I'd like to

visit you. I'll bring useful gifts, information and

cards you can redeem for more gifts at local

businesses. All free for you.

Call 658-6211

, 9 ££zjr

/ft- ■if

JEANS.HARTKA - rv^^~A

We can arrange • ■ , /- l ~_ .i^'.'.'' i *'"\

a get together in J"v O/^ "/ -" t " — ' -''Tf/fc & 1

your home for a Itf/Wlpi ^Mj?- '

CV'

brief visit.

OLD 'N' GOLD FLEA MARKET

Open Every Sat & Sun - 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Free Admission - Free Parking 17 NEW SHOPS

Best buys from Antiques, Watches, Collectibles, Bar

Accessories, Shoes, Jewelry, Crafts ...

YOU NAME IT! NEW & OLD!

Tewksburv

m0W s

iiiiiliiii

Three function

rooms available

seating from 9 - 900

, people

DEALERS WANTED

Joe Lepordo

Function Coordinator

(Swrwundedui

^legruuxzso unique^

youxguesk will

1830 Main St., Tewksbury

508-640-1005

SPINELLI

INSURANCE

AGENCY, INC.

We will be happy to serve you.

Office hours:

Mon - Fri 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m

362 Middlesex Ave.

Wilmington, MA 01887

(508) 658-5064

A bear around

the backboards

Rec coming events

* , Play gym

The Wilmington Recreation

Department is offering a new

program for children ages four

through grade two, called Play

Gym.

The program will include

tumbling, games, creative

movement, songs and exploration

of physical education equipment.

The class begins Saturday,

February 2 and will meet for six

weeks'. Cost is $25. Register in the

Rec Office between 8:30 a.m. and

4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday

or call 658-4270 for more

information.

Karate and kinderkicks

Registration is now in progress in

the Recreation Office for two

popular programs for children

ages three through adult.

Kinderkicks introduces boys and

girls ages three to grade one to

karate. Karate is a program for

everyone from grade two through

adult. This program helps develop

coordination, character, integrity,

self-discipline and respect for

others.

Both classes meet on Saturday

CARPET REMNANTS

from major mills

HIGH END SUPER PLUSH

1 st QUALITY CARPETS!

Our last load

was Sold Out in

ONE LOW PRICE!

CABINCRAFT 100% Nylon with Safeguard

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your choice of 30 colors your choice of 24 colors

Installed on our best pad

$ 1 B99

Sf yd. ( Compare at $ 1 9 9 % yd

FIRST QUALITY COMMERCIAL CARPET $ 5." yd 12 Colors

Hundreds more!

Too many to

List!!!

12x9

12x12

12x15

12x18

ROBERT'S CARHl

Rose

Blue

Rose

Blue

$119.

$159.

$199.

$239.

CARPET OUTLET

SAVE!

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SAVE!

SAVE!

474MAINST. ST. WILMINGTON

WILMINGTON 658*9694

beginning Saturday, January 19

and meet for six weeks. Cost is $25

for each program. Register in the

Recreation Office al town hall

■ from 8:30 a.m.. to 4:30 p.m.

Monday through Friday.

Atlantic City trip

A few openings still exist for the

February 18, three day trip to

Atlantic City with the Wilmington

Recreation Department.

Accomodations will be at the

fabulous Showboat Hotel. Cost for

transportation, lodging for two

nights, $12 coin bonus, two dinner

coupons, one show, baggage

handling, taxes and escort service

NFL picks

by Mike Smart

As I write this piece, the NiF.L.

has reached its 'version of the Final

Four and the world is on the brink

of war.

Certainly the two games on

Sunday will be considered classic

battles, with dominant aerial

shows, massive ground attacks and

strategic moves.

But on another field these same

tactics will be taking place with

much more at stake than a trip to

' •

Wilmington's Mike Hawley (55) was a bear around both backboards for his team in

MVC action last week. See the story on recent action in this week's Town Crier.

is $140 per person double

occupancy. Call the Rec Office

658-427P to have information sent

to you.

. Cq-ed, vollejtyill

The popular co-ed volleyball

continues on Thursday evenings

from 7 to 9 p.m. at the North

Intermediate Gym through March

28. Cost is $3.00 at the door. It's

informal and a lot of fun.

Discounts

Discounts are available for many

Florida attractions, including

Magic Kingdom, Epcol, MGM

Studio, ScaWorld, Cypress

Gardens, Church Street Station,

Playoffs could be classic

Super Bowl XXV. As we possibly

enter war, the hope is that we back

our soldiers as solidly as we back

our teams.

Buffalo 30 L.A. Raiders 21

The best sign of the week was in

Rich Stadium last Saturday "Bo

don't know snow." It might be

true, but it really won't matter.

Too much Kelly and Reed, and way

too much fan support for the Bills

to falter.

Hockey (from page 11)

Senior Rob MacDonald scored

the tying goal.against Tewksbury

before the WHS' attack shifted into

high gear later in ihc week with a

9-5 rout of Methuen.

Scott Barry was the big gun in the

win over Methuen with two goals

and four assists as the Wildcats

look to knock the favorcd\Redmen

out of the top spot in the Small

School Division.;,

CHANGE YOUR OIL. CHANGE YOUR

FILTER. OR CHANGE YOUR CAR...

An AC Duraguard Oil Filter

and routine maintenance can

MON

thru

help your car last longer.

Special cellulose/synthetic

filter media designed to

trap more dirt and sludge

Helps protect engines

against abrasive engine

wear for up to 15,000 miles*

Available for most

domestic and import

cars and light-

duty trucks cf.^

>

"See your owner's

manual lor

recommended

change

intervals.

Delco

GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION


Wet 'nWild, and Universal Studio.

Stop by the Recreation Office at

town hall to sec if any new

discounts arc available.

' Theatre discounts

The Wilmington Recreation

Department has discount tickets

available for the Showcase

Cinemas, good in Woburn,

Lawrence and Revere. These

tickets arc good Monday through

Thursday only. Call 658-4270 for

details or stop by the Rec Office at

town hall between 8:30 a.m. and

4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

San Francisco 27

N.Y. Giants 17

If the Giants have any hope of

pulling off an upset, it must sack

Joe Montana five times and pick

him off twice. Otherwise, this

might be a laugher.

Last week:

— 3-1 Outright

2-2 vs spread

Hoop

(from page 10)

Rappoli with seven and Brian

Carroll with four.

Colin Sullivan, Mike Giordano

and Matt Hardy played an

all-around great game - for

Princeton. Rob LaVita, Tim

Murphy and Scan Crowley played

aggressive defense for Yale.

jag*

AC-DELCO. IT'S LIKE BUYING TIME.

F & R AUTO SUPPLY

160 Lowell St. (Rte 129) Wilmington 658-5705

i




-

V '

'

. I

«,

\"

. •

TOWN CRIER, JANUARY 16, 1991 13

Wilmington school news MCC international business workshops

West Intermediate School

The next West Intermediate

School PAC meeting will be held

Thursday, January 17 at 7 p.m. in

the school library. All parents are

invited to attend.

Mon., January 21 is the obser-

vance of Martin Luther King's

birthday. There will be no school.

Parents are reminded that marks

close for the second term on

Thursday, January 24. Report

cards will be sent home on

• February 6. .

Wednesday, January 30 will be an

early dismissal for students to

allow teachers to attend work-

shops. Lunch will be served on that

day. Students will be dismissed at

11:30 a.m.

Sixth grade art classes and the

Library/Media center are partici-

pating in a cooperative program

for sixth grade students. Mr. Ro-

berts and Mrs. Mott are directing

this project which includes seeking

information and using it in indivi-

dual creative projects.

The purpose of the program is to

give the students experience in

finding country information and

translating it into a travel poster

made by each student. The student

will ultimately have experience in

logo design and lettering, plus the

creative experience of illustrating a

popular symbol or scene from the

country of their choice.

Students must use the school

library first and seek information

on their individual countries by

using the card catalog to seek

books, the magazine indpft to find

magazine articles with illustra-

tions, and vertical file folders to

find consular material with pic-

tures from foreign lands.

The vertical file has been

developed in the library only

during the last few years. Its

availability will prepare the

students for high school as the high

school media center has an

extensive vertical file system.

New student volunteersjn the

library are Melissa Ings and

Stephanie Poloian. Stephanie is Ihe

periodical and serials clerk. She

keeps track of items that arrive

daily and need to be entered in the

record. Melissa is an exceptional

"Jacqueline of all trades." She

single handedly cleared the confe-

rence room of materials and furni-

ture that were needed elsewhere in

the building. She also inventories

the filmstrip collection and has

been instrumental in straightening

this collection.

The book fair is being presented

this year by Crates and Books of

Melrose. Michelle Castronovo, Jen

Benton, Kristina Leverone, Jill

Branley, and Jennifer Fantigrossi

were clerks in charge of the

counter during this book fair. They

handled the monetary transactions,

kept the sale items in proper order,

and assisted the student patrons in

placing their orders.

North Intermediate School

The North Intermediate School

has announced its students of the

month: In grade six, Shannon

Lyman and Doug Bonarrigo; grade

seven, Chris Rogers and Ryan

Hoffman; grade eight, Pat Rufo

TOWN OF TEWKSBLRY

CONSERVATION

COMMISSION

LEGAL NOTICE »

PUBLIC HEARING

Tewksbury Housing Authority,

of Tewksbury, Mass., having submitted

a notice of intent to remove, fill, dredge

or alter a marsh, swamp, bank, beach,

dune or flat bordering an existing creek,

river, stream, pond or lake or land under

said waters or land subject to flooding,

the sai(J land & located at the Carnation

Dr. Complex to the manhole on Main St.,

according to a plan by Morgenroth &

Associates, Inc. Dated Nov. 19, 1990, a

copy of the notice of intent and proposed

plans having been filed with the

Tewksbury Conservation Commission;

therefore, notice is hereby given that a

_v public hearing will be held by said

\ Conservation Commission at the D.P.W.

Building, 999 Whipple Rd.. in the

Planning Board office on Wednesday,

Jan. 23. 1991, at 7:10 P.M. in

accordance with the provisions of

General Laws, Chapter 131, section 40,

as amended.

William D. HaUisjy

J16 Chaiiman

and Jen Hayes; specialist, Tim

Murphy and Julie Stokes.

Each of these students has been

chosen for his/her pleasant attitude,

cooperative nature, helpful attitude

and diligent work ethic.

The North Intermediate Student

Council was busy sharing the

holiday spirit during the past

Christmas season. They organized

and conducted a dance for sixth,

seventh and eighth grade students

on December 14. Profits from the

dance were donated to the New

England Pediatrics Care. Mr. Bir-

mingham, student council advisor,

thanks the following adults For

assisting him in chaperoning this

event: Mrs. Merlino, Mrs. Pent-

tinen, Mr. Mirisola, Mr. Tikonoff,

Mrs. Blowers and Mrs. Trevisone.

The student council, together

with the North Intermediate Cho-

rus and the West Intermediate

Chorus, toured and sang to the

patients of the following places:

The Hawthorne Center of Danvers

State Hospital, the John T. Berry

Center, and the Wilmington Woods

Nursing Home. Mr. Birmingham

thanks Mr. Joseph Plassman, the

chorus director, in assisting him in

conducting this event.

Wildwood School

The Wildwood School PAC

sponsored pancake breakfast which

was to be Held Saturday, Jan. 12,

has been rescheduled for January

19 due to thk weather. The Pac will

gladly refuniK money to ticket-

holders unable tdiiltend.

Megan Lojek, a fourth grader in

Miss Kelley's class, received a $50

Savings Bond for her second place

finish in the Reading Municipal

Light Poster Contest. This presen-

tation took place Tuesday, Jan. 15

at the Reading Town Hall.

The Wildwood-PAC sponsored

the presentation, Stories Around

the World, by the New England

Touring Theatre. It was on Mon-

day, Jan. 7 for the entire student

body. The program included a

fable, folktale, tall talc, a legend

and a just-so story by Rudyard

Kipling.

The "Reading Around the

World" program is progressing

well. Children have been enthu-

siastic in improving their reading

for independence. Most classrooms

have traveled to their third or

fourth destination on their journey

around the world.

The school is seeking volunteers

to come to the school and read to a

class or small group. If interested,

contact Mrs. Keeler, reading

specialist at 694-6010.

Dates worth noting:

Jan. 21, schools closed, Martin

Luther King Day; Jan. 28, Kin-

dergarten switch over. AM session

for the first half of the year will

attend the PM session beginning on

this date. Those students who

attended the PM session thus far,

will now attend the AM session.

This applies only to Mrs. Morano's

kindergarten classes. Jan. 30,

Inservice workshop for teachers -

schools dismissed at noon.

The New England Touring

Theatre was at the school on

Monday. All the children had a

good time.

REWARD

Lost 12/19/90 in the vicinity of

Woburn & Lowell Streets in

Wilmington. Male, approx 55-

65 lbs, black and brown, an-

swers to the name "Bernie",

wearing white flea collar.

Please call (508) 658-0008

after 3 p.m.

COMMONWEALTH OF

MASSACHUSETTS

LAND COURT

DEPARTMENT OF

THE TRIAL COURT

(SEAL) Case No. 155520

To: Laura Murphy also known as

Laura M. Murnhy; and to all persons

entitled to the benefit of the Soldiers' and

Sailors' Civil Relief Act of 1940 as

amended:

Pension Nominee Corp. claiming

to be the holder of a mortgage covering

real property in Wilmington numbered 59

Wildwood Street given by Laura Murphy

also known as Laura M. Murphy to

Plaintiff dated August 2, 1990 recorded

with the Middlesex County (Northern

District) Registry of Deeds at Book 5295

Page 232 has filed with said court a

complaint for authority to foreclose said

mortgage in the manner following: by

entry and possession and exercise of

power of sale.

If you are entitled to the benefits of the

Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act of

1940 as amended and you object to such

foreclosure you or your attorney should

file a written appearance and answer in

said court at Boston on or before the 18th

day of February 1991, or you may be

forever barred from claiming that such

foreclosure is invalid under said act.

Witness, JOHN E. FENTON JR. Chief

Justice of said Court this 3rd day of

January 1991. Charles W. Trombly, Jr.

J16 Recorder

Woburn Street School

The Woburn Street School PAC

held its monthly meeting this past

Tuesday. Mrs. Brenda Horan,

director of reading K-12 and

language arts was guest speaker.

She touched on the various reading

tests students take throughout the

year. Parents in attendance enjoyed

a tour of the school's gym to view

the completed art work. Many

thanks to physical education tea-

cher Sue Hendee for her imagina-

tive and enthusiastic ideas and the

PAC for funding this project.

Second graders at the Woburn

Street School are excited in

anticipation of their January 29

field trip to the New England

Aquarium.

Many thanks to all the parents and

students who have been partici-

pating in the bottle drive. This has

been a successful playground

fundraiser and is still in effect.

Your dedication is appreciated and

*we ask that you keep those bottles

coming! There will be more

fundraiser information sent home

in the near future. Your continued

support is greatly needed.

Important dates to remember:

Thurs., Jan. 24, kindergarten con-


'■-I ■• ■-' i- ' i'.' ^^^^^^mm^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^mmmmmmmmmm mmm

1 * TOWN CRIER, JANUARY 16, 1991

yC\ PLUMBING

^ HEATING

REASONABLE RATES

FREE ESTIMATES.

EXCELLENT WORK

Call PAUL

Master £LC W T WEO

Lie. #8588057-7758

RJN HEATING SERVICE

Factory Authorized

• Service • Sales

Installations on most makes 01

OIL BURNERS

WATER HEATERS

BOILERS and FURNACES

|0// Burners Cleaned and Tuned

24 Hour Emergency Service *

658-8700

CHARLIE'S

AUTO BODY

611 MAIN ST., WILMINGTON I

Frame Straightening

Major Collision Work

Windshields Fiberglass Botiies

Wrecker Service

658-5360

BLUE TEMP

HEATING & COOLING

Boilers • Air Conditioning

Furnaces • Oil Burners

Water Heaters

Duct & Pipe Systems

Installed & Serviced

658-8578

SHAWSHEEN PLUMBING

& HEATING CORP.

NEW - REMODELING - REPAIRS

AIRFF TA. SALERA MASS. LIC. #6811 658"61 1 8

Wright Electric Co.

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS ' QUALITY ELECTRICAL

INSTALLATIONS

057-71-95 Wilmington CUSTOM *ALARM SYSTEMS

fPARKER'S

ELECTRIC SERVICE

625 South St

Tewksbury, MA 01876

Master Lie. No. A8205

Telephone

(508) 658-6301

QUALITY WORK YOU CAN AFFORD

ROBERT FRANCIS

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Gravel • Loam • Fill • Sand

Septic Sand

Bulldozer, Backhoe and Loader Rental

Snowplowing • Demolition • Lowbed Service

COMPLETE SITE & UTILITIES WORK

Office (508) 657-4145

Res. (508) 373-0425

856 Woburn St.

Wilmington, MA 01887

REAL ESTATE BROKER

NOTARY PUBLIC

PAUL K. BUTT

HONEST WILMINGTON, MASS.

ESTIMATES

658-3716

BUILDER - DEVELOPER

CUSTOM HOMES BUILT, ADDITIONS AND GARAGES

FAMILY ROOMS - BACK HOE RENTAL

Fair prices & expert craftsmanship

Member: Wilmington Chamber of Commerce

*

D&D

Bathrooms, Kitchens, Formica

Tile Work, Decks, Additions

General Repair

HARVEY REPLACEMENT WINDOWS

FINISH WORK OUR SPECIALTY

Residential & Commercial Insurance

Estimates Available

Fully Licensed and Insured

FREE ESTIMATES

(508)657-7912

***

*** NO JOB TOO SMALL

—^——

SCREENED

LOAM

CALL

475-8153

DELOURY

fODD JOBSA

PAINTING • REPAIR

RENOVATION

Steve 658-8265

Gutters

Cleaned

Any House

APP EXTERMINATING

We Kill All Pests

Fully licensed and insured

Professionals at your service

1(508) 694-6702 • 657-7596

■ 1(617) 938-8690

after 6 p.m.

A Division of Ed/Wood Tree

Do you need snow removed

from you walk or driveway?

Or is a small repair or

cleanup of your house or

garage what you need?

NATURAL GRASS

MOWING / TRIMMING / PLANTING / HANDYMAN

658-5821 Dennis P. Hewett, Sr.

CLEAN - UPS

Mowing - Mulching - Sod

Creative Landscaping

Railroad Tie Walls

Much More

658-8224 call 658-6239

' FREE ESTIMATES

sS*

LOAM

TOP QUALITY MATERIAL

SCREENED: $14/ yard (free del. 5 yds & over)

Also: n " & gravel available

Dozer, drainage, pipeline, sewer, demolition and disposal, stumps

removed, pools removed and backfilled.

E.L. HUPPER & SONS

(SOS! 359-4Q02

VINYL & ALUMINUM SIDING

Complete Trim Coverage

• Additions • Doors - Windows • Porches

• Masonry • Roofs ^^ • Kitchens / Bathrooms

Fully Insured fll

Licensed ALCDA

ALUMINUM AGE, INC.

(508) 664-5475 (508) 658-8462

C.A. CUSHING, INC.

POURED FOUNDATIONS - FLOORS

REINFORCING

Business: 485 Main St. Rear, Wilmington, MA 01887

657-7566

SHEA

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REPLACE YOUR OLD STAIRS

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773 Salem St., Route 62

No. Wilmington, Mass. 01887

Tel. (508) 658-2645

Fax (508) 658-0541

TOLL FREE WITHIN MA 800-696-SHEA

W

James White, Jr.

Carpenter

General remodeling

Kitchens - Bathrooms

Playrooms - Porches

69 West St., Wilmington

658 - 3141

WWWWWifW

MARK'S

DOG GROOMING

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TOWN OFTEWKSBURY

BOARD OF HEALTH .

_■ Regulations Concerning

the Employment of

X ..-- Outside Consultants

I 1.0 PURPOSE

', 1.1. The Tewksbury Board of Health is

■, responsible for the protection of the

\ Public Health and Welfare in the Town of

i Tcwksbury. In an effort to protect the

,' public, the following regulations are

promulgated to allow the hiring of

♦' special consultants by the Board of

i rHealth to review certain proposals before

1.1 them.

»> 2.0. AUTHORITY

ft 1 2.1. These regulations are adopted

* under the authority of M.G.L. Chapter

111. Sections 31 and 150A. and M.G.L.

Chapter 44, Section 53G.

3.0. DEFINITIONS

3.1. BOARD shall mean the

Tcwksbury Board of Health.

3.2. COMMONWEALTH shall mean

* the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

^ 3.3. DIRECTOR shall mean the

Director of Public Health, appointed by

I the Tewksbury Board of Health.

, 3.4.TOWN shall mean the Town of

Tewksbury, MA.

4.0. APPLICABILITY

i 4.1. These regulations shall apply to the

j following situations:

A. Proposed septic systems exceeding a

daily flow of 2,000 gallons per lot per

day as determined by criteria set forth in

310 CMR 15.00, Title V of the State

.Environmental Code.

« B. Proposed developments, residential

or commercial, requiring a Site Plan

Special Permit, a Cluster Development

Special Permit, or a Multiple Family

Special Permit from the Planning Board.

C. Proposals requiring a Site

""Assignment from the Board, including,

bat not limited tocM.G.L. Chapter 111,

Sections 143, 150A, 150B.or 151.

D. Proposals concerning Waste Water

Treatment Plants, Private Sewage

Treatment Facilities (Package Treatment

Plants), coal burning plants, hazardous

waste incinerators, or any other facility

• that, in the opinion of the Board, has the

. potential of threatening the health, safety,

or well being of the general public.

5.0. PROCEDURES FOR

PUBLIC HEARING

5.1. Upon receipt of any proposal

listed in Regulation 4.O., the Director

shall determine if the Board should hold a

public hearing on it. Those proposals

listed in Regulation 4.1.B shall go to the

Board for review only if the Director or a

Board member deem it necessary.*

5.2. Those proposals listed in

Regulation 4.1.C and 4.1.D shall require

a public hearing before the Board. Where

applicable, said hearing shall be held in

accordance with the procedures

established by slate laws and regulations.

5.3. When no other state law or

■ regulation provides guidelines for the

public hearing, the following procedure

• shall be followed:

A. The applicant shall request a public

y hearing before the Board in writing.

•' Upon receipt of the written request, the

I Director shall place the matter on the

, Board's next available meeting agenda,

'-' but in no case shall the matter be heard

j before a two week waiting period, to be

counted from the day of filing.

B. The applicant shall, at no cost to the

Town, notify all abuttors within 150 feet

■ of the subject property, by Certified Mail

Return Receipt Requested, of the said

hearing.

C. The applicant shall place a legal

advertisement in a newspaper. Said

I advertisement shall be worded by the

Director, and shall be published at least

five days prior to the date of the hearing.

D. The Director may require that the

applicant submit certain information with

the application for the hearing. Said

information may include, but not be

h limited to, the information requested in

M.G.L. Chapter 111 section 150A 1/2.

, E. The Board shall conduct the public.

| hearing and shall accept written and oral

testimony from all concerned persons.

I The Board may close or continue to a

• later date said hearing at any time they

• deem appropriate.

E. The Board shall have up to 60 days

I from the closing of the hearing to issue a

decision, unless the Board determines

that more time is required to adequately

review the proposal, or the applicant

I requests an extension. Said decision shall

• be issued at an open meeting of the

' Board. .

5.4. The Board may require that the

v applicant pay a fee when submitting an

application for a hearing. Said fee shall be

set by the Board annually.

6.0. SELECTION AND

FUNDING OF A CONSULTANT

6.1. The Board shall have the authority

to require that the applicant seeking

approval of a project listed in Regulation

4.0. provide funding for the hiring of an

outside consultant, if one of the following

conditions exists:

A. Town staff are unable to adequately

review the proposal due to time

constraints.

B. A particular field of expertise is

required to adequately review the project

and advise the Board.

6.2. The Board may require the

applicant to deposit up to $20,000 in a

special account to pay for the hiringNjf an

outside consultant (see Regulation 7.O.).

6.3. The consultant shall be selected by

the Board in accordance with the bidding

procedures outlined in M.G.L. Chapter

30B and any guidelines developed under

it. Said consultant shalfhave either an

educational degree in or related to the

field at issue, or three or more years of

practice in the field at issue or a related

field.

7.0. ESTABLISHMENT OF

SPECIAL ACCOUNT

7.1. Whenever the Board requires that

an applicant provide funding for the

hiring of an independent consultant, the

funds shall be deposited into a special

account held by the Town Treasurer.

7.2. Said special account, including any

accrued interest, shall be expended by the

Board only in connection with its

responsibilities under these regulations.

7.3. Any excess funds in the account

attributable to a specific project, including

interest, shall be repaid to the applicant or

to the applicant's successor in interest and

a final report shall be made to the

applicant or to the applicant's successor

in interest.

7.4. The Town auditor shall submit

annually a report of the special account to

the Board of Selectmen, the Town

Manager, and the Director of the Bureau

of Accounts, and shall have it published

in the Annual Town Report.

8.0. APPEAL

8.1. Any party aggrieved with the

selection of the outside consultant shall

have the opportunity to appeal it to the

Board of Selectmen. Said appeal must be

filed with the Board of Selectmen within

seven days of the decision of the Board to

hire a 'specific consultant.

8.2. The grounds for said appeal shall

be limited to the following:

A. The consultant selected has a conflict

of interest in the issue, OR

B. The consultant does not possess the

minimum required qualifications.

8.3. The required time limits for action

upon an application before the Board

shall be extended by the duration of the

appeal.

8.4. If the Board of Selectmen fails to

make a decisiorton the appeal within one

month of the filing of the appeal, the

selection of the consultant shall stand.

8.5. Appeal of the decision of the

Board of Selectmen concerning the

applicant's appeal shall be to a court of

competent jurisdiction in the Common-

wealth on the grounds provided for in

Regulation 8.2.

9.0. VARIANCE

9.1. The Board may vary these

regulations when the applicant shows the

following:

A. The strict application of these

regulations would result in manifest

injustice.

B. The proposal does not pose a threat

to the public health, safety, or welfare.

9.2. When seeking a variance from

these regulations, a request for a public

hearing shall be in writing. The public

hearing shall be held in accordance with

the procedures outlined in Regulation

5.0.

10.0. PENALTIES

10.1. Failure to comply with any of

these regulations shall result in a negative

decision concerning the proposal.

10.2. Failure to comply with these

regulations may result in the suspension

or revocation of any permits or licenses

issued by the Board.

11.0. SEVERABILITY

11.1. If any provision of these

regulations is declared invalid or not

enforceable, the other provisions shall not

be affected thereby, but shall continue in

full force and effect.

ADOPTED JANUARY 8.1991

William Lindsey, Chairman

Dr. Donald Miller, Vice Chairman

J16 Alan Dunlcvy, Clerk

MORTGAGEE'S SALE

OF REAL ESTATE

By virtue and in execution of the Power

of Sale contained in a certain mortgage

given by Chester C. Sullivan to The

Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank,

dated July 31, 1987, and recorded in

Middlesex County (Northern District)

Registry of Deeds, Book 4181, Page

292, of which mortgage the undersigned

is the present holder, for breach of

conditions of said mortgage and for the

purpose of foreclosing same, will be sold

at public auction on February 14, 1991,

at 2:00 o'clock p.m., on the mortgaged

premises located at Unit 192,192 Patrick

Road, Tcwksbury, Massachusetts, all

and singular, the premises described in

said mortgage as follows:

"The Unit known as Unit 192, Building

21, Phase 3 in the CARTER GREEN II

CONDOMINIUM, of Tewksbury.

Middlesex County, Massachusetts, a

condominium established by the Grantor

pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws,

Chapter 183A, by a Master Deed dated

October 7, 1985, and recorded on

October 7, 1985, in the Middlesex North

District Registry of Deeds in Book 3204,

Page 152.

The Unit is conveyed together with an

appurtenant 0.8333 percent individual

interest in the Common Areas and

Facilities of the Condominium and the

exclusive right and easement to use

certain Common Areas and Facilities as

set forth in the Master Deed.

Said Unit is to be used for residential

purposes only.

The Unit is conveyed also together with

a appurtenant membership in the

CARTER GREEN II CONDOMINIUM

ASSOCIATION, as set forth in the

Master Deed.

The said premises are conveyed subject

to and with the benefit of the following:

(a) The provisions of Massachusetts

General Laws, Chapter 183A as the same

may now or hereafter be amended;

(b) The Master Deed and any

amendments thereto;

(c) The Bylaws of the CARTER

GREEN II CONDOMINIUM ASSOC-

IATION, any amendments to the same,

and any rules and regulations adopted

from time to time pursuant thereto, and all

matters of record, stated or referred to in

the MASTER DEED, as completely as if

each were fully set forth herein; and

(d) Further subject to real estate taxes

attributable to said Unit for the current

year as arc not now due and payable.

The Unit referred to above is laid out as

shown on the Unit Plan attached hereto,

which is a copy of a portion of the plans

filed with the MASTER DEED and to

which is affixed a verified statement in

the form provided in Massachusetts

General Laws, Chapter 183A, Section 9

and said unit contains the area shown on

said plan attached hereto and recorded

herewith."

For Mortgagors-title sec deed recorded

Middlesex North District Registry of

Deeds herewith."

Said premises will be sold subject to all

unpaid taxes, outstanding tax titles,

federal or municipal liens or assessments,

tenancies, condominium liens, if any.

Terms of Sale: Five Thousand Dollars

($5,000.00) will be required to be paid in

cash or by certified check by the

purchaser at the time and place of sale as

earnest money. The balance is to be paid

in cash or by certified check within

twenty (20) days thereafter to be

deposited in escrow with Attorney James

A. Hall, at 35 Paige Street, Lowell,

Massachusetts, pending approval of the

sale by the Land Court. Deed is to be

taken within ten (10) days from the dale

of approval of said sale by the Land

Court. Purchaser will be responsible for

state documentary transfer stamps. Other

terms, if anv, to be announced at the sale.

' THE LOWELL FIVE CENT

SAVINGS BANK

Present Holder of said Mortgage,

by Robert A. Caruso

J16. 23,30 St. Vice President

MORTGAGEES SALE

OF REAL ESTATE

By virtue and in execution of the Power

of Sale contained in a certain mortgage

given by John K. Campbell and

Dawn F. Campbell to Citicorp

Mortgage, Inc. dated September 30,

1988, and recorded with the Middlesex

County (Northern District) Registry of

Deeds in Book 4673. Page 312, of which

mortgage the undersigned is the present

holder, for breach of the conditions of

said mortgage and for the purpose of

foreclosing the same will be sold at public

auction at 12:00 p.m. on the 30th day of

January, 1991, on the premises now

known and numbered as 4 St. Paul

Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts, all

and singular the premises described in

said mortgage,

Towic

The land with the buildings thereon

situated in Wilmington, in Middlesex

County, Massachusetts, on St. Paul

Street, and being Lots numbered 97 and

98, on a Plan known as Pine Grove Park

and recorded with Middlesex North

District Registry of Deeds; Book of Plans

26, Plan 25, and bounded and described

as follows:

NORTHWESTERLY by St. Paul

Street, as shown on said plan, fifty (50)

feet; ,

NORTHEASTERLY by Lot 96, as

shown on said plan, one hundred (100)

feet;

SOUTHEASTERLY by Lots 105 and

106, as shown on said plan, fifty (50)

feet;

SOUTHWESTERLY by Lot 99, as

shown on said plan, one hundred (100)

feet.

Containing, according to said plan,

5000 square feet, more or less, or

however otherwise said premises may be

bounded, measured or described.

Fqr title, see deed of Jeffrey C. Steuart

and" Mary E. Steuart dated September 30,

1988 and recorded with said Deeds in

Book 4073, Page 311.

The above-described premises shall

also be sold subject to, and with the

benefit of, all restrictions, easements,

rights of others, unpaid taxes,

outstanding tax titles, assessments, liens

or claims in the nature of liens, municipal

liens, and existing encumbrances of

record created prior to the mortgage, if

any there be.

Terms of Sale: The amount of Five

Thousand and no/100 ($5,000.00)

Dollars is to be paid in cash or certified

and/or cashier's check by the purchaser at

the time and place of sale. The balance of

the purchase price is to be paid upon

delivery of the deed within twenty (20)

days of the date of sale. Other terms, if

any, shall be announced at the sale.

Dated December 31,1990

Signed: Citicorp Mortgage, Inc..

Mortgagee/Assignee and

Present Holder

By its attorney,

Scott M. Jamieson

Warner & Stackpole

75 State Street

Boston, Massachusetts 02109

J9.16.23 (617)951-9000

TOWN OF WILMINGTON

9b

PLANNING BOARD

NOTICE OF

PUBLIC HEARING

In accordance with the provisions of

Chapter 41, Sections 81-T and 81-U.

M.G.L., the Wilmington Planning Board

will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday,

February 5. 1991 at 8:00 P.M. in the

Auditorium of the Wilmington Town

Hall, 121 Glen Road, Wilmington, MA

on the application of Holly Realty

Trust, Ralph E. Newhouse,

Trustee, 299 Main Street, Wilmington,

MA, concerning the revised Definitive

Subdivision Plan known as "Carter

Estates Revised Definitive Subdivision

Plan, Wilmington, MA," Holly Realty

Trust, Ralph E. Newhouse, Trustee, 299

Main Street, Wilmington, MA, K.J.

Miller Company, Inc., Civil Engineers &

Land Surveyors, 106 West Street,

Wilmington, MA 01887, Dated:

December 18, 1990, Scale 1"=40',

located on Henry L. Drive, shown on

Assessors Map 59, Parcels 14, 15 and

part of 16. The revision of this

Subdivision is limited to a change of the

boundary, to create Lots A, B and C,

only.

A copy of the plan and application are

on file at the Planning Board's Office and

may be inspected during the hours of

8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through

Friday.

Any person interested, or wishing to be

heard should appear at the time and place

designated.

David J. Clark, Chairman

J9.16 Wilmington Planning Board

TOWN OF TEWKSBURY

Invitation for Bids

One (1) Screen Processing

Plant (Used or New)

The Town of Tewksbury, through it's

Town Manager is accepting Bids for a

"Screen Processing Plant" (Used or

New).

Specifications for bidding may be

obtained from the Tewksbury Department

of Public Works, 999 Whipple Road,

Tewksbury, MA at the^officc of the

Superintendent of Public Works during

the normal hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30

p.m. Monday through Friday. Bids must

be submitted no later than 4:00 p.m. on

Friday, January 25, 1991 at which time

bids will be opened and read.

The Town Manager reserves the right to

reject any and all proposals, wholly and

in part and to accept any bid or part

thereof deemed to be in the best interest

of the Town.

By: William R. Burris, Jr.

Superintendent of Public Works

For: David G. Cressman

J9.16 Town Manager

TOWN OF WILMINGTON-

CONSERVATION

COMMISSION

PUBLIC MEETING

Notice is hereby given that a Public

Meeting will bs held in the Town Hall,

Room 9, 121 Glen Road, Wilmington

MA 01887 on Wednesday, January 23.

1991 at 8:30 P.M. in compliance with the

provisions of MA G.L. Chapter 131,

Section 40, as amended on the Request

for determination of Applicability filed by

Mark Nelson, Sixth Realty Trust,

16 Dorchester St., Wilmington, MA

applicant and Mi*. Jay Tighe, 117 Glen

Rd., Wilmington, MA and Town of

Wilmington, Town Hall, Wilmington,

MA property owners, for permission to

construct a 1036 linear ft., 8" gravity

sewer line within the confines of Third

Avc. Right-Of-Way from Edgcworth

Street to the existing sewer manhole,

Shawshccn River Estates. Approximately

340 linear ft. of sewer line construction

will occur within the Buffer Zone

(according to the applicant), hs designated

in tlie MA Wetland, Protection Act, 310

C.M.R., Mass Chapter 131, section 40,

as aiiicidcd on land i-howii on Assessors

Map 11, Third Avc., R.O.W.

Wilmington, MA 01S87. Plan and

application may be viewed during normal

office hours ir by appointment at the

Conservation Office, Room 6.

Dennis P. Puitrino, Chairman

J16 Conservation Commission

TOWN OF TEWKSBURY

PLANNING BOARD

LEGAL NOTICE

PUBLIC HEARING

In accordance with MGL Chapter 40A,

Section 5, notice is hereby given that the

Tcwksbury Planning Board will hold a

public hearing on Monday, February 11,

1991 at 7:15 P.M., in the Planning Board

office, 999 Whipple Road, Tewksbury,

MA 01876, to consider the following

proposed amendment to the Zoning

Bylaw;,. , , , . : -

To see if the Town will vote to amend

the Tewksbury Zoning Bylaws Section 2,

Definitions, as follows:

DELETE: Special Permit Granting

Authority: The authority to grant Special

Permits, which shall be the Board of

Appeals unless some other Board is so

designated'in these Bylaws.

ADD: Special' Permit Granting

Authority: The'authority to grant Special

Pernttisr which shall be the Planning

Board unless some other Board is so

designated in these Bylaws.

Or lake any other action relative thereto.

Copies of the petition may be viewed

Monday through Friday, 8:30 A.M. to

4:30 P.M. at the office of the Tewksbury

Planning Board, 999 Whipple Road,

Tcwksbury, MA 01876. '

Petition submitted by the Tewksbury

Planning Board.

Robert P. Sullivan, Chairman

J9.16 Planning Board

r



i

TOWN CRIER, JANUARY 16, 1991.

COMMONWEALTH OF

MASSACHUSETTS

LAND COURT

DEPARTMENT OF THE

TRIAL COURT

CASE NO. 33952-S199012A

(SEAL)

Eric E. Murray, Trustee

Plaintiff,

Vs.

David M. Sheehan - Eric E.

Murray, Bay Bank Merrimack

Valley, N.A., Bank of New

England, N.A., E.A. Fraser

Electric Co., Inc.

Defendants,

TO: Eric E. Murray, Trustee of the

Northlake Realty Trust, David M.

Sheehan of Andover, Baybank

Merrimack Valley, N.A., of Andover,

Bank of New England N.A. of Lowell, .

E.A. Fraser Electric Co., Inc. of

Tewksbury.

You are hereby notified that a complaint

has been filed by the above named

plaintiff in which you are named as an

interested party.

This complaint concerns an action to

clear the title to a certain parcel of land in

Tcwksbury in the County of Middlesex,

and said Commonwealth. David M.

Sheehan gave a mortgage to Butler Bank

dated May 31, 1990 recorded at

Middlesex North as Document No.

130046 noted on Certificate of Title No.

29152. Plaintiff is grantee in a

foreclosure deed registered as Document

No. 133937 noted on Certificate of Title

No. 29152. Said foreclosure

proceedings, were conducted without

compliance with the Soldiers' and

Sailors' Civil Relief Act of 1940, as

amended. Plaintiff alleges that none of the

defendants were in the military service

and entitled to the benefits of said act.

This complaint may be examined at the

Land Court, Boston, Massachusetts, or a

copy obtained from plaintiffs attorney.

If you intend to make any defense, you

are hereby required to serve upon

plaintiffs attorney, John K. Leslie, whose

address is 3 Courthouse Lane Unit 4,

Chclmsford, MA 01824, an answer to the

complaint on or before the 25th day of

February the return day hereof and a copy

hereof must be filed in this Court on or

before said day.

If you fail to do so, judgment by default

will be taken against you for the relief

demanded in the complaint. Unless

otherwise provided by Rule 13(a), your

answer must state as a counterclaim any

claim which you may have against the

plaintiff which arises out of the

transaction or occurrence that is the

subject matter of the plaintiffs claim or

you will thereafter be barred from making

such claim in any other action.

It is ORDIvRHD: that notice be given by

publishing a copy of this order one time

in the Town Crier, a newspaper

published in said Tcwksbury, one month

at least before the 25th day of February

1991.

Witness, JOHN E. FF.NTON, JR..

CHIEF JUSTICE, of our Land Court,

this 4th day of January 1991.

A True Copy Attest

Charles W. Trombly, Jr.

J16 Recorder

.15

COMMONWEALTH OF

- MASSACHUSETTS

LAND COURT

DEPARTMENT OF

THE TRIAL COURT

(SEAL)

Middlesex, si.

Civil Action

No. 146124

Jacqueline Doucette, Plaintiffs)

vs.

Arthur M. White, et als, Defend-

ants)

TO: Arthur M. White and Jessie Ray

White, both deceased, formerly of.

"Wilmington, Middlesex County, and said

Commonwealth; their heirs, devisees or

legal representatives

You are hereby notified that a complaint

has been filed by the above-named

plainuff(s) in which you are named as an

interested party. This complaint concerns:

A cloud on the plaintiffs title to a

certain parcel of land on Dewcy Avenue

in Wilmington, Middlesex County, and

said Commonwealth, being more

particularly described in a deed from

Suburban Land Company, Inc., to Arthur

M. White, dated March 11. 1924 and

recorded with Middlesex North District

Registry of Deeds in Book 703, Page

- 321; the plaintiff alleges that she has

established her title by adverse

possession against the defendants, their

heirs, devisees or legal representatives;

and seeks a judgment to that effect.

This complaint may be examined at the

Land Court, Boston, Massachusetts, or a

copy obtained from plaintiff(s) attorney.

If you intend to make any defense, you

are hereby reqnircd to serve upon

flaintiff(s) attorney, Kevin S. Sullivan,

squire, Callan, Sullivan & Burke, P.C.,

whose address is 40 Church Street;

Lowell, MA 01852, an answer to the

complaint on or before the eighteenth day

of February, the return day hereof, and a

copy thereof must be filed in this Court

on or before said day.

If you fail to do so, judgment by default

will be taken against you for the relief

demanded in the complain^. Unless

otherwise provided by Rule 13 (a), your

answer must state as a counterclaim any

claim which you may have against the

plaintiff(s) which arises out of the

transaction or occurrence that is the

subject matter of the plaintiff(s) claim or

you will thereafter be barred from making

such claim in any other action.

It is ORDERED that notice be given by-

publishing a copy of this order one time

in the Town Crier, a newspaper

published in the County of Middlesex,

one month at least before the eighteenth

day of February.

Witness, JOHN E. FENTON, JR.,

CHIEF JUSTICE; of our Land Court,

the third day of January , 1991.

Charles W. Trombly, Jr.

RRCORDI-E

A true copy attest:

Charles W. Trpmbly, Jr.

J16 Rccordci

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WILMINGTON, MA 01887 before 5 m Monday ads no, paid in advance.!


16 TOWN CRIER, JANUARY 16. 1991

RA TES QUOTED BY PHONE

WE WILL COMPLETE YOUR APPLICATION BY

TELEPHONE AND HAVE IT READY FOR YOUR ARRIVAL

REGISTRY SERVICE • BUDGET PLANS

r

m

/ 658-4772

ROBERT J. CAIN

INSURANCE AGENCY

585 MAIN STREET (JCT RTES 38 & 129) WILMINGTON

If you suffer f 'Heel piiin

these painful •Fractures

foot problems, /CT^k

We can help! / *"Wweor«i r

/ -Gout of the fool

, l "* u, '" , "; s "£&**'• / •ThfckMcd naiLs

ISIUV I loss Uluc Shield /.. .. ,

Bay Stale I leallh Care / 'Aching, burning wails

U.S. Ik-allncari- / 'Swollen, arthritic joints

leamstvrs, Medicare / 'Bunions & painful, crooked toes

Many (liners, f •Burning cramps in ball of foot

== • Northeast Podiatric

^BT" ^ Medicine & Surgery of Ilie Feet

11 Middlesex Ave.

Wilmington, MA

(508) 658-9774

Dr. Kenneth M. Leavitt & Associates

Affiliated with

New England

Memorial Hospital

175 Main St.

C>iarlestown, MA

(617)242-3344

ROBERTS CHIROPRACTIC

Health Care Office

New Patients Welcome'

(& can be seen immediately in most cases)

HOI ID Q ■ Monday thru Saturday

nvuno, 9:00a m _ 12pm & 3:00pm _7pm

MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING;

Medicare, Auto, Worker's Comp., etc.

Tewksbury

1501 Main Street Rt. 38 851-0515

Janice Copp Burns, D.C

!Lniropractor

668 .Main Street

Wilmington, MA 01887

Winter weather is here and with it all the usual hazards.

Winter driving can be very dangerous and even minor "fender benders" can

cause injury. Regardless of whether you experi-

ence symptoms after an accident you should

have an examination to assess any undetected

damage that may have occurred.

If we can be of any service, please call

(508) 658-0944

Gentle, individualized

chiropractic care for all ages.

CYNTHIA A. PETERSON

REGISTERED ELECTROLOGIST

EociAnS

Permanent Hair Removal for Men & Women

Day, Evening & Weekend Appointments Available

• Individual Probes

• Complimentary Consultation

Call for appointment

x 658-9907

311 Middlesex Ave.

Wilmington, MA 01887

For those of you who haven't yet tried our office we

thought we would send you a special invitation.

f " I~T~0~UaORY " ' "\

NEW PATIENT SPECIAL I

$42

. . ' INCLUDES

Cleaning y

Necessary X-Rays

Examination - Diagnosis |

and Treatment Plan |

COMPREHENSIVE

DENTAL SERVICES

COSMETIC SMILE

ENHANCERS

*""""'s

PREVENTIVE AND

EMERGENCY CARE

"DAVID ZAMPESE, D.M.D.

"Your friendly neighborhood dentist"

(508) 658-8400

96 MAIN STREET (across from Silver Lake)

WILMINGTON / TEWKSBURY LINE

YOUR INSURANCE

PLAN WELCOME

CONVENIENT HOURS

EVENING APPOINTMENTS

Market plan benefits counseling service

The concern for helping troubled

individuals and families get the

help they need but may not be able

to afford has led the Wilmington

Family Counseling Service to

initiate a new fund raising

program. Through the Star Share

program, the agency will receive

five percent of the customer cash

register receipts of people who

shop at any Star Market on January

22, 23 and 24 (Tuesday,

Wednesday, Thursday) and present

the Star Share coupon (specify

here where coupon appears in the

- paper).

Our mission always has been to

provide counseling for people with

Financial hardship at a cost they can

afford," explained Carol Golub,

Ph.D., WFCS Director. "However,

as the economic situation

deteriorates with more and more

people being laid off, losing health

insurance benefits, or not being

able to afford their health

insurance premiums - more and *

more people will be seeking our

help who cannot afford to pay the

cost of the service. This Star Share

program will allow-pcople to help

others in the community without

;

STAR SHARE Identification Certificate

102864

Group Number Cashier Number Store Number

Group Name Wilmington Family Counseling Service

Your Star Share Days

letters to the editor

Dear Larz:

On Thursday, January 10, I

awbko at 6:20 a.m. to find my front

steps and entire driveway were a

sheet of ice. I watched as my

mother ventured to her car to clean

it off. She looked like a

two-year-old, tip-toeing toward

her destination. It took her quite a

long time to actually reach the car.

Now my point is this If it takes an

adult a few minutes to reach a point

that is normally seconds away (and

they fear their own safety), can you

imagine sending.littlc children to a

bus stop that may be a quarter of a

mile away? Not. only is it

dangerous, but getting on the bus

and trusting it to get you to school

isn't easy cither. For all of the

teenagers who drive to school, they

Customer Signature

Jan. 22-24, 1991

'I'llinns lb 1. Star Share participants can make

Remember purchases a! any STAR MARKET

on the days shown above.

2. Please present to cashier prior

to check-out.

i

Dollars

Inc.

Cents

Porriu'r

3. Your non-profit organization earns a 5% cash

return (or 5% return In the form of gift

certificates) based on the tout amount you

spend (excluding tax) at STAR MARKET during

your group's designated Star Share days.

IDENTIFICATION CARDS ARE NOT TO BE DISTRIBUTED ON

STAR MARKET PROPERTY

actually contributing any money of

their own but just by spending their

grocery money at a Star Market.

With the new Star Market in North

Reading we are hopeful people will

be interested in trying the new

market and will take this

opportunity to support us by

shopping on our behalf."

The Wilmington Family

Counseling Services receives funds

had to inch along on ice covered

roads, and for those who drove as

they usually do, fish-tailing and

sliding around wasn't unusual.

Many of these families with

children in school live on

secondary roads that are not yet

sanded (forget plowed) early in the

morning. Mr. Fay lives not only in

a different town, but on a main

road. Maybe the highways aren't so

bad, but our roads weren't so safe.

Would it have taken much for Mr.

Fay to realize that? Maybe just a

few phone calls. Somehow, a few

radio stations became misinformed

and announced a, school

cancellation.

When the students found this out,

I'm sure they were more than'a

little upset. Personally, I never

Jennifer Ann Burkinshaw, age 24, claims she was

A fomilv boro Fcbruar y 15 - l966 > at Tewksbury Hospital, and

Any iamiiy was later adopted. Burkinshaw is now searching for

resemblance? ner ,ruc P arents , wn o she believes may still live in the

Tewksbury area. At birth, she was given the name of

Richardtina, and she. says that her real parents may

have been high school students. She may be reached

at P.O. Box 174, Plaistow, N.H. 03865.

WILMINGTON

DOOR & WINDOW

Sales & Installation

J!fc, ;

• Storm

Windows

• Steel

DOORS $41 Sjgfoe

• Vinyl

Replacement

Windows

STORM DOORS |;HJMI;EE

$229"* BEST pmcES

INSTALLED »««■ rna*,**

CALL NOW FOR FREE ESTIMATES!

(508) 657-7912

I ' J

from the town of Wilmington and

the Merrimack Valley United Fund

to subsidize fees of Wilmington

residents. The agency's funding

from the town to subsidize cljent

fees was cut 14 percent for the

current fiscal year because of the

town's budget cuts.

"We need to rally concern for

other in these hard times," Dr.

Golub concluded. "This program

even made it to school. As I heard,

about half the school population

didn't either.

My major concern is that Mr. Fay

will fail to realize when the roads

are not safe to travel on and school

should at least be delayed. If he was

putting a young child on a bus to

travel miles on icy roads, maybe

his decision would have changed. I

feel that Mr. Fay was incompetent

in his decision to hold school, and I

hope in the future that others in

positions of authority will help this

man with important decisions.

*■*■--;--'*"""*" ■■ ■——r—-Sincerely,

Mary Fisher, student

Dear Larz:

I feel that anyone reading this

paper who can't see the

"backroom" politics being

promoted by Kevin Sowyrda and

his sidekick, Arlene Surprenant,

really has to be asleep. What really

bothered me during the last few

weeks were a couple of cheap shots

at exrSelectman McCoy.

First of all, Arlene's "cute"

remark during her wrapup stating

that Bob Cain should have spare

parts in case he runs into a former

Town Seleciman(guess who?) and,

secondly, in your 1990 year-end

review: "Charges dropped and then

reinstated." against McCoy. The

judge also found against Cain. In

other words, this new judge treated

Cain and McCoy in the same

fashion. She found sufficient facts

against both of them You

deliberately left this out. This is

fraudulent on the Crier's part.

This is the same Kevin Sowyrda

who told us that during his ill-fated

campaign for State Representative

that the Shawshccn Tech needed a

dress code, but neglected to tell us

that he answered candidate

questionnaires stating that he was

for gay rights and against limiting

sex and violence on cable T.V. This

wouldn't be important, except that

he made a big deal about the dress

code.

I won't bother with Surprenant

because Firefighter Welsh did an

outstanding job relative to that

issue last week. In other words

Kevin^and Arlene: Don't use the

newspaper to do your personal

dirty work. Don't give McCoy any

special breaks, but give him the

same fair share you gave Cain.

Don't forget, a lot of people made

pre-judgements on the Stuart Case,

and look How that turned out.

p.s. I hear that Sowyrda is a

candidate for this April's election.

Why is he allowed to write on a

weekly basis?

Samuel D. LaFollctte

Featuring

®ualter

lllaid

ui

makes it easy to do something to

help - cut out the coupon, take it to

Star Market and do your grocery

shopping, turn in the coupon at the

cash register, and Star Market will

contribute five percent of your

grocery bill so that children who

have been abused, adults who are

too- depressed to function

adequately, alcoholics who are just

beginning to take a day at a time

sober - all of them and many others

can get the counseling services they

need.lt will take hundreds of

people to participate to make up the

cut in the town funding, but every

person who docs participate

helps!"

by Linda Gaffey

GETTING INTO

~—-A4zATHER -

Bathing with soap may be an ac-

ceptable practice for people with

oily skin, but it is to be avoided by

those with normal, dry or sensitive

skin. The reason for this caution is

that soap usually has a high alka-

line pH which is more than likely to

strip away the skin's natural mois-

ture. As a result, skin can be left

feeling dry and irritated. A more

suitable bathing product for those

with normal, dry or sensitive skin

is a bath or shower gel. Far from

being a mere bar soap formulation

in liquid form, a bath gel usually

consists of surfacants (which lift

dirt) and skin softening agents.

Another advantage of a bath gel is

its ability to lather better and

longer than soap. It also docs not

leave a bathtub ring.

Be careful you aren't shampoo-

ing the natural oils out of your hair,

too. Let your beauty expert hair

services and the finest beauty

products from Matrix. If your hair

is color treated you will want to use

our Essential Liquids, perfect for

many hair problems. All of our

products are safe for you and the

environment. We are open six days

and nights, except Sunday. Stop in

at 161 Shawsheen Ave., Rt. 129,

Wilmington.

Let one of our professionals

recommend the proper Matrix

shampoo for your hair needs.

rflflTTSljmc - bain gels^ontauT

vitamins A, D, and E to moisturize

skin.

SkawJteeu

\4 76ait Saion

• Free Estimates • Decorator Design Service

Appliance Selection • Professional Installation

Xitrltnui bg 3Rtre WVQB. 3nr.

Specialists in Kitchen and Bath Designs

3 (Rear) Church St., Wilmington, Mass. • 658-3219

Hours:Mon 8 - 5; Tues, Wed & Tliurs 8 - 9p.m.; Fri 8 - 5 & Sat 9 - 4


ISSUE IICII MISSING

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