Trend - Okaloosa County Transit

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Trend - Okaloosa County Transit

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Table of ContentsCHAPTER 1—BASE DATA ............................................................................................... 1-1INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 1-1Demographic and Economic Conditions ................................................................. 1-3ESRI 2010/2015 Demographic Update................................................................ 1-32010 Census ........................................................................................................ 1-42009 American Community Survey (ACS) ........................................................... 1-42009 Florida Statistical Abstract (BEBR).............................................................. 1-42010 Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD)................................. 1-4Chapter Organization ........................................................................................... 1-5Economic Conditions .............................................................................................. 1-7Median Home Values........................................................................................... 1-7Employment ......................................................................................................... 1-15Unemployment ..................................................................................................... 1-20Income ............................................................................................................ 1-23Family Households............................................................................................... 1-35Household Units................................................................................................... 1-38Family Size........................................................................................................... 1-41Household Size .................................................................................................... 1-44Population ........................................................................................................... 1-47TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED FORECASTS .............................................. 1-57Forecasts TD Population...................................................................................... 1-57AGE DISTRIBUTIONS.................................................................................................. 1-61TRANSPORTATION CHARACTERISTICS .................................................................. 1-67Commuter Inflow/Outflow..................................................................................... 1-67CHAPTER 2—PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT............................................................................ 2-1Public Engagement: A Regional Approach ................................................................... 2-1Design Elements for Execution..................................................................................... 2-3Dynamic Public Events ................................................................................................. 2-7Publicity ....................................................................................................................... 2-11Elements of the Public Involvement Plan...................................................................... 2-12Public Involvement Plan Elements.......................................................................... 2-12Project Management Team (PMT).......................................................................... 2-12Steering Committee ................................................................................................ 2-13Okaloosa-Walton Transportation Planning Organization (TPO) ............................. 2-15Public & Customer Outreach Activities ................................................................... 2-16Web-based Survey Methodology.................................................................................. 2-19Telephone Survey......................................................................................................... 2-21Web-based and Telephone Survey Results.................................................................. 2-21Markets and Service Area............................................................................................. 2-29Importance of Transit .............................................................................................. 2-30Major Overview of Demographic Comparison ........................................................ 2-36On-Board Survey of OCT Customers ........................................................................... 2-41Modes of Access and Egress, Trip Purpose, and Transferring............................... 2-42Drivers License ....................................................................................................... 2-45iiTable of Contents


On-Board Survey of U.S. 98 Routes............................................................................. 2-55Public Involvement Results................................................................................................. 2-64Measures of Effectiveness............................................................................................ 2-64CHAPTER 3 – PERFORMANCE EVALUATION .............................................................. 3-1INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 3-1The Purpose of Performance Review .................................................................. 3-1National Transit Database.................................................................................... 3-1PART ONE: FIXED-ROUTE TRANSIT SERVICE ........................................................ 3-3OCT: Year-at-a-Glance ........................................................................................ 3-4FIXED ROUTE PEER AND TREND ANALYSIS........................................................... 3-5Operational Performance Measures .................................................................... 3-6Service Measures........................................................................................... 3-6Vehicle Measures........................................................................................... 3-10Effectiveness Measures ................................................................................. 3-12Financial Performance Measures......................................................................... 3-16Expense and Revenue Measures .................................................................. 3-16Efficiency Measures ............................................................................................. 3-19Peer Summary ..................................................................................................... 3-22PART TWO: DEMAND RESPONSE TRANSIT SERVICE ........................................... 3-26OCT: Year At-A-Glance........................................................................................ 3-27DEMAND RESPONSE TREND ANALYSIS.................................................................. 3-28Operational Performance Measures .................................................................... 3-28Service Measures.............................................................................................. 3-28Vehicle Measures................................................................................................. 3-31Effectiveness Measures ....................................................................................... 3-33Financial Performance Measures......................................................................... 3-37Expense and Revenue Measures ..................................................................... 3-37Efficiency Measures .......................................................................................... 3-38DEMAND RESPONSE PEER ANALYSIS .................................................................... 3-40CHAPTER 4 – PROFILE OF EXISTING SERVICES ........................................................ 4-1Service Area.................................................................................................................. 4-1Types of Service................................................................................................... 4-1Fixed Route Services ........................................................................................... 4-1Transit Transfer Centers ............................................................................................... 4-7Paratransit .................................................................................................................... 4-7CHAPTER 5 – SITUATION APPRAISAL – RIDERSHIP FORECASTING USINGT-BEST MODEL .................................................................................................. 5-1INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 5-1Organizational Structure ............................................................................................... 5-1Demographic and Economic Conditions....................................................................... 5-4Land Use .................................................................................................................... 5-5Economic Development ................................................................................................ 5-10Intelligent Transportation Systems................................................................................ 5-11iiiTable of Contents


Summary of Local, Regional, and State Plans.............................................................. 5-11Horizon 2060 Florida Transportation Plan .................................................................... 5-12Okaloosa-Walton Transportation Outlook 2035 Long Range TransportationPlan Update ......................................................................................................... 5-14VISION STATEMENT, MISSION STATEMENT, AND GOALSAND OBJECTI VES ............................................................................................. 5-14Goal A .................................................................................................................. 5-14Goal B .................................................................................................................. 5-15Goal C .................................................................................................................. 5-15Goal D .................................................................................................................. 5-16Okaloosa County Strategic Plan ................................................................................... 5-17Growth Management Division/Transit and Grants ........................................................ 5-17Goal 1................................................................................................................... 5-17Goal 2................................................................................................................... 5-17Goal 3................................................................................................................... 5-17Goal 4................................................................................................................... 5-18Okaloosa County Comprehensive Plan 2009 ............................................................... 5-18Goal 1 .................................................................................................................. 5-18Goal 2 .................................................................................................................. 5-19Goal 3 ................................................................................................................. 5-21Goal 4 .................................................................................................................. 5-22Tri-County Growth Management Plan.................................................................. 5-22City of Fort Walton Beach Comprehensive Plan 2011 Transportation Element... 5-23City of Destin Evaluation and Appraisal Report 2010 .......................................... 5-25Conclusions................................................................................................................... 5-29RIDERSHIP FORECASTING USING THE TBEST MODEL......................................... 5-32Model Inputs/Assumptions and Limitations.......................................................... 5-33Okaloosa Scenarios ............................................................................................. 5-34Scenario One: Grow Existing System to 2020 with No Service Improvements ... 5-35Base Results for Comparison............................................................................ 5-36Scenario Two: Growing Existing System to 2020 and Implement SaturdayService .............................................................................................................. 5-36Comparison of Scenario Two to Scenario One ................................................. 5-37Scenario Three: Grow Existing System to 2020, add Saturday andSunday Service ................................................................................................. 5-38Comparison of Scenario Three to Scenario One .............................................. 5-38Scenario Four: Grow Existing System to 2020 and Bring Span of Serviceto 7am to 8:00 pm ............................................................................................. 5-39Comparison of Scenario Four to Scenario One ................................................ 5-39Scenario Five: Grow Existing System to 2020 and Bring Span of Serviceto 7:00 am to 10:00 pm .................................................................................... 5-40Comparison of Scenario Five to Scenario One ................................................. 5-40Scenario Six: Bring All Non-express Routes to 30 minute Frequency onWeekdays.......................................................................................................... 5-41Scenario Seven: Add New Service to Existing OCT Route Network .................. 5-42Comparison of Scenario Seven to Scenario One.............................................. 5-42Conclusions and Considerations.......................................................................... 5-43ivTable of Contents


CHAPTER 6 – VISION, MISSION, GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES .............. 6-1INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 6-1DATA COLLECTION AND EVALUATION .................................................................... 6-1PUBLIC TRANSIT VISION, MISSION, GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND STRATEGIES .. 6-2Public Transit Vision............................................................................................. 6-2Public Transit Mission .......................................................................................... 6-2Goal 1................................................................................................................... 6-2Goal 2................................................................................................................... 6-4Goal 3................................................................................................................... 6-6Goal 4................................................................................................................... 6-7Goal 5................................................................................................................... 6-8Goal 6................................................................................................................... 6-8Goal 7................................................................................................................... 6-9CHAPTER 7 – EVALUTION OF ALTERNATIVES ............................................................ 7-1INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 7-1PRIORITY ALTERNATIVE NUMBER ONE .................................................................. 7-2Maintain The Existing System ........................................................................... 7-2PRIORITY ALTERNATIVE NUMBER TWO.................................................................. 7-4Improvements to Existing System ..................................................................... 7-4Evening Service ................................................................................................ 7-4New Route......................................................................................................... 7-5PRIORITY ALTERNATIVE NUMBER THREE.............................................................. 7-7Bring All System Bus Stops to ADA Accessibility Standards ............................ 7-7Candidate Improvements.............................................................................................. 7-15CHAPTER 8 – TEN-YEAR PROGRAM OF IMPROVEMENTS ......................................... 8-1INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 8-1FRAMEWORK FOR TEN-YEAR PROGRAM OF IMPROVEMENTS........................... 8-1CHAPTER 9 – PLAN DEVELOPMENT AND CAPITAL & OPERATING PLAN ............... 9-1INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 9-1MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING PROGRAM........................................................ 9-1VEHICLE REPLACEMENT PROGRAM ....................................................................... 9-10CAPITAL AND OPERATING PROGRAM..................................................................... 9-12vTable of Contents


FiguresChapter 1Figure 1-1 Visual Representation of Base Data Chapter Organization ..................... 1-6Figure 1-2 Percent Change in Median Home Values – Fort Walton Beach View2006-2010 ................................................................................................ 1-8Figure 1-3 Percent Change in Median Home Values – Navarre View2006-2010 ................................................................................................ 1-10Figure 1-4 Percent Change in Median Home Values –Miramar Beach View2006-2010 ................................................................................................ 1-12Figure 1-5 Percent Change in Median Home Values – Crestview View2006-2010 ................................................................................................ 1-14Figure 1-6 Employers per Square Mile, Fort Walton Beach View – 2010.................. 1-16Figure 1-7 Employers per Square Mile – Navarre View - 2010 ................................. 1-17Figure 1-8 Employers per Square Mile – Miramar Beach View - 2010...................... 1-18Figure 1-9 Employers per Square Mile – Crestview View - 2010 .............................. 1-19Figure 1-10 Unemployment Concentrations – 2010 .................................................... 1-21Figure 1-11 Unemployment Concentrations - 2015 ..................................................... 1-22Figure 1-12 Per Capita Income View - 2010................................................................ 1-24Figure 1-13 Per Capita Income View - 2015................................................................ 1-25Figure 1-14 Per Capita Income, Miramar Beach View - 2010 ..................................... 1-26Figure 1-15 Per Capita Income, Miramar Beach View - 2015 ..................................... 1-27Figure 1-16 Percentages of Households with Income under $20,000 –2010.......................................................................................................... 1-29Figure 1-17 Percentages of Households with Income under $20,000 –2015.......................................................................................................... 1-30Figure 1-18 Percentages of Households with Incomes between $20,000 to$49,999 – 2010......................................................................................... 1-31Figure 1-19 Percentages of Households with Incomes between $20,000 to$49,999 – 2015......................................................................................... 1-32Figure 1-20 Percentages of Households with Incomes between $50,000Figure 1-21to $99,999 – Pensacola View 2010 ......................................................... 1-33Percentages of Households with Incomes Between $50,000 to$99,999 – Pensacola View 2015.............................................................. 1-34Figure 1-22 Total Family Households – 2010 .............................................................. 1-36Figure 1-23 Total Family Households – 2015 .............................................................. 1-37Figure 1-24 Total Housing Units Per Square Mile – 2010 ........................................... 1-39Figure 1-25 Total Housing Units Per Square Mile – 2015 ........................................... 1-40Figure 1-26 Average Family Size – 2010..................................................................... 1-42Figure 1-27 Average Family Size – 2015..................................................................... 1-43Figure 1-28 Average Household Size – 2010.............................................................. 1-45Figure 1-29 Average Household Size – 2015.............................................................. 1-46Figure 1-30 Total Population Greater Fort Walton Beach View – 2010 ...................... 1-48Figure 1-31 Total Population Greater Fort Walton Beach View – 2015....................... 1-49viFigures


Figure 1-32 Total Population Miramar Beach View – 2010 ......................................... 1-50Figure 1-33 Total Population Miramar Beach View – 2015 ......................................... 1-51Figure 1-34 Population Density Greater Fort Walton Beach View – 2010 .................. 1-53Figure 1-35 Population Density Greater Fort Walton Beach View – 2015................... 1-54Figure 1-36 Population Density Miramar Beach View – 2010 ..................................... 1-55Figure 1-37 Population Density Miramar Beach View – 2015 ..................................... 1-56Figure 1-38 Persons Under Age 20 Per Square Mile – Fort Walton BeachView – 2010.............................................................................................. 1-62Figure 1-39 Persons Under Age 20 Per Square Mile – Navarre View – 2010............. 1-63Figure 1-40 Persons Over Age 60 Per Square Mile – Fort Walton BeachView – 2010 ............................................................................................. 1-65Figure 1-41 Persons Over Age 60 Per Square Mile – Navarre View – 2010............... 1-66Figure 1-42 Okaloosa County Commute Inflow/Outflow – 2009.................................. 1-68Figure 1-43 Walton County Commute Inflow/Outflow – 2009...................................... 1-69Figure 1-44Okaloosa County – Where People Who Work in Okaloosa CountyLive........................................................................................................... 1-70Chapter 2Figure 2-1 Transit Development Plan Campaign Logo................................................. 2-2Figure 2-2 Local Transit Development Plan Campaign Logo ....................................... 2-2Figure 2-3 Landing Page for www.transitsurvey.org..................................................... 2-4Figure 2-4 Local Okaloosa County Page...................................................................... 2-5Figure 2-5 First Page of Survey.................................................................................... 2-6Figure 2-6 Vinyl Banners for Make Your Mark Campaign ............................................ 2-8Figure 2-7 Business Cards -- Make Your Mark Campaign .......................................... 2-9Figure 2-8 Electronic Blast – Make Your Mark Campaign............................................ 2-10Figure 2-9 Most Important Issues ................................................................................. 2-22Figure 2-10 Employment Status ..................................................................................... 2-23Figure 2-11 County of Residence ................................................................................... 2-23Figure 2-12 Community of Residence ............................................................................ 2-24Figure 2-13 Commute Patterns ...................................................................................... 2-25Figure 2-14 Community of Work..................................................................................... 2-26Figure 2-15 Awareness of Public Transportation............................................................ 2-27Figure 2-16 Name Recognition....................................................................................... 2-27Figure 2-17 Agreement with Statements Regarding Transportation Systems................ 2-28Figure 2-18 Agreement with Transportation Improvements............................................ 2-29Figure 2-19 Markets and Service Area ........................................................................... 2-30Figure 2-20 Importance of Public Transportation ........................................................... 2-31Figure 2-21 Agreement with Existing Service Improvements ......................................... 2-31Figure 2-22 Agreement with Transit Trip Purposes ........................................................ 2-32Figure 2-23 Agreement with Funding of Transit Improvements...................................... 2-33Figure 2-24 For What Purposes Would you Use the System ......................................... 2-34Figure 2-25 Reason for Supporting Public Transportation.............................................. 2-35Figure 2-26 Age ............................................................................................................ 2-36Figure 2-27 Ethnic Background ...................................................................................... 2-37Figure 2-28 Household Income ...................................................................................... 2-37Figure 2-29 Gender ........................................................................................................ 2-38viiFigures


Figure 2-30 Education .................................................................................................... 2-38Figure 2-31 Working Adults ............................................................................................ 2-39Figure 2-32 Number of Children under 17 ...................................................................... 2-39Figure 2-33 Number of Seniors over 65 ......................................................................... 2-40Figure 2-34 Route Customers were Riding when Completing Survey............................ 2-41Figure 2-35 Mode of Access........................................................................................... 2-42Figure 2-36 Where Customers was Coming From to Make Trip .................................... 2-43Figure 2-37 Transfer Required to Complete Trip............................................................ 2-43Figure 2-38 Where Customers Were Going on Their Trip.............................................. 2-44Figure 2-39 Mode of Egress ........................................................................................... 2-44Figure 2-40 Customer Possesses valid Drivers License ................................................ 2-45Figure 2-41 Fare Paid for Trip ........................................................................................ 2-46Figure 2-42 Number of Days per Week Customers Ride ............................................... 2-46Figure 2-43 Reasons for Riding OCT ............................................................................. 2-47Figure 2-44 How Customers Would Make Trip if Not By Bus ......................................... 2-48Figure 2-45 Length of Use .............................................................................................. 2-48Figure 2-46 Age Distribution ........................................................................................... 2-49Figure 2-47 Gender ........................................................................................................ 2-49Figure 2-48 Ethnicity....................................................................................................... 2-50Figure 2-49 Household Income 2010 ............................................................................. 2-51Figure 2-50 Number of Working Vehicles in Household................................................. 2-51Figure 2-51 Duration of Residency ................................................................................. 2-52Figure 2-52 Where Customers Would Like to Travel...................................................... 2-52Figure 2-53 Satisfaction with Service Characteristics..................................................... 2-53Figure 2-54 Most Desired Improvements ....................................................................... 2-54Figure 2-55 Q1: Are you a permanent resident of Ft. Walton Beach/Destin area? ........ 2-55Figure 2-56Q2; Are you a visitor to or seasonal resident of theFt. Walton Beach/Destin area? .................................................................. 2-55Figure 2-57 Q4: What is your primary reason for visiting the area? ............................... 2-56Figure 2-58 Q5: When did you arrive in the area?.......................................................... 2-56Figure 2-59 Q6: Are you traveling?................................................................................. 2-57Figure 2-60 Q7: How many people are traveling with you?............................................ 2-57Figure 2-61 Q8: When do you plan to leave the area?................................................... 2-58Figure 2-62 Q9: How often do you visit the area? .......................................................... 2-58Figure 2-63 Q10: Do you plan to return to this area for future vacations?...................... 2-59Figure 2-64 Q11: do you have a car available during your stay in the area? ................. 2-59Figure 2-65 Q12: How many times have you used The Wave during your stay?........... 2-60Figure 2-66 Q13: Please describe your status as a customer by choosing one ofThe responses below: ................................................................................. 2-60Figure 2-67 Q14: What is the most important reason you choose to use The Wave .... 2-61Figure 2-68Q15: How would you rate the following items in terms of your satisfactionWith The Wave ................................................................................... 2-61Figure 2-69 Q17: Your age is ......................................................................................... 2-62Figure 2-70 Q18: Are you.. ............................................................................................. 2-62Figure 2-71 Q19: Ethnicity .............................................................................................. 2-63Figure 2-72 Q20: What was the range of your total household income for 2010............ 2-63Figure 2-73 Correlation between Website Visits and Surveys Completed ..................... 2-65Figure 2-74Completed Surveys, Publicity Coverage, Public Outreach/Events andE-Newsletters by Month .............................................................................. 2-66viiiFigures


Chapter 3Figure 3-1 Service Area Population (in thousands) ...................................................... 3-7Figure 3-2 Service Area Density (Population per sq. Mile)........................................... 3-7Figure 3-3 Passenger Trips (in thousands)................................................................... 3-8Figure 3-4 Passenger Miles (in thousands) .................................................................. 3-8Figure 3-5 Average Passenger Trip Length (Miles)..................................................... 3-9Figure 3-6 Revenue Miles (in thousands)..................................................................... 3-9Figure 3-7 Revenue Hours (in thousands).................................................................... 3-10Figure 3-8 Total Vehicles and Vehicles in Maximum Service....................................... 3-10Figure 3-9 Total Vehicles.............................................................................................. 3-11Figure 3-10 Vehicles in Maximum Service...................................................................... 3-11Figure 3-11 Revenue Miles Per Vehicles in Maximum Service (in thousands) .............. 3-11Figure 3-12 Average Age of Fleet (Years)...................................................................... 3-12Figure 3-13 Total Employees FTEs ................................................................................ 3-12Figure 3-14 Passenger Trips per Capita......................................................................... 3-13Figure 3-15 Passenger Trips per Vehicles in Max. Service ............................................ 3-13Figure 3-16 Passenger Trips per Revenue Mile ............................................................. 3-14Figure 3-17 Passenger Trips per Revenue Hour............................................................ 3-14Figure 3-18 Operating Expenses (in thousands $) ......................................................... 3-15Figure 3-19 Maintenance Expenses (in thousands $) .................................................... 3-16Figure 3-20 Passenger Fares (in thousands $) .............................................................. 3-18Figure 3-21 Average Fare............................................................................................... 3-18Figure 3-22 Operating Expense per Capita .................................................................... 3-19Figure 3-23 Operating Expense per Passenger Trip ...................................................... 3-19Figure 3-24 Operating Expense per Revenue Mile......................................................... 3-20Figure 3-25 Operating Expense per Revenue Hour ....................................................... 3-20Figure 3-26 Farebox Recovery ....................................................................................... 3-21Figure 3-27 Peer Analysis – Operational Measures, FY 2009........................................ 3-24Figure 3-28 Peer Analysis – Financial Measures, FY 2009............................................ 3-25Figure 3-29 Passenger Trips (in thousands)................................................................... 3-29Figure 3-30 Passenger Miles (in thousands) .................................................................. 3-29Figure 3-31 Average Passenger Trip Length (Miles)...................................................... 3-30Figure 3-32 Revenue Miles (in thousands)..................................................................... 3-30Figure 3-33 Revenue Hours (in thousands).................................................................... 3-31Figure 3-34 Total Vehicles and Vehicles in Maximum Service....................................... 3-31Figure 3-35 Revenue Miles per Vehicles in Maximum Service (in thousands)............... 3-32Figure 3-36 Average Age of Fleet (Years)...................................................................... 3-32Figure 3-37 Revenue Miles per Capita ........................................................................... 3-33Figure 3-38 Passenger Trips per Vehicles in Max. Service ............................................ 3-34Figure 3-39 Passenger Trips per Revenue Mile ............................................................. 3-34Figure 3-40 Passenger Trips per Revenue Hour............................................................ 3-35Figure 3-41 Operating Expense (in thousands $)........................................................... 3-37Figure 3-42 Maintenance Expenses (in thousands $) .................................................... 3-37Figure 3-43 Operating Expense per Capita .................................................................... 3-38Figure 3-44 Operating Expense per Passenger Trip ...................................................... 3-38Figure 3-45 Operating Expense per Revenue Mile......................................................... 3-39Figure 3-46 Operating Expense per Revenue Hour ....................................................... 3-39Figure 3-47 Peer Analysis – Operational Measures, FY 2009........................................ 3-42Figure 3-48 Peer Analysis – Financial Measures, FY 2009............................................ 3-43ixFigures


Chapter 4Figure 4-1 System Map –North Map............................................................................. 4-4Chapter 5Figure 5-1 Overall Organizational Structure – Okaloosa County.................................. 5-2Figure 5-2 Organizational Structure OCT ..................................................................... 5-3Figure 5-3 Overall Organizational Structure – OCT...................................................... 5-6Figure 5-4 Overlay Zones with Urban Development Boundaries –North Okaloosa County ............................................................................... 5-8Figure 5-5 Overlay Zones with Urban Development Boundaries --South Okaloosa County .............................................................................. 5-9Chapter 7Figure 7-1 New Routes Coded Into T-Best................................................................... 7-6Figure 7-2 Universal Accessibility Approach................................................................. 7-8Figure 7-3 Required Elements for Accessible Bus Stops ............................................. 7-10Figure 7-4 Bus Stop Accessibility in Suburban Environment........................................ 7-12Figure 7-5 Bus Stop Accessibility in Rural Environments............................................. 7-14Chapter 8Figure 8-1 Routes to Implement Evening Service Improvements FY 2016.................. 8-5Figure 8-2 New Route – Niceville/Bluewater to Destin via Mid-Bay BridgetFY2017 ............................................................................................... 8-6xFigures


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TablesChapter 1Table 1-1 Civilian Labor Force and Employment......................................................... 1-23Table 1-2 Household Income Distribution – 2009........................................................ 1-28Table 1-3 Housing Unit Occupancy............................................................................. 1-41Table 1-4 General Populations, Growth Rates 2000-2010.......................................... 1-52Table 1-5 Population Growth for Cities, Towns, and Census DesignatedPlaces.......................................................................................................... 1-52Table 1-6 Forecasts of TD Populations in Okaloosa County 2011-2015..................... 1-58Table 1-7 Okaloosa County Potential Transportation Disadvantaged Population(Category I) -2011 ....................................................................................... 1-59Table 1-8 Okaloosa County Transportation Disadvantaged PopulationTable 1-9(Category II) – 2011 .................................................................................... 1-60Status of Minority and Non-Minority Populations within OkaloosaCounty – 2009 ............................................................................................. 1-60Table 1-10 Population Age Distribution – Okaloosa County – 2009.............................. 1-64Table 1-11 Distribution Vehicle Availability.................................................................... 1-71Table 1-12 Average Commute & Journey-to-Work Mode Split – 2009.......................... 1-71Chapter 2Table 2-1 Events and Public Workshops..................................................................... 2-17Chapter 3Table 3-1 Selected Performance Review Measures – Fixed Route TransitServices....................................................................................................... 3-3Table 3-2 Systems Year-at-a-Glance – Operational Measures................................... 3-4Table 3-3 Systems Year-at-a-Glance – Financial Measures....................................... 3-5Table 3-4 OCT Fixed Route Peer Systems, FY 2009.................................................. 3-6Table 3-5 Trend Analysis – Okaloosa Operational Measures ..................................... 3-15Table 3-6 Trend Analysis – Okaloosa Financial Measures ......................................... 3-22Table 3-7 Peer Analysis – Operational Measures, FY 2009........................................ 3-23Table 3-8 Peer Analysis – Financial Measures, FY 2009............................................ 3-25Table 3-9 Selected Performance Review Measures – Demand RespondServices....................................................................................................... 3-26Table 3-10 System Year-at-a-Glance – Operational Measures..................................... 3-27Table 3-11 System Year-at-a-Glance – Financial Measures......................................... 3-28Table 3-12 Trend Analysis – Okaloosa Operational Measures ..................................... 3-36Table 3-13 Trend Analysis – Okaloosa Financial Measures ......................................... 3-40xiiTables


Table 3-14 Okaloosa Demand Response Peer Systems, FY 2009............................... 3-41Table 3-15 Peer Analysis – Operational Measures, FY 2009 ....................................... 3-42Table 3-16 Peer Analysis – Financial Measures, FY 2009............................................ 3-43Chapter 4Table 4-1 Okaloosa County Transit Fixed Routes Service Data ................................ 4-2Table 4-2 OCT Holidays – No Service ........................................................................ 4-3Table 4-3 Annual Fixed Route Ridership..................................................................... 4-5Table 4-4 Monthly Fixed Route Ridership ................................................................... 4-5Table 4-5 Fare Structure ............................................................................................. 4-6Table 4-6 2010 Paratransit Profile............................................................................... 4-8Chapter 5Table 5-1 TBEST MODEL Runs.................................................................................. 5-35Table 5-2 Grow Existing System to 2020, No Service Changes – Weekday .............. 5-36Table 5-3 Grow Existing System to 2020 .................................................................... 5-36Table 5-4 Saturday Services ....................................................................................... 5-37Table 5-5 Comparison of Scenario Two to Scenario One ........................................... 5-37Table 5-6 Sunday ........................................................................................................ 5-38Table 5-7 Comparison of Scenario Three to Scenario One......................................... 5-38Table 5-8 Evening Service to 8:00 p.m. ...................................................................... 5-39Table 5-9 Comparison of Scenario Four to Scenario One........................................... 5-39Table 5-10 Evening Service to 10:00 p.m. .................................................................... 5-40Table 5-11 Comparison of Scenario Five to Scenario One ........................................... 5-40Table 5-12 Non-express Routes to 30-Minute Frequency............................................. 5-41Table 5-13 Comparison of Scenario Six to Scenario One............................................. 5-41Table 5-14 Base Network Plus New Routes.................................................................. 5-42Table 5-15 Comparison of Scenario Seven to Scenario One........................................ 5-43Chapter 7Table 7-1 Existing System Costs................................................................................. 7-3Table 7-2 One Evening Round Trip on Non-express Routes ...................................... 7-5Table 7-3 Operating Characteristics – Niceville/Bluewater Bay to Destin ................... 7-5Table 7-4 Candidate Improvements Outside Ten-Year Timeframe............................. 7-16Chapter 8Table 8-1 Framework for Ten-Year Program of Improvement..................................... 8-2Table 8-2 Ten-Year Program of Improvements – FY 2011 - 2015 ............................. 8-3Table 8-3 Ten-Year Program of Improvements – FY 2016 - 2020 .............................. 8-4Table 8-4 Candidate Projects Outside Ten-Year Timeframe....................................... 8-7xiiiTables


Chapter 9Table 9-1 Monitoring Program and Measures – Goals and Objectives....................... 9-2Table 9-2 Vehicle Replacement Plan FY 2011-2020 .................................................. 9-11Table 9-3 Operating Program...................................................................................... 9-13Table 9-4 Capital Program .......................................................................................... 9-14xivTables


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OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCHAPTER ONEBASE DATAINTRODUCTIONA TDP is a multi-year plan required by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) thatcalls for a description of the transit agency's vision for public transportation, along with anassessment of transit needs in the study area and a staged implementation program to setpriorities for improvements. FDOT requires a TDP in order to maintain eligibility for State BlockGrant funding.The TDP is also a policy document that integrates transit goals and objectives with those ofother adopted plans. FDOT strongly encourages a strategic approach to the planning processand emphasizes the importance of public participation in the preparation of the TransitDevelopment Plan.The TDP is one of the key elements that link public transportation planning to the MPO’s overalltransportation planning process. The TDP provides direction and input to the MPO’s UnifiedPlanning Work Program (UPWP), Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) and theTransportation Improvement Program (TIP).• Identifies transit needs ,• Identifies transit needs Identifies all Project is evaluated, Project from cost Project fromlist of• and potential capital transportation related priced, and prioritized feasible LRTP ispriority projects is• and operating costs planning studies that to determine if included considered as ascheduled for funding• for projects will be undertaken in the LRTP priority to be• during the fiscal year scheduled and fundedIn 1987, Okaloosa County Transit began operations in Fort Walton Beach with grant funds fromthe Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA).Okaloosa County Transit is made up of deviated fixed route service across 11 lines in thegreater Fort Walton Beach area and Crestview as well as a limited Paratransit service1-1Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANcountywide. In 2009, ridership reached 225,000 annual passenger trips. While the service existsto serve residents, it does the majority of its ridership during the peak tourist season.Okaloosa County Transit has been challenged by current economic conditions. In March 2010,the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) conducted a survey in which 151 transitagencies responded carrying more than 80 percent of all public transportation riders in theUnited States. The survey found that, “Public transportation agencies across the United Statesare in the midst of unprecedented budgetary challenges as a result of the current recession.Transit agencies have been forced to cut service, lay off employees, raise fares, slow capitalimprovements and take many other actions to survive. More troubling is that this comes at atime when transit use is at near modern record levels. The results show that service cuts, fareincreases, and reductions in staff, benefits, and pay are faced by a large number of transitagencies due to declining revenues. The impacts were most severe among the larger publictransportation agencies. The survey found the following:• Revenue decline is widespread, with 90 percent of public transit agencies reportingflat or decreased local funding and 89 percent reporting flat or decreased statefunding.• Budgetary pressures are increasing with seven out of ten agencies (69%) projectingbudget shortfalls in the coming year.• Despite actions taken to address budgetary issues, 11 transit agencies projectshortfalls in excess of 20 percent, and the cumulative projected shortfall amongparticipating transit agencies is almost $2 billion.• More than 8 out of 10 transit agencies (84%) have cut service or raised fares or areconsidering either of those actions for the future, with nearly three in five agencies(59%) having already cut service or raised fares.” (source: American PublicTransportation Association)A Major Transit Development Plan Update establishes a horizon for transit improvements over aten-year period. Under current economic conditions, it is helpful to look back to ten years ago. Inearly 2001, George W. Bush was in the initial months of his Presidency. As of that time, noAmerican could have imagined the events of September 11, the subsequent downturn in theeconomy, two wars, the housing boom, gas at $4.00+ per gallon, and the subsequent collapseof the housing boom and financial markets. While it is true that the economic climate in Floridais not expected to improve in the near term, it is also true that the unimaginable events of theprevious ten years did occur and there is no way to predict the changes to come in the next tenyears. It is important that this Major Update reflect current economic conditions and state/localgovernment challenges; however, it is equally important for the Major Update to contain a visionfor future transit initiatives to be considered in future years as conditions warrant.1-2Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANThe challenges for Okaloosa County Transit, local government jurisdictions, the riding public,and residents of Okaloosa and Walton Counties are to maintain the success that publictransportation has achieved over the past years, gain feedback from the public on the relevanceand support for public transportation in years to come, and continuously seek additional sourcesof funding to maintain existing and invest in future expansion of services. These challenges willbe addressed by a number of means, particularly a significant public outreach campaign duringthe course of this update to gain feedback from the public on the relative importance of publictransportation in Okaloosa County.Demographic and Economic ConditionsOkaloosa County, part of the Florida Panhandle, is bordered by the State of Alabama to thenorth, to the east by Walton County, to the west by Santa Rosa County, and on the south by theGulf of Mexico. The county has a total area of 1,082 square miles, that is divided between 935square miles that is land and 146 square miles that is water.Prior to the 2010 Decennial Census, vital information about a community’s demographicmakeup provided by the United States Census Bureau revealed a detailed understanding ofneighborhoods including such traits as household incomes, auto-ownership, and agecharacteristics. This was achieved through a sampling of 16 percent of households across theUnited States who completed the long form.Beginning in 2000, the Census Bureau began a strategic process in which the Bureau wished toreturn to the fundamentals of its constitutional mission, which is to count the population forpurposes of congressional districting. The long form was replaced by the American CommunitySurvey (ACS), an annual survey with a much smaller sampling size than the long form. Whilethe ACS provides more timely and up-to-date demographic profiles, the sampling methodologydoes not provide the equity of geographic distribution that the long form held and thus mappingof demographic data from the ACS is more challenging. ESRI, the company that makes ArcGISsoftware, has developed a product that synthesizes multiple data sets from public databasesaround the country. It is an advantage that the public sector is ESRI’s largest client, whichprovides the company with a wealth of information sources.ESRI 2010/2015 Demographic Data UpdateBecause of the limitations with using 2000 Census Data in rapidly changing communities, in2007, ESRI, the manufacturer of ArcGIS products, issued a product called the “2006/2011Demographic Data Update.” ESRI utilized the block group data collected from the 2000 U.S.Census and developed current estimates at both the County level and block group level. It did,however, provide estimates of categories including population, population density, population byage group, and household income levels down to the block group levels produced in the 2000census. In 2010, ESRI issued a revised product called the “2009-2014 Demographic Update,”which provides projections for population, age, sex, race, household, labor force, employment1-3Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANand unemployment, and income. This data can also be mapped to the block group level,allowing a visual depiction of the location of those block group who would be most attracted tousing transit facilities. According to a White Paper issued by ESRI entitled, “ESRI DemographicUpdate Methodology: 2009/2014”, “Forecasts are prepared initially for counties and blockgroups. From the block group database, forecasts can be retrieved for census tracts; places;county subdivisions; ZIP codes; congressional districts for the 111 th Congress; or any userdefinedsite, circle or polygon.”2010 CensusJust released are a limited number of datasets from the recently conducted 2010 Census. Initialdata includes information about population, housing units and race. Utilized in the followinganalysis are 2010 counts for countywide and municipal population.2009 American Community Survey (ACS)The U.S. Census Bureau has recognized the challenges faced by communities whendemographic data is available only on a decennial basis. In response, the Census Bureau hasdeveloped the American Community Survey (ACS). The data for the ACS is collected by surveyon an annual basis to provide communities with a more current snapshot of demographicconditions. While more comprehensive than the data developed by ESRI, the ACS data is notavailable at the block group level, but is aggregated to a County level only. Therefore, mappingof this data is not available and will only be presently in tabular format. CUTR has chosen to usethree-year averages of the data (2007-2009) which provide the optimal mix of current samplingthat is reliable.2009 Florida Statistical Abstract (BEBR)The Bureau of Economic and Business Research, also known as BEBR, publishes acomprehensive collection of demographic, social and economic conditions on an annual basis,known as the Florida Statistical Abstract. It is a valuable tool in identifying the demographicconditions within the State of Florida, as well as at the County level. BEBR utilizes data from theU.S. Census Bureau, as well as federal and state agencies and private organizations incompiling it annual edition. Similar to the ACS data, the Florida Statistical Abstract provides dataat the County and City level, not at the block group level. Therefore, this data will be presentedin tabular format throughout the report.2010 Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD)Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) is a program within the U.S. CensusBureau that utilizes statistical and computing techniques to combine administrative data onemployers and employees with core Census Bureau censuses and surveys. The resultinginformation provides an up-to-date understanding of households, employment and commutepatterns throughout the U.S.1-4Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANThese various sources of data will be combined to provide a current snapshot of demographicconditions in Okaloosa County.Chapter OrganizationFigure 1-1 is a visual depiction of how the datasets and maps created for this section create awell-rounded view of Okaloosa County. Many of the maps to follow in this chapter are for theyears 2010 and 2015. This gives the reader an understanding of where conditions stand todaywith a look to the future. In recent years, it has been difficult to accurately project mid-rangeplanning horizons of five to ten years due to the volatility in employment and economic sectors.However, as those areas have begun to stabilize, the projections have become more valid andin turn allow governments such as Okaloosa County to prepare for what lies ahead.Most map views have been at minimum, created for the areas of and surrounding greater FortWalton Beach. The section organization begins with an economic profile of Okaloosa County,then transitions into maps and tables regarding population with an analysis of household data.Finally, the chapter wraps up with a look at transportation habits of residents along withpredominant travel patterns. Upon completion of this chapter, the reader will better understandthe current conditions of the County along with a recalibrated expectation of what economic,population and transportation issues will be faced by 2015.1-5Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-1 – Visual Representation of Base Data Chapter Organization1-6Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANEconomic ConditionsMedian Home ValuesHome values are an immediately recognizable and for many, a very personal representation ofthe state of the local economy. In 2005/2006, home values had increased across the Countymany times over previous years, providing a sense of financial safety for homeowners.However, the reality of dropping home values began to take hold beginning in 2006 into today.That drop in values has put downward pressure on individuals, businesses and governmentsalike, stressing budgets and services. Coupled with increases in fuel prices, many individualswho had never before used public transit have begun to at minimum, consider it.Figures 1-2 through 1-5 comprise several views of median housing value decreases over thelast 5 years within various geographic areas of Okaloosa County. These views allow for a betterunderstanding of which areas within the County have experienced a greater drop in valuesagainst those that have seen a more modest fluctuation in prices. Home values have droppeduniversally, ranging from 20% up to over 50% in the hardest hit areas.Figure 1-2 is a view centered on the area of Fort Walton Beach. The red pockets within the Cityrepresent the most dramatic drops in value. Geographic areas with the greatest decrease invalue within this view include a neighborhood to the east of Eglin Parkway in Shalimar, severalcensus blocks to the south of Beal Parkway in Fort Walton Beach and an area to the east ofSanta Rosa Mall near Mary Esther.Housing value decreases across this view begin at approximately 30% and continue upwards of50%. It is notable that the census block with the lowest median housing value both in 2006 andin 2010, with the exception of the far-east rural land, experienced the greatest drop in values inthe area. Typical of this view however, is that few neighborhoods were spared from significanthousing price decreases. What can be observed from these trends is that home devaluation hasoccurred across the spectrum of values and have not disproportionally effected one value classof homes over another. It should be noted however that those more likely to consider usingtransit as a result of decreasing home values will be those in lesser-valued homes.This view also demonstrates the clustered nature of certain home value changes. A collection ofred and orange census blocks in the Fort Walton Beach area suggest home values are notnecessarily neighborhood but instead geographically determined.1-7Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-2 – Percent Change in Median Home Values, Fort Walton Beach View 2006-20101-8Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-3 displays the area of and surrounding Navarre and Santa Rosa County. Relative toOkaloosa, home values here dropped in value below the overall median. Most blocks’ medianhome value decrease was considerably below 30% for the 5-year spread.1-9Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-3 Percent Change in Median Home Values, Navarre View 2006-20101-10Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-4 illustrates value decreases in the Miramar Beach and Santa Rosa Beach areas.Sandestin maintained its high property values with minimal decreases as did Miramar Beachand Santa Rosa Beach. Census blocks southeast of Santa Rosa Beach experienced medianhousing value decreases above the median.1-11Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-4 Percent Change in Median Home Values, Miramar Beach View 2006-20101-12Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCrestview housing values in Figure 1-5 were some of the hardest hit from 2006-2010. Valueshere in 2006 were below the median in this rural community. A geographic cluster in thenortheast section of Crestview uniformly exceeded 35% loss of median home values.Throughout the state of Florida, it has been common to find some the largest decreases inhousing values in suburban and exurban areas were commute times are greatest to places ofemployment,1-13Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-5 Percent Change in Median Home Values, Crestview View 2006-20101-14Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTo summarize, relative to its neighboring counties, Okaloosa has had some of the highermedian home values in the Florida panhandle. Decreases in median home values have tendedto be slightly more severe than its neighbors. Prospects for future values in the short term aremixed. Opportunities for improvement are found in the expansion of military mission in the area,potentially driving additional in-migration to the County. The large amount of military owned landin Okaloosa could impede any rapid increase in supply of homes potentially pushing housingvalues upward. Several bills passed in this year’s state legislative session will ease restrictionson managed growth and facilitate construction of new homes.EmploymentServing employment centers with public transportation is essential to a community, particularlyin times of high gas prices. Much of the state of Florida has decentralized employment, leadingto challenges in designing transit routes that connect residents to their places of work. As canbe seen in Figures 1-6 and 1-7, employer density per square mile is highest in Fort WaltonBeach to the south and along the major corridors of Eglin Parkway, Beal Parkway andHollywood Boulevard. Destin also has a high concentration of employers in the leisure andtourist driven areas.In times of high unemployment, work trips taken on public transportation become proportionallylower than other trip purposes. However, as employment recovers and gas prices remain high,those re-entering the workforce may choose or be restricted to public transportation as a meansto commute. Centers of employment can become prime candidates for investment of transitservice resources.1-15Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-6 Employers per Square Mile, Fort Walton Beach View – 20101-16Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-7 Employers per Square Mile, Navarre View – 20101-17Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-8 Employers per Square Mile, Miramar Beach View – 20101-18Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-9 Employers per Square Mile, Crestview View – 20101-19Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANUnemploymentFigures 1-10 and 1-11 display concentrations of unemployment in locations surrounding FortWalton Beach. The median 2010 unemployment rate average of 9.95% is most closelyrepresented in Shalimar and north Fort Walton Beach. High unemployment ‘hotspots’ are foundin the darkest blue regions of the map, within blocks as high as 19% in the south of Fort WaltonBeach, approaching the coast. Unemployment is relatively low surrounding Niceville, MaryEsther and Eglin Air Force Base. Year 2015 concentration of unemployment remainsgeographically consistent, but with the hardest hit areas of unemployment gaining jobs on theorder of 4 to 5%.1-20Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-10 Unemployment Concentrations – 20101-21Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-11 Unemployment Concentrations – 20151-22Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 1-1 Civilian Labor Force Size and EmploymentCivilian% ofAreaLabor ForceLabor Force Employed86,051 80,350Okaloosa County(93.4%)American Community Survey - 2009IncomeFigures 1-12 through 1-15 display the per capita income by block group for Okaloosa County,years 2010 and 2015. This per capita income level distinction is an important value to isolatethose geographic areas where individual’s incomes exist to support the cost of a personalautomobile. The lower end of income is projected to change from $10,653 in 2010 to $11,947 by2015, a 12% increase. The upper average by block group is projected to increase by more than$6,000. The highest per capita income portions of the County are along the waterfront areaswhile the lowest are found in pockets of Crestview and Fort Walton Beach. Census blocks withlower per capita income will have a higher reliance on transit use.1-23Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-12 Per Capita Income View – 20101-24Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-13 Per Capita Income View – 20151-25Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-14 Per Capita Income, Miramar Beach View –20101-26Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-15 Per Capita Income, Miramar Beach View – 20151-27Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANAreaOkaloosaCounty$0-$9,999$10,000-$14,999$15,000-$24,999$25,000-$34,999$35,000-$49,999$50,000 &Over5.9% 3.9% 10.6% 10.7% 16.6% 52.2%Florida 7.3% 5.8% 12% 11.9% 15.8% 47.2%American Community Survey – 2009Table 1-2Household Income Distribution2009Okaloosa County has a lower percentage of households with income below the poverty linerelative to the rest of the state as shown in Table 1-2. These areas are some of the most relianton public transit as a means of transportation of any due to the high cost of personaltransportation. The annual cost of a vehicle, insurance and fuel is prohibitive to those lowincome households. The number of lowest income residents in Okaloosa County isproportionally smaller when compared to the rest of the State of Florida.1-28Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-16 Percentage of Households with Income under $20,000 - 20101-29Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-17 Percentage of Households with Income under $20,000 – 20151-30Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-18 Percentages of Households with Incomes Between $20,000 to $49,999 – 20101-31Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-19 Percentage of Households with Incomes Between $20,000 to $49,999 – 20151-32Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-20 Percentage of Households with Incomes Between $50,000 to $99,999 View – 20101-33Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-21 Percentage of Households with Incomes Between $50,000 to $99,999 View – 20151-34Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFamily HouseholdsFigures 1-22 and 1-23 display the 2010 and 2015 projected number of family households incensus blocks throughout Okaloosa County. Households refer to the people living in ahousehold, in this case those, which comprise a family. A family household is a household withone or more people related to a householder by birth, marriage, or adoption.1-35Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-22 Total Family Households – 20101-36Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-23 Total Family Households – 20151-37Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANHousing UnitsWhere the unit of value ‘households’ referred to the number of people living in a home, the term‘housing units’ refers to the structures in which people live. According to the census, ‘A housingunit is a house, an apartment, a mobile home or trailer, a group of rooms, or a single roomoccupied as a separate living quarters, or if vacant, intended for occupancy as separate livingquarters. Separate living quarters are those in which the occupants live separately from anyother individuals in the building and which have direct access from outside the building orthrough a common hall.’The measure of housing units per square mile demonstrates the potential for population densitythrough increased unit occupancy. A high density of housing units can be found in Destin,adjacent to Hurlburt Field and to the south of Crestview. The concentration of housing units persquare mile, coupled with a look at housing unit occupancy found in Table 1-3, can provideinsight into which geographic areas of the County could become more populated through betterutilization of existing housing. The unusually high vacancy rates in Destin and Miramar Beachare better understood through the definition of a vacant unit. A vacant unit may be one, which isentirely occupied by persons who have a usual residence elsewhere.1-38Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-24 Total Housing Units Per Square Mile – 20101-39Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-25 Total Housing Units Per Square Mile – 20151-40Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 1-3 Housing Unit OccupancyTotal Housing Housing Units Housing UnitsCity or PlaceUnits Occupied VacantFort Walton Beach 9,592 8,401 1,191Mary Esther 1,779 1,616 163Destin 13,672 5,294 8,378Niceville 5,695 5,241 454Valparaiso 1,939 1,712 227Crestview 9,153 7,654 1,499Defuniak Springs 2,713 2,160 553Freeport 919 702 217Miramar Beach 12,385 3,002 9,383Source : 2010 CensusFamily SizeThe average family size for Okaloosa County in 2010 is just below three persons per family at2.96. To compare, this value is exactly the same as that of Orlando (2.97) and less than thenational average family size of 3.14. The average family size for the state of Florida is 2.98.There are not significant changes in this value across the geography of Okaloosa County by theyear 2015, as seen in Figure 1-26.Larger families are found in the suburban Fort Walton Beach census blocks, whereas areasalong the coast are found to have smaller family sizes.1-41Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-26 Average Family Size –20101-42Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-27 Average Family Size –20151-43Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANHousehold SizeAccording to the U.S. Census bureau, the average size of American households has beendeclining for decades. A reverse in that decline has been found in recent years due to thegrowth in multi-generational households. There have also been notable trends found in the statewith increasing household size potentially due to higher unemployment leading to adult childrenmoving back in with parents.The 2010 average Okaloosa County household size is 2.48, which is projected to remainessentially unchanged by 2015. The average U.S. household size is 2.53 and has increased to2.48 in Florida. The patterns seen in family size are repeated in household size with largernumbers found in the suburban areas.1-44Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-28 Average Household Size – 20101-45Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-29 Average Household Size – 20151-46Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPopulationFrom 2000 to 2010, Okaloosa County’s total population has increased to over 180,000, or atotal of 6.1%. The county has grown considerably slower over the last decade compared to thestate as a whole, which has grown 17.6%. Much of that growth occurred over the first half of the2000’s, with the last several years bringing only minimal increases and in some cases, stagnantpopulation counts. Neighboring Walton County in that same time period has grown over 35%.Figures 1-30 and 1-37 showcase which areas of Okaloosa County are expected to seepopulation growth over the next 5 years. Increased population is forecast to take place;• Destin• Fort Walton Beach• Shalimar• Mary EstherDecreases in total population are projected in the area surrounding Crestview.1-47Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-30 Total Population Greater Fort Walton Beach View - 20101-48Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-31 Total Population Greater Fort Walton Beach View – 20151-49Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-32 Total Population Miramar Beach View – 20101-50Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-33 Total Population Miramar Beach View – 20151-51Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 1-4General Populations, Growth Rates 2000 - 2010Area20002010Population PopulationChangeOkaloosa County 170,498 180,822 6.1%Walton County 40,601 55,043 35.6%Florida 15,982,378 18,801,310 17.6%Sources: U.S. Census 2000/2010Table 1-5Population Growth for Cities, Towns and Census Designated PlacesCity or Place 2000 Population 2010 Population % ChangeFort Walton Beach 19,973 19,507 -2.3%Mary Esther 4,055 3,851 5.0%Destin 11,119 12,305 10.7%Niceville 11,684 12,749 9.1%Valparaiso 6,408 5,036 21.4%Crestview 14,766 20,978 42.1%Defuniak Springs 5,089 5,177 1.7%Freeport 1,190 1,787 50.2%Miramar Beach 2,435 6,146 152.4%Sources: U.S. Census 2000/20101-52Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-34 Population Density Greater Fort Walton Beach View – 20101-53Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-35 Population Density Greater Fort Walton Beach View – 20151-54Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-36 Population Density Miramar Beach View – 20101-55Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-37 Population Density Miramar Beach View – 20151-56Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED FORECASTSChapter 427 §427.011(1) of the Florida Statutes defines Transportation Disadvantaged (TD)persons as:"Those persons who because of physical or mental disability, income status, orage are unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation and are,therefore, dependent upon others to obtain access to health care, employment,education, shopping, social activities, or children who are handicapped orhigh-risk or at risk as defined in s. 411.202."Forecasts of TD PopulationTable 1-6 shows forecast of both types of TD population. There are two categories of TDpopulation in the State of Florida; the differences between them are specifically related tofunding arrangements. The first group is the "potential TD population" (also known as TDCategory I). This potential TD population includes disabled, elderly, low-income persons, andchildren who are "high-risk" or "at-risk."The second group of TD population (also known as TD Category II), includes those personswho are unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation. These persons areeligible to receive the same subsidies as those in Category I, plus they are eligible to receive TDTrust Fund monies for non-sponsored general trips. Thus, this population group is actually asubset of the potential TD population.1-57Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTD PopulationTable 1-6Forecasts of TD Populations in Okaloosa County2011-2015Year2011 2012 2013 2014 2015Category I 59,392 60,814 62,277 63,783 65,334Category II 14,437 14,755 15,081 15,416 15,761Source: Transportation Disadvantaged Population Estimates, Center for Urban TransportationResearch, College of Engineering, University of South Florida, 1993Tables 1-7 and 1-8 break down the Potential TD Population and TD Population groups inOkaloosa County. Persons in either of these population groups may be heavily dependent onsome form of public transportation.1-58Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 1-7Okaloosa County Potential TransportationDisadvantaged Population (Category I)2011SegmentsPopulationEstimatesPercent ofTotalPotentialTDDisabled, Non-Elderly, Low Income 850 1.4%Disabled, Non-Elderly, Non-Low Income 7,319 12.3%Disabled, Elderly, Low Income 904 1.5%Disabled, Elderly, Non-Low Income 9,030 15.2%Non-Disabled, Elderly, Low Income 2,224 3.7%Non-Disabled, Elderly, Non-Low Income 22,216 37.4%Non-Disabled, Non-Elderly, Low Income 16,849 28.4%Total Potential Transportation Disadvantaged59,392Population100%Source: Transportation Disadvantaged Population Estimates, Center for Urban TransportationResearch, College of Engineering, University of South Florida, 19931-59Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 1-8Okaloosa County TransportationDisadvantaged Population (Category II)2011SegmentsTransportation Disadvantaged, Non-Elderly, LowIncomeTransportation Disadvantaged, Non-Elderly, Non-Low IncomePopulationEstimatesPercent ofTotal TD Cat.II319 2.2%2,744 19%Transportation Disadvantaged, Elderly, Low Income 616 4.3%Transportation Disadvantaged, Elderly, Non-LowIncomeNon-Transportation Disadvantaged, Low Income, NoAuto, No Fixed-Route Transit6,156 42.6%4,602 31.9%Total Transportation Disadvantaged Population 14,437 100%Source: Transportation Disadvantaged Population Estimates, Center for Urban TransportationResearch, College of Engineering, University of South Florida, 1993Minority population in Okaloosa County continues to trend well below that of the rest of the stateof Florida. Most recent estimates from 2009 indicate nearly than 4 out of 5 persons in OkaloosaCounty are of a non-minority status. As a comparison, the rest of Florida has a non-minoritypopulation that represents 3 of every 5 residents statewide.Table 1-9Status of Minority and Non-Minority Populations within Okaloosa County2009Minority Status Minority Non-MinorityOkaloosa County 155,700 41,900Percentage 78.8% 21.2%Walton County 49,600 8,200Percentage 85.8% 14.2%State of Florida 7,443,100 11,364,100Percentage 39.6% 60.4%Florida Statistical Abstract - 20091-60Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANAGE DISTRIBUTIONSThe aging population should be considered a major factor in the strategic planning process andcontinuing development of public transit in the region.The age groups of persons less than 20 years and over 60 years are of particular interest in thisstudy. Those under the age of 18 are either too young to drive or do not have access to anautomobile. Similarly, the elderly often do not drive or do not have adequate access toautomobiles and, due to limitations sometimes resulting from the aging process, are no longerable and/or willing to drive. Therefore, persons in these two age groups typically rely more onpublic transportation for mobility.The population age distribution table shows an under 18 population in 2009 greater than of therest of Florida, exceeding 23%. Okaloosa County has higher percentage of its population of theworkforce age compared to the rest of the state. Okaloosa County’s population aged 65 andover is 2 percentage points lower than the rest of Florida.Concentrations of population aged under 20 years old are found in the suburban areas. Personsaged over 65 are found in high numbers in the coastal areas such as Destin.1-61Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-38 Persons Under Age 20 Per Square Mile – Fort Walton Beach View – 20101-62Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-39 Persons Under Age 20 Per Square Mile – Navarre View – 20101-63Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANAreaAge0 - 17 18 - 34 35-54 55-64 65-79 80 & overOkaloosaCounty46,239 45,507 56,138 23,047 20,091 6,575(% of totalpopulation)23.40% 23.03% 28.41% 11.66% 10.17% 3.33%Florida 4,189,734 3,975,488 5,166,927 2,218,206 2,239,765 1,017,099(% of totalpopulation)22.28% 21.14% 27.47% 11.80% 11.91% 5.41%Florida Statistical Abstract – 2009Table 1-10Population Age Distribution – Okaloosa County20091-64Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-40 Persons Over Age 60 Per Square Mile – Fort Walton Beach View – 20101-65Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-41 Persons Over Age 60 Per Square Mile – Navarre View – 20101-66Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTransportation CharacteristicsCommuter Inflow/OutflowFigure 1-42 displays the 2009 commute patterns in, out and within Okaloosa County. Theemphasis of the view within this map is to understand the patterns of commuters, where theylive and where they work. The colored arrows in the map represent the following on an averageweekday:• 58,713 people commute from outside to work in Okaloosa County• 30,614 people live in Okaloosa County and drive to work outside of it• 83,633 people live in Okaloosa County and commute to work within the CountyOf the 142,346 people working in Okaloosa County, 59%, or three in five originate in Okaloosa.These workers make up the candidate population for potential Okaloosa County work trips.1-67Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-42 Okaloosa County Commute Inflow/Outflow – 20091-68Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-43 Walton County Commute Inflow/Outflow – 20092009 LEHD Data1-69Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 1-44 Okaloosa County – Where People Who Work in Okaloosa County Live1-70Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFrom 2000 to 2009, Okaloosa County average commute times have increased from under 20minutes to more than 20 minutes. Fewer commuters tend to drive single occupancy vehicles (a2% decrease) and carpools have remained unchanged. However, public transportation use hasincreased .1% share of all work trips. This number is relatively small; it represents a muchlesser share than the state of Florida average of 2.3% of all work trips being taken by masstransit.AreaNumber of Vehicles AvailableZero One Two Three or MoreOkaloosa County 4.0% 32.0% 43.7% 20.2%Florida 6.5% 40.6% 38.5% 14.5%American Community Survey – 2009Table 1-11Distribution Vehicle Availability2009AreaOkaloosaCounty Year2000OkaloosaCounty Year2009Table 1-12Average Commute & Journey-to-Work Mode Split2009AverageCommuteUnder 20minutesTravelModeDriveAloneCarpoolPublicTransitOther82.8% 11.7% 0.3% 5.2%22.4 minutes 80.7% 11.7% 0.4% 7.4%Source: U.S. Census 2000 & American Community Survey 20091-71Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN(This page intentionally left blank)1-72Base Data


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCHAPTER TWOPUBLIC INVOLVEMENTPublic involvement in transportation is a required element for all transportation projects.Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs), transit agencies and the Florida Department ofTransportation (FDOT) all must maintain an adopted public involvement program (PIP) forplans, projects, and studies conducted in the transportation field. However, transportationprojects can be esoteric in nature and easily understood by planners and engineers but moredifficult to understand for the public. It is sometimes difficult to create a personal connectionbetween the planning process and how the process impacts people’s daily lives or their overallquality of life. In addition, the vast majority of the public in Okaloosa County is likely unaware ofthe intricacies involved in the Federal process of designating urbanized areas and thesubsequent impact on Federal formula grants, state and local transit funding. Since the primaryobjective of the Transit Development Plan for Okaloosa County is to bring further unification ofcitizens and transit services, an extensive Public Involvement Plan (PIP) is needed as part ofthe strategic element of this major update.Rule revisions for the development of Major Transit Development Plans and Annual Updates(Rule 14-73.001) have elevated the importance of public involvement in the planning process.The revised rule now requires that a Public Involvement Plan (PIP) must be submitted to andapproved by FDOT. This chapter summarizes the elements of the PIP and a progress report todate on the fulfillment of those elements.Public Engagement: A Regional ApproachWith the Florida-Alabama, Okaloosa-Walton and Bay County TDPs occurring simultaneously,there was a unique opportunity to position transportation regionally in the minds of theconsumers, communities and elected officials. With the ultimate long-term goal of addressingthe mobility needs of all residents of the urbanized areas of the six county regions, thispositioning during development of the TDPs would help communicate a “bigger picture” andvision for regional transportation.While all three TDPs remain separate with individualized survey questions and publicinvolvement plans (workshops, community events, review teams, etc.), each is united by acommon visual theme and concept. CUTR teamed with Bowstern, Inc., a marketing andcommunications firm, to execute the public engagement campaign.The campaign created for this purpose appropriately called residents to “Make Your Mark.” Thecore of the campaign is a logo used for all three TDPs in the region. The logo creates a call toaction for the residents to participate in the transit planning process. Figure 2-1 below displaysthe Make Your Mark logo.2-1Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-1Transit Development Plan Campaign LogoIn addition to the generic logo, there was a logo produced to be local to Okaloosa County.Figure 2-2 below shows the localized logo for the Okaloosa County TDP.Figure 2-2Local Transit Development Plan Campaign Logo2-2Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANDesign Elements for Execution:The specific call to action is for residents to participate in a survey that will help determine thefuture of public transportation services in Okaloosa County. The logo was then used as the corevisual element to develop a dedicated website, an e-blast template, banners for public events,business cards to hand out to residents at public events, and banners for websites to link to thededicated website. For this project, the website URL www.transitsurvey.org was selected. Figure2-3 below displays the landing page that all residents of the region would find upon accessingthe site. There are three portals to enter for the three sub-regions, and a note to residents ofWalton and Santa Rosa Counties regarding the fact that they may reside in different transitservice areas. Portions of Walton and Santa Rosa County are within the Ft. Walton BeachUrbanized Area.2-3Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-3Landing Page for www.transitsurvey.orgOkaloosa County Icon to the Right2-4Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-4 displays the page residents saw when clicking on the Okaloosa County icon. Thephotos were streaming banner photos.Figure 2-4Local Okaloosa County Page – www.transitsurvey.org2-5Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFinally, Figure 2-5 below displays the first page of the survey if residents clicked through toparticipate. Survey results will be discussed later in the chapter, but elements of the campaigncontinue.Figure 2-5First Page of Survey – www.transitsurvey.org2-6Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANDynamic Public EventsA non-traditional approach was usedin this public involvement campaignas an attempt to engage moremembers of the public. Many times,transportation projects are difficult toentice citizens to attend traditionalpublic meetings or workshops to giveinput into planning processes. Most ofthe public involvement eventstargeted a venue or location whereinpeople naturally congregate (i.e.malls, colleges, area attractions,church gatherings). In addition, we willwork to identify leaders in thecommunity who can help rally participation at various events amongst their pre-establishednetworks. Each event had a series of integrated materials by which people can participate inthe survey, including: Paper copies of survey in English and Spanish Laptops with internet access to complete survey at event Business cards with mark, slogan and website to complete survey at a later timeFigure 2-6 below show the large banners that were made for the campaign to display at eventsto identify the purpose of participation.2-7Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-6Vinyl Banners for Make Your Mark CampaignAt public events, if residents did not want to complete the survey at the event, a business cardwas available to give them an opportunity to complete the survey later at their own convenience.Figure 2-7 below shows the front and backsides of the business cards handed out to membersof the public.2-8Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-7Business Cards – Make Your Mark CampaignAn electronic blast, also known as e-blast, is a cluster of e-mail addresses compiled to provideongoing communications with residents regarding the planning process. An initial list wasassembled from available databases and residents could sign up on the website to receiveelectronic blasts. Figure 2-8 below displays a localized e-blast for the Okaloosa County TDP.2-9Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-8Electronic Blast – Make Your Mark Campaign2-10Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPublicityThe local press, including newspaper, radio and television news provided coverage of thecampaign as another means by which residents could be encouraged to participate in theprocess. Below is a summary of coverage for the Make Your Mark campaign in Okaloosa andsurrounding counties.Print / Online:Radio:TV:• North West Florida Daily News (online & print)• Gulf Coast Post –front page coverage• Bay Beacon Calendar• Coastlines (Official publication of the FWB Chamber of Commerce)• Destin Log• Crestview Bulletin• WUWF-NPR Radio• PSAs distributed to :o Cumulus Media (WYZB, WZNS, WKSM)o Qantum Communications (WFFY, WMXZ, WWAV)o WAAZo Saturday Special – WJSB• WEAR-TVTOTAL EARNED MEDIA IMPRESSIONS: 397,6282-11Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANElements of the Public Involvement PlanThe section above, Public Engagement: A Regional Approach, was designed to present thecreative elements of the Public Involvement Plan to maximize public participation in the transitdevelopment planning process. However, FDOT requires that a formal Public Involvement Plan(PIP) be submitted to address all of the elements of public involvement and requires that theTDP provide documentation of completion of the PIP elements. However, public involvement isdesigned to take place across the entire period of the planning process all the way through toadoption. This section provides a status update on public involvement activities to date.Public Involvement Plan ElementsA. – Project Management Team (PMT)Description: The PMT will provide overall management of the development of the TDP.An important responsibility of the PMT includes oversight of the PIP design,implementation and monitoring. The PMT will be composed of the Okaloosa CountyTransit (OCT) project manager, TPO project manager, Bowstern, and CUTR as well asadditional public involvement support staff on an ad hoc basis.The PMT will be continuously involved with all elements of this PIP and will be using theexisting Marketing and Public Relations resources of OCT, the TPO and local providers.It should be recognized that OCT views public involvement and participation as acontinuous on-going process beyond the limits of the development of just this major TDPUpdate. A number of public participation activities that were initiated by OCT before theTDP scope of work was initialized and will be utilized and incorporated into the TDP PIP.Status Update: The Project Management Team met regularly throughout thecourse of the TDP.2-12Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANB. – Steering CommitteeDescription: The Steering Committee will provide input into the development of theTDP. The Steering Committee will review and comment on the TDP during thedevelopment of the mission, goals, objectives, alternatives, and ten-year implementationprogram. The Steering Committee will be composed of staff, consultants, the WorkForce Development Board, FDOT District Three, and the following community interests:Agency RepresentationJobs PlusCity Fort Walton BeachSanta Rosa County StaffOkaloosa County StaffFriends of 30AWalton County‐ Tri County Community CouncilNorthwest Florida State CollegeBase Planner‐ Eglin AFBBase Planner ‐‐ Hurlburt FieldUnited Way/Social ServiceFort Walton Beach Chamber of CommerceTourist Development Council (TDC)Fort Walton Beach MedicalVocational Rehab.City of CrestviewCity of NicevilleCity of DestinAgency for Persons with DisabilitiesFDOT2-13Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANA. A complete list of Steering Committee members is attached as Appendix A.The steering committee met to discuss the TDP benchmarks and draft plan resultsa total of three times. Prior to scheduled dates, all steering committee membersreceived an email and phone call with meeting information. Steering committeemeetings were conducted on the following dates:o April 4, 20111:30 – 3:30 p.m.Emerald Coast Convention and Visitors Bureau1540 Miracle Strip ParkwayFt. Walton Beach, FL 32548Topics Discussed: Process for developing TDPso July 25, 20111:30 – 3:30 p.m.Fort Walton Beach Public Library185 Miracle Strip Parkway, SEFort Walton Beach, FL 32548Topics Discussed: Survey results, Goals and Objectives, T-BEST models,definition of alternativeso August 17, 201110 a.m. – 12 p.m.Crestview Chamber1447 Commerce DriveCrestview, FLTopics Discussed:ImprovementsEvaluation of Alternatives, Ten-Year Program of2-14Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANB. Okaloosa-Walton Transportation Planning Organization (TPO)Description: The TPO is composed of a policy board and various committees to fulfillthe State and Federal Urban Transportation Planning Process. The membership of theTPO board includes elected representatives from Okaloosa and Walton Counties, andCities of Crestview, Niceville, Defuniak Springs, Fort Walton Beach, Valparaiso, MaryEsther, and Destin.This element of the PIP provides seamless coordination and communication with theTPO process by utilizing existing planning, programming and committee relationshipswith transit through the course of developing the TDP by including the followingactivities:1. Coordination with TPO staff that includes participation in the TDP ProjectManagement Team (PMT) and the Review Team. TPO staff is specifically involvedwith the TDP scope of work.Status Update: TPO staff have been integrally involved with all phases andhave assisted with public involvement events.2. TDP process development updates and major milestones will be presented to theTPO Board, the Technical Coordinating Committee (TCC) and the Citizens AdvisoryCommittee (CAC).Presentations made to TPO Committees in July. Input sought: survey results,Goals and Objectives, definition of alternatives.3. Coordination with the Local Coordinating Board for Okaloosa County, servingtransportation disadvantaged constituencies.Status Result: TPO staff provided presentation to Local Coordinating Board inAugust.4. Coordination of TDP development with the Long Range Transportation (LRTP)Update.Status Update: TPO Staff, Okaloosa County staff and CUTR collaborated inexamining the route network in the LRTP and the routes to be tested in T-BEST. The LRTP map was changed to reflect a new route from Niceville toDestin via the Mid-Bay Bridge.5. Final Draft review of the TDP Update by TPO staff, presentations to TCC and CACas well as final endorsement by the TPO Board.2-15Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANStatus Update: Due to scheduling conflicts, TPO endorsement of the TDP willcome after adoption by Okaloosa County.C. – Public & Customer Outreach ActivitiesDescription: A number of activities will be utilized to communicate with and engagethe public in general as well as interest groups throughout the region. As referenced inelement B of this PIP, the Review Team will enhance this communication andfeedback process as liaisons with the groups they represent. This element of the PIPwill implement certain outreach activities to include:1. Dedicated web-site with survey of general public and transit riders – web-site willdetermine community’s attitudes, needs, desires and support for publictransportation. The survey instrument will be similar to surveys used in previousstudies of this type. The survey instrument will be available in paper version inboth English and Spanish. The paper version will also be downloadable in PDFformat. Links to the dedicated web-site will be placed on multiple web-sites whenpossible.Status Update: Completed and documented at the beginning of thischapter. General public survey results presented below.2. Public Workshops – opportunities will be sought to engage public participation atlocations where the public can provide input on public transportation. In the initialphase, public workshops will focus on the survey of transit needs as outlinedabove. In final phases, workshops will focus on goals and objectives,alternatives, and plan development as required by rule. Below is a list of venuesby phase for workshops. Table 2-1 below displays the events and workshopsthroughout the course of the TDP.2-16Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 2-1Events and Public WorkshopsDate Event / Agency Time Spent at Event LocationEstimated # inAttendance4/21/2011 United Way N/A Virtual Event 10,0004/21/2011 North West Florida State College 2 hours 100 College Blvd150Niceville, FL 325785/20/2011 Agency for Persons with Disabilities N/A Virtual Event 1306/1/2011 North West Florida State College 4 hours 100 College BlvdNiceville, FL506/2/2011 Westwood Senior Living Center N/A 1001 Mar Walt Drive Fort 135Walton Beach, FL6/3/2011 Okaloosa County Chamber of2 hours 34 Miracle Strip Parkway 300Commerce‐ Bowlegs BreakfastFWB, FL 325486/7/2011 White‐Wilson Medical Center N/A Virtual Event 3506/13/2011 Autism Support N/A Virtual Event 2226/25/2011 Latin Salsa Festival 3 hours Landing 139 NE Brooks St 1,000Fort Walton Beach, FL7/25/2011 Public Workshop 2 hours Public Library7(4– 6 pm) 185 Miracle Strip PkwyFort Walton Bch, FL8/16/2011 Public Workshop8/17/2011 Public Workshop2 hours(4 – 6 pm)2 hoursDestin City Hall Annex4100 Indian Bayou TrailCrestview Library73(4 – 6 pm) 1445 Commerce DriveCrestview, FL2-17Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN3. Discussion Groups with the MPO/TPO committees and the Local CoordinatingBoards. Discussion groups will entail transit image and profile, service levels,future service needs, markets, and community support.Status Update: The Goals and Objectives and evaluation of alternativeswere discussed with TPO committees in July.4. Stakeholder Interviews – CUTR will conduct key stakeholder interviews that willinclude County Commissioners, mayors, and others in the community tounderstand leadership views, opinions and community vision for publictransportation, including an understanding of constituent transportation issues.Status Update: CUTR conducted interviews with elected officials in earlyJune 2011. Interviewees included County Commissioners, the City ofCrestview, the City of Ft. Walton Beach, and the City of Destin. At the timethe interviews took place, the Tourist Development Council Board hadmade a motion to discontinue funding for their portion of routes servingthe U.S. 98 corridor.Elected officials consider economic circumstances in the County to besomewhat balanced. The collapse of the real estate market combined withthe Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill has deeply wounded Okaloosa County,which, according to the Florida Association of Counties, has the lowestcountywide millage rate in Florida. However, the mission expansion ofEglin Air Force Base is bringing an influx of population and Crestview feelsespecially well situation to provide housing because it is more affordablethan in southern portions of the County.When it was explained that previous TDPs for Okaloosa County were veryaggressive in terms of service areas and service expansion, electedofficials acknowledged that major initiatives from previous TDPs have to bescaled back. As such, many County Commissioners expressed that it isgoing to be difficult for the County to maintain the system in place now.Commissioners brought up the fact that they had forced the TDC tocontinue funding transit in the last budget year but did not feel itappropriate to do so again.The cities that currently have transit service, Ft. Walton Beach, Crestviewand Destin all feel that transit is a needed and necessary service. However,the cities expressed that they are not in a financial position to be able toassist the County in funding services. Destin indicated that they want2-18Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANpartnerships with the County in terms of making transit improvements inthe multi-modal transportation districts.Overall, elected officials do not see expansion of transit in the forseeablefuture, but many did mention that the Eglin expansion may drive futurepublic transportation improvements due to congestion on the County’snorth-south highways.5. CUTR will conduct an on-board survey of OCT’s current customers and routenetwork.Status Update: Completed and documented below6. CUTR will conduct a telephone market research survey of 350 households inOkaloosa County.Status Update: Completed and documented below.7. Other communication efforts will be used to seek TDP development awarenessand input to include the use of existing internet/website access for informationand comment.Status Update: In addition to the more formalized events, the teamincorporated personalized outreach amongst the following:oooooElder servicesFaith-based organizations & Local ChurchesArea Non-profitsLocal businesses & employersMilitaryWeb-based Survey MethodologyThe methodology employed to develop the web-based survey was to utilize telephone surveyinstruments used by CUTR and other consultants in the past and adapted to a web environmentsince telephone surveys are scripted. The instrument was designed to probe the public on thestrategic nature of the TDP, giving them a direct means by which to have input into the Goals2-19Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANand Objectives, Evaluation of Alternatives, and the Ten-Year Program of Improvements.Sections of the survey and the intended results are as follows:• Most Important Issues Facing Community: designed to help transit define its role inthe community;• Commute and means of commute: designed to determine currents modes used forcommuters;• County of Residence: designed to establish the regional nature of the survey inaccordance with all of the urbanized areas;• Community of Residence and Work: designed to establish the saturation ofcommunities represented in the survey and the heaviest concentrations of employment;• Recognition and Name Recognition of Transit Providers: designed to establish thepublic’s knowledge of the presence of transit providers;• Agreement with statements regarding Transportation Systems: designed toestablish the public’s overall issues and support for public transportation versus roadconstruction alternatives;• Agreement with Transportation Improvements: designed to establish the public’ssupport for intra-county and inter-regional transit connections in accordance with thePensacola Urbanized Area;• Importance of Public Transportation: designed to gain the public’s overall beliefs ofthe importance of transit in the community;• Agreement with Existing Service Improvements: designed to gain the public’soverall support for earlier morning, evening and weekend service improvements;• Agreement with Trip Purposes: designed to determine if the public has an overallpreference for which types of trip purposes public transportation should address;2-20Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN• Agreement with Statements regarding Funding of Public TransportationImprovements: designed to determine if the public supports funding for expansion andwhether there is a tolerance for new or additional taxes in which to achieve expansion;• Purposes for which survey respondents would consider using publictransportation: designed to determine how transit can lure potential customers toutilize public transportation;• Reasons for supporting public transportation: designed to assist OKALOOSA indevising a marketing campaign based on the messages the public will be mostresponsive;• Demographics: designed to determine the degree to which there is a broad base of thecommunity represented in the survey.Telephone SurveyIn addition to the web-based survey, a telephone survey of 350 households was conducted inOkaloosa County. The web-based survey instrument was used to form the foundation of thetelephone survey script. Some questions had to be eliminated due to time constraints. Thetelephone is a statistically valid sampling of the public such that there is a 95 percent confidenceinterval with a plus or minus 5 percent margin of error. When applicable, the results of thetelephone survey are presented side-by-side with the web-based survey results to form acomparison between the two.Web-based and Telephone Survey ResultsAs discussed in the opening sections of this chapter, the Mark Your Mark Campaign wasdesigned to encourage residents to participate in a survey to help determine the future of publictransportation in Okaloosa County. There were 885 completed surveys. The telephone surveycompleted 350 household surveys using Okaloosa County exchanges only.Web-based survey results show that traffic congestion are the most important issue (average4.23 on a scale of 1 to 5) with the rising costs of fuel and energy coming in as the second mostimportant issue (4.13) and jobs/new industries as the third most important issues (4.07).Telephone survey respondents responded that the rising cost of fuel and energy is the mostimportant issue (4.56), followed by education (4.49) and jobs/new industries (4.46).2-21Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-9Most Important IssuesQ1: In your opinion, what are the most important issues facing the Okaloosa and surroundingcounties? Please give your opinion on a scale from1 to 5, where 5 = most important, 3 = neutral and 1 = least importantIssueResponseTotalWeb SurveyResponseAverageTelephone SurveyResponseTotalResponseAverageRising costs of fuel/energy 701 4.13 350 4.56Education 685 3.82 350 4.49Jobs/new industries 703 4.07 350 4.46Hurricane preparedness 686 3.63 350 4.36Family incomes 685 3.67 350 4.26Water and Sewer infrastructure 686 3.42 350 4.25Traffic congestion 701 4.23 350 4.15Growth management (residential/commercial andindustrial development) 692 3.74 350 3.87Rising costs of housing 683 3.2 350 3.61Availability of new housing 685 2.78 350 3.012-22Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANA total of 78 percent of residents are employed outside the home in the web survey versus 54percent are retired in the telephone survey. Only 11 percent of web survey respondents areretired.Figure 2-10Employment StatusQ2: Please describe your employment Status: (please check one)Employment Status Web Survey Telephone SurveyResponseTotalResponsePercentResponseTotalResponsePercentEmployed full time outside the home 575 78% 96 27%Employed part time outside the home 19 3% 23 7%Self-employed/work in home 17 2% 17 5%Unemployed 16 2% 10 3%Student 18 2% 0 0%Homemaker 13 2% 16 5%Retired 83 11% 188 54%Total Respondents 737 100% 350 100%Participation in the survey in Santa Rosa County was strong with 33 percent of respondentsfrom Santa Rosa County in the web survey. A total of 64 percent of respondents are fromOkaloosa County in the web survey. As noted earlier, the telephone survey used OkaloosaCounty exchanges only such that 100 percent are Okaloosa County residents. Figure 2-11below displays county of residence.Figure 2-11County of ResidenceQ3: Please indicate your county of residence: (please check one)County of Residence Web Survey Telephone SurveyResponseTotalResponsePercentResponseTotalResponsePercentOkaloosa 468 64% 349 100%Santa Rosa 239 33% 0 0%Walton 10 1% 1


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANThe municipalities overall are well represented in both surveys with 33 percent from Ft. WaltonBeach, Destin and Crestview in the web-based survey versus 53 percent in the telephonesurvey. Niceville residents accounted for 21 percent of the telephone survey but only 6 percentof the web-based survey. In the web survey, 30 percent of respondents were from Navarre.Figure 2-12 below shows community of residence.Figure 2-12Community of ResidenceQ4: Please indicate your community of residence: (please check one)Web SurveyTelephone SurveyResponse Response Response ResponseCommunity of ResidenceTotal Percent Total PercentCity of Ft. Walton Beach 108 15% 79 23%City of Destin 34 5% 26 7%City of Crestview 90 12% 80 23%City of Mary Esther 54 7% 13 4%City of Niceville 47 6% 72 21%City of Valparaiso 5 1% 6 2%Town of Shalimar 17 2% 25 7%Navarre 219 30% 0 0%Navarre Beach 9 1% 0 0%Unincorporated Okaloosa County 100 14% 9 3%Unincorporated Walton County 2 0% 1


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANThree percent of respondents utilize public transportation for commuting outside the home inboth the web and telephone survey. A total of 79 percent drive alone in the web survey versus93 percent in the telephone survey. Figure 2-13 displays commuting patterns for surveyrespondents.Figure 2-13Commute PatternsQ5: If you commute to work outside the home, please indicate how you travel: (please checkone)Web SurveyTelephone SurveyMeans of Commute to WorkResponseTotalResponsePercentResponseTotalResponsePercentDrive Alone 580 79% 124 93%Carpool with one or more persons 49 7% 26 20%Public Transportation 21 3% 4 3%Bicycle 16 2% 11 8%Walk 5 1% 12 9%Total Respondents 730 100% 350 100%Respondents in both surveys were asked for the city or place of work. There is no clear primaryemployment center in Okaloosa with 24 percent of web survey and 23 percent of telephonesurvey respondents indicating Ft. Walton Beach as their place of employment. A total of 18percent of telephone survey respondents indicated working at Eglin Air Force Base compared to7 percent of web survey respondents. Figure 2-14 below displays community of work.2-25Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-14Community of WorkQ6: If you commute to work outside the home, please indicate the community orinstallation that best describes where you work: (please check one)Web SurveyTelephone SurveyCommunity of WorkResponseTotalResponsePercentResponseTotalResponsePercentCity of Ft. Walton Beach 171 23% 31 24%City of Destin 29 4% 11 8%City of Crestview 39 5% 16 12%City of Mary Esther 62 9% 4 3%City of Niceville 20 3% 14 11%City of Valparaiso 2 0% 1 1%City of Shalimar 7 1% 1 1%Cinco Bayou 0 0% 0 0%Laurel Hill 0 0% 1 1%Eglin Air Force Base 48 7% 24 18%Defuniak Springs 1 0% 3 2%Freeport 0 0% 1 1%Paxton 0 0% 0 0%Sandestin 2 0% 0 0%Beaches of South Walton 2 0% 0 0%Navarre 11 2% 0 0%Navarre Beach 1 0% 0 0%Unincorporated Okaloosa County 36 5% 4 3%Total Respondents 729 100% 132 100%2-26Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANIn Question 7, 57 percent of web survey and 78 percent of telephone survey respondentsindicate they have heard of organizations that provide public transportation, but in question 8,69 percent of web survey and 74 percent of telephone survey respondents indicated they haveheard of Okaloosa County Transit. This is very good recognition of transit within the community.Paratransit providers are usually less well known, but 44 percent of respondents indicated theyhave heard of Pensacola Bay Transportation. Figures 2-15 and 2-16 below display theawareness and name recognition of public transportation.Figure 2-15Awareness of Public TransportationQ7: Have you heard of any organizations that provide public transportation services inOkaloosa County?TransportationProvidersResponseTotalWeb SurveyResponsePercentTelephone SurveyResponse ResponseTotal PercentYes 364 57% 274 78%No 277 43% 74 21%Total Respondents 641 100% 348 100%Figure 2-16Name RecognitionQ8: What organizations have you heard of prior to taking this survey? (Check all that apply)Web SurveyTelephone SurveyName Recognition of Transit ProvidersResponseTotalResponsePercentResponseTotalResponsePercentOkaloosa County Transit (OCT) 498 69% 260 74%Pensacola Bay Transportation 55 8% 71 26%Walton County Transportation 26 4% 51 19%Tri-County Community Council 28 4% 45 16%Total Respondents 727 100% 427 N/A2-27Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANQuestion 9 probes overall issues related to transportation. A total of 71 percent of web surveyand 63 percent of telephone survey respondents believe that an effective public transportationsystem is important for the economy to grow with an overall average rating of 3.98 (web) and3.85 (telephone) on a 1 to 5 scale. Traffic congestion is a major problem for more web surveyrespondents than telephone survey respondents with a response average of 4.05 versus 3.54,respectively. The next highest average rating was given to the statement that respondentswould support funding for transit even if they do not use it with a rating of 3.8 in the web surveyversus 3.77 in the telephone survey. Respondents disagree that public transportation is only forthose who cannot afford or own a car in both surveys. Figure 2-17 below display the results forthis section.Figure 2-17Agreement with Statements Regarding Transportation SystemsQ9: Below is a series of statements about transportation systems in Okaloosa County. Pleaseindicate your agreement with statements on a scale of 1 to 5, where 5 = strongly agree, 3 =neutral and 1 = strongly disagree.Agreement with Statements Web Survey Telephone SurveyResponseTotalResponseAverageResponseTotalResponseAverageAn effective public transportation system isimportant for Okaloosa County’s economy to grow. 694 3.98 350 3.85Traffic congestion in this area is a major problem forme. 694 4.05 350 3.54It is a hardship to commute between Santa Rosa,Okaloosa and Walton Counties 690 3.67 350 3.35Building and widening roads is the best solution fortraffic congestion problems. 685 3.49 350 3.72Public Transportation is only for those who cannotafford a car or cannot drive. 692 2.03 350 2.62I would support my local government funding apublic transportation system even if I don’t use it. 694 3.8 350 3.772-28Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANQuestion 10 was designed to probe residents regarding new service areas, including parts ofthe urbanized area outside of Okaloosa County. Respondents in both surveys do not agree thatcurrent routes in Ft. Walton Beach, Destin and Crestview are sufficient for service coverage,receiving an average rating of 2.32 in the web survey and 2.75 in the telephone survey. Also,respondents in both surveys agree that more north-south routes in Okaloosa County areneeded, with an average rating of 3.71 in the web survey and 3.84 in the telephone survey.Figure 2-18 below displays results for transit improvements.Figure 2-18Agreement with Transportation ImprovementsQ10: Below is a series of statements regarding public transportation improvements forOkaloosa County residents and for what purposes. Please indicate your agreement withstatements on a scale of 1 to 5, where 5 = strongly agree, 3 = neutral and 1 = strongly disagree.Reaction to New ServicesResponseTotalWeb SurveyResponseAverageTelephone SurveyResponseTotalResponseAverageCurrent bus routes serving in Ft. Walton Beach,Destin and Crestview are sufficient for servicecoverage in Okaloosa County. 648 2.32 350 2.75There should be more bus routes connecting northand south Okaloosa County, such as the currentexpress route between Crestview, Niceville and Ft.Walton Beach 643 3.71 350 3.84There should be bus routes linking Niceville andValparaiso 642 3.33 350 3.15There should be bus routes linking Niceville andValparaiso to Eglin AFB 638 3.61 350 3.67There should be a bus route that connects Nicevilleand Bluewater Bay to Destin via the Mid-Bay Bridge 640 3.51 350 3.6There should be a bus route that links Destin withthe Beaches of South Walton 635 3.27 350 3.26Markets and Service AreasThe next set of statements was designed to probe respondent’s attitudes toward potentialmarkets and service areas for transit. This set provides the greatest divergence of agreementbetween the web and telephone surveys. Web survey respondents were very much inagreement that public transportation is good for tourists, employees of the hospitality industryand the military. However, telephone survey respondents were not in such agreement. Websurvey agreements disagreed that public transportation should serve residents traveling in2-29Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANOkaloosa County (average rating of 2.52) while telephone survey respondents were much morein agreement (average rating of 3.85). There is not significant support between either survey forservice between Okaloosa, Santa Rosa and South Walton Counties. Figure 2-19 below displaysthe results for this section.Figure 2-19Markets and Service AreasWeb SurveyTelephone SurveyMarkets and Service AreasResponseTotalResponseAverageResponseTotalResponseAveragePublic transportation is good for tourismand should serve tourists and employeesworking in the hospitality industry. 644 4.02 350 3.26Public Transportation is good for armedforces installations and should connectemployees and bases. 648 4.06 350 3.66Public transportation should serveresidents traveling to destinations inOkaloosa County only. 637 2.52 350 3.85Public transportation should serveOkaloosa County residents traveling todestinations in Santa Rosa County. 638 3.53 350 2.94Public transportation should serve SantaRosa County residents traveling toOkaloosa County. 641 3.6 350 3.09Public transportation should serve Beachesof South Walton residents traveling todestinations in Okaloosa County. 632 3.36 350 3.2Importance of TransitThe public had an opportunity to express that transit is either important or not important in bothsurveys. Figure 2-20 shows that the public agrees that public transportation is important forOkaloosa County.2-30Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-20Importance of Public TransportationImportance of Transit Web Survey Telephone SurveyResponseTotalResponseAverageResponseTotalResponseAveragePublic transportation is not important for residentsof Okaloosa County 638 1.8 350 2.26I believe it is important for Okaloosa County to havea public transportation system. 635 4.16 350 4.12The next series of questions was designed to determine if residents would prefer improvementsto existing OCT services rather than expansion into new service areas. First, there was notstrong agreement that improvements to existing service is the most preferred with this optionreceiving an overall rating of 2.6 in the web survey and 3.15 in the telephone survey. However,later evening and earlier morning service are the most preferred of improvements to existingservices. Figure 2-21 below displays the results of this question.Figure 2-21Agreement with Existing Service ImprovementsQ 10a: Below is a series of statements regarding public transportation improvements forOkaloosa County residents and for what purposes. Please indicate your agreement withstatements on a scale of 1 to 5, where 5 = strongly agree, 3 = neutral and 1 = strongly disagreeSupport for Existing Services Web Survey Telephone SurveyResponseTotalResponseAverageResponseTotalResponseAveragePublic transportation should not focus on newservice areas but should make improvements toexisting services. 638 2.6 350 3.15I would support: More frequent buses on existingroutes (more buses per hour). 632 3.43 350 3.55I would support: More service on Saturday andSunday 637 3.51 350 3.55I would support: More service earlier in themornings on weekdays 630 3.77 350 3.77I would support: Later evening service onweekdays. 633 3.75 350 3.572-31Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANQuestion 10b was a series of questions designed to determine the types of trip purposesresidents will support. Overall, residents think transit should serve all trip types with nosignificant difference in the results. Figure 2-22 below displays the results for this set, which wasnot probed in the telephone survey.Figure 2-22Agreement with Transit Trip PurposesQ 10b: Below is a series of statements regarding public transportation improvements forOkaloosa County residents and for what purposes. Please indicate your agreement withstatements on a scale of 1 to 5, where 5 = strongly agree, 3 = neutral and 1 = strongly disagreeSupport for Trip PurposesResponseTotalWeb SurveyResponseAverageI would support: Public transportation should linkresidents to jobs. 635 4.16Public transportation should link residents to healthcare. 634 4.12Public transportation should link residents togovernment and other services. 635 4.03Public transportation should link residents toshopping. 634 3.88Public transportation should link residents to publicschools, colleges and universities 633 4.06Question 11 was designed to probe residents on funding for public transportationimprovements. Although there is some support for local governments to raise revenues toexpand transit (overall rating of 3.75), the fact is that residents prefer that expansion of publictransportation occur with no new or additional taxes (3.42). This question is important forelected officials and jurisdictions because residents were not probed on which services theywould want reduced in order to fund expansions in public transportation. The important point isresidents do not want additional taxes right now in order to accomplish improvements. Figure 2-23 displays the results for this set in the web survey.2-32Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-23Agreement with Funding of Transit ImprovementsQ11: Below is a series of statements regarding public transportation improvements forOkaloosa County residents and for what purposes. Please indicate your agreement withstatements on a scale of 1 to 5, Where 5 = strongly agree, 3 = neutral and 1 = strongly disagreeWeb SurveyFundingResponseTotalResponseAverageIf local governments in Okaloosa County were toconsider allocating additional funds for a publictransportation system, I would be strongly opposed. 633 2.08If local governments in Okaloosa County were toconsider allocating additional funds for a publictransportation system, I would be neutral. 631 2.28If local governments in Okaloosa County were toconsider allocating additional funds for a publictransportation system, I would be strongly in favor. 636 3.75I would prefer that taxpayer funds be raised tosupport expanding public transportation with GasTax. 628 2.43I would prefer that taxpayer funds be raised tosupport expanding public transportation with SalesTax. 633 2.82I would prefer that taxpayer funds be raised tosupport expanding public transportation with Advalorem (property) tax. 631 2.19I would prefer that taxpayer funds be raised tosupport expanding public transportation with Nonew or additional taxes. 633 3.422-33Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANIn question 12, residents indicate that if they were to consider using public transportation thepurpose would primarily be for work. Only 12 percent of web and 11 percent of telephonesurvey respondents said that no one in their family would ever consider using publictransportation. Figure 2-24 below displays the results for this set of questions.Figure 2-24For What Purpose Would You Use The SystemQ12: If you or a member of your family considered using public transportation, for what purposewould you use the system? (Please check one)Trip Purposes if considering use of publictransportationResponseTotalWeb SurveyResponsePercentTelephone SurveyResponseTotalResponsePercentWork 436 66% 71 20%Health Care 143 22% 93 27%Government or other services 115 17% 2 1%Shopping 230 35% 68 19%Education 132 20% 23 7%Entertainment 206 31% 29 7%No member of my family would consider usingpublic transportation. 79 12% 40 11%Total Respondents 659 100% 488 100%Question 13 probed residents as to why they are in favor of supporting public transportation inOkaloosa County. A total of 3 percent each said that public transportation is good for theenvironment and 33 percent support public transportation because commute times are longerdue to traffic congestion. Figure 2-25 below displays the results for this set.2-34Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-25Reason for Supporting Public TransportationQ13: From the list below, please indicate the one reason that most closely reflects why you arein favor of supporting public transportation system in Okaloosa County?Web SurveyReasons for Supporting Public TransportationResponseTotalResponsePercentI (we) do not own a private vehicle. 15 2%My current source of transportation is notdependable. 12 2%My household has two working adults but only onevehicle available. 19 3%It is becoming too expensive to own and operate acar. 155 24%My commute time to work is longer because roadsare congested with traffic. 219 33%I believe public transportation is good for theenvironment. 236 36%I believe public transportation could enhancetourism and other industries. 183 28%I believe public transportation will provide access forthose seeking education and job training. 151 23%I (we) would have better job opportunities. 40 6%I am not in favor of public transportation. 59 9%Total Respondents 658 100%2-35Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANComparison of Demographics Web-based and Telephone SurveyMajor Overview Demographic Comparison• Age varied significantly between the web-based and telephone survey. A total of 66% ofweb survey respondents are between the age of 25-54; in the telephone survey, 74%are 55 or older.• Ethnicity is more in alignment between the two surveys with 82% of web surveyrespondents reporting an ethnicity of white compared to 87% of telephone surveyrespondents.• Household incomes for 2009 tended higher in both surveys with 61% of respondentsreporting income of $50,000 or more compared to 57% of telephone surveyrespondents.• Gender: males are 62% of the web-based surveys with the telephone survey at an exact50%-50% split between men and women.• Education varied most with high school education as highest level achieved. In thetelephone survey, 23% reported a high school education as compared to 7% in the websurvey. A total of 56% of web respondents reported a college or post-graduate degreecompared to 44% of the telephone survey respondents.Figure 2-26AgeQ14: Please indicate the range of your current age: (please check one)Age Web Survey Telephone SurveyResponseTotalResponsePercentResponseTotalResponsePercent0-17 2 0% 0 0%18-24 24 4% 2 1%25-34 98 15% 9 3%35-44 135 21% 24 7%45-54 192 30% 53 15%55-64 132 20% 83 24%65+ 65 10% 176 50%Total Respondents 648 100% 347 100%2-36Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-27Ethnic BackgroundQ15: Please mark below the ethnic background with which you associate yourself: (pleasecheck one)Web SurveyTelephone SurveyEthnicityResponseTotalResponsePercentResponseTotalResponsePercentWhite 519 82% 305 87%Black/African-American 37 6% 15 4%Hispanic 24 4% 4 1%Asian 13 2% 1


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-29GenderQ17: What is your gender: (please check one)Web SurveyTelephone SurveyGenderResponseTotalResponsePercentResponseTotalResponsePercentMale 396 62% 176 50%Female 240 38% 174 50%Total Respondents 636 100% 350 100%Figure 2-30EducationQ18: What is the highest grade of school you completed: (please check one)Web SurveyTelephone SurveyHighest level of educationResponseTotalResponsePercentResponseTotalResponsePercentGrade school 2 0% 3 1%Some high school 5 1% 13 4%High school graduate 42 7% 81 23%Some college or vocational school 232 36% 100 29%College graduate 213 33% 86 25%Post graduate 144 23% 66 19%Total Respondents 638 100% 350 100%2-38Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-31Working AdultsQ19: Number of working adults in household: (please check one)Web SurveyTelephone SurveyWorking Adults in HouseholdResponseTotalResponsePercentResponseTotalResponsePercentOne 251 39% 148 42%Two 292 46% 92 26%Three or more 37 6% 90 26%Retired/Unemployed 61 10% 16 5%Total Respondents 641 100% 346 100%Figure 2-32Number of children under 17Q20: Number of children 17 or younger in household: (please check one)Web SurveyTelephone SurveyNumber of children 17 or youngerResponseTotalResponsePercentResponseTotalResponsePercentZero 413 64% 277 79%One 112 17% 41 12%Two 76 12% 19 5%Three 29 5% 8 2%Four 8 1% 1


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-33Number of Seniors over 65Q21: Number of seniors (65+) in household: (please check one)Web SurveyTelephone SurveyNumber of seniors (65+) in householdResponseTotalResponsePercentResponseTotalResponsePercentZero 535 83% 148 42%One 60 9% 90 26%Two 46 7% 110 31%Total Respondents 642 100% 348 100%2-40Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANOn-Board Survey of OCT CustomersAn on-board survey of OCT customers was conducted June 2-3, 2011. CUTR used an on-boardsurvey instrument that has been used in past TDPs with updated route numbers. CUTR hiredthe firm of Kelly Services to provide surveyors on buses. A total of 181 surveys were returnedon weekdays for the Ft.Walton Beach, Crestview and Express route only. A separate surveywas conducted for routes serving Okaloosa Island, Destin, and U.S. 98 (presented after thissection). The results of the survey are presented below.Figure 2-34 displays the routes upon which customers were riding when completing the survey.Overall, each route is well represented on weekday except for the 14 Express.Figure 2-34Route Customers were Riding when Completing Survey2-41Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANMode of Access and Egress, Trip Purpose, and TransferringFigures 2-35 through 2-39 below display the following:• 50 percent of weekday customers walk three blocks or less to access the busstop (mode of access)• 66 percent of weekday customers were coming from home before their trip• 32 percent of weekday customers indicate their trip requires a transfer• 30 percent of weekday customers indicate shopping as their trip purpose and 25percent indicate work as trip purpose• 52 percent of weekday customers will walk three blocks or less to their finaldestination (mode of egress)Figure 2-35Mode of Access2-42Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-36Where customer was coming from to make tripFigure 2-37Transfer Required to Complete Trip2-43Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-38Where customers were going on their tripFigure 2-39Mode of Egress2-44Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANDrivers LicenseFigure 2-40 below displays that 60 percent of weekday customers do not possess a valid driverslicense.Figure 2-40Customer Possesses Valid Drivers License2-45Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANAbout 54 percent of weekday the base cash fare. Only 24 percent of customers use a monthlypass. Figure 2-41 below displays the fare media used to pay fares.Figure 2-41Fare Paid for TripFigure 2-42 below shows that 52 percent of weekday customers ride 4 days per week or more.Figure 2-42Number of Days per Week Customers Ride2-46Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-43 below shows that 76 percent of weekday customers use the bus because they donot drive, a car is not available, or they do not possess a valid driver’s license.Figure 2-43Reasons for Riding OCT2-47Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-44 below shows that 88 percent of weekday customers would either drive, ride withsomeone, bicycle, walk or take a taxi if they did not make their trip by OCT.Figure 2-44How Customers would make trip if not by busFigure 2-45 below shows that about half of weekday customers have been riding for more thantwo years and half than two years.Figure 2-45Length of Use2-48Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANThough youth and elderly are considered traditional transit markets, the two groups account foronly 15 percent of overall ridership. Figure 2-46 below displays the age distribution of OCTcustomers.Figure 2-46Age DistributionMale and female customers are split evenly on weekdays. Figure 2-47 below displays thegender of OCT customers.Figure 2-47Gender2-49Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANOver 86 percent of both weekday customers are either white or black. Figure 2-48 belowdisplays the ethnicity of OCT customers.Figure 2-48EthnicityA total of 83 percent of weekday customers have household incomes lower than $20,000. Thepoverty line is about $24,000 for a family of four. Figure 2-49 below displays the householdincome for 2010.2-50Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-49Household Income 2010Figure 2-50 below shows that 67 percent of weekday customers have no working vehicles in thehousehold. A total of 26 percent of weekday customers are one-vehicle households.Figure 2-50Number of working vehicles in household2-51Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANMore than 84 percent of weekday customers reside in Okaloosa County 12 months out of theyear. Figure 2-51 shows duration of residency.Figure 2-51Duration of ResidencyFigure 2-52 below shows that 35 percent of weekday customers desire regional travel either toNavarre or the Beaches of South Walton. Another 26 percent desire travel to Eglin or Hurlburtand just 11 percent desire travel to Niceville/Valparaiso.Figure 2-52Where customers would like to travel2-52Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-53 below displays customer satisfaction with 22 service characteristics on a 1 to 5scale, where 1 is least satisfied and 5 is most satisfied. Overall satisfaction with OCT is above4.0 for weekday customers. Weekday customers are least satisfied with the number of transfersrequired to complete trip and the frequency of service. Figure 2-54 following displays theaspects of service most helpful to customers if service were to improve. Weekday customerscited frequency and the latest times buses run on weekdays.Figure 2-53Satisfaction with Service Characteristics2-53Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-54Most Desired Improvements2-54Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANOn-board Survey of U.S. 98 RoutesFor this TDP update, a special survey was conducted of the routes serving Okaloosa Island(Route 20) and Destin (Routes 30, 32 and 33). The specific objective of this survey was todetermine the degree to which these routes are serving the tourist market. A total of 82 surveyswere completed with 68 percent of customers indicating they are a permanent resident of the Ft.Walton Beach/Destin area. With the small sampling of tourists (26 respondents), significantanalysis of the tourist market travel patterns and needs is not warranted. Subsequently theTourist Development Council decided to discontinue its funding participation in the Waveservice and the County has accepted the decision. Graphics for the special on-board survey arepresented below but with no further analysis.Figure 2-55Q1: Are you a permanent resident of Ft. Walton Beach/Destin area?Figure 2-56Q2: Are you a visitor to or seasonal resident of the Ft. Walton Beach/Destin area?2-55Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-57Q4: What is your primary reason for visiting the area?Figure 2-58Q5: When did you arrive in the area?2-56Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-59Q6: Are you traveling?Figure 2-60Q7: How many people are traveling with you?2-57Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-61Q8: When do you plan to leave the area?Figure 2-62Q9: How often do you visit the area?2-58Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-63Q10: Do you plan to return to this area for future vacations?Figure 2-64Q11: Do you have a car available during your stay in the area?2-59Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-65Q12: How many times have you used The Wave during your stay?Figure 2-66Q13: Please describe your status as a customer by choosing one of the responsesbelow:2-60Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-67Q14: What is the most important reason you choose to use The Wave?Figure 2-68Q16: How would you rate the following items in terms of your satisfaction withThe Wave?2-61Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-69Q17: Your age is…Figure 2-70Q18: Are you…2-62Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-71Q19: Are you…Figure 2-72Q20: What was the range of your total household income for 2010?2-63Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPublic Involvement ResultsMeasures of EffectivenessThe original PIP provided the following as measures of effectiveness for the overall purposes ofthe plan. Effectiveness measures were be defined as follows:‣ Total number of persons engagedo Events and Workshops: 12,350o Media Impressions (ratings & readership): 397,000o Meetings and presentations: Approximately 75‣ Total number of public involvement eventsoo9 public events3 public workshops‣ Total number of persons surveyedooo885 web-based and paper surveys350 households in telephone survey270 customer on-board survey‣ Total visits to website to complete surveysoTo be determined (see graphics below)‣ Total events in the greater Pensacola regionoo2 events in Niceville1 public workshop in Crestview‣ Total service recommendations in 10-year plan that result from public involvementoooMaintain existing system (elected officials)Weekday Evening service (web-based, paper, and on-board survey)New route: Niceville to Destin via Mid-Bay Bridge2-64Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-73 below shows the correlation between website visits and surveys taken. Figure 2-74below displays the surveys completed, publicity coverage, public outreach and events, and e-newsletters by month throughout the project.Figure 2-73Correlation between Website Visits and Surveys Completed2-65Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 2-74Completed Surveys, Publicity Coverage, Public Outreach/Events and E-Newsletters byMonth2-66Public Involvement


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCHAPTER 3PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONINTRODUCTIONThis chapter summarizes the results of the performance evaluation of Okaloosa County’s fixedroute and demand response systems operated by Okaloosa County Transit (OCT). Theperformance evaluation was conducted using a sample of peers, which were selected based onsimilar urbanized area demographics and operating statistics to Okaloosa County.The Purpose of Performance ReviewA performance review is one method of evaluating transit performance and consists of thoseaspects of the transit agency’s operation that can be measured quantitatively with data from astandard reporting instrument, in this case the National Transit Database (NTD). The NTDprovides a consistent reporting format over a period of years, allowing for the measurement ofperformance indicators over time and a comparison of performance indicators between transitsystems. However, a performance review does not provide insight into the quality of service orthe level of passenger satisfaction. On-board surveys and other surveying techniques mustcomplement the performance review in order to get a complete picture of the value of transit tothe community.In addition to understanding the limits of this analysis, caution should be exercised ininterpreting the meaning of the various measures. The performance review does not provideinformation regarding what aspects of performance are within the control of the agency andwhat measures are not. For instance, local policy decisions on land use, zoning, and parkingcan greatly dictate the types of services that will work for the community and therefore greatlyaffect performance. Another example is the operating expense measure, which can vary greatlybetween transit systems based on work rules and collective bargaining agreements.National Transit DatabaseTo receive federal funds, transit properties are required to report a variety of data in astandardized format to the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), resulting in what is known asthe National Transit Database (NTD). These documents provide standardized measures ofreporting that enable a more accurate comparison of information between properties. Since1979, when this reporting requirement was instituted, additional refinements in data collectionand reporting have increased the accuracy and comparability of the data.Data Reliability - All NTD data submitted to the FTA are subject to considerable review andvalidation through manual and automated methods. Each report is thoroughly examined by theFTA’s data analysts for identification of any errors or inconsistencies. The analyst then notifiesthe reporting agency of these errors and requires the agency to resubmit its data after3-1Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANaddressing the FTA’s concerns. Once the FTA is satisfied with the data, the final report isaccepted. The latest validated NTD data is from FY 2009. This report uses NTD data throughFY 2009 for the peer analysis and uses the most recent five complete years of NTD dataavailable (2005-2009) for the trend analysis. For this performance review, CUTR did not collectany original data or conduct any audits or on-site analyses.Data Definitions - To fully understand the data presented in NTD reports, it is important tounderstand the definitions of the terms. For example, "passenger trip" refers to an individualboarding a transit vehicle. A person riding a bus from the corner to the office takes onepassenger trip and a second passenger trip to return home. Likewise, a person transferring fromone bus to another is considered to have made two passenger trips to get to his or herdestination. In spite of these definitions and continued refinements in data collectionprocedures, there remain some discrepancies between systems as to how terms are definedand how information is collected. Accordingly, caution should be used in interpreting findings,especially for those variables that are more likely to be subject to variation in definitions.Performance Measure Categories - The evaluation measures that are used throughout theperformance review are divided into two major categories: operational measures and financialmeasures. These categories are further subdivided into general operational, vehicle, employee,service, and general financial and efficiency measures. Operational measures indicate theproductivity and effectiveness of day-to-day transit operations. Financial measures display theoverall expenses and revenues as well as the cost efficiency of the system. The substantialamount of data available through NTD reporting provides an opportunity to develop a largenumber of measures. Performance measures that typically provide a good representation ofoverall transit system performance have been selected for this review.3-2Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPART ONE: FIXED-ROUTE TRANSIT SERVICETable 3-1 lists the performance measures selected for the review of the fixed route transitservices.Table 3-1Selected Performance Review MeasuresFixed Route Transit ServicesOperational MeasuresFinancial MeasuresServiceService Area PopulationService Area DensityPassenger TripsPassenger MilesAverage Passenger Trip LengthRevenue MilesRevenue HoursVehicleVehicles Available in Maximum ServiceVehicles Operated in Maximum Service(VOMS)Revenue Miles per Vehicle in Max. ServiceAverage Age of Fleet (in yrs.)Expense and RevenueOperating ExpensesMaintenance ExpensesPassenger Fare RevenueAverage FareEfficiencyOperating Expense per CapitaOperating Expense per Passenger TripOperating Expense per Revenue MileOperating Expense per Revenue HourFarebox RecoveryEffectivenessVehicle Miles per CapitaPassenger Trips per CapitaPassenger Trips per VOMSPassenger Trips per Revenue MilePassenger Trips per Revenue Hour3-3Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANOCT: Year at-a glanceThe most recent year of NTD data available (FY 09) and the percent change from the previousyear of fixed route performance data for OCT are shown in Table 3-2 and 3-3. The source of thedata is the agency’s FY 2008 and 2009 NTD reports.Table 3-2Systems Year At-a-Glance – Operational MeasuresOCTPerformance MeasuresFY 09% ChangeFrom FY08Service Area Population 170,498 0.0%Service Area Density 852.49 0.0%Passenger Trips 172,122 -18.6%Passenger Miles 825,175 -19.9%Average Passenger Trip Length 4.79 -1.6%Revenue Miles 445,586 0.7%Revenue Hours 36,643 0.7%Vehicles Available 17 0.0%Vehicles Operated in Maximum Service 14 0.0%Revenue Miles per Veh. in Max. Service (000) 31.83 0.7%Average Age of Fleet (in years) 2.2 83.3%Revenue Miles per Capita 2.61 0.7%Passenger Trips per Capita 1.01 -18.6%Passenger Trips per Veh. in Max. Service (000) 12.29 -18.6%Passenger Trips per Revenue Mile 0.39 -19.1%Passenger Trips per Revenue Hour 4.70 -19.1%3-4Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 3-3Systems Year At-a-Glance – Financial MeasuresPerformance MeasuresFY 09OCT% ChangeFrom FY08Operating Expense $1,099,672 -3.1%Maintenance Expense $122,000 31.9%Passenger Fare Revenue $103,140 54.1%Average Fare $0.60 89.2%Operating Expense per Capita $6.45 -3.1%Operating Expense per Passenger Trip $6.39 19.0%Operating Expense per Revenue Mile $2.47 -3.8%Operating Expense per Revenue Hour $30.01 -3.7%Farebox Recovery 9.4% 59.0%FIXED ROUTE PEER AND TREND ANALYSISUtilizing OCT’s NTD reports, a fixed route trend analysis was conducted for OCT for FY 2005 toFY 2009. Performance measures are grouped into categories and presented in tabular form(Tables 3-5 and 3-6), including the percent change for each measure for the trend period.A fixed-route peer review analysis was also conducted to compare OCT’s performance withother similar transit systems in the United States. The Florida Transit Information System onlineprogram (FTIS), which was jointly developed by FDOT and the Lehman Center forTransportation Research (LCTR) at Florida International University (FIU), was utilized to selectpotential peer systems using the methodology outlined in TCRP Report 141 – A Methodologyfor Performance Measurement and Peer Comparison in the Public Transportation Industry.Selected data from 2006 American Community Survey (ACS) data is utilized by this FTISmethod.The methodology calculates a likeness score for each measure and then averages the likenessscore across all variables. In addition, Vehicles in Maximum Service (a FY 2009 NTD measure)was added to the analysis and likeness scores were calculated for it as well. The ten systemswith the closest likeness scores to OCT (values closest to zero) were selected as peer systemsfor this analysis.3-5Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 3-4OCT Fixed Route Peer Systems, FY 2009Selected Peer SystemsBay County Council on Aging (Panama City, FL)City of Huntsville – Public Transportation Division (Hunstville, AL)Senior Resource Association – Indian River County (Vero Beach, FL)High Point Transit (High Point, NC)Michiana Area Council of Governments (South Bend, IN)Washington County Transportation Department (Hagerstown, MD)Spartanburg Transit System (Spartanburg, SC)Tuscaloosa County Parking and Transit Authority (Tuscaloosa, AL)Hill County Transit District (San Saba, TX)Council on Aging of St. Lucie, Inc. (Fort Pierce, FL)Graphics throughout this chapter (Figures 3-1 through 3-26) illustrate the selected operationaland financial measures. There are two types of graphs displayed: trend area graphs and peergroup bar graphs. The two trend area graphs show OCT’s trends for each performancemeasure. The percent change over the period is shown at the top right of each graph. The peergroup graph shows OCT’s performance in relation to its peer systems for the most recentvalidated year of data, FY 2009. The peer mean of the entire group is displayed with a black barand a vertical black line. OCT values are shown with a light blue bar. All other systems areshown with bright green bars.A peer summary is also included to compare OCT to its peer group as a whole (minimum,mean, and maximum values for each performance measure).Operational Performance MeasuresService MeasuresService area population is calculated using a formula (area around ¾ of a mile from service)specified by the National Transit Database (NTD). Most agencies do not update this figure onan annual basis and therefore it remains unchanged over the trend period. This was the casewith OCT, with its service area population remaining unchanged at 170,498. Compared to thepeer group, OCT ranked third, 17.4 percent above the peer mean for this measure.3-6Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-1Service Area Population (in thousands)TrendUnch.3002401801206002005 2006 2007 2008 2009San Saba, TXSt. Lucie, FLOkaloosaPeer MeanSouth Bend, INHunstville, ALTuscaloosa, ALIndian River, FLHigh Point, NCBay County, FLSpartansburg, SCHagerstown, MDPeers (FY2009)0 100 200 300 400 500Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009OCT’s service area density was also unchanged over the trend period (because the servicearea population was unchanged). Okaloosa ranked below the peer mean for this measure.Figure 3-2Service Area Density (Population per Sq. Mile)TrendUnch.1,5001,20090060030002005 2006 2007 2008 2009South Bend, INHigh Point, NCHunstville, ALBay County, FLSpartansburg, SCPeer MeanOkaloosaTuscaloosa, ALHagerstown, MDIndian River, FLSt. Lucie, FLSan Saba, TXPeers (FY2009)0 750 1,500 2,250 3,000Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Ridership has increased dramatically for OCT over the five-year period by 142 percent, althoughit declined after a peak in FY 2008. OCT still ranks next to last among its peer group for thismeasure (and 56 percent below the peer mean), ahead of only the St. Lucie Council on Aging.3-7Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-3Passenger Trips (in thousands)Trend 142%3002401801206002005 2006 2007 2008 2009High Point, NCIndian River, FLSpartansburg, SCBay County, FLPeer MeanHagerstown, MDSan Saba, TXHunstville, ALTuscaloosa, ALSouth Bend, INOkaloosaSt. Lucie, FLPeers (FY2009)0 250 500 750 1,000Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009The number of passenger miles is a NTD measure that multiplies the number of passenger tripsby the average passenger trip length to estimate the total number of miles passengers traveled.In some regards, passenger miles more accurately portray actual utilization of the bus systemsince a system could have a high volume of short passenger trips while the bus is empty for amajority of its trip. Passenger miles at OCT increased 109 percent over the trend period, butOCT still ranked last among its peers for this measure in FY 2009.Figure 3-4Passenger Miles (in thousands)Trend 109%1,5001,20090060030002005 2006 2007 2008 2009Indian River, FLSpartansburg, SCSan Saba, TXBay County, FLHigh Point, NCPeer MeanHunstville, ALSouth Bend, INHagerstown, MDTuscaloosa, ALSt. Lucie, FLOkaloosaPeers (FY2009)0 750 1,500 2,250 3,000Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-8Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANThe average passenger trip length for OCT decreased 14 percent over the five-year trendperiod. OCT ranked seventh in this measure, 9.9 percent below the peer mean.Figure 3-5Average Passenger Trip Length (Miles)Trend 14%864202005 2006 2007 2008 2009St. Lucie, FLSouth Bend, INSan Saba, TXPeer MeanTuscaloosa, ALHunstville, ALBay County, FLOkaloosaSpartansburg, SCIndian River, FLHagerstown, MDHigh Point, NCPeers (FY2009)0 2 4 6 8 10Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Revenue miles of service is one measure that gives an indication of the level of service providedby a transit system. OCT’s revenue miles of service measure increased 15 percent over thetrend period from approximately 388,000 to 446,000. This placed OCT fourth among its peergroup.Figure 3-6Revenue Miles (in thousands)Trend 15%90060030002005 2006 2007 2008 2009Hunstville, ALBay County, FLSan Saba, TXOkaloosaSouth Bend, INHagerstown, MDHigh Point, NCPeer MeanIndian River, FLSpartansburg, SCSt. Lucie, FLTuscaloosa, ALPeers (FY2009)0 150 300 450 600 750Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-9Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANRevenue hours of service is another measure of the amount of service provided. OCT’s revenuehours of service increased 23 percent over the trend period as shown in Figure 7. OCT rankedsecond in revenue hours, trailing only the system in the City of Huntsville, AL.Figure 3-7Revenue Hours (in thousands)Trend 23%60504030201002005 2006 2007 2008 2009Hunstville, ALOkaloosaSan Saba, TXIndian River, FLHigh Point, NCSouth Bend, INBay County, FLPeer MeanHagerstown, MDSpartansburg, SCSt. Lucie, FLTuscaloosa, ALPeers (FY2009)0 10 20 30 40 50Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Vehicle MeasuresFigures 3-8, 3-9, and 3-10 depict the peer and trend data for vehicles available and operated inmaximum service. These two measures were combined into one graphic to depict OCT’s overallvehicle trend. OCT has increased its vehicle fleet 13 percent and its vehicles operated inmaximum service 17 percent. OCT’s FY 2009 vehicle data places it fourth in total vehicles andfirst in vehicles operated in maximum service as compared to its peer group.Figure 3-8Total Vehicles and Vehicles in Maximum Service30Trend13%17%24vehiclesvoms1812602005 2006 2007 2008 20093-10Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-9 Figure 3-10Total VehiclesVehicles in Maximum ServiceHunstville, ALSan Saba, TXIndian River, FLOkaloosaHigh Point, NCPeer MeanSt. Lucie, FLHagerstown, MDBay County, FLSpartansburg, SCSouth Bend, INTuscaloosa, ALPeers (FY2009)OkaloosaHunstville, ALSan Saba, TXHigh Point, NCIndian River, FLBay County, FLPeer MeanSt. Lucie, FLSpartansburg, SCHagerstown, MDSouth Bend, INTuscaloosa, ALPeers (FY2009)0 6 12 18 24 300 5 10 15 20Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Revenue miles per vehicle in maximum service is a measure showing the degree of utilization ofeach vehicle in service. The larger the number of revenue miles, the more demand is placedupon each vehicle. Figure 3-11 shows that OCT’s revenue miles per vehicle in maximumservice declined 2 percent over the trend period. Okaloosa ranked near the bottom of the peergroup (22 percent below the peer mean) indicating that compared to its peers, OCT isunderutilizing the fleet.Figure 3-11Revenue Miles Per Vehicles in Maximum Service (in thousands)Trend 2%504030201002005 2006 2007 2008 2009South Bend, INHagerstown, MDHunstville, ALBay County, FLSan Saba, TXPeer MeanHigh Point, NCSpartansburg, SCIndian River, FLOkaloosaTuscaloosa, ALSt. Lucie, FLPeers (FY2009)0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-11Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANThe average age of OCT’s fleet decreased 3-12 percent over the trend period with largefluctuations. FY 2007 and 2008 data indicates that OCT purchased new vehicles during thattime. OCT has the youngest fixed route fleet of any of its peer systems and is 61 percentyounger than the peer mean.Figure 3-12Average Age of Fleet (Years)Trend 12%5432102005 2006 2007 2008 2009OkaloosaHunstville, ALSouth Bend, INHigh Point, NCIndian River, FLSan Saba, TXTuscaloosa, ALPeer MeanSt. Lucie, FLBay County, FLHagerstown, MDSpartansburg, SCPeers (FY2009)0 2 4 6 8 10Effectiveness MeasuresSource: National Transit Database 2005-2009Revenue miles per capita is the amount of service supplied divided by the service areapopulation. OCT’s revenue miles per capita rose 15 percent over the trend period, which is thesame increase as revenue miles since the service area population was not adjusted. Okaloosaranked eighth, 32 percent lower than the peer group mean.Figure 3-13Revenue Miles per CapitaTrend 15%5432102005 2006 2007 2008 2009Hagerstown, MDBay County, FLHunstville, ALHigh Point, NCSpartansburg, SCPeer MeanIndian River, FLSouth Bend, INOkaloosaTuscaloosa, ALSan Saba, TXSt. Lucie, FLPeers (FY2009)0 2 4 6 8 10Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-12Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFour measures that reveal the service effectiveness of a fixed route system are passenger tripsper capita, passenger trips per vehicle operated in maximum service, passenger trips perrevenue mile, and passenger trips per revenue hour. The peer and trend data for OkaloosaCounty is shown in the next set of Figures (3-14 through 3-17). Okaloosa increasedsubstantially in all four measures (almost doubling). There were considerable increases in allfour measures between FY 2005-2008, but declined in FY 2009. Despite these increases,Okaloosa still ranked at the bottom or near the bottom of the peer group for all four of thesemeasures.Figure 3-14Passenger Trips Per CapitaTrend 142%2.01.51.00.50.02005 2006 2007 2008 2009Hagerstown, MDHigh Point, NCSpartansburg, SCIndian River, FLBay County, FLPeer MeanHunstville, ALTuscaloosa, ALSouth Bend, INOkaloosaSan Saba, TXSt. Lucie, FLPeers (FY2009)0 2 4 6 8 10Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Figure 3-15Passenger Trips Per Vehicles in Max. ServiceTrend 107%201510502005 2006 2007 2008 2009High Point, NCSpartansburg, SCIndian River, FLHagerstown, MDPeer MeanBay County, FLSan Saba, TXTuscaloosa, ALHunstville, ALSouth Bend, INSt. Lucie, FLOkaloosaPeers (FY2009)0 20 40 60 80Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-13Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-16Passenger Trips Per Revenue MileTrend 111%0.60.50.40.30.20.10.02005 2006 2007 2008 2009Spartansburg, SCHigh Point, NCIndian River, FLPeer MeanHagerstown, MDTuscaloosa, ALBay County, FLSan Saba, TXHunstville, ALSt. Lucie, FLSouth Bend, INOkaloosaPeers (FY2009)0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Figure 3-17Passenger Trips Per Revenue HourTrend 96%864202005 2006 2007 2008 2009High Point, NCSpartansburg, SCIndian River, FLBay County, FLPeer MeanHagerstown, MDTuscaloosa, ALSan Saba, TXHunstville, ALSouth Bend, INSt. Lucie, FLOkaloosaPeers (FY2009)0 6 12 18 24 30Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-14Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 3-5 shows OCT’s operational measures for FY 2005 through FY 2009 as well as thepercent change over the trend period.Table 3-5Trend Analysis – Okaloosa Operational MeasuresMeasure FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009% Change2005-2009Service Area Population 170,498 170,498 170,498 170,498 170,498 0.0%Service Area Density 852.49 852.49 852.49 852.49 852.49 0.0%Passenger Trips 71,193 108,404 169,389 211,330 172,122 141.8%Passenger Miles 394,800 507,250 811,155 1,030,013 825,175 109.0%Average Passenger TripLength5.55 4.68 4.79 4.87 4.79 -13.5%Revenue Miles 388,282 416,851 488,929 442,358 445,586 14.8%Revenue Hours 29,702 30,508 38,154 36,404 36,643 23.4%Vehicles Available 15 17 17 17 17 13.3%Vehicles Operated in Max.Service 12 14 14 14 14 16.7%3-15Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 3-5 (Continued)Trend Analysis – Okaloosa Operational MeasuresMeasure FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009%Change2005-2009Rev. Miles per Veh in Max.Service32.36 29.78 34.92 31.60 31.83 -1.6%Average Age of Fleet 2.50 3.10 2.40 1.20 2.20 -12.0%Revenue Miles per Capita 2.28 2.44 2.87 2.59 2.61 14.8%Passenger Trips perCapitaPassenger Trips perVOMS (000’s)Passenger Trips per RevMilePassenger Trips per RevHour0.42 0.64 0.99 1.24 1.01 141.8%5.93 7.74 12.10 15.10 12.29 107.2%0.18 0.26 0.35 0.48 0.39 110.7%2.40 3.55 4.44 5.81 4.70 96.0%Financial Performance MeasuresExpense and Revenue MeasuresFigure 3-18 shows that OCT’s operating expenses increased 117 percent over the five-yeartrend period. Despite this large increase, OCT still ranked next to last for this measure, onlygreater than the Tuscaloosa County Parking and Transit Authority in Tuscaloosa, AL.3-16Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-18Operating Expenses (in thousands $)$1,500$1,200$900$600$300$0Trend 117%2005 2006 2007 2008 2009High Point, NCSan Saba, TXHunstville, ALSpartansburg, SCPeer MeanHagerstown, MDSouth Bend, INBay County, FLSt. Lucie, FLIndian River, FLOkaloosaTuscaloosa, ALPeers (FY2009)$0 $750 $1,500 $2,250 $3,000Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009As a subset of total operating expenses, OCT’s maintenance expenses increased at an evenfaster rate – 320 percent, although Okaloosa was still 66 percent below the peer mean.Figure 3-19Maintenance Expenses (in thousands $)$200$160$120$80$40$0Trend 320%2005 2006 2007 2008 2009South Bend, INSan Saba, TXHunstville, ALPeer MeanHagerstown, MDSpartansburg, SCSt. Lucie, FLHigh Point, NCIndian River, FLTuscaloosa, ALOkaloosaPeers (FY2009)$0 $150 $300 $450 $600 $750Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009OCT’s passenger fares collected measure increased 340 percent over the five-year trendperiod, with a steady increase every year. This placed OCT ahead of its fellow Florida systemsin St. Lucie and Indian River Counties. It is important to note that Indian River County does notcharge a fare, but accepts donations, which are not reported to the NTD.3-17Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-20Passenger Fares (in thousands $)$160$120$80$40$0Trend 340%2005 2006 2007 2008 2009High Point, NCHagerstown, MDBay County, FLSpartansburg, SCPeer MeanHunstville, ALSan Saba, TXSouth Bend, INTuscaloosa, ALOkaloosaSt. Lucie, FLIndian River, FLPeers (FY2009)$0 $100 $200 $300 $400 $500Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Average fare is calculated by dividing the total passenger fare revenue by the total number ofpassengers. Average fare may be higher in systems that do not offer a special rate for transfers,but require passengers to pay full fare for each trip. The average fare may be lower in systemsin which passengers utilize discounted daily or monthly passes. In the case of OCT, the averagefare increased 82 percent, with the greatest change occurring in FY 2009 after the measurestayed relatively constant during the prior three years. Okaloosa ranked 5 th among its peers and11 percent higher than the peer mean.Figure 3-21Average Fare$1.00$0.75$0.50$0.25$0.00Trend 82%2005 2006 2007 2008 2009South Bend, INHagerstown, MDBay County, FLTuscaloosa, ALOkaloosaHigh Point, NCSt. Lucie, FLPeer MeanHunstville, ALSan Saba, TXSpartansburg, SCIndian River, FLPeers (FY2009)$0.00 $0.25 $0.50 $0.75 $1.00Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-18Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANEfficiency MeasuresThe first set of efficiency measures use the overall operating expense and other performancemeasures to create ratios of cost efficiency. The measures include operating expenses percapita, per passenger trip, per revenue mile and per revenue hour. Figures 3-22 through 3-25display OCT’s peer and trend data for these measures. OCT had increases in three of the fourmeasures, with operating expenses per passenger trip being the lone exception with a 10percent decrease (as passenger trips rose at a faster rate than operating expenses). In thesefigures, the peer graphics show the most efficient agencies from top to bottom (lower values).OCT ranked at or near the top for three of the four measures, while ranking ninth in operatingexpenses per passenger trip.Figure 3-22Operating Expense Per Capita$10.00$8.00$6.00$4.00$2.00$0.00Trend 117%2005 2006 2007 2008 2009St. Lucie, FLSan Saba, TXTuscaloosa, ALOkaloosaIndian River, FLSouth Bend, INHunstville, ALBay County, FLPeer MeanHigh Point, NCSpartansburg, SCHagerstown, MDPeers (FY2009)$0.00 $10.00 $20.00 $30.00 $40.00Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Figure 3-23Operating Expense Per Passenger Trip$12.00$9.00$6.00$3.00$0.00Trend 10%2005 2006 2007 2008 2009Indian River, FLHigh Point, NCBay County, FLSpartansburg, SCHagerstown, MDTuscaloosa, ALPeer MeanSan Saba, TXHunstville, ALOkaloosaSouth Bend, INSt. Lucie, FLPeers (FY2009)$0.00 $3.00 $6.00 $9.00 $12.00Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-19Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-24Operating Expense Per Revenue Mile$4.00$3.00$2.00$1.00$0.00Trend 89%2005 2006 2007 2008 2009OkaloosaBay County, FLHunstville, ALIndian River, FLSouth Bend, INHagerstown, MDTuscaloosa, ALPeer MeanSan Saba, TXSt. Lucie, FLHigh Point, NCSpartansburg, SCPeers (FY2009)$0.00 $2.00 $4.00 $6.00 $8.00Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Figure 3-25Operating Expense Per Revenue Hour$50.00$40.00$30.00$20.00$10.00$0.00Trend 76%2005 2006 2007 2008 2009OkaloosaIndian River, FLBay County, FLTuscaloosa, ALHunstville, ALSouth Bend, INPeer MeanHagerstown, MDSan Saba, TXSt. Lucie, FLHigh Point, NCSpartansburg, SCPeers (FY2009)$0.00 $25.00 $50.00 $75.00 $100.00Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-20Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFarebox recovery is a ratio that shows the amount an agency receives in the form of passengerfares as a percentage of total operating expenses. OCT’s farebox recovery rate increased 103percent over the five year period, from 4.6 percent to 9.4 percent. This is still on the low endcompared to its peers that have an average farebox recover rate of 12.5 percent.Figure 3-26Farebox Recovery25%20%15%10%5%0%Trend 103%2005 2006 2007 2008 2009Bay County, FLHigh Point, NCHagerstown, MDTuscaloosa, ALSpartansburg, SCPeer MeanSouth Bend, INHunstville, ALOkaloosaSan Saba, TXSt. Lucie, FLIndian River, FLPeers (FY2009)0% 10% 20% 30% 40%Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Table 3-6 shows Okaloosa’s financial measures for FY 2005 through FY 2009 as well as thepercent change over the trend period.3-21Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 3-6Trend Analysis – Okaloosa Financial MeasuresMeasure FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009%Change2005-2009Operating Expense $507,239 $799,479 $979,510 $1,134,692 $1,099,672 116.8%Maintenance Expense $29,036 $67,680 $80,840 $92,500 $122,000 320.2%Passenger FareRevenue $23,426 $32,619 $54,694 $66,941 $103,140 340.3%Average Fare $0.33 $0.30 $0.32 $0.32 $0.60 82.1%Operating ExpensePer Capita $2.98 $4.69 $5.74 $6.66 $6.45 116.8%Operating ExpensePer Passenger Trip $7.12 $7.37 $5.78 $5.37 $6.39 -10.3%Operating ExpensePer Revenue Mile $1.31 $1.92 $2.00 $2.57 $2.47 88.9%Operating ExpensePer Revenue Hour $17.08 $26.21 $25.67 $31.17 $30.01 75.7%Farebox Recovery 4.6% 4.1% 5.6% 5.9% 9.4% 103.1%Peer SummaryA summary of OCT as compared to its peers for the selected operational measures is displayedin the table and figure below. Table 3-7 shows OCT’s values for the operational measures andhow they compare to the peer group mean. Figure 27 shows how OCT’s values compare to thepeer group minimum, maximum, and mean.3-22Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 3-7Peer Analysis – Operational Measures, FY 2009Performance MeasuresOCT% FromPeerMeanService Area Population 170,498 17.4%Service Area Density 852.49 -31.5%Passenger Trips 172,122 -55.6%Passenger Miles 825,175 -53.9%Average Passenger Trip Length 4.79 -9.9%Revenue Miles 445,586 12.3%Revenue Hours 36,643 34.4%Vehicles Available 17 16.4%Vehicles Operated in Maximum Service 14 44.3%Revenue Miles per Veh. in Max. Service (000) 31.83 -21.7%Average Age of Fleet (in years) 2.2 -60.7%Total Employee FTEsRevenue Hours per Employee FTE (000)Passenger Trips per Employee FTE (000)Revenue Miles per Capita 2.61 -32.2%Passenger Trips per Capita 1.01 -75.4%Passenger Trips per Veh. in Max. Service (000) 12.29 -69.1%Passenger Trips per Revenue Mile 0.39 -62.6%Passenger Trips per Revenue Hour 4.70 -67.0%3-23Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-27Peer Analysis – Operational Measures, FY 2009300%250%200%150%100%50%0%Peer MaxOkaloosaMeanPeer MinA summary of OCT’s financial measures as compared to the peer systems is displayed in thefollowing table and figure. Table 8 shows OCT’s values for the selected financial measures anda comparison to the peer group mean. Figure 3-28 shows how OCT’s values compare to thepeer group minimum, maximum, and mean.3-24Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 3-8Peer Analysis – Financial Measures, FY 2009Performance MeasuresOCT% FromPeer MeanOperating Expense $1,099,672 -25.8%Maintenance Expense $122,000 -66.4%Passenger Fare Revenue $103,140 -46.0%Average Fare $0.60 11.0%Operating Expense per Capita $6.45 -55.6%Operating Expense per Passenger Trip $6.39 34.9%Operating Expense per Revenue Mile $2.47 -37.3%Operating Expense per Revenue Hour $30.01 -45.8%Farebox Recovery 9.4% -25.0%Figure 3-28Peer Analysis – Financial Measures, FY 2009250%200%150%100%50%0%Peer MaxOkaloosaMeanPeer Min3-25Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPART TWO: DEMAND RESPONSE TRANSIT SERVICETable 3-9 lists the performance measures selected for the review of the demand responsetransit services.Table 3-9Selected Performance Review MeasuresDemand Response ServicesOperational MeasuresFinancial MeasuresServicePassenger TripsPassenger MilesAverage Passenger Trip LengthRevenue MilesRevenue HoursVehicleVehicles Available in Maximum ServiceVehicles Operated in Maximum Service(VOMS)Revenue Miles per Vehicle in Max. ServiceAverage Age of Fleet (in yrs.)Expense and RevenueOperating ExpensesMaintenance ExpensesEfficiencyOperating Expense per CapitaOperating Expense per Passenger TripOperating Expense per Revenue MileOperating Expense per Revenue HourEffectivenessRevenue Miles per CapitaPassenger Trips per VOMSPassenger Trips per Revenue MilePassenger Trips per Revenue Hour3-26Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANOCT: Year at-a glanceThe most recent year (FY 09) of NTD data and the percent change from the previous year ofdemand response performance data for OCT is shown in Tables 3-10 and 3-11. The source ofthe data is the agency’s FY 2008 and FY 2009 NTD reports.Table 3-10System Year At-a-Glance – Operational MeasuresOCTPerformance Measures% FromFY 09FY08Passenger Trips 95,173 -0.5%Passenger Miles 711,978 -2.0%Average Passenger Trip Length 7.48 -1.5%Revenue Miles 723,544 -0.1%Revenue Hours 46,767 -2.3%Vehicles Available 35 0.0%Vehicles Operated in Maximum Service 32 0.0%Revenue Miles per Veh. in Max. Service (000) 22.61 -0.1%Average Age of Fleet (in years) 1.90 -9.5%Revenue Miles per Capita 4.24 -0.1%Passenger Trips per Veh. in Max. Service (000) 2.97 -0.5%Passenger Trips per Revenue Mile 0.13 -0.4%Passenger Trips per Revenue Hour 2.04 1.9%3-27Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 3-11System Year At-a-Glance – Financial MeasuresPerformance MeasuresFY 09OCT% FromFY08Operating Expense $1,515,553 3.3%Maintenance Expense $137,600 42.6%Operating Expense per Capita $8.89 3.3%Operating Expense per Passenger Trip $15.92 3.8%Operating Expense per Revenue Mile $2.09 3.4%Operating Expense per Revenue Hour $32.41 5.8%DEMAND RESPONSE TREND ANALYSISUtilizing OCT’s NTD reports, a demand response trend analysis was conducted for OCT fromFY 2005 to FY 2009. Performance measures are grouped into categories and presented intabular form (Tables 3-12 and 3-13), including the percent change for each measure for thetrend period.Graphics throughout this chapter (Figures 3-29 through 3-49) illustrate the selected operationaland financial performance measures. The trend area graphs show OCT’s performance in eachmeasure for the five-year period. The percent change over this period is shown at the top ofeach graph.Operational Performance MeasuresService MeasuresOCT’s demand response ridership decreased 29 percent over the five-year trend period, withthe largest decrease occurring from 2005 to 2006.3-28Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-29Passenger Trips (in thousands)150Trend 29%12090603002005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Passenger miles decreased 24 percent at OCT over the five year trend. Like passenger trips,the largest decrease was from 2005 to 2006, while from 2007 to 2008 there was a sizeableincrease.Figure 3-30Passenger Miles (in thousands)1,000Trend 24%80060040020002005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009The average passenger trip length increased 7 percent for OCT, remaining relatively the sameover the trend period.3-29Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-31Average Passenger Trip Length (Miles)10Trend 7%864202005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Revenue miles of service is one measure that gives an indication of the level of service providedby a transit system. OCT’s revenue miles decreased 17 percent over the trend period.Figure 3-32Revenue Miles (in thousands)1,000Trend 17%80060040020002005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Revenue hours of service is another measure of the amount of service provided. OCT’s revenuehours of service over the trend period decreased 9 percent as shown in Figure 3-33.3-30Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-33Revenue Hours (in thousands)75Trend 9%6045301502005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Vehicle MeasuresFigure 3-34 depicts the trend data for vehicles available and operated in maximum service.These two measures were combined into one graph to depict OCT’s overall vehicle trend. Bothtotal vehicles and vehicles operated in maximum service decreased over the last five years , at26 percent and 18 percent respectively.Figure 3-34Total Vehicles and Vehicles in Maximum Service7560TrendVehicles26%VOMS18%45301502005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-31Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-35 shows the revenue miles per vehicles in maximum service for OCT. This measurehas remained relatively the same over the trend period (up 2 percent).Figure 3-35Revenue Miles Per Vehicles in Maximum Service (in thousands)40Trend 2%322416802005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009The average age of OCT’s fleet decreased 54 percent over the five-year trend period, as shownin Figure 3-36.Figure 3-36Average Age of Fleet (Years)6Trend 54%5432102005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-32Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANEffectiveness MeasuresRevenue miles per capita measures the amount of service supplied divided by the service areapopulation. OCT’s revenue miles per capita decreased from FY 2005 to FY 2006, but remainedstable through 2009. Overall, revenue miles per capita was down 17 percent over the five yeartrend period.Figure 3-37Revenue Miles per Capita76543210Trend 17%2005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Three measures that reveal the service effectiveness of a demand response system arepassenger trips per vehicle operated in maximum service, passenger trips per revenue mile,and passenger trips per revenue hour. The trend data for OCT is shown in the next set ofFigures (3-38 through 3-40). All three of the measures decreased over the trend period (13, 15,and 22 percent respectively).3-33Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-38Passenger Trips Per Vehicles in Max. Service6Trend 13%5432102005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Figure 3-39Passenger Trips Per Revenue Mile0.30Trend 15%0.250.200.150.100.050.002005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-34Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-40Passenger Trips Per Revenue Hour4Trend 22%32102005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-35Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 3-12 shows OCT’s operational measures for demand response services for FY 2005through FY 2009 as well as the percent change over the trend period.Table 3-12Trend Analysis – Okaloosa Operational MeasuresMeasure FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009%Change2005-2009Passenger Trips 133,539 91,367 90,114 95,678 951,173 -28.7%Passenger Miles932,717 659,376 614,872 726,680 711,978 -23.7%Average Passenger TripLength 6.98 7.22 6.82 7.60 7.48 7.1%Revenue Miles 867,358 716,399 705,842 724,527 723,544 -16.6%Revenue Hours 51,397 44,774 44,397 47,891 46,767 -9.0%Vehicles Available 47 37 37 35 35 -25.5%Vehicles Operated inMax. Service 39 34 34 32 32 -17.9%Revenue Miles per Vehiclein Maximum Service (000) 22.24 21.07 20.76 22.64 22.61 1.7%Average Age of FleetRevenue Miles per Capita4.10 2.20 2.40 2.10 1.90 -53.7%5.09 4.20 4.14 4.25 4.24 -16.6%Passenger Trips perVOMS (000) 3.42 2.69 2.65 2.99 2.97 -13.1%Passenger Trips perRev Mile 0.15 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 -14.6%Passenger Trips perRev Hour 2.60 2.04 2.03 2.00 2.04 -21.7%3-36Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFinancial Performance MeasuresExpense and Revenue MeasuresFigure 3-41 shows that OCT’s operating expenses increased 1 percent over the 5 year trendperiod.Figure 3-41Operating Expenses (in thousands $)$2,000Trend 1%$1,500$1,000$500$02005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009As a subset of total operating expenses, OCT’s maintenance expenses increased 20 percentover the trend period, at a much faster rate than overall operating expenses.Figure 3-42Maintenance Expenses (in thousands $)$200Trend 20%$150$100$50$02005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-37Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANEfficiency MeasuresThe efficiency measures for demand response services include operating expenses per capita,per passenger trip, per revenue mile and per revenue hour. Figures 3-43 through 3-47 displayOCT’s peer and trend data for these measures. All four of these measures showed increases,meaning the operating expenses are increasing faster than service area’s population rate orservice provided. Most of the increases occurred in FY 2005 to FY 2006 however.Figure 3-43Operating Expense Per Capita$15Trend 1%$12$9$6$3$02005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Figure 3-44Operating Expense Per Passenger Trip$25Trend 42%$20$15$10$5$02005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-38Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 3-45Operating Expense Per Revenue Mile$4Trend 21%$3$2$1$02005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-2009Figure 3-46Operating Expense Per Revenue Hour$50Trend 11%$40$30$20$10$02005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: National Transit Database 2005-20093-39Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 3-13 shows OCT’s financial measures for FY 2005 through FY 2009 as well as thepercent change over the trend period.Table 3-13Trend Analysis – Okaloosa County Transit Financial MeasuresMeasure FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 FY 2009%Change2005-2009Operating Expense $1,497,246 $1,487,560 $1,422,869 $1,467,207 $1,515,553 1.2%Maintenance Expense $114,292 $76,320 $91,160 $96,500 $137,600 20.4%Operating ExpensePer Capita $8.78 $8.72 $8.35 $8.61 $8.89 1.2%Operating ExpensePer Passenger Trip $11.21 $16.28 $15.79 $15.33 $15.92 42.0%Operating ExpensePer Revenue Mile $1.73 $2.08 $2.02 $2.03 $2.09 21.3%Operating ExpensePer Revenue Hour $29.13 $33.22 $32.05 $30.64 $32.41 11.2%DEMAND RESPONSE PEER ANALYSISA peer review analysis similar to what was conducted for the fixed route was also completed forthe demand response service in order to compare OCT’s performance with other similar transitsystems in the United States. The Florida Transit Information System online program (FTIS),which also used for to select potential peer systems using the methodology outlined in TCRPReport 141 – A Methodology for Performance Measurement and Peer Comparison in the PublicTransportation Industry. Selected data from 2006 American Community Survey (ACS) data isutilized by this FTIS method.The methodology calculates a likeness score for each measure and then averages the likenessscore across all variables. In addition, Vehicles in Maximum Service (a FY 2009 NTD measure)was added to the analysis and likeness scores were calculated for it as well. The ten systemswith the closest likeness scores to ECAT (values closest to zero) were selected as peersystems for this analysis.3-40Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 3-14Okaloosa Demand Response Peer Systems, FY 2009Selected Peer SystemsSpartanburg County Transportation Services (Spartanburg, SC)Sioux Falls Transit (Sioux Falls, SD)Charlotte County Transit Division (Punta Gorda, FL)City of Appleton – Valley Transit (Appleton, WI)Bis-Man Transit Board (Bismarck, ND)Michian Area Council of Governments (South Bend, IN)Charleston Area Regional Transportation Authority (Charleston, SC)Indian River County Council on Aging, Inc (Vero Beach, FL)A summary of OCT as compared to the peer systems for the selected operational measures isdisplayed in the following table and figure. Table 3-15 shows OCT’s values for the operationalmeasures and how they compare to the peer group mean. Figure 3-47 shows how OCT’svalues compare to the peer group minimum, maximum, and mean.3-41Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 3-15Peer Analysis – Operational Measures, FY 2009Performance MeasuresOCT% FromPeerMeanPassenger Trips 95,173 30.8%Passenger Miles 711,978 20.2%Average Passenger Trip Length 7.48 -21.5%Revenue Miles 723,544 10.5%Revenue Hours 46,767 -0.3%Vehicles Available 35 3.3%Vehicles Operated in Maximum Service 32 14.3%Revenue Miles per Veh. in Max. Service (000) 22.61 -13.6%Average Age of Fleet (in years) 1.90 -53.5%Revenue Miles per Capita 4.24 13.6%Passenger Trips per Veh. in Max. Service (000) 2.97 -16.6%Passenger Trips per Revenue Mile 0.13 -10.4%Passenger Trips per Revenue Hour 2.04 -2.3%Figure 3-47Peer Analysis – Operational Measures, FY 2009350%300%250%200%150%100%50%0%Peer MaxOkaloosaMeanPeer Min3-42Performance Evaluation


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANA summary of OCT as compared to the peer systems for the financial measures is provided inthe following table and figure. Table 3-16 shows OCT’s values for the selected operationalmeasures and how they compare to the peer group mean. Figure 3-48 shows how OCT’svalues compare to the peer group minimum, maximum, and mean.Table 3-16Peer Analysis – Financial Measures, FY 2009Performance MeasuresOCT% FromPeer MeanOperating Expense $1,515,553 -30.2%Maintenance Expense $137,600 -69.3%Operating Expense per Capita $8.89 -27.2%Operating Expense per Passenger Trip $15.92 -63.2%Operating Expense per Revenue Mile $2.09 -39.6%Operating Expense per Revenue Hour $32.41 -33.5%Figure 3-48Peer Analysis – Financial Measures, FY 2009400%350%300%250%200%150%100%50%0%Peer MaxOkaloosaMeanPeer Min3-43Performance Evaluation


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OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCHAPTER FOURPROFILE OF EXISTING SERVICESService AreaOkaloosa County Transit (OCT) provides service in the 936 square mile land area of OkaloosaCounty and extends into Walton County to the east. OCT serves the areas of Fort WaltonBeach, Crestview, Okaloosa Island, and Destin. The actual OCT service area (calculated as thetotal area up to a distance of ¾ of a mile from any OCT bus line) is 200 square miles duringpeak service.Types of ServiceThe OCT system currently provides fixed route bus service, shuttle service, and paratransittransportation. Okaloosa County is the designated recipient of FTA Section 5307 funds andFDOT Block grant funds. The County is also the designated Community TransportationCoordinator (CTC) and is the recipient of transportation disadvantaged grant funds. OkaloosaCounty contracts with Okaloosa County Transit, a subsidiary corporation of the OkaloosaCounty Council on Aging, to operate fixed-route and paratransit systems.Fixed Route SystemThe fixed route system operates 11 routes throughout the county on weekdays. Table 4-1shows the days of service, areas served, frequencies, and span of service for OCT’s fixedroutes. Route 14 is an express route that connects Fort Walton Beach to the Crestview Areaand provides 3 trips per day. Routes 20, 30, 32, and 33 are shuttle routes that provide greaterservice (30 minute headways) in the summer (Memorial Day through Labor Day) and 45 minuteheadways from September through May. Table 4-2 shows the days that the fixed routes do notoperate. Figure 4-1 shows the current fixed route system map.4-1Profile of Existing Services


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 4-1Okaloosa County Transit Fixed Routes Service DataRouteDays ofService Area Served Frequency Span of Service1 Mon‐Fri Fort Walton Beach 80 7:00 AM ‐7:30 PM2 Mon‐Fri Fort Walton Beach 60 7:10 AM ‐6:50 PM3 Mon‐Fri Fort Walton Beach 80 6:30 AM ‐7:45 PM4 Mon‐Fri Fort Walton Beach 70 6:50 AM ‐7:30 PM11 Mon‐Fri Crestview 75 7:00 AM ‐7:15 PM12 Mon‐Fri Crestview 70 7:10 AM ‐6:40 PM14 Mon‐Fri WAVE Express 3 trips 6:20 AM ‐5:50 PM20 Mon‐Fri Okaloosa Island 30/45 7:30 AM ‐6:30 PMDestin/South30 Mon‐Fri Walton 30/45 8:00 AM ‐7:00 PM32 Mon‐Fri Destin 30/45 8:00 AM ‐6:30 PM33 Mon‐Fri East Destin 60 8:00 AM ‐6:30 PM4-2Profile of Existing Services


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 4-2OCT Holidays – No serviceThe WAVE Routes 1, 2, 3, 4, 11, 12 & 14(WAVE EXPRESS) will not Operate on thefollowing days in FT WALTON BEACH &CRESTVIEWNew Years DayMemorial DayIndependence DayLabor DayVeterans DayThanksgiving DayChristmas Eve(No Service After 2PM)Christmas DayOKALOOSA ISLAND & DESTIN SHUTTLERoutes 20, 30, 32 and 33 will not Operate on:New Years DayThanksgiving DayChristmas Eve(No Service After 2PM)Christmas Day4-3Profile of Existing Services


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 4-1System MapNorth AreaSouth Area4-4Profile of Existing Services


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 4-3Annual Fixed Route RidershipFiscal YearRidershipYearlyChange2001 27,6642002 64,870 134.5%2003 96,795 49.2%2004 92,171 -4.8%2005 71,193 -22.8%2006 108,404 52.3%2007 169,389 56.3%2008 211,330 24.8%2009 172,122 -18.6%Table 4-4Monthly Fixed Route RidershipMonthPassengers ServedMay 2010 13,795June 2010 16,177July 2010 16,328August 2010 17,308September 2010 16,187October 2010 14,032November 2010 12,618December 2010 13,090January 2011 12,482February 2011 12,021March 2011 13,625April 2011 14,0674-5Profile of Existing Services


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 4-5Fare StructureWave and Shuttle Fares and PassesFWB & CrestviewFares and PassesPriceRegular Fare $1.00Senior (65+) / Disabled $0.25Monthly PassRegular Fare $26.00Senior (65+) / Disabled $7.50Wave Express Fares and PassesFWB & Crestview ConnectionFares and PassesPriceRegular Fare $1.50Senior (65+) / Disabled $0.75Express Super Pass (Monthly Pass)*Regular Fare $40.00Senior (65+) / Disabled $20.00*Express Super Pass valid on all WAVE Routes.4-6Profile of Existing Services


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANStudents and/or children with a height equal to or shorter than the top of the farebox ride freewith a paying adult.Transit Transfer CentersOCT maintains one primary transit transfer center, Uptown Station, where the Routes 1, 2, 3, 4,14 and 20 connect. In addition, there are seven minor transit transfer centers where at least tworoutes connect, as follows:• Santa Rosa Mall – Routes 2 and 3• FWB Medical Center – Routes 1 and 3• WalMart FWB – Routes 3 and 4• Boardwalk/Wayside Park – Routes 20 and 30• 98 Palms (Destin) – Routes 30, 32• Destin Commons – Routes 32 and 33ParatransitIn 2010, OCT paratransit provided 133,700 passenger trips, which was a 2 percent increaseover 2009. Table 4-5 provides a profile for paratransit for 2010.4-7Profile of Existing Services


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 4-62010 Paratransit Profile4-8Profile of Existing Services


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCHAPTER FIVESITUATION APPRAISALRIDERSHIP FORECASTING USING T-BEST MODELINTRODUCTIONIn accordance with Rule 14-73.001, the situation appraisal is intended to, “include an appraisalof factors within and outside the provider that affect the provision of transit service. At aminimum, the situation appraisal shall include:1. The effects of land use, state and local transportation plans, other governmental actionsand policies, socioeconomic trends, organizational issues, and technology on the transitsystem.2. An estimation of the community’s demand for transit service using the planning toolsprovided by the Department, or a Department approved transit demand estimationtechnique with supporting demographic, land use, transportation, and transit data. Theresult of the transit demand estimation process shall be a ten-year annual projection oftransit ridership.3. An assessment of the extent to which the land use and urban design patterns in theprovider’s service area support or hinder the efficient provision of transit service,including any efforts being undertaken by the provider or local land use authorities tofoster a more transit-friendly operating environment.The situation appraisal can be viewed as an assessment of the overall community context withinwhich a transit agency operates, and the barriers and opportunities that impact the delivery oftransit services. This chapter presents an overview of OCT’s organizational structure, OkaloosaCounty’s land use, demographic and economic characteristics, parking facilities, IntelligentTransportation Systems and summaries of state, regional and local plans.Organizational StructureIn Okaloosa County, all vehicles and capital equipment are provided by the County, and allpersonnel are employees of Okaloosa County Transit, a subsidiary of the Okaloosa CountyCouncil on Aging. The Okaloosa County Department of Growth Management overseesOkaloosa County Transit in terms of services operated and grants. Figure 5-1 below displaysthe overall organizational structure with Okaloosa County. Figure 5-2 then displays theorganizational structure of Okaloosa County Transit, the contracted provider.5-1Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 5-1Overall Organizational Structure – Okaloosa County5-2Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 5-2Organizational Structure – OCTExecutiveDirector5-3Profile of Existing Services


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANDemographic and Economic ConditionsDemographic and economic trends are factors that may be used to evaluate current and futuretransit needs. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Okaloosa County’s population grew at rateof 6.1 percent between 2000 and 2010 (from 170,497 to 180,822), while the rate of growth inthe State of Florida’s population was 17.6 percent during the same period. The Bureau ofEconomic and Business Research projects a potential loss in population (or relatively modestpopulation growth rate in Okaloosa County between 2010 and 2020 (ranging between a lowestimate of


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANLand UseLand use patterns play an important role in the effectiveness and efficiency of publictransportation services. Much of Okaloosa County is characterized by relatively low densities.Figure 5-3 below presents the Future Land Use Map for Okaloosa County. The Land Use Mapreveals that much of the southern and central portions of Okaloosa County are Eglin Air ForceBase and/or the Eglin Encroachment Zone. Much of the northern sections of the County areagriculture. Therefore, the County has developed urban boundaries that encourage infilldevelopment around the current incorporated cities, including Ft. Walton Beach, Destin, MaryEsther, Niceville, Valparaiso and Crestview.5-5Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 5-3Overall Organizational Structure – Okaloosa County5-6Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANIn northern Okaloosa County, the urban development boundary is located in the Crestview area,generally surrounding the area west of the Bob Sikes Airport. Located to the west of Crestview,the communities of Baker and Holt have rural and low-density residential designations. Theurban development boundaries in the southeastern and south-central portions of the County arelocated around Choctawhatchee Bay and include Niceville, Valparaiso, and the Eglin Complex.The urban development boundaries in the far southern portion of Okaloosa County includeDestin and Fort Walton Beach. Figure 5-4 below presents the urban development boundaries innorth County. Figure 5-5 below presents the urban development boundaries in south County.5-7Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 5-4Overlay Zones with Urban Development BoundariesNorth Okaloosa County5-8Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 5-5Overlay Zones with Urban Development BoundariesSouth Okaloosa County5-9Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANEconomic DevelopmentThe West Florida Regional Planning Council (WFRPC) is the designated regionalplanning agency for the West Florida region. The WFRPC region was designated as anEconomic Development District by the U.S. Department of Commerce EconomicDevelopment Administration in 1995. As such, the WFRPC is tasked with thepreparation and maintenance of a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy(CEDS) and providing technical assistance to economic development organizationsthroughout the region. The CEDS identified the strengths, weaknesses, opportunitiesand threats related to the economic makeup of the region.Some of the strengths identified in the plan were the region’s natural quality of life,attractions, and cultural and historical amenities that attract new businesses and add tothe retention rate of existing businesses. Military retirees and spouses in the region werealso considered strengths as they add to a viable and skilled workforce.Regional weaknesses include workforce-training efforts, which are hampered by lowhigh school graduation rates and high out-migration of trained baccalaureates. Projectedhigh growth sectors of service industry jobs and lower wage rates are also considered aweakness as is limited industrial space availability, low housing availability, and risinginsurance costs.Opportunities include the potential to develop internships between schools andbusinesses and targeted efforts to expand the healthcare and IT industries by expandingprogram offerings at area colleges. Major airport expansions/relocations will also makethe region a key destination and a more competitive area for relocations.Threats to the region include needed enhancements to workforce development andeducation programs, and limited financial incentives available for attracting and retainingtarget industries. As compared to neighboring states, the higher cost of doing businessand more regulatory requirements in Florida is a competitive disadvantage in terms ofbusiness relocations and expansions. Finally, the potential for additional bad stormseasons could have significant economic impacts in the future.Strategic findings related to transportation in the 2010 CEDS were:• All levels of government, with participation of the private sector and residents,must develop and approve solutions for financing of transportation infrastructure.The alternatives are to construct transportation capacity or reduce travel demandthrough transit oriented land use, implementation of Intelligent TransportationSystems, and enhancement of transit and other High Occupancy Vehicleprograms.• State, regional and local transportation agencies can coordinate efforts todevelop additional minor arterial and collector roads and streets, which5-10Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANcomplement the arterial network by removing short trips from the arterials. Alltransportation corridors must include safe facilities for bicyclists, pedestrian andtransit so that these modes can replace trips made by single occupant motorvehicles.Intelligent Transportation SystemsIntelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) refer to a range of technologies includingprocessing, control, communication and electronics, which are applied to atransportation network to better manage the systems, and enhance efficiency andsafety. In 2010, a Regional Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) plan was completedfor the West Florida region. The purpose of the plan was to facilitate the implementationof a regional vision for transportation operations using technology and regionalpartnerships. The study included a comprehensive evaluation of the existing ITSnetwork, and future projects designed to improve the region’s ITS deployment wereidentified.Current technologies in Okaloosa County include an extensive fiber optic network, asmall Traffic Management Center, one dynamic message sign and 19 traffic cameras.The Regional ITS Plan identified the need for future ITS improvements in OkaloosaCounty. These included additional fiber optic cable, closed circuit television cameras andadditional dynamic message signs, and a larger and updated traffic management centerfor improved traffic monitoring and response capabilities.Although the Plan acknowledged the potential benefits of ITS applications specificallydesigned to enhance transit efficiencies, no specific future needs were identified in theanalysis, although regional transit will certainly reap the benefits of enhanced roadwayoperations as a result of the better signal coordination capabilities.In 2009, Okaloosa County Transit introduced electronic fareboxes on its fixed route fleet.The new fareboxes issue transfers, provide on-board fare purchase capabilities (singleride and 31 day passes), and provide stored value change cards. Okaloosa County hasno further plans for technological improvements at this time.Summary of Local, Regional, and State PlansIn addition to the plans and initiatives described above, the situation appraisal calls forthe evaluation of other state and local plans and how the transportation elements ofthese plans impact the provision of transit in the provider’s service area. Following is asummary of the major transit elements of these plans:5-11Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANHorizon 2060 Florida Transportation PlanGoal: Invest in transportation systems to support a prosperous, globally competitiveeconomy.Objectives:• Maximize Florida’s position as a strategic hub for international anddomestic trade, visitors, and investment by developing, enhancing, andfunding Florida’s Strategic Intermodal System (SIS).• Improve transportation connectivity for people and freight to establish andemerging regional employment centers in rural and urban areas.• Plan and develop transportation systems to provided adequateconnectivity to economically productive rural lands.• Invest in transportation capacity improvements to meet future demand formoving people and freight.• Be a worldwide leader in development and implementation of innovationtransportation technologies and systems.Goal: Make transportation decisions to support and enhance livable communities.Objectives:• Develop transportation plans and make investments to support the goalsof the FTP and other statewide plans, as well as regional and communityvisions and plans.• Coordinate transportation investments with other public and privatedecisions to foster livable communities.• Coordinate transportation and land use decisions to support livable andrural and urban communities.Goal: Make transportation decisions to promote responsible environmental stewardship.Objectives:• Plan and develop transportation systems and facilities in a manner, whichprotects, and where feasible, restores the function and character of thenatural environment and avoids or minimizes adverse environmentalimpacts.5-12Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN• Plan and develop transportation systems to reduce energy consumption,improve air quality, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.Goal: Provide a safe and secure transportation system for all users.Objectives:• Eliminate fatalities and minimize injuries on the transportation system.• Improve the security of Florida’s transportation system.• Improve Florida’s ability to use the transportation system to respond toemergencies and security risks.Goal: Maintain and operate Florida’s transportation system proactively.Objectives:• Achieve and maintain a state of good repair for transportation assets forall modes.• Reduce the vulnerability and increase the resilience of criticalinfrastructure to the impacts of climate trends and events.• Minimize damage to infrastructure from transportation vehicles.• Optimize the efficiency of the transportation system for all modesGoal: Improve mobility and connectivity for people and freight.Objectives:• Expand transportation options for residents, visitors, and businesses.• Reinforce and transform Florida’s Strategic Intermodal System facilities toprovided multimodal options for moving people and freight.• Develop and operate a statewide high speed and intercity passenger railsystem connecting all regions of the state and linking to publictransportation systems in rural and urban areas.• Expand and integrate regional public transit systems in Florida’s urbanareas.• Increase the efficiency and reliability of travel for people and freight.5-13Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN• Integrate modal infrastructure, technologies, and payment systems toprovide seamless connectivity for passengers and freight trips form originto destination.Okaloosa-Walton Transportation Outlook 2035 Long Range TransportationPlan UpdateVISION STATEMENT, MISSION STATEMENT, AND GOALS AND OBJECTIVESVision Statement: Our vision is to provide a safe, efficient, and cost-effective multimodaltransportation system that supports economic vitality and quality of life whileprotecting the environment and promoting efficient system management and operation.Mission Statement: To preserve and enhance a transportation system that is safe,efficient, socially responsible, financially constrained, coordinated with land use patterns,and allows for modal choice.Goal A: Provide a safe, multi-modal transportation network that is user-friendlyand maximizes mobility.Objective A-1: Develop a Long Range Transportation Plan that identifies multi-modaland intermodal transportation facilities that will function as an integrated system andaddress the mobility needs of the area.Objective A-2: Incorporate emergency evacuation planning into the Long RangeTransportation Planning process.Objective A-3: Integrate bicycle and pedestrian routes and projects into the TPO’s LongRange Transportation Plan, with increased attention to school routes and touristdestinations.Objective A-4: Provide multi-modal linkages to increase the range of modal choicesavailable and connection between modes to motorized and non-motorized users.Objective A-5: Increase safety & efficiency by utilizing Intelligent Transportation Systemsto enhance multi-modal integration of people and goods.Objective A-6.: Give priority to transportation improvements that will relieve existingtraffic congestion and / or enhance safety.5-14Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANGoal B: Provide an efficient transportation system that provides for the effectivemovement of goods and people in order to increase the region’s competitivenessand grow the economy.Objective B-1: Place priority on the facilities that comprise the Strategic IntermodalSystem and important regional facilities as designate in the Strategic Regional PolicyPlan in the Long Range Transportation Plan process.Objective B-2: Support transportation network serving military installations because oftheir unique missions of national and international significance and because of the valuethey add to our region.Objective B-3: Maximize the region’s ability to handle freight movements by targetingand enhancing regional distribution networks.Objective B-4: Encourage and improve the efficiency and connectivity of the supplychain serving Florida’s businesses.Objective B-5: Enhance the urban economic vitality by providing a transportation systemthat considers the needs of the business community and economic developmentstrategies.Objective B-6: Be proactive regarding identification of emerging regional employmentcenters, rural employment centers, logistics centers, trade gateways, and significantregional transportation corridors.Objective B-7: Give priority to projects that are part of the Strategic Highway Networksystem.Goal C: Encourage a socially responsible transportation system that promotessustainability and environmental protection.Objective C-1: Consider flora and wildlife populations and well-connected habitats whenplanning transportation facilities.Objective C-2: Meet federal standards for air quality attainment.Objective C-3: Address environmental issues during the planning process, includingsensitive habitats, air quality, water quality, water quantity, and recharge areas.Objective C-4: Positively impact public health by encouraging projects that enhances orprovide bicycle and pedestrian modal choice.Objective C-5: Place priority on energy-efficient transportation infrastructure, modes, andtechnologies for moving people and freight.5-15Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANObjective C-6: The TPO shall collaborate with other government resource agencies,private landowners, and other partners when planning transportation projects in order toidentify and protect natural resource systems.Objective C-7: Reduce energy consumption by promoting actions to increase theoccupancy of vehicles (e.g. ridesharing, rail transportation, mass transit, HighOccupancyVehicle (HOV) lanes).Goal D: Promote a high quality of life by protecting community features,supporting the public, and marrying transportation planning with land useplanning.Objective D-1: Design, build, operate, and maintain transportation facilities toaccommodate users of all ages and abilities, including the young, persons withdisabilities, the economically challenged, and the elderly.Objective D-2: Address aesthetics during the planning process, including signage,landscaping, and retention ponds.Objective D-3: Ensure transportation benefits are balanced throughout the community.Objective D-4: Plan and develop transportation projects that support mixed-usedevelopment and urban infill / redevelopment, with an emphasis on providing transitoptions.Objective D-5: Co-locate transportation projects with utilities or other infrastructureinvestments to focus growth in areas targeted for development or redevelopment.Objective D-6: Long Range Transportation Plan projects shall be reviewed forconsistency with local government comprehensive plans.Objective D-7: Encourage local governments to request that, during the site planprocess, developers include provisions for forms of transportation and facilities alternateto the traditional automobile, such as motorcycle, golf cart, bicycle racks, HighOccupancy Vehicle (HOV), designated park and ride lots, designated car pool, and bus.Objective D-8: Reduce the number of vehicle miles traveled by supporting localgovernment land use decisions that encourage a denser built environment, such asmixed-use zoning.5-16Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANOkaloosa County Strategic PlanGrowth Management Division/Transit and GrantsGoal 1: Maintain in FY 2012 existing levels of fixed-route service and uphold goals andobjectives of locally adopted Transit Development Plan.Objective During FY 2012 identify a dedicated funding source (or sources) for,and increase operating revenue of, fixed-route public transit service.Action/Strategiesa) Propose and develop partnerships with municipalities and largepublic/private entities within service areasb) Increase advertising revenue by 25% by end of FY2012c) Examine existing routes to see efficiency to reduce operating costs andexamine existing fixed-route service for improvements that wouldencourage increased ridershipd) Develop proposal to dedicate a portion of gas tax to fixed-route servicebeginning in FY 2013Goal 2: Continue to encourage paratransit rider shift to fixed-route serviceObjective Keep operating costs of paratransit at lowest possible levelsAction/Strategiesa) During FY 2012 increase public awareness/education of fixed-routesystem through advertising, public service announcements, and otherappropriate, cost-effective mediab) With assistance of Okaloosa County Transit, in first quarter of FY2012conduct an annual examination of existing fixed-route service forimprovements that would encourage increase ridershipGoal 3: Capitalize on all grant opportunities available by identifying desired countyprojects with insufficient fundingObjective Continue to identify desired county projects presently deficient infundingAction/Strategiesa) Establish communication with all county departments5-17Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANb) Develop comprehensive needs listc) Utilize comprehensive needs list for internal (county staff) and external(grant consultant) for grant identificationGoal 4: Maintain eligibility to receive State Transit Block Grant fundingObjective Execute and adopt Transit Development Plan Major Update asrequired by Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT)Action/Strategiesa) Issue task order to the West Florida Regional Planning Council/Center for Urban Transportation Research to implement requirements asestablished by FDOTb) Establish a steering committee, public participation program,workshops, on board surveys and stakeholder interviewsc) Adoption of the TDP by resolution of the TPO and BCCOkaloosa County Comprehensive Plan 2009Goal 1: FUTURE LAND USE - It is the goal of Okaloosa County to plan for and providefor a high quality of life, to meet the needs of population growth through public andprivate development and redevelopment, and through the appropriate distribution,location, and extent of land use, consistent with adequate levels of services, efficient useof facilities, protection of natural resources and environmental lands, promote an orderlyand efficient pattern of growth and development, promote compatibility between landuses and reduce the potential for nuisances, protect viable residential neighborhoodsand property values, maintain a healthy property tax base, and to generally promote,protect, and improve the public health, safety, good order, appearance, and generalwelfare of the community.Objective 9 Urban sprawl is not a desirable development pattern. It shall bediscouraged and/or reduced through the following techniques:a) the use of the appropriate designation of land for future land uses on theFuture Land Use Map;b) the establishment of an urban development boundary area;c) policies regarding provision, location, and expansion of urban services andfacilities;d) policies regarding conversion of agricultural and rural lands to urban uses;5-18Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANe) encouraging appropriate infill development;f) encouraging redevelopment; andg) encouraging the reuse of existing facilities.Policy 9.1 An urban development area is established and depicted on theFuture Land Use Map. The urban development area boundaryencompasses those lands within Okaloosa County that are, or areexpected to become, urban. When designating the urban developmentarea the following criteria shall be applied.a. The area must be developed to include a mix of residential,commercial, industrial, institutional, recreation, and other land uses.b. The average population density throughout the area is generally noless than 500 persons per square mile.c. Typical urban services including central water and sewer are or will beavailable.Policy 9.2 In the evaluation of proposed land use amendments for land inthe “agricultural” or “rural residential” categories, the application shalldemonstrate the following:a. the need for such land use amendment;b. the amendment will not result in urban sprawl;c. a functional relationship of the proposed amendment to other moredensely or intensely designated or development lands;d. the availability of facilities and services for a more dense or intenseland use; ande. the relationship of the proposed amendment site to the urbandevelopment area boundary.Policy 9.6 The County shall encourage infill through the use of higherdensity and higher intensity land use designations and mixed-usedesignations in area desirable for infill development, and through the useof density bonuses or targeted redevelopmentGoal 2: TRANSPORTATION Provide a safe, economic and efficient transportationsystem that maximizes the mobility of people and goods.5-19Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANObjective 1.1 Develop a Long Range Transportation Plan that identifies multimodaland intermodal transportation facilities that will function as an integratedsystem and address the mobility needs of the area.Policy 1.1.1 Continue to participate in the Okaloosa – WaltonTransportation Planning Organization planning process in coordinationwith adjacent local governments and other public agencies and privateorganizations whose purpose is to implement the transportation, land use,parking and other provisions of the transportation element.Policy 1.1.2 Participate in the development of the Five Year TransitDevelopment Plan especially in the establishment of numerical indicatorsagainst which the achievement of the mobility goals of the community canbe measured, such as modal split, annual transit trips per capita, andautomobile occupancy rates.Objective 1.3 Give the highest priority to transportation improvements that willrelieve existing traffic congestion.Policy 1.3.3 Prior to approving new road construction projects to addcapacity the County shall investigate the feasibility of alternativeimprovements to the existing roadway system such as:a. Intersection improvements;b. Synchronization of traffic signals;c. Traffic calming measures;d. Installation of auxiliary lanes;e. Redesign or realignment of roadways; andf. Multi-modal systemsObjective 1.4 Minimize accidents, including automobile/ pedestrian/ bicycleconflicts, by emphasizing safety features and by developing a multi-modal andintermodal transportation system.Policy 1.4.2 Facilitate the provision of a network for pedestrians andbicyclists that allows shortcuts and alternatives to travelling high-volumestreets.Objective 1.7 Maintain and improve access to important regional facilitiesincluding airports, educational facilities, parks, historical and recreational areasand military installations.5-20Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPolicy 1.7.3 Ensure that the Five Year Transit Development Planincludes strategies to address motorized and non-motorized access to allmajor attractors in Okaloosa County including intermodal terminals andaccess to aviation and rail facilities.Objective 2.2 Reduce energy consumption by promoting actions to increase theoccupancy of vehicles (e.g., ridesharing, mass transit, High Occupancy Vehicles(HOV) lanes) or to reduce travel demand.Policy 2.2.1 Evaluate existing Park & Ride lot usage and review therecommendations in the WFRPC West Florida Park & Ride Lot PlanningGuide in order to determine how to promote existing usage and where toestablish new Park & Ride lots if analysis warrants the need for suchfacilities.Policy 2.2.2 Coordinate with the Ride Share Program of the WFRPC todevelop and maintain car/vanpool programs that serve area employers,especially those that employ more than 50 employees.Policy 2.2.3 Coordinate with the Economic Development Council tosupport and promote commute trip reduction programs, telecommuting,electronic communications, variable work weeks and flextime.Policy 2.2.4 Participate in the development of the Okaloosa – WaltonTPO 2030 LRTP especially in support of travel demand managementstrategies aimed at reducing the number and length of car trips andincreasing the efficiency of the transportation system.Objective 2.3 Reduce energy consumption by promoting measures to facilitatepedestrian and bicycle facilities into the design of transportation projects not onthe Interstate System.Policy 2.3.1 Where feasible, all new road construction projects within theurban development area boundary will be required to accommodate nonmotorizedtransportation facilities including but not limited to, theinstallation of signage, striping of roadways, widening of roadways,installation of sidewalks, and wheelchair ramps at intersections.Goal 3: Provide a transportation system in harmony with environmental, social,economic and aesthetic features of the area.Objective 3.2 Encourage accessible public transportation for thetransportation disadvantaged through coordination of local social servicetransportation.5-21Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPolicy 3.2.1 Continue to support the provision of transportation servicesto the transportation disadvantaged by the designated provider.Policy 3.2.2 Coordinate plans for transportation-disadvantaged serviceswith the development of the Five-Year Transit Development Plan asupdates are completed.Goal 4: Provide a transportation system that optimizes and preservation and efficiencyof existing transportation facilities.Objective 4.1 Minimize the need for construction of new highways throughdevelopment of a Congestions Management System and identification ofstrategies to reduce travel demand, encourage alternative modes of travel andimplement traffic operations improvements.Policy 4.1.1 Participate in the development of the Okaloosa – WaltonTPO 2030 LRTP plan as it addresses establishment of transportationdemand management programs to modify peak hour travel demand andreduce the number of vehicle miles traveled per capita within thecommunity and region.Policy 4.1.2 Participate in the development of the TPO 2030 plan as itaddresses establishment of transportation system managementstrategies that are appropriate to improve system efficiency and enhancesafety.Policy 4.1.3 Support and promote public awareness campaigns thatfocus attention on the societal and environmental impacts and costs oftravel choices, and that make people aware of the range of travel choicesavailable. Make information available at all county offices on anycommuter assistance programs, public transit, the coordinatedtransportation system program, and any bicycle/pedestrian programsendorsed by the County.Tri-County Growth Management PlanThis plan is the result of a 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Committee’sdecision to locate the training and operational mission of the new Joint Strike Fighter(JSF) F-35 and the Army’s 7 th Special Forces Group to Eglin Air Force Base, and thesubsequent formation of the Tri-County Growth Management Task Force to develop aplan to address the substantial economic and demographic impacts BRAC will have onfuture growth in the region. From a transportation perspective, the study focused on the5-22Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANsurface transportation system, including roadways, transit and bicycle and pedestriansystems. Several key recommendations of the plan included:• Conduct a local transportation funding study for the tri-county region that wouldinclude the formation of a committee made of local elected officials, agencyrepresentatives and citizens to study and develop recommendations fordedicated local transportation funding options, including funding for transit,bicycle and pedestrian projects.• Create and implement a “complete streets” policy. Streets must consider theneeds of all potential users, not jus the automobile. In addition to providing routedchoi8ces for the traveling public, streets must also provide for mode choice.Incomplete streets may not only discourage travel by alternative modes, but maybe hazardous for non-auto users. A complete streets policy will ensure thatfacilities for all modes are required as part of the initial planning, design andconstruction of all roadway facilities. Given the distance involved, it is unlikelythat many will walk to Eglin AFB, however, some may arrive by bicycle and/orride transit.• Provide express transit service from residential areas to Eglin Main Base, and orthe Duke Field/7SFGA areas including consideration for park and ride areas andvanpool programs.• Provide additional capacity from the Crestview area to the Niceville area.Additional capacity may be provided by improving the corridor to six lanes, or forsome form of transit.• Plan and program studies to identify and implement lower cost systemmanagement improvements in the more urban, built out areas of the region.Such improvements, signal timing and coordination improvements, accessmanagement improvements and incorporation of facilities for bicyclists,pedestrians and transit in all future improvements.City of Fort Walton Beach Comprehensive Plan 2011 Transportation ElementGoal: Provide for a safe, energy efficient, cost effective and uncongested multimodaltransportation system in the city, as well as to and from the surrounding regional areas,in a manner that not only accommodates today’s demand but also reasonablyanticipates growth.Objective B.3 Coordinate the traffic circulation system, including multimodalsystems with future land uses as show on the future land use map series.5-23Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPolicy B.3.2: The City shall participate in the preparation of corridorstudies for all designated principal and arterial roadways and willcoordinate the studies with adjacent communities. The corridor studiesshall consider land uses adjoining the corridor, access management, andmultimodal transportation options including sidewalks, bikeways andtransit.Policy B.S.4: The City will continue to coordinate with Okaloosa Countyin the provision of transit services within the City and seek methods toimprove transit services to residents and visitors in the City.Objective B.4: Coordinate the City’s transportation decision making process withthe transportation plans and programs of the OWTPO and the FDOT.Policy B.4.4: The City will participate on the technical coordinatingcommittee of the OWTPO to assure that needed projects are included inplanning efforts.Objective B.6: Integrate a safe system of bikeways and pedestrian facilities intothe City.Policy B.6.1: Arterial and collector road construction projects within theCity will accommodate non-motorized transportation, such as by providingbikeways and/or walkways where right of way is sufficient.Policy B.6.3: The City will continue to required sidewalks to beconstructed and maintained for new development and redevelopmentprojects.Policy B.6.4: When fixed route transit service is implemented, transitstops will be provided and include sidewalk access.Policy B.6.5: The City will ensure that traffic operations measures andtraffic control devices support and accommodate bicycle and pedestrianuses, including crosswalks, pedestrian signals, refuge islands, andbicycle loop detectors.Policy B.6.6: The City will ensure that facility design for roads, parkingfacilities, sidewalks, and other transportation improvements conform toADA standards.Objective B.7: Maintain a transportation concurrency exception area (TCEA)coterminous with the Fort Walton Beach Community Redevelopment Area (CRA)5-24Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPolicy B.7.4: The City will provide multimodal transportationimprovements as funds are available, except for improvements necessaryto meet transportation safety or operational requirements arising from theproposed development or redevelopment project.Policy B.7.7: The City will maintain and update strategies to achieveimprovements to the multimodal transportation systems. Strategies mayinclude:Provision of sidewalksBicycle lanesBicycle parking facilitiesTransit stops and sheltersPedestrian features such as benches, safe havens for streetcrossings, and signalized pedestrian crossingsIncentives for retrofit to include multimodal featuresDemand management programsObjective B.8: Meet the needs of the transportation disadvantagedPolicy B.8.1: The City will coordinate with transit providers to ensureaccessibility of demand responsive services to City residents.Policy B.8.2: The City will coordinate with transit providers to ensurecompliance with transit requirements of the Americans with DisabilitiesAct (ADA)City of Destin Evaluation and Appraisal Report 2010The goal of the Transportation Element is to plan for a high quality, balanced multimodaltransportation system. To that end, the policies in the Transportation Element call forrelieving traffic on the City’s main thoroughfare, US Highway 98 (also known as HarborBoulevard and Emerald Coast Parkway) by adding an additional east-west corridor,improving the pedestrian, bicycle, and transit network through the implementation of aMultimodal Transportation District, and revitalizing the harbor area in part through addingadditional community parking in that area.5-25Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANSuccesses and Shortcomings: The Transportation Element was substantially amendedin December 2005 to include the adoption of a multimodal transportation district. As wasdiscovered during the EAR public workshop in June, additional bike and pedestrianfacilities are a major issue within the City. Policy 2-1.3.3 states: Design Development tobe Supportive of Multimodal Transportation. The City shall amend the LDC to includemultimodal design standards within one year of adopting Ordinance 05-24-PC to amendthe Comprehensive Plan.Additionally, the City shall produce a document within one year of adopting Ordinance05-24-PC to amend the Comprehensive Plan that outlines the MMTD standards with therequirements and acceptable ranges for each urban design element and incentiveprograms for enhanced design. This document shall be distributed as a component ofthe development review process.Although the LDC has not yet been amended to include these standards, City staff isclose to finalizing the LDC amendment and has negotiated multimodal improvements forseveral projects within the MMTD:Another success of the Transportation Element is the ongoing implementation of Policy2-1.3.10: Dedicate Funding to Multimodal Transportation Improvements. Within one yearof adopting this ordinance to amend the Comprehensive Plan, the City shall adopt arevised transportation impact fee ordinance to enable the contribution of developmentimpact fees towards the funding of multimodal transportation facilities and to supportmultimodal design standards. The City has funded and constructed several projectssince the implementation of the MMTD:Additionally, the City is currently amending its Capital Improvement Program (CIP) toinclude the following Prioritize Community Parking over On-site Parking. The City shallcomplete a study within two years of adopting this ordinance to amend theComprehensive Plan to investigate changes to the City’s parking policies andrecommend implementation actions.The City completed a parking analysis in 2006 to estimate parking demand within theHarbor CRA and identified potential locations for structured parking facilities. The draftMMTD Ordinance includes language pertaining to developer contributions to in-lieuparking fees, which could be used to finance off-site shared parking in-lieu of on-sitesurface parking. The draft MMTD Ordinance also include language pertaining to parkingmaximums in the Old Destin MMTD, parking reductions as an incentive to providingmultimodal design features on-site, incentives for shared parking agreements, andincentives for the use of on-street parking.Major Issue: Transportation Choices – Bicycle Friendly City; Pedestrian Friendly City5-26Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPolicy 2-1.3.10: Dedicate Funding to Multimodal Transportation Improvements.Within one year of adopting this ordinance to amend the Comprehensive Plan,the City shall adopt a revised transportation impact fee ordinance to enable thecontribution of development impact fees towards the funding of multimodaltransportation facilities and to support multimodal design standards.Current Conditions: In early 2008, the City completed an update of thetransportation impact fee ordinance. The previous impact fee was designed to beused only for road improvements. The updated impact fee ordinance is designedso that fees are now collected to fund bicycle, pedestrian, transit and roadimprovements.Policy 2-1.3.4: Expand Pedestrian and Cycling Infrastructure. The City shallenhance the existing pedestrian and cycling network through filling gaps inthe network and providing new pedestrian and cycling facilities throughout thecity.Current Conditions: The City completed construction of a multi-use trail on thenorth side of Scenic Highway 98 from Matthew Boulevard to Pompano Street.The trail is Segment 1a of a planned multi-use trail running west-to-east throughthe entire length of the City, from the Marler Bridge to the Walton County Line.The City completed construction of a multi-use trail on the north side of ScenicHighway 98 from Pompano Street to James Lee Park. The trail is Segment 1b ofthe City-wide multi-use trail.Major Issue: Transportation Choices Expanded public transit opportunities; Buses,Trams, Water taxi, RidesharingPolicy 2-1.3.5: Expand and Enhance Transit Coverage and Service. The Cityshall amend the LDC to include revised transit development standards within oneyear of adopting this ordinance to amend the Comprehensive Plan.Current Conditions: In 2006, the City completed the Transit Stop Design andLocation Study that provides general standards for transit stop design andlocations identified on maps portraying existing and proposed transit routes. Thetransit standards have been incorporated into the draft LDC update. The transitstop maps have been used in the development review process to help negotiatefor the provision of transit easements and infrastructure for sites where transitstops have been proposed.Policy 2-1.3.6: Promote Water Taxi Service. The City of Destin shall amend theone year of adopting this ordinance to amend the Comprehensive Plan to includerequirements to provide space for water taxi docking facilities, multimodal5-27Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANconnections to water taxi locations, and developer contributions towards thecreation of water taxi service in the City.Current Conditions: The City adopted Ordinance 05- 13-LC on August 22,2005, which required a boat slip to be reserved for a “water taxi” and provided forpedestrian access from US Highway 98 down to the Harbor and east-westaccess along the Harbor. The draft LDC update addresses land development,sidewalk, trail, bike lane, street, and transit standards, all of which are of moreimmediate relevance than the potential for water taxi service.Major Issue: Transportation Choices - Transit Service AwarenessPolicy: There are no objectives or policies that relate to this issue.Current Situation: The City currently does not publish information regardingtransit service within the City.Recommendation: No changes to the plan are necessary; however the Cityshould provide information on its website and print information at key citydestinations (library, rec centers, city hall, newsletters, etc) regarding transitavailability.Major Issue: Transportation Choices – Multimodal Transportation DistrictObjective: Adopt a multimodal transportation district.Current Situation: The City adopted a MMTD and is currently in the process ofwriting its first bi-annual monitoring report, due in January to DCA and FDOT.The City is also in the process of amending the LDC to implement specific designstandards and requiring on-site multimodal transportation improvements.Recommendation: Minor changes to the transportation element will be requiredbased on the data and analysis provided in the biannual monitoring report. Theelement should contain policies requiring the creation of multi-modal designimplementation “evaluation/point system” in the Land Development Code.Major Issue: Transportation Choices-Parking Supply along Harbor BoulevardPolicy 2-1.3.8: Prioritize Community Parking over On-site Parking.Current Situation: The City completed a parking analysis in 2006 to estimateparking demand within the Harbor and identify potential locations for structuredparking facilities. The draft LDC update includes language pertaining todeveloper contributions of in lieu parking fees which could be used to finance offsiteshared parking in lieu of on-site surface parking.5-28Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANMajor Issue: Transportation Choices-Transit Service (County)Policy 2-1.3.5: Expand and Enhance Transit Coverage and Service.Current Situation: Transit service in the City of Destin is provided in partnershipwith Okaloosa County Transit. Prior to 2006, transit service was provided onlyduring the summer season from late May to late September. Beginning in 2006,all Okaloosa County Transit routes now operate year round. The City continuesto coordinate with Okaloosa County Transit (OCT) to improve current transitoperations and future transit planning. Okaloosa County Transit representativeswere interviewed during the development of the Transit Stop Design andLocation Study and given an opportunity to provide feedback on the City’s finaldraft. The City and OCT coordinate during the development review process toensure that applicants are providing transit infrastructure consistent with OCTstandards and to ensure that new developments will not have an adverse impacton transit operations.Major Issue: Transportation Choices-US98 multi-modal implementation (FDOT)ConclusionsPolicy 2-1.3.4: Expand Pedestrian and Cycling Infrastructure. The City shallcoordinate with FDOT to ensure adequate signal locations and timing as newcrossings are planned along Harbor Boulevard/Emerald Coast Parkway forsafe crossing at that facility.Current Conditions: Policy 2-1.3.4 is the only policy in the plan that relates tocoordination with FDOT on multimodal issues. Other coordination issues existregarding bus stops and streetscaping on Highway 98/Harbor Blvd./EmeraldCoast Parkway.Recommendation: The City should add the following policies to theTransportation Element: The City shall coordinate with FDOT to permit transitstops on US HWY 98. The City shall coordinate with FDOT regardinglandscaping and other streetscape enhancements within the MMTD on US HWY98.The sheer magnitude of federally owned land in Okaloosa County, with associatedencroachment zones, creates an environment that is challenging for transit. OkaloosaCounty is a series of urban clusters separated by either land or water. As such,Okaloosa County only encourages land uses in unincorporated areas surroundingexisting urban clusters and then within the rural clusters of Holt and Baker. This isreflected in Objective 1.2, Strategy 1.2.2.5-29Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANNumerous plans support the development of transit including park-and-ride service toEglin Air Force Base, multi-modal transportation districts in Destin, access to intermodalterminals including airport and rail, and mixed-use development. However, the economicclimate in Okaloosa County is such that no jurisdiction other than the County has fundsto contribute to make any of these improvements a reality. Therefore, the goals andobjectives will be more futuristic in nature. These are reflected in Objectives 1.6, 1.8,Strategies 1.8.1, 1.8.2, and 1.8.3 and Objective 2.5, Strategies 2.5.1, 2.5.2 and 2.5.3.Okaloosa County is satisfied with the current organizational structure wherein theCounty is the designated recipient of transit funding and maintains its designation asCommunity Transportation Coordinator but contracts operations with Okaloosa CountyTransit. OCT will continue to serve the mobility needs of residents, visitors and thebusiness community in the future. It is recommended that resources to enhance OCT’scommunity outreach, advertising, and promotional activities be provided to support OCTefforts to reinforce its value to the community in terms of livability, economicdevelopment, and quality of life in the region. This is reflected in Goal 3 and associatedobjectives.Similar to transit agencies across the nation, OCT is impacted and severely constrainedby the realities of current economic conditions, which were further exacerbated by theDeepwater Horizon oil spill and the devastating impact it had on tourism. Even with verypositive signs of recovery, the Emerald Coast Convention and Visitors Bureau will ceaseparticipation in funding transit as of October 1, 2011, leaving Okaloosa County as theonly local funding agency in the area. Still, tourism remains a very important part of thelocal economy and OCT should continue its focus on this market, by tailoring serviceswith broad appeal to tourists and tourism related business in Okaloosa County. This isreflected in Goal 3, Objective 3.1.While many areas struggle with issues related to providing mobility options toaccommodate significant population growth, in Okaloosa County, projections suggestthere will be a loss, or only a slight increase, in the County’s population. To better serveresidents, OCT should concentrate on increasing ridership with current service levels.Though no service area expansion is called for in this TDP, OCT should continue tomonitor the impacts of Eglin expansion and associated traffic congestion to determine iftransit services are viable for the military installations, deployed personnel, dependents,and civilian work force. This is reflected in Goal 1, Objectives 1.1 through 1.8.Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) can be used to further enhance publictransportation services; however, Okaloosa County has no planned technologyimprovements at this time except investigating stop announcement technology on buses.This is reflected in 2.7.5-30Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANAt this time, the most realistic plan that most closely reflects the economic climate is theOkaloosa County Strategic Plan Growth Management Division/Transit and Grants,which has the following goals and associated objectives. These are reflected in Goal 1,Goal 3, Objectives 3.7 and 3.8, and Goal 6, Objective 6.2.• Goal 1 Maintain in FY 2012 existing levels of fixed-route service anduphold goals and objectives of locally adopted Transit Development Plan.• Goal 2 Continue to encourage paratransit rider shift to fixed-route service• Goal 3 Capitalize on all grant opportunities available by identifyingdesired county projects with insufficient funding• Goal 4 Maintain eligibility to receive State Transit Block Grant fundingOverall, state, regional and local plans support the provision of public transportation inOkaloosa County. The Future Land Use Map included in the Okaloosa CountyComprehensive Plan, concentrates recreational, rural, agricultural, conservation andindustrial uses within the urban development boundaries surrounding existingmunicipalities. This is reflected in Goal 1, Objective 1.2, Strategy 1.2.2.The City of Destin has continued plans to expand and enhance transit coverage andservice in the multi-modal transit districts. The City has design standards for bus stopsand is negotiating with developers for bus stops, in order for the objectives of theirplanning efforts to be fully realized will entail funding for transit operations. The Countycan continue to assist the City in building transit amenities, but should do so prudentlywith associated investments in operations. This is reflected in Goal 1, Objective 1.6 andGoal 2, Objective 2.5.The overall planning framework within Okaloosa County is supportive of transit andprovides an environment within which OCT can become an integral part of thecommunity, its economic development initiatives, livability, and quality of life. These aredifficult economic times, and there is competition for scarce resources. Currently,expansion opportunities are limited. In spite of, and because of these challenges, it isimperative for Okaloosa County and OCT to become more proacative in reaching out toits partners, communicating its needs, and touting its accomplishments as it strives toachieve its vision and fulfill its mission. This is reflected in Goal 3 and associatedobjectives.5-31Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANRIDERSHIP FORECASTING USING THE TBEST MODELThe transit network in place in 2011 reflects the evolution of fixed-route transit servicesin Okaloosa County to date. Ridership forecasts were prepared using the FDOTapprovedtransit demand forecasting tool, Transit Boardings Estimation and SimulationTool (TBEST). TBEST is a comprehensive transit analysis and ridership-forecastingmodel that is capable of simulating travel demand at the individual route-level. Thesoftware was designed to provide near- and mid-term forecasts of transit ridershipconsistent with the needs of transit operational planning and TDP development. Inproducing model outputs, TBEST also considers the following:• Transit network connectivity – Refers to the level of connectivity betweenroutes within the bus network. The greater the connectivity between bus routes,the more efficient the bus service becomes.• Spatial and temporal accessibility – Refers to service frequency and todistance between stops. The larger the physical distance between potential busriders and bus stops the lower the level of service utilization. Similarly, lessfrequent service is perceived as less reliable and in turn utilization decreases.• Time-of-day variations – TBEST accommodates peak period travel patterns byrewarding peak service periods with greater service utilization forecasts.• Route competition and route complementarities – TBEST accounts forcompetition between routes. Routes connecting to the same destinations oranchor points or that travel on common corridors experience decreases inservice utilization. Conversely, routes which are synchronized and support eachother in terms of service to major destinations or transfer locations and schedulebenefit from that complementary relationship.In addition to the existing route network, new routes were developed for this TransitDevelopment Plan Update that would achieve the following objectives:• Improve north-south county connectivity;• Provide linkages major military installations;• Provide linkage between Niceville and Destin via the Mid-Bay Bridge; and• Provide linkage between Navarre and Hurlburt Field.TBEST is an important tool in determining the direction of developing fixed-route transitin the area because the model allows outputs for two broad scenarios: 1) Considerationof improvements to the existing route network and 2) Consideration of improvements tothe existing network and a future route network as put forth in a unique scenario.5-32Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANThe following section outlines the model inputs and assumptions used, includes adescription of the TBEST scenario runs performed using the model, and summarizes theridership forecasts produced by TBEST for each model scenario.Model Inputs/Assumptions and LimitationsTBEST uses various demographic and transit network data as model inputs. The inputsand the assumptions made in modeling Okaloosa transit service in TBEST arepresented below. It should be noted, however, that the model is not interactive withroadway network conditions. Therefore, ridership forecasts will not show direct sensitivityto changes in the roadway traffic conditions or speeds.• Transit Network - The transit route networks for Okaloosa County were coded inthe base TBEST model were updated with current route schedules. The transitnetwork in TBEST required various edits to reflect the current route alignmentsand service characteristics, including:• Adding and editing routes based on current route schedules as posted onthe agency’s websites,• Bus stops were based on stop location approximations as shown on routemaps or auto generated by using a ¼ mile interval between stops whereinfo was not available,• Matching service span to existing service spans,• Modifying headways, also known as the frequency with which a bus willarrive at a stop (e.g. one bus every 60 minutes or one bus every 30minutes);• Establishing passenger travel times on board a bus,• Defining special generators, and• Other considerations such as the speed at which buses travel.• Demographic Data - The demographics used as the base input for the TBESTmodel are derived from the 2000 census for population and 2010 InfoUSA datafor employment.• Population and Employment Growth Rates - TBEST uses a socio-economicdata growth function to project population and employment data. For this model,the population data was projected to 2010 using 2010 GIS demographic zonaldata. Various TBEST attributes were matched to 2010 GIS data (Totalpopulation, Black population, Hispanic population, Female population, Totalhouseholds, Average household income, Per capita income, and median5-33Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANhousehold income) and then projected to 2010.A population growth rate and anemployment growth rate were calculated using information from the Bureau ofEconomic and Business Research (BEBR).• TBEST Model Limitations - According to Rule 14-73.001 Florida AdministrativeCode, TBEST is the FDOT-approved model for transit ridership forecasting aspart of Transit Development Plans in Florida. It has long been a desire of FDOTto have a standard modeling tool for transit demand that could be standardizedacross the State similar to the FSUTMS model used by MPOs in developingLong Range Transportation Plans (LRTPs). However, it is important tounderstand that while TBEST is an important tool for evaluating improvements toexisting and future transit services, model outputs do not account for latentdemand for transit that could yield significantly higher ridership, andcorrespondingly model outputs may over-estimate demand in isolated cases. Inaddition, TBEST cannot display sensitivities to external factors such as animproved marketing and advertising program, changes in pricing service forcustomers, and other local conditions.Although TBEST provides ridership projections at the route and bus stop levels,its strength lies more in its ability to facilitate relative comparisons of ridershipproductivity for various transit network scenarios. As a result, the analysis shouldremain focused on the fact that model outputs are not absolute ridershipprojections but rather are comparative for evaluation in actual serviceimplementation decisions. TBEST has generated interest with other StateDepartments of Transportation and continues to be a work in progress that willbecome more useful as its capabilities are enhanced in future updates to themodel.Using these inputs, assumptions, and FY 2010 and 2011 ridership data provided by thestudy area transit agencies, the TBEST model was validated. Using the validated modelas the base model, TBEST ridership forecasts for the TDP planning horizon year, FY2020, were developed for a set of analysis scenarios.Okaloosa ScenariosA total of seven alternative model runs were completed using TBEST. The set of modelruns was designed to include improvements to existing services, new service, and alsoan alternative that would grow ridership to 2020 with no service improvements. Five newroutes were developed for Okaloosa and Santa Rosa County at the County’s request.New conceptual network routes were developed and added to a new services scenario.The scenarios are summarized and briefly described in Table 5-1. Additionally, adescription of each scenario and a brief summary of the corresponding TBEST resultsare provided.5-34Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 5-1TBEST Model RunsScenarioDescriptionScenario 1Grow ridership to 2020 with no service improvementsScenario 2Grow existing system to 2020 and add Saturday serviceScenario 3Grow existing system to 2020, add Saturday and Sunday serviceScenario 4Grow existing system to 2020 and expand service hours on weekdays from 7:00 a.m. to8:00 p.m. (one additional round trip)Scenario 5Grow existing system to 2020 and expand service hours on weekdays from 7:00 a.m. to10:00 p.m. (three additional round trips)Scenario 6Bring all non-express routes to 30 minute frequencies on weekdaysScenario 7 Base system, New Routes, no improvements from Scenarios 2 through 6.Navarre to Hurlburt GateNiceville PNR to Eglin Gate & HurlburtNiceville PNR to Destin via Mid-BayBridgeEglin to HurlburtNiceville PNR to Eglin & HurlburtScenario One: Grow existing system to 2020 with no service improvementsScenario one is included in the TBEST analysis in order to establish a benchmark forcomparison between service improvement alternatives. For this scenario, population andemployment was projected to 2019 and annual ridership forecasts generated reflect theestimated level of service utilization if no changes were made to any of the fixed-routeservices. Below are the operating characteristics and associated operating costs for thisscenario.5-35Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 5-2Grow Existing System to 2020, No service changesWeekdayROUTETOTALDAILYBOARDINGSANNUALRIDERSHIPANNUALREVENUESERVICETRIPSANNUALREVENUEMILESANNUALSERVICEHOURSRoute 1 123.5 31,493 5,100 34,680 3,188Route 11 30.6 7,803 2,550 34,170 3,060Route 12 32.9 8,390 2,550 43,095 2,933Route 14 43.1 10,991 1,530 42,330 1,530Route 2 68.6 17,493 6,120 27,540 2,933Route 20 85.7 21,854 3,531 41,211 3,659Route 3 44.7 11,399 5,100 31,620 3,060Route 30 73.9 18,845 3,531 76,785 3,531Route 32 57.3 14,612 3,531 32,100 3,531Route 33 53.7 13,694 2,805 32,385 1,785Route 4 70.8 18,054 5,610 33,405 1,785Total Routes 685 174,624 41,958 429,321 30,993Base Results for ComparisonTable 5-3 below displays the base scenario for comparison to subsequent scenarios.Table 5-3Grow Existing System to 2020Scenario OneWeekdayTotal Annual Ridership 174,624Total Annual Revenue Hours 30,993Total Annual Revenue Miles 429,321Total Annual Service Trips 41,958Total Annual Cost (2010 $) $1,053,762Scenario Two: Grow Existing System to 2020 and implement Saturday serviceIn this scenario, weekday ridership from Scenario One does not change but Saturdayridership increases when brought to weekday service levels. Table 5-4 below displaysSaturday at weekday service levels.5-36Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANROUTEANNUALRIDERSHIPTable 5-4Saturday ServiceANNUALREVENUESERVICETRIPSANNUALREVENUEMILESANNUALSERVICEHOURSRoute 1 354 936 5,252 416Route 11 151 936 6,500 468Route 12 73 988 9,048 468Route 14 5 416 11,492 416Route 2 166 1,248 5,616 364Route 20 224 3,744 16,848 1,040Route 3 239 1,040 8,060 572Route 30 192 3,744 24,804 1,040Route 32 125 3,744 14,248 2,028Route 33 99 624 3,588 364Route 4 270 1,144 6,760 468Total Routes 1,898 18,564 112,216 7,644Comparison of Scenario Two to Scenario OneThis scenario represents less than one percent change in annual ridership with acorresponding 24 percent increase in cost in 2010 dollars. Table 5-5 below displays thecomparison.Table 5-5Comparison of Scenario Two to Scenario OneScenario Two Scenario One Scenario TwoPercentChange fromScenarioOneTotal Annual Ridership 174,624 176,522 1.09%Total Annual Revenue Hours 30,993 38,637 24.66%Total Annual Revenue Miles 429,321 541,537 26.14%Total Annual Service Trips 41,958 60,522 44.24%Total Annual Cost (2010 $) $1,053,762 $1,313,658 24.66%5-37Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANScenario Three: Grow existing system to 2020, add Saturday and Sunday serviceIn this scenario, the weekday and Saturday ridership and service levels do not change.Tables 5-6 below display the results for Sunday.Table 5-6SundayROUTEANNUALRIDERSHIPANNUALREVENUESERVICETRIPSANNUALREVENUEMILESANNUALSERVICEHOURSRoute 1 208 936 5,252 416Route 11 94 936 6,500 468Route 12 47 988 9,048 468Route 14 0 416 11,492 416Route 2 99 1,248 5,616 364Route 20 146 3,744 16,848 1,040Route 3 135 1,040 8,060 572Route 30 125 3,744 24,804 1,040Route 32 88 3,744 14,248 2,028Route 33 68 624 3,588 364Route 4 146 1,144 6,760 468Total Routes 1,154 18,564 112,216 7,644Comparison of Scenario Three to Scenario OneThis scenario projects a 2 percent increase in ridership with an associated 49 percent incost. Table 5-7 below displays the comparison.Table 5-7Comparison of Scenario Three to Scenario OneScenario Three Scenario One Scenario ThreePercentChange fromScenarioOneTotal Annual Ridership 174,624 177,676 1.75%Total Annual Revenue Hours 30,993 46,281 49.33%Total Annual Revenue Miles 429,321 560,101 30.46%Total Annual Service Trips 41,958 79,086 88.49%Total Annual Cost (2010 $) $1,053,762 $1,573,554 49.33%5-38Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANScenario Four: Grow existing system to 2020 and bring span of service to 7:00a.m. to 8:00 p.m.This scenario provides one additional round trip on weekdays in the evening. Results arepresented in Table 5-8 below.Table 5-8Evening Service to 8:00 p.m.ROUTETOTALDAILYBOARDINGSANNUALRIDERSHIPANNUALREVENUESERVICETRIPSANNUALREVENUEMILESANNUALSERVICEHOURSRoute 1 134.6 34,323 5,100 27,540 2,295Route 11 33.0 8,415 5,100 35,445 2,550Route 12 35.4 9,027 4,590 41,820 2,295Route 14 129.4 32,997 4,590 126,990 4,335Route 2 75.0 19,125 7,140 32,130 2,040Route 20 98.7 25,169 3,531 41,211 5,865Route 3 47.5 12,113 4,590 35,445 2,295Route 30 83.4 21,267 3,531 76,785 5,865Route 32 62.5 15,938 3,531 32,100 7,650Route 33 60.0 15,300 3,570 20,655 2,040Route 4 77.6 19,788 5,100 30,090 2,040Total Routes 837 213,461 50,373 500,211 39,270Comparison of Scenario Four to Scenario OneThis scenario projects a 22 percent increase in ridership with an associated 27 percentincrease in annual cost. This is a viable alternative compared to Saturday and Sundayservice because ridership increases significantly.Table 5-9Comparison of Scenario Four to Scenario OneScenario Four Scenario One Scenario FourPercentChange fromScenarioOneTotal Annual Ridership 174,624 213,461 22.24%Total Annual Revenue Hours 30,993 39,270 26.71%Total Annual Revenue Miles 429,321 500,211 16.51%Total Annual Service Trips 41,958 50,373 20.06%Total Annual Cost (2010 $) $1,053,762 $1,335,180 26.71%5-39Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANScenario Five: Grow existing system to 2020 and bring span of service to 7:00a.m. to 10:00 p.m.This scenario adds three round trips on weekdays in the evening to bring service to10:00 p.m. The results are presented in Table 5-10 below.ROUTETOTALDAILYBOARDINGSTable 5-10Evening Service to 10:00 p.m.ANNUALRIDERSHIPANNUALREVENUESERVICETRIPSANNUALREVENUEMILESANNUALSERVICEHOURSRoute 1 140.2 35,751 6,120 33,405 2,805Route 11 35.0 8,925 6,120 42,330 3,060Route 12 35.4 9,027 4,590 41,820 2,295Route 14 129.4 32,997 4,590 126,990 4,335Route 2 77.7 19,814 8,160 36,720 2,295Route 20 101.6 25,908 3,531 41,211 6,630Route 3 48.9 12,470 5,610 43,350 3,060Route 30 89.2 22,746 3,531 76,785 6,885Route 32 63.9 16,295 3,531 32,100 9,180Route 33 61.4 15,657 4,080 23,715 2,295Route 4 81.9 20,885 6,120 36,210 2,295Total Routes 865 220,473 55,983 534,636 45,135Comparison of Scenario Five to Scenario OneThis scenario increases ridership by 26 percent; however, the increase in cost is 46percent in 2010 dollars.Table 5-11Comparison of Scenario Five to Scenario OneScenario Five Scenario One Scenario FivePercentChange fromScenarioOneTotal Annual Ridership 174,624 220,473 26.26%Total Annual Revenue Hours 30,993 45,135 45.63%Total Annual Revenue Miles 429,321 534,636 24.53%Total Annual Service Trips 41,958 55,983 33.43%Total Annual Cost (2010 $) $1,053,762 $1,534,590 45.63%5-40Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANScenario Six: Bring all non-express routes to 30 minute frequency on weekdaysThis scenario brings all routes except Route 14 to 30 minute frequencies. Table 5-12below displays the results.ROUTEANNUALRIDERSHIPTable 5-12Non-express Routes to 30 minute FrequencyANNUALREVENUESERVICETRIPSANNUALREVENUEMILESANNUALSERVICEHOURSRoute 1 37,536 12,750 71,400 5,865Route 11 8,798 12,750 88,485 6,375Route 12 9,741 11,730 107,355 5,865Route 14 14,357 1,530 42,330 1,530Route 2 22,823 12,240 55,335 3,570Route 20 22,007 3,531 82,620 5,100Route 3 24,480 13,260 102,765 6,885Route 30 18,845 3,531 121,635 5,100Route 32 14,612 3,531 69,870 5,865Route 33 13,694 3,060 17,595 1,785Route 4 22,134 12,750 75,480 5,100Total Routes 209,024 90,663 834,870 53,040Comparison of Scenario Six to Scenario OneScenario Six projects a 20 percent increase in ridership (less than evening service) withan associated 71 percent increase in cost in 2010 dollars. Table 5-13 below displays thecomparison.Table 5-13Comparison of Scenario Six to Scenario OneScenario Six Scenario One Scenario SixPercentChange fromScenarioOneTotal Annual Ridership 174,624 209,024 19.70%Total Annual Revenue Hours 30,993 53,040 71.14%Total Annual Revenue Miles 429,321 834,870 94.46%Total Annual Service Trips 41,958 90,663 116.08%Total Annual Cost (2010 $) $1,053,762 $1,803,360 71.14%5-41Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANScenario Seven: Add New Service to Existing OCT Route networkThe conceptual bus network includes 5 new bus routes. For this model run, servicecharacteristics for the existing system were kept the same with no other improvementsincluded. Below are the operating characteristics and associated costs for all of theservice routes, existing and new, for this scenario.ROUTETable 5-14Base Network Plus New RoutesANNUALRIDERSHIPANNUALREVENUESERVICETRIPSANNUALREVENUEMILESANNUALSERVICEHOURSRoute 1 31,569 4,590 24,735 2,040Route 11 7,803 4,590 31,875 2,295Route 12 8,390 4,080 37,230 2,040Route 14 10,991 1,530 42,330 1,530Route 2 17,493 6,120 27,540 1,785Route 20 21,854 3,531 41,211 3,659Route 3 11,399 4,080 31,620 2,040Route 30 20,528 3,531 76,785 3,531Route 32 20,604 3,531 32,100 3,531Route 33 12,266 3,060 17,595 1,785Route 4 18,054 4,590 27,285 1,785Navarre to Hurlburt Gate 28,713 6,120 110,670 6,120Niceville PNR to Eglin Gate & Hurlburt 69,896 6,120 100,980 6,120Niceville PNR to Destin via Mid-Bay Bridge 103,479 6,120 100,470 6,120Eglin to Hurlburt 35,649 6,120 52,275 3,060Niceville PNR to Eglin & Hurlburt 0 6,120 45,135 3,060Total Routes 418,685 73,833 799,836 50,501Comparison of Scenario Seven to Scenario OneThis scenario projects a 140 percent increase in ridership with an associated 63 percentincrease in cost. It is unclear why T-BEST did not pick up ridership from Niceville to Eglinand Hurlburt except to say that T-BEST requires population and employment density forprojections. Table 5-15 below displays the comparison.5-42Situation Appraisal


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 5-15Comparison of Scenario Seven to Scenario OneScenario Seven Scenario One Scenario SevenPercentChange fromScenarioOneTotal Annual Ridership 174,624 418,685 139.76%Total Annual Revenue Hours 30,993 50,501 62.94%Total Annual Revenue Miles 429,321 799,836 86.30%Total Annual Service Trips 41,958 73,833 75.97%Total Annual Cost (2010 $) $1,053,762 $1,717,017 62.94%Conclusions and ConsiderationsWhen reviewing the TBEST model output results, it is important for the transit agency tointegrate sound planning judgment and experience. As such, several conclusions andissues to consider when reviewing the TBEST results are noted below.It is important to note that the forecasts should not be treated as absolutes. The resultsshould instead be used for comparative purposes only as TBEST provides an indicationof route productivity based on service area population and employment data but doesnot consider other factors that could impact ridership growth or decline. In addition, noone scenario would be recommended for implementation. Rather, other factors will beconsidered in the evaluation of alternatives to develop a priority scheme for serviceimprovements that could be selected from all of the scenarios.5-43Situation Appraisal


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OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCHAPTER SIXVISION, MISSION, GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIESINTRODUCTIONThis chapter summarizes an important process in developing the framework for a future publictransportation system that meets the mobility needs of various customer markets withinOkaloosa County.The goals, objectives, and strategies were developed based on public input and with anemphasis on community values and mobility needs. The goals, objectives and strategiessupport those included in the various state and local plans that were analyzed, and incorporateissues identified during discussions CUTR held with community leaders, the ProjectManagement Committee, staff, customers, and input received from the web-based and papersurvey.The overriding themes that emerged from these outreach activities were:Community accessibility – ensure transit options are available for individuals to access healthcare, employment, education, and other community resources.Energy and environment – provide public transportation options that promote environmentalinitiatives and address the rising costs of energy.Economic development – improve public transportation services to support business activity,military installations, promote economic investment and access to jobs.Service improvement – meet customer demand in conjunction with ridership increases andfocus on key markets and activity centers.DATA COLLECTION AND EVALUATIONAs described in the earlier chapters of this plan, a significant amount of data collection wasconducted to understand the unique characteristics of Okaloosa County, and to evaluate futureissues and opportunities related to the provision of public transportation services from theperspective of the community and as compared to other systems in a peer and trend analysis.These activities were designed to gain an understanding of the community’s mobility needs andtravel behavior. The perceptions and preferences of users and non-users about existing6-1Vision, Mission, Goals, Objectives, and Strategies


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANservices and those most desired for the future of transit in Okaloosa County were utilized to helpdefine service improvements.PUBLIC TRANSIT VISION, MISSION, GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND STRATEGIESFor strategic planning purposes, it is important to articulate an organization’s vision (a broadand inspiring statement about what the agency wants to achieve) and mission (a broadperspective of the overall purpose of the organization, the activities it conducts to serve thatpurpose, and the values that guide its work).Building upon the vision and mission an organization develops goals (somewhat broadstatements of general intent), objectives, (something more specific that may or may not bemeasurable) and strategies (a plan of action for attaining a goal.) Goals, objectives, andstrategies are based upon an evaluation of the current situation and desired outcomes.The starting point for the development of Okaloosa County’s public transit vision, mission, goals,objectives and strategies was based on the goals and objectives contained in existing plansincluding: the Comprehensive Plans of the county and cities, These were then supplementedwith information collected during the outreach activities undertaken during the development ofthis plan. The following is intended to serve as a roadmap or guide for internal and externalactions and initiatives that must be undertaken in order to “arrive” at an ideal future.Public Transit VisionOkaloosa County and Okaloosa County Transit will be recognized as the best small transitsystem in Florida by delivering a well-balanced multi-modal transportation system that promotescommunity embrace, economic development, community accessibility, environmentalsensitivity, and customer demand.Public Transit MissionOkaloosa County and Okaloosa County Transit will operate and coordinate a public safe andreliable transportation system that effectively and efficiently meets the existing and futuremobility needs as identified through on-going outreach to Okaloosa County County’s residents,visitors, and businesses.Goal 1: Maintain service delivery for existing and potential customers to meet demandfor transit services in Okaloosa County.Objectives:• Objective 1.1: Maintain existing levels of fixed-route service.o Strategy 1.1.1: Continue maximization of Federal and State grants to maintainadequate funding for the existing system.6-2Vision, Mission, Goals, Objectives, and Strategies


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANo Strategy 1.1.2: Apply for additional federal grant funding as new transportationauthorization bill allows.• Objective 1.2: Pursue those improvements that are the most efficient in terms ofgarnering ridership and cost-effective to implemento Strategy 1.2.1: Annually monitor ridership on individual routes and identify routemodifications that could increase ridership.o Strategy 1.2.2: Focus all service within the Urban Development Area Boundary.o Strategy 1.2.3: Proactively development partnerships with municipalities andlarge public/private entities within service areas.• Objective 1.3: Enhance connectivity and transfer opportunities.o Strategy 1.3.1: Ensure that schedules are prepared to maximize timed-transfersat major and minor transfer locations.o Strategy 1.3.2: Pursue timed transfers at on-street locations where routesintersect.• Objective 1.4: Enhance service reliability and on-time performance to secure customerloyalty.o Strategy 1.4.1: Compile customer complaints to determine if specific routes havechronic on-time performance problemso Strategy 1.4.2: Conduct running time checks on routes with on-time performanceproblems.o Strategy 1.4.3: Conduct periodic field checks to ensure if routes are runningwithin their allocated running times.• Objective 1.5: Establish guidelines for increasing frequency on high-demand routes toimprove service capacityo Strategy 1.5.1: Establish standards for weekday frequencies.o Strategy 1.5.2: Consider future frequency improvements only as demandwarrants.• Objective 1.6: Design all fixed-routes to optimize direct routing and minimize customertravel time.o Coordinate and partner with Destin to develop stops and amenities and adjustservice from U.S. 98 to parallel corridors with stop improvements.• Objective 1.7: Establish guidelines and a prioritization process for extending hours ofservice based on customer demand and community support.oStrategy 1.7.1: Coordinate with FDOT for future service developmentopportunities to expand evening service hours.6-3Vision, Mission, Goals, Objectives, and Strategies


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANoStrategy 1.7.2: Expand evening hours of service only on higher demand routes.• Objective 1.8: Focus all new services on connecting critical activity centers, employmentcenters and military installations within Okaloosa County.o Strategy 1.8.1: Investigate express transit service from residential areas to EglinMain Base, and or the Duke Field/7SFGA areas including consideration of parkand-rideareas and vanpool programs.o Strategy 1.8.2: Address connections to all major attractors in Okaloosa Countyincluding intermodal terminals and access to aviation and rail facilities as fundingresources warrant.o Strategy 1.8.3: Utilize the West Florida Park & Ride Lot Planning Guide todetermine where to locate Park & Ride lots if analysis warrants the need for suchfacilities.• Objective 1.9: Establish performance benchmarks for all service improvements andmonitor performance to ensure minimum performance levels are met.o Strategy 1.9.1: Establish numerical indicators against which the achievement ofmobility goals of the community can be measured.o Strategy 1.9.2: Utilize the system average for passenger trips per revenue hour,passenger trips per revenue mile, farebox recovery and cost per passengers asbenchmarks for service performance.Goal 2: Maintain and expand adequate capital infrastructure to ensure vehicles,facilities, customer amenities and bus stops achieve the highest standard of accessibilityand comfortObjectives:• Objective 2.1: Develop and maintain a comprehensive Capital Improvement Program(CIP)o Strategy 2.1.1: Utilize this major TDP update as a basis for developing andmaintaining a Capital Improvement Program (CIP).• Objective 2.2: Continue with funded plans to expand the current facility with a bus washand improved paving of the parking lot.o Strategy 2.2.2: Expend remaining ARRA funds to complete projects.• Objective 2.3: Replace buses as the fleet ages to bring down the average age of thefleet.6-4Vision, Mission, Goals, Objectives, and Strategies


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANooStrategy 2.3.1: Expend remaining ARRA funds to replace buses.Strategy 2.3.2: Expend Section 5307 funds to replace vehicles as needed.• Objective 2.4: Expand fleet as needed for future service improvements.o Strategy 2.3.2: Purchase coaches for future service improvements when grantfundingsources are available for operations.• Objective 2.5: Create a passenger amenities program to place shelters and amenitiesthroughout the service area.o Strategy 2.5.1: Continue to coordinate improvements with Destin to implementthe Transit Stop Design and Location Study.o Strategy 2.5.2: When possible, apply design standards for shelters in Destin toother system stops.o Section 2.5.3: Program Section 5307 funds to procure passenger amenities.• Objective 2.6: Create a bus stop improvement program to bring all bus stops intocompliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.o Strategy 2.6.1: Procure firm capable of design, engineering, construction andpermitting to bring bus stops into ADA compliance.o Strategy 2.6.2: Program Section 5307 funds to complete this program of busstop improvements.• Objective 2.7: Pursue technology improvements to enhance operational efficiency,effectiveness and customer satisfaction.o Strategy 2.7.1: Consider stop announcement system for fixed-route buses.o Strategy 2.7.2: Pursue technology enhancements as organizational capabilitieswarrant.• Objective 2.8: Coordinate with municipalities, business interests, communityassociations, etc. to leverage resources for capital improvementso Strategy 2.8.1: Coordinate with private property owners as part of their own ADArequirements for accessible pathways to make ADA bus stop accessibilityimprovements when right-of-way is insufficient.6-5Vision, Mission, Goals, Objectives, and Strategies


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANGoal 3: Develop a comprehensive marketing, communications and media relationsprogram to effectively promote transit’s image, awareness, public embrace andinformation materials.Objectives:• Objective 3.1: Develop a comprehensive marketing program to market services toexisting and potential customer bases, including employees, employers, traditionaltransit markets, persons with disabilities, military personnel and their dependents,tourists, primary school students and college students.o Strategy 3.1.1: Since this objective is not eligible within existing grants, identifyand communicate the need for a marketing program and estimate annual cost ofa marketing program.o Strategy 3.1.2: Propose that local funds be used to implement a marketingprogram.o Strategy 3.1.3: When possible, conduct marketing activities that can becompleted within existing staff resources.• Objective 3.2: Develop printed transit information and web-based transit information thatis customer-friendly and attractive.o Strategy 3.2.1: Monitor information materials and web activity over time todetermine if enhancements to existing information materials are warranted.o Strategy 3.2.2: Make information available at all county offices on commuterassistance programs, public transit, the coordinated transportation systemprogram, and bicycle/pedestrian programs.• Objective 3.3 Enhance communications between Okaloosa County Transit and its ridersusing social mediao Strategy 3.3.1: Utilize facebook , Twitter , Bing and other forms of socialmedia to establish communications with customers and the community.• Objective 3.4: Develop a comprehensive media-relations program to communicatesuccesses and appropriately deal with incidents.o Strategy 3.4.1: Proactively seek positive press coverage for OCT’s initiativesand improvements.• Objective 3.5: Increase advertising revenue by 25%.o Maintain a bus advertising program to promote interior and exterioradvertisements to local businesses.6-6Vision, Mission, Goals, Objectives, and Strategies


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN• Objective 3.6: Encourage paratransit rider shift to fixed-route service.o Increase public awareness/education of fixed-route system through advertising,public service announcements and other appropriate, cost-effective media.Goal 4: Evaluate and participate community values and initiatives as they relate to futureplansObjectives:• Objective 4.1: Support collaborative land and use and transportation planning effortsthat ensure communities can develop in an efficient and sustainable way.o Strategy 4.1.1: Coordinate with FDOT, County and municipal engineers toincorporate transit amenities and ADA stop improvements on any roadconstruction projects.• Objective 4.2: Coordinate with bicycle and pedestrian plans to ensure that transit routesare a consideration in the prioritization process for projects.o Strategy 4.2.1: Coordinate with the Okaloosa-Walton TPO in bicycle andpedestrian planning activities to ensure that transit has a place in the overallpriority mix for improvements.• Objective 4.3: Coordinate with local development comprehensive planning and zoningcode efforts to encourage transit-oriented development policies.o Strategy 4.3.1: Coordinate with Okaloosa County Growth Management toensure that new developments incorporate transit amenities within the servicearea.• Objective 4.4: Support efforts of the City of Destin to implement transit stops andshelters within the City.o Strategy 4.4.1: Program Section 5307 funds for stop and shelter improvements.• Objective 4.5: Ensure transit improvements are included in the Okaloosa-Walton LongRange Transportation Plan.• Objective 4.6: Promote linkages between transit services and education and trainingfacilities.o Pursue student fees for transportation from colleges.6-7Vision, Mission, Goals, Objectives, and Strategies


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANGoal 5: Maximize safety and security for all transit services and facilitiesObjectives:• Objective 5.1: Maintain a comprehensive System Safety Program Plan.o Strategy 5.1.1: Update SSPP in accordance with FDOT requirements.• Objective 5.2: Maintain and implement safety and security systems throughout facilities,fleet and public stops and stations.o Strategy 5.2.1: Implement cameras on buseso Strategy 5.2.2: Identify safety and security issues at Uptown Station and othertransfer locations.• Objective 5.3: Establish design guidelines and priority system improvements.o Strategy 5.3.1: Prioritize improvements for office facilities, passenger waitingareas, transfer centers, and on-street transfer locations.Goal 6: Ensure prudent public stewardship of financial resources and secure additionalfunding for system maintenance and improvements.Objectives:• Objective 6.1: Maintain an equitable fare policy and establish a farebox recoverystandard.o Strategy 6.1.1: Consider daily and weekly passes that can be sold on buses asadditional fare media.o Strategy 6.1.2: Maintain a farebox recovery standard equal to the peer mean.• Objective 6.2: Develop a long range financial plan that maximizes grant funding sourcesfor TDP strategic improvements and long range transportation improvements.o Strategy 6.2.1: Continue to coordinate with FTA and FDOT to identify grantfunding sources that can fund eligible projects identified in this TDP.• Objective 6.3: Ensure that TDP improvements are included in the Long RangeTransportation Plan efforts.o Strategy .6.3.1: Coordinate with TPO staff to ensure that transportation facilitiesaccommodate users of all ages and abilities, including the young, persons withdisabilities, the economically challenged, and the elderly.6-8Vision, Mission, Goals, Objectives, and Strategies


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN• Objective 6.4: Seek to additional local funds when such funds can leverage federal andstate grant funding opportunities.o Strategy 6.4.1: When projects are eligible for FDOT service development funds,seek local funds to match at 50 percent levels.Goal 7: Pursue regional transportation needs with surrounding counties and the overallFt. Walton Beach Urbanized Area.Objective:• Objective 7.1: Proactively seek partnerships with Walton County and Beaches of SouthWalton business interests to develop transit services linking Walton and OkaloosaCounties.o Strategy 7.1.1: As regional local governments match aspirations for publictransportation with local funds to operate service, coordinate transit linkages.• Objective 7.2: Proactively seek partnerships with Santa Rosa County government andbusiness interests to develop transit services linking Santa Rosa and OkaloosaCounties.o Strategy 7.2.1: As regional local governments match aspirations for publictransportation with local funds to operate service, coordinate transit linkages.6-9Vision, Mission, Goals, Objectives, and Strategies


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN(This page intentionally left blank)6-10Vision, Mission, Goals, Objectives, and Strategies


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCHAPTER SEVENEVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVESINTRODUCTIONThis section synthesizes all of the elements of the previous chapters to identify priorities formoving forward to a ten-year program of prioritized improvements. Under consideration in thischapter are four areas to focus service over the next ten years:• Maintain the existing system;• Improvements to existing services in terms of later evening trips if external grant fundingsources become available;• One new route operating between Niceville/Bluewater Bay and Destin via the Mid-BayBridge if external grant funding sources become available.In addition to the focus areas listed above, Okaloosa County may maintain a candidate list ofservice improvements considered to be outside of the ten-year timeframe. Candidateimprovements can, at any time, be moved into the ten-year timeframe with a simple modificationto the Annual Update of the Transit Development Plan that must be submitted each year.Therefore, if grant opportunities or other funding sources become available, the project isincluded in the TDP. In addition to candidate projects for Okaloosa County, there are two routesconnecting Navarre to Hurlburt Field and Destin to the Beaches of South Walton. Candidateimprovements include:• Additional new routes as tested for ridership demand in T-BEST (including Navarre toHurlburt Field – Santa Rosa);• Additional evening departures on weekdays;• New routes from previous TDP updates that were not implemented;• Addition of Saturday service;• Addition of Sunday service; and• Express services to Eglin AFB from park-and-rides.7-1Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPRIORITY ALTERNATIVE NUMBER ONEMAINTAIN THE EXISTING SYSTEMIn these unprecedented economic times, resources for public transportation in Okaloosa Countyare constrained to the maximum extent. The Emerald Coast Convention and Visitors Bureau,which had been a partner in funding transit services along U.S. 98, will discontinue funding as ofOctober 1, 2011, leaving the County as the only local funding agency in the area. In addition,the Situation Appraisal noted that Okaloosa County has the lowest millage rate in the State ofFlorida and property value declines have significantly decreased revenues for all Countyprograms. However, there is acknowledgement among the elected officials that cutting servicewould be harmful to the riding public. Therefore, maintaining the existing system for the first fiveyears of the ten-year program is Priority Alternative One. This alternative will be achievedthrough the following actions:• Maximize Okaloosa County’s existing capability of using FTA Section 5307 funds foroperations by matching federal funds with every existing source of local funds includingPurchase of Service contracts under the Coordinated System;• Maximize existing and additional FDOT Corridor funds that have been granted to theCounty to maintain service over the next five years;• Maximize the potential to bring additional FDOT Service Development funds into theCounty for eligible projects identified in this TDP, subject to a local match of 50%;• Hold the County’s current contribution of $188,000 annually to FY 11 levels for the fiveyear period.Table 7-1 below displays the annual hours and cost of the existing system in 2011 dollars.7-2Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 7-1Existing System CostsService AreaRoutesTotal AnnualHoursTotal AnnualCost 2011 $Ft. Walton Beach 1, 2, 3, 4 12,439.50 $401,787.86Crestview + Express 11, 12, 14 8,997.00 $266,581.24Island and Destin Shuttles 20, 30, 32, 33 13,552.00 $436,052.25Total 34,988.50 $1,104,421.357-3Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPRIORITY ALTERNATIVE NUMBER TWOIMPROVEMENTS TO EXISTING SERVICESeveral improvements to existing services were tested in the T-BEST model in Chapter Five.Improvements included Saturday service, Sunday services, expanded evening service onweekdays, and increased frequencies on weekdays. In addition, the seventh scenario tested atotal of five new routes in Okaloosa County and Santa Rosa County.Weekend service improvements yielded little ridership in relation to increases in cost.Frequency improvements yielded significantly higher costs than increases in ridership.Therefore, the improvements deemed to be feasible within the ten-year timeframe include oneadditional evening round trip on weekdays for non express routes.Evening ServiceThe incremental cost of one additional evening round trip is quantifiable. The total round triptime is multiplied by the 2011 cost per hour and then by 252 weekdays to yield an annual cost.Table 7-2 below displays the annual cost at the route level for one evening round trip on nonexpressroutes, for a total annual cost of $89,500. These improvements will only be consideredif external grant funding sources become available. Additional evening round trips will remaincandidate projects beyond the ten-year timeframe.7-4Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 7-2One Evening Round Trip on Non-express RoutesTotalRound TripOne Additional Evening Round Trip on Non-TimeExpress Routes2011 Cost PerhourTotal AnnualCost 2011$Route1 Ft. Walton Beach Route 1 1.00 $31.59 $7,9612 Ft. Walton Beach Route 2 1.00 $31.59 $7,9613 Ft. Walton Beach Route 3 1.25 $31.59 $9,9514 Ft. Walton Beach Route 4 1.00 $31.59 $7,96111 Crestview Route 11 2.00 $31.59 $15,92112 Crestview Route 12 1.00 $31.59 $7,96120 Island Shuttle 1.00 $31.59 $7,96130 Destin Connector 1.00 $31.59 $7,96132 Destin East 1.00 $31.59 $7,96133 Crystal Beach 1.00 $31.59 $7,961Total 11.25 $89,558New RouteOkaloosa County requested that a total of five new routes be tested in T-BEST. Figure 7-1below displays the routes that were coded in T-BEST. The one route that holds the greatestmarket potential is the route from Niceville and Bluewater Bay to Destin over the Mid-BayBridge. Tolling on the bridge is at $5.00 for a round trip whereas a transit round trip would be$2.00 if the base fare is applied. This improvement would only be pursued if grant fundingsources become available. Table 7-3 below shows the annual cost of service estimated at$244,000. The remaining new routes will be shown as candidate projects outside the ten-yeartimeframe.Table 7-3Operating Characteristics – Niceville/Bluewater Bay to DestinRoute1TotalAnnualHours2011 Cost PerhourTotal AnnualCost 2011$New RouteNiceville/Bluewater Bay to Destin via Mid-BayBridge 3,570 $31.59 $112,7767-5Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 7-1New Routes Coded Into T-BEST7-6Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANPRIORITY ALTERNATIVE NUMBER THREEBRING ALL SYSTEM BUS STOPS TO ADA ACCESSIBILITY STANDARDSADA regulations now require that transit agencies have a plan to bring bus stops to ADAcompliance except when practicably impossible to do so. This alternative calls for OkaloosaCounty to issue an RFP for design, engineering, construction and permitting to bring bus stopsto ADA accessibility standards. This will be an enormous undertaking for the County to managethe process.At the Annual Conference of the Florida Public Transportation Association in October 2010,Tindale-Oliver and Associates gave a presentation on ADA bus stop accessibility standards. Aportion of that presentation is presented below. Figure 7-2 below displays an overall universalapproach to bus stop accessibility. This entails the notion that local governments, FDOT, privateproperty owners, and public transit systems all have a joint responsibility in providing accessiblepathways.7-7Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 7-2Universal Accessibility Approach7-8Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 7-3 below shows the required elements for accessibility in urban environments. Note thatshelters and other amenities are optional. There must be 96 inches of perpendicular accessfrom the road.7-9Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 7-3Required Elements for Accessible Bus Stops7-10Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 7-4 below displays design dimensions for suburban environments. Note that amenitiesare optional.7-11Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 7-4Bus Stop Accessibility in Suburban Environment7-12Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFinally, Figure 7-5 below displays design standards for bus stops in rural environments. Notethat in rural environments there is limited accessible pathway to the stop.7-13Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 7-5Bus Stop Accessibility in Rural Environments7-14Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCandidate ImprovementsThe Candidate Improvements are those that are considered to be outside of the ten-yeartimeframe but could be moved into the ten-year program with an annual update to the TDP.Candidate Improvements include:• Additional evening round trips on weekdays;• Additional new routes as tested for ridership demand in T-BEST (including Navarre toHurlburt Field – Santa Rosa);• Additional evening departures on weekdays;• New routes from previous TDP updates that were not implemented;• Addition of Saturday service;• Addition of Sunday service; and• Express services to Eglin AFB from park-and-rides.Table 7-4 below displays Candidate Improvements.7-15Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 7-4Candidate Improvements Outside Ten-Year TimeframeImprovementNet NewTotalServiceHoursCost perServiceHourTotal AnnualCost 2011 $Two additional weekday evening round trips on Non-express Routes 5,670 $31.59 $179,115Add Saturday Service 3,120 $31.59 $98,561Add Sunday Service 3,120 $31.59 $98,561Navarre to Hurlburt Gate 3,570 $31.59 $112,776Niceville PNR to Eglin Gate & Hurlburt 3,570 $31.59 $112,776Eglin to Hurlburt 3,570 $31.59 $112,776Niceville PNR to Eglin & Hurlburt 3,570 $31.59 $112,776Local Route in Ft. Walton Beach connecting WalMart on BealParkway to Shalimar via Lew Street, Mayflower, Pocahontas, SouthAvenue and Eglin Parkway 3,570 $31.59 $112,776Local service within Niceville connecting to a transfer center7,140 $31.59 $225,553Local route connecting the Destin Community Center to the ShoresShopping Center via Calhoun, Kelly, Beach Drive and U.S. 98 3,570 $31.59 $112,776Local route connecting the Destin Community Center to the ShoresShopping Center via Azalea Drive, Legion Drive and Main Street 3,570 $31.59 $112,776Local route connecting the Shores Shopping Center to the WalMartSuper Center via Main Street, Airport Road, Indian Bayou/Two Treesand Commons Drive 3,570 $31.59 $112,776Park and Ride service to Eglin Air Force Base 3,570 $31.59 $112,776TOTALS 51,180 $1,616,7767-16Evaluation of Alternatives


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCHAPTER EIGHTTEN-YEAR PROGRAM OF IMPROVEMENTSINTRODUCTIONThis chapter incorporates all of the previous chapters to present a focused approach to the tenyearprogram of improvements, presented below. Chapter Seven presented a number ofcandidate service improvements that will remain in effect throughout the ten-year period of thisTDP. At any time, as circumstances or funding sources warrant, Okaloosa County can move aservice improvement from candidate status into the ten-year program and simply reflect such inthe next annual update. The framework and details of the ten-year program are presentedbelow.FRAMEWORK FOR TEN-YEAR PROGRAM OF IMPROVEMENTSThroughout the first five years of the program, the program is to maintain the existing systemand bring all bus stops up to ADA accessibility standards. In FY 16, additional evening trips arecalled for on weekdays for non-express routes. At full implementation, this will add 2,835 annualservice hours at a cost of $89,558 annually in 2011 dollars. In FY 17, the program calls for thenew route serving between Niceville/Bluewater Bay to Destin via the Mid-Bay Bridge. From FY18 through FY 20, the program calls for maintaining the existing system with eveningimprovements and the new route. Table 8-1 below displays the framework for the ten-yearprogram of improvements.8-1Ten-Year Program of Improvements


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 8-1Framework for Ten-Year Program of ImprovementsTen‐Year ProgramService ImprovementNon‐RecurringCostNet NewDaily ServiceHoursNet NewAnnualService HoursAnnual Cost ofServiceImprovements(2011 $)FY 11 ‐ FY 15 Maintain Existing System 34,989 $1,105,287FY 11 ‐ FY 14 Bring all bus stops to ADA Accessibility Standards $700,000FY 16One additional daily round trip on Strong and AveragePerformers ‐‐ Weekday only 11.25 2,835 $89,558New route operating between Niceville/Bluewater Bay toFY 17Destin via the Mid‐bay Bridge 14.17 3,570 $112,776FY 18 ‐ FY 21 Maintain Existing System $1,307,621Table 8-2 below displays the detail of the ten-year program of improvements. Figure 8-1, whichfollows, displays the routes slated for evening improvements. Figure 8-2 displays the new routeconnecting Niceville/Bluewater Bay to Destin via the Mid-Bay Bridge.8-2Ten-Year Program of Improvements


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANYear Affected Routes ImprovementFY 2011FY 2012FY 2012Base YearRoutes 1-7, CareerConnector, Panama CityBeach PilotTable 8-2TEN-YEAR PROGRAM OF IMPROVEMENTSFY 2011 - 2014Non-ServiceRelatedExpenditureNet NewTotalServiceHoursTotalAnnualServiceHoursCost perServiceHourTotal AnnualCostMaintain Existing Service including Panama CityBeach pilot summer service 44,067 $52.00 $2,291,484Maintain Existing Service including Panama CityBeach pilot summer service 0 44,067 $52.00 $2,291,484Continue design, engineering and construction ofexpanded capacity to administration, operationsand maintenance facility $1,300,000 0FY 2012Procure design, engineering, construction, andpermitting services to bring all system bus stopsto ADA accessibility standards and place shelters 0FY 2012Make ADA bus stop improvements to 50 stops atan estimate of $2,000 per stop $100,000 0Routes 1-7, CareerConnector, Panama City Maintain Existing Service including Panama CityFY 2013 Beach PilotBeach pilot summer service 0 44,067 $52.00 $0Continue design, engineering and construction ofexpanded capacity to administration, operationsFY 2013and maintenance facility $1,300,000 0FY 2013Make ADA bus stop improvements to 100 stops atan estimate of $2,000 per stop $200,000 0Add one evening daily departure for Routes 1-7only to bring weekday span of service from 6:00FY 2014 Routes 1-7a.m. to 9:00 p.m. 3,224 3,224 $52.00 $2,459,132FY 2014 Route 7Bring Route 7 to weekday service levels onSaturday operating from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 742 3,966 $52.00 $2,497,716Complete construction of expanded capacity toadministration, operations and maintenanceFY 2014facility $1,300,000 0 0 $0.00 $0FY 2014Make ADA bus stop improvements to 100 stops atan estimate of $2,000 per stop $200,000 0 0 $0.00 $0TOTALS $4,400,000 3,966 48,033 $9,539,8168-3Ten-Year Program of Improvements


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 8-3TEN-YEAR PROGRAM OF IMPROVEMENTSFY 2015 - 2021Year Affected Routes ImprovementTotal AnnualServiceHoursCost perServiceHourTotalAnnualCostFY 2016 Base Year from 2014 34,989 $31.59 $1,105,287FY 2016FY 2017Routes 1, 2, 3, 4, 11, 12,20, 30, 32, and 33 One additional evening round trip on weekdays 37,824 $31.59 $1,194,844New RouteNiceville/Bluewater bay to Destin via Mid-BayBridge 41,394 $31.59 $1,307,621FY 2018 All Maintain Existing System 41,394 $31.59 $1,307,621FY 2019 All Maintain Existing System 41,394 $31.59 $1,307,621FY 2020 All Maintain Existing System 41,394 $31.59 $1,307,621FY 2021 All Maintain Existing System 41,394 $31.59 $1,307,621TOTALS 41,394 $1,307,6218-4Ten-Year Program of Improvements


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 8-1Routes to Implement Evening and Saturday Service ImprovementsFY 20148-5Ten-Year Program of Improvements


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANFigure 8-2New Route – Niceville/Bluewater Bay to Destin via Mid-Bay BridgetFY 20168-6Ten-Year Program of Improvements


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCandidate ProjectsTable 8-4 below displays candidate projects deemed outside the ten-year timeframe.Many of these projects appeared in previous TDP updates.Table 8-4Candidate Projects Outside Ten-ear TimeframeNet NewTotalServiceHoursCost perServiceHourTotal AnnualCost 2011 $ImprovementTwo additional weekday evening round trips 5,865 $31.59 $185,275Implement Saturday Service 6,812 $31.59 $215,191Implement Sunday Service 9,308 $31.59 $294,040Local Service within Niceville 3,648 $31.59 $115,240Destin Internal - Community Center - Beach Drive 3,570 $31.59 $112,776Destin Internal - Community Center to Shores ShoppingCenter 3,570 $31.59 $112,776Shores Shopping Center to WalMart Super Center 3,570 $31.59 $112,776Myrtle Grove to Rosa L. Parks Transit Complex via W Street 3,570 $31.59 $112,776Alternative Service types, including circulators and vanservice, privatized, designed to provide connectivity to fixedroutesystem 3,570 $31.59 $112,776TOTALS 43,483 $1,373,6288-7Ten-Year Program of Improvements


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANThis page intentionally left blank8-8Ten-Year Program of Improvements


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCHAPTER NINEPLAN DEVELOPMENT AND CAPITAL & OPERATING PLANINTRODUCTIONThe Evaluation of Alternatives presented in Chapter Seven and the Ten-Year Program ofImprovements presented in Chapter Eight are critical components to Plan Development and areincorporated by reference in this chapter. This chapter includes a Management and MonitoringProgram for the Goals and Objectives, a vehicle replacement plan and a Capital and OperatingPlan to implement the improvements called for throughout this TDP update.MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING PROGRAMThe Management and Monitoring Program takes the Goals, Objectives and Strategiespresented in Chapter Six and assigns a performance measure for each of the objectivesand strategies. This instrument can be used in future Annual Updates as OCT shares itsprogress with FDOT.Table 9-1 below displays the performance measures for all Goals, Objectives, andStrategies. Note: management and monitoring program for remaining goals andobjectives will be included in final draft.9-1Plan Development and Capital & Operating Plan


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 9-1Monitoring Program and MeasuresGoals and ObjectivesGOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIESPERFORMANCE MEASURESACTUALPERFORMANCE FORANNUAL UPDATESGoal 1: Maintain service delivery for existing and potential customers to meetdemand for transit services in Okaloosa CountyObjectives and StrategiesObjective 1.1: Maintain existing levels of fixed route service.Number of grants awardedStrategy 1.1.1: Continue maximization of Federal and State grantsto maintain adequate funding for the existing system.Value of grant funds awardedStrategy 1.1.2: Apply for additional federal grant funding as newtransportation authorization bill allows.Number of new grant programsObjective 1.2: Pursue those improvements that are the most efficient in terms Number of Improvements completedof garnering ridership and cost-effective to implement.within existing ResourcesStrategy 1.2.1: Annually monitor ridership on individual routes andidentify route modifications that could increase ridership.Number of route modificationsStrategy 1.2.2: Focus all service within the Urban Area Boundary.Number of funding partners gainedStrategy 1.2.3: Proactively develop partnerships withmunicipalities and large public/private entities within service areas.Objective 1.3: Enhance connectivity and transfer opportunities.Dollar value of funding partnershipsData collection on critical transfersbetween routesStrategy 1.3.1: Ensure that schedules are prepared to maximize Number of daily timed transfers attimed-transfers at major and minor transfer points.designated transfer centersStrategy 1.3.2: Pursue timed transfers at on-street locations whereroutes intersect.Objective 1.4: Enhance service reliability and on-time performance to securecustomer loyalty.Strategy 1.4.1: Compile customer complaints to determine ifspecific routes have chronic on-time performance problems.Number of daily on-street timedtransfersNumber of routes with complaintsStrategy 1.4.2: Conduct running time checks on routes with ontimeperformance problems.Number of running time checkscompletedStrategy 1.4.3: Conduct periodic field checks to ensure if routesare running within their allocated running times.Number of field checks completedObjective 1.5: Establish guidelines for increasing frequency on high-demandroutes to improve service capacity.Strategy 1.5.1: Establish standards for weekday frequencies.Standards for 60, 90, and 120minute frequenciesStrategy 1.5.2: Consider future frequency improvements only as Frequency considered with loaddemand warrants.factors exceeds 120 percent9-2Plan Development and Capital & Operating Plan


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 9-1 ContinuedMonitoring Program and MeasuresGoals and ObjectivesGOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIESPERFORMANCE MEASURESObjective 1.6: Design fixed-routes to optimize direct routing and minimizecustomer travel time.ACTUALPERFORMANCE FORANNUAL UPDATESStrategy 1.6.1: Coordinate and partner with Destin to develop Number of direct routingstops and amenities and adjust service from U.S. 98 to parallel modifications as financial resourcescorridors with stop improvements.are availableObjective 1.7: Establish guidelines and a prioritization process for extendinghours of service based on customer demand and community support.Strategy 1.11.1: Coordinate with FDOT for future servicedevelopment opportunities to expand weekday service hours.Service Development and localresources availabilityStrategy 1.11.2: Focus evening improvements on higher demand Number of improvements made toroutes only.non-express routesObjective 1.8: Focus all new services on connecting critical activity centers,employment centers and military installations within Okaloosa County.Strategy 1.8.1: Investigate express transit service from residentialareas to Eglin Main Base, and or the Duke Field areas including Financial resources, including grantconsideration of park-and ride areas and vanpool programs. funding sources availableStrategy 1.8.2: Address connections to all major attractors inOkaloosa County including intermodal terminals and access to Number of park & ride facilitiesaviation and rail facilities as funding sources warrant.proposedStrategy 1.8.3: Utilize the West Florida Park & Ride Lot PlanningGuide to determine where to locate park & ride logs if analysis Number of park & ride facilitieswarrants the need for such facilities.funded and constructedObjective 1.9: Establish performance benchmarks for all service improvementsand monitor performance to ensure minimum performance levels are met.Strategy 1.9.1: Establish numerical indicators against which theachievement of mobility goals of the community can be measured.Conduct annual reportStrategy 1.9.2: Utilize the system average for passenger trips perrevenue hour, passenger trips per revenue mile, farebox recoveryand cost per passenger trips as benchmarks for service Consider modifications to routesperformance.severely under-performing9-3Plan Development and Capital & Operating Plan


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 9-1 ContinuedMonitoring Program and MeasuresGoals and ObjectivesGOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIESGoal 2: Maintain and expand adequate capital infrastructure to ensure vehicles,facilities, customer amenities and bus stops to achieve the highest standard ofaccessibility and comfort.Objectives and Strategies:PERFORMANCE MEASURESACTUALPERFORMANCE FORANNUAL UPDATESObjective 2.1:Program (CIP).Develop and maintain a comprehensive Capital ImprovementStrategy 2.1.1: Utilize this major TDP update as a basis fordeveloping and maintaining a Capital Improvement Program (CIP). Capital and Operating PlanObjective 2.2: Continue with funded plans to expand the current facility with abus wash and improved paving of the parking lot.Strategy 2.2.1: Expend remaining ARRA funds to complete Project procurement, constructionprojects.and completionObjective 2.3:of the fleet.Replace buses as the fleet ages to bring down the average ageStrategy 2.3.1: Expend remaining ARRA funds to replace buses.Number of buses purchased withinFederal interest lifespanStrategy 2.3.2: Expend Section 5307 funds to replace vehicles asneeded.Average Age of FleetObjective 2.4: Expand fleet as needed for future service improvements.Funding availability for serviceexpansionStrategy 2.4.1: Purchase coaches for future service improvementswhen grant-funding sources area available for operations.Number of buses purchasedObjective 2.5: Create a passenger amenities program to place shelters andamenities throughout the service area.Strategy 2.5.1: Continue to coordinate improvements with Destin Completion of shelter and stopto implement the Transit Stop Design and Location Study.designStrategy 2.5.2: When possible, apply design standards for sheltersin Destin to other system stops.Number of shelters placedStrategy 2.5.3: Program Section 5307 funds to procure passengeramenities.Customer satisfactionObjective 2.6: Create a bus stop improvement program to bring all bus stops Procure firm for design, engineering,into compliance with the Americans Disabilities Act.construction and permittingStrategy 2.6.1: Procure firm capable of design, engineering,construction and permitting to bring bus stops into ADA Program $700,000 for bus stopcompliance.improvementsStrategy 2.6.2: Program Section 5307 funds to complete thisprogram of bus stop improvements.Number of bus stops improvedObjective 2.7: Pursue technology improvements to enhance operationalefficiency, effectiveness and customer satisfaction.Consider stop announcement system for fixed-Program 5307 fundsStrategy 2.7.1:route buses.Strategy 2.7.2: Pursue technology enhancements as organizationalcapabilities warrant.Procurement and installationObjective 2.8: Coordinate with municipalities, business interests, community Number of community groupsassociations, etc. to leverage resources for capital improvements.participating in improvementsStrategy 2.8.1: Coordinate with private property owners as part oftheir own ADA requirements for accessible pathways to make ADA Number of private property ownersbus stop accessibility improvements when right-of-way is and municipalities participating ininsufficient.improvements9-4Plan Development and Capital & Operating Plan


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 9-1 ContinuedMonitoring Program and MeasuresGoals and ObjectivesGOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIESGoal 3: Develop a comprehensive marketing, communications and mediarelations program to effectively promote transit’s image, awareness, publicembrace and information materials.PERFORMANCE MEASURESACTUALPERFORMANCE FORANNUAL UPDATESObjectives and StrategiesObjective 3.1: Develop a comprehensive marketing program to market servicesto existing and potential customer bases, including employees, employers,traditional transit markets, persons with disabilities, military personnel, tourists,primary school students and college students.Increased ridershipStrategy 3.1.1: Since this objective is not eligible within existinggrants, identify and communicate the need for a marketing Project justification and costprogram and estimate annual cost of a marketing program. estimateStrategy 3.1.2: Propose that local funds be used to implement a Successful inclusion in OCBCCmarketing program.budgetStrategy 3.1.3: When possible, conduct marketing activities that Number of speaking engagements,can be completed within existing staff resources.festivals, transportation daysObjective 3.2: Develop printed transit information and web-based transitinformation that is customer-friendly and attractive.Number of venues where guidebooksare distributedStrategy 3.2.1: Monitor information materials and web activityover time to determine if enhancements to existing information Annual number of guidebooksmaterials are warranted.distributedStrategy 3.2.2: Make information available at all county offices oncommuter assistance programs, public transit, the coordinated Annual number of visits to OCTtransportation system program, and bicycle/pedestrian programs. websiteObjective 3.3 Enhance communications between Okaloosa County Transit andits riders using social media.Effectiveness of communicationsStrategy 3.3.1: Utilize facebook, Twitter, Bing and otherforms of social media to establish communications with customersand the community.Number of followersObjective 3.4: Develop a comprehensive media-relations program tocommunicate successes and appropriately deal with incidents.Number of positive press storiesattemptedStrategy 3.4.1: Proactively seek positive press coverage for OCT’s Number of positive press storiesinitiatives and improvements.coveredObjective 3.5: Increase advertising revenue by 25%.Strategy 3.5.1: Maintain a bus advertising program to promoteinterior and exterior advertisements to local business.Number of new clients/ads soldObjective 3.6: Encourage paratransit rider shift to fixed-route service.Develop flyer for paratransit busesStrategy 3.6.1: Increase public awareness/education of the fixedroutesystem through advertising, public service announcements Increased ixed-route ridership/and other appropriate, cost-effective media.Decreased paratransit ridership9-5Plan Development and Capital & Operating Plan


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 9-1 ContinuedMonitoring Program and MeasuresGoals and ObjectivesGOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIESPERFORMANCE MEASURESACTUALPERFORMANCE FORANNUAL UPDATESGoal 4: Evaluate and participate in community values and initiatives as theyrelate to future plans.Objectives and Strategies:Objective 4.1: Support collaborative land and use and transportation planningefforts that ensure communities can develop in an efficient and sustainable way.Number of amenities resulting fromconstruction projectsStrategy 4.1.1: Coordinate with FDOT, County and municipal Number of ADA bus stopengineers to incorporate transit amenities and ADA stop improvements from roadimprovements on any road construction projects.construction projectsObjective 4.2: Coordinate with bicycle and pedestrian plans to ensure thattransit routes are a consideration in the prioritization process for projects.Strategy 4.2.1: Coordinate with the Okaloosa-Walton TPO in Criteria for considering transit routesbicycle and pedestrian planning activities to ensure that transit has as a priority for pedestrian anda place in the overall priority mix for improvements.bicycle improvementsObjective 4.3: Coordinate with local development comprehensive planning andzoning code efforts to encourage transit-oriented development policies.Strategy 4.3.1: Coordinate with Okaloosa County GrowthManagement to ensure that new developments incorporate transit Number of transit improvementsamenities within the service area.made in new developmentsObjective 4.4: Support efforts of the City of Destin to implement transit stopsand shelters within the City.Shelter designStrategy 4.4.1:improvements.Program Section 5307 funds for stop and shelterNumber of shelters placedObjective 4.5: Ensure transit improvements are included in the Okaloosa-WaltonLong Range Transportation PlanStrategy 4.5.1: Pursue STP flex funds as part of Cost-feasible planAnnual transit improvements in TIPObjective 4.6: Promote linkages between transit services and education andtraining facilities.Develop proposal for student feesStrategy 4.6.1: Pursue student fees for transportation fromcolleges.Dollar value of student fees9-6Plan Development and Capital & Operating Plan


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 9-1 ContinuedMonitoring Program and MeasuresGoals and ObjectivesGOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIESPERFORMANCE MEASURESACTUALPERFORMANCE FORANNUAL UPDATESGoal 5: Maximize safety and security for all transit services and facilitiesObjectives and StrategiesObjective 5.1: Maintain a comprehensive System Safety Program Plan.Strategy 5.1.1: Update SSPP in accordance with FDOTrequirements.Objective 5.2: Maintain and implement safety and security systems throughoutfacilities, fleet and public stops and stations.Update SSPPStrategy 5.2.1: Implement cameras on busesNumber of buses with camerasStrategy 5.2.2: Identify safety and security issues at UptownStation and other transfer locationsNumber of safety and security issuesidentifiedObjective 5.3: Establish design guidelines and priority system improvements.Number of improvements prioritizedStrategy 5.3.1: Prioritize improvements for office facilities,passenger waiting areas, transfer centers, and on-street transferlocations.Number of improvements made9-7Plan Development and Capital & Operating Plan


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 9-1 ContinuedMonitoring Program and MeasuresGoals and ObjectivesGOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIESPERFORMANCE MEASURESACTUALPERFORMANCE FORANNUAL UPDATESGoal 6: Ensure prudent public stewardship of financial resources and secureadditional funding for system maintenance and improvements.Objectives and Strategies:Objective 6.1: Maintain an equitable fare policy and establish a fareboxrecovery standard.Strategy 6.1.1: Consider daily and weekly passes that can be soldon buses as additional fare media.Farebox upgrades/new fare mediaStrategy 6.1.2: Maintain a farebox recovery standard equal to the Establish standard at 12.5 percentpeer mean.from peer reportObjective 6.2: Develop a long-range financial plan that maximizes grantfundingsources for TDP strategic improvements and long-range transportationimprovements.Number of grants awardedStrategy 6.2.1: Continue with FTA and FDOT to identify grantfundingsources that can fund eligible projects identified in thisTDP.Dollar value of grants awardedObjective 6.3: Ensure that TDP improvements are included in the Long RangeTransportation Plan efforts.Strategy 6.3.1: Coordinate with TPO staff ensure thattransportation facilities accommodate users of all ages and abilities,including the young, persons with disabilities, the economicallychallenged, and the elderly.Participate in TCC and TPO processObjective 6.4: Seek additional local funds when such funds can leveragefederal and state grant funding opportunities.Strategy 6.4.1: When projects are eligible for FDOT servicedevelopment funds, seek local funds to match at 50 percent levels.9-8Plan Development and Capital & Operating Plan


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 9-1 ContinuedMonitoring Program and MeasuresGoals and ObjectivesGOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIESPERFORMANCE MEASURESACTUALPERFORMANCE FORANNUAL UPDATESGoal 7: Pursue regional transportation needs with surrounding counties and theoverall Fort Walton Beach Urbanized Area.Objective and Strategy:Objective 7.1: Proactively seek partnerships with Walton County and Beachesof South Walton business interests to develop transit services linking Walton Number of regional routes proposedand Okaloosa Counties.and fundedStrategy 7.1.1: As regional local governments match aspirationsfor public transportation with local funds to operate service, Number of regional routescoordinate transit linkages.implementedObjective 7.2: Proactively seek partnerships with Santa Rosa Countygovernment and business interests to develop transit services linking Santa Number of regional routes proposedRosa and Okaloosa Counties.and fundedStrategy 7.2.1: As regional local governments match aspirationsfor public transportation with local funds to operate service, Number of regional routescoordinate transit linkages.implemented9-9Plan Development and Capital & Operating Plan


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANVEHICLE REPLACEMENT PROGRAMThroughout the ten-year program, Okaloosa County will maintain a fleet of 53 vehiclesby replacing 62 cutaways and buses and 25 sedans, minivans and service vehiclesbased on Federal interest lifespan. The replacement program includes vehicles forfixed-route and paratransit. Table 9-2 below presents the vehicle replacement programfor Okaloosa County.9-10Plan Development and Capital & Operating Plan


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 9-2Vehicle Replacement Plan – FY2011-2021Replacement Vehicle YearsModel Replacement Manufacturer/NumberofVehicles FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FYYear Year Model Type 2011 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 20212004 2014 Freight Bus 3 3 3 3 R2006 2011 Dodge Minivan 4 R2006 2011 Ford Sedan 3 R2006 2012 Chevrolet Cutaway 10 10 R2007 2012 Ford Sedan 5 5 R2007 2013 Chevrolet Cutaway 5 5 5 R2008 2014 Chevrolet Cutaway 12 12 12 12 R2009 2015 Chevrolet Cutaway 8 8 8 8 8 R2007 2017 Freight Trolley 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 R2011 2016 Ford Pick Up 1 1 1 1 1 1 R2011 2015 Replacement Van 4 4 4 4 R2011 2016 Replacement Sedan 3 3 3 3 3 R2012 2018 Replacement Cutaway 10 10 10 10 10 10 R2012 2016 Replacement Sedan 5 5 5 5 R2013 2019 Replacement Cutaway 5 5 5 5 5 5 R2014 2024 Replacement Bus 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 32014 2020 Replacement Cutaway 12 12 12 12 12 12 R2015 2020 Replacement Van 4 4 4 4 4 4 42015 2021 Replacement Cutaway 8 8 8 8 8 8 82016 2021 Replacement Sedan 3 3 3 3 3 32016 2022 Replacement Cutaway 10 10 10 102016 2021 Replacement Sedan 5 5 5 5 5 52016 2021 Replacement Pick Up 1 1 1 1 1 12017 2027 Replacement Trolley 2 2 2 2 22019 2026 Replacement Cutaway 5 5 52020 2027 Replacement Cutaway 12 12TOTALS 53 53 53 53 53 53 53 53 53 53 53 539-11Plan Development and Capital & Operating


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANCAPITAL AND OPERATING PROGRAMThe Capital and Operating Program is a required element of the TDP and outlines projects thatare funded, and currently unfunded. Key to the Operating Program for Okaloosa County are:Section 5307 operating assistance;Section 5307 capitalized operating revenues including preventative maintenance, andProgram Administration;FDOT Block Grant and Corridor grants;Federal Section 5311 (Non-urbanized); andLocal funds from Okaloosa County held steady at 2011 levels.The capital program over the next ten years will achieve the following:Procure 62 replacement cutaways and buses;Procure 25 replacement sedans, minivans and support vehicles;Bus and Maintenance Equipment;Office and other Miscellaneous Equipment;Procure 1 expansion vehicles for TDP frequency improvements;Bring bus stops to ADA accessibility standards;Transit Transfer Center Improvements;Passenger Amenities; andStop announcement system on fleet.Tables 9-3 and 9-4 below displays the Capital and Operating Program for Okaloosa Countyfrom FY 11 through FY 21.9-12Plan Development and Capital & Operating Plan


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 9-3Operating ProgramOperating Program FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 FY2019 FY2020 FY2021 TOTALFTA - Operating Assistance $600,000 $650,000 $650,000 $650,000 $650,000 $650,000 $650,000 $650,000 $650,000 $650,000 $650,000 $7,100,000FTA Capital - Preventive Maintanence $200,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $3,200,000FTA - Project Administration $15,000 $15,000 $15,000 $15,000 $15,000 $15,000 $15,000 $15,000 $15,000 $15,000 $15,000 $165,000FDOT (Block Grant) $420,151 $432,684 $432,684 $432,684 $432,684 $432,684 $432,684 $432,684 $432,684 $432,684 $432,684 $4,746,991FDOT (Service Development) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0FDOT Urban Corridor $249,028 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $1,999,028FDOT Non Urbanized Funding $186,704 $157,350 $157,350 $157,350 $157,350 $157,350 $157,350 $157,350 $157,350 $157,350 $157,350 $1,760,204County $188,000 $188,000 $188,000 $188,000 $188,000 $188,000 $188,000 $188,000 $188,000 $188,000 $188,000 $2,068,000Miscellaneous (including fares) $845,757 $871,130 $897,264 $924,182 $951,907 $980,464 $1,009,878 $1,040,174 $1,071,380 $1,103,521 $1,136,627 $10,832,283Total Operating* $2,704,640 $2,789,164 $2,815,298 $2,842,216 $2,869,941 $2,898,498 $2,927,912 $2,958,208 $2,989,414 $3,021,555 $3,054,661 $31,871,506Operating Costs* FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 FY2019 FY2020 FY2021 TOTALFixed Route Service $1,105,287 $1,105,287 $1,105,287 $1,105,287 $1,105,287 $1,105,287 $1,105,287 $1,105,287 $1,105,287 $1,105,287 $1,105,287 $12,158,154Coordinated Paratransit System $1,564,799 $1,580,447 $1,596,251 $1,612,214 $1,628,336 $1,644,619 $1,661,066 $1,677,676 $1,694,453 $1,711,398 $1,728,512 $18,099,771Gross Expenditures $2,670,086 $2,685,734 $2,701,538 $2,717,501 $2,733,623 $2,749,906 $2,766,352 $2,782,963 $2,799,740 $2,816,684 $2,833,798 $30,257,925TDP Enhancements - Ten Year Program $89,558 $202,334 $202,334 $202,334 $202,334 $202,334 $1,101,228Unfunded Operating $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $89,558 $202,334 $202,334 $202,334 $202,334 $202,334 $1,101,228*Operating Revenues exceeding operating costs are considered contingency funds and not deemed eligible to fund unfunded improvements9-13Plan Development and Capital & Operating


OKALOOSA COUNTY TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANTable 9-4Capital ProgramCapital Program* FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 FY2019 FY2020 FY2021 TOTALTransit Vehicles Replacement $850,000 $425,000 $1,275,000 $680,000 $400,000 $850,000 $1,020,000 $1,020,000 $6,520,000Number of Vehicles: 75 10 5 15 8 2 10 12 12Service Vehicle Replace $210,000 $150,000 $120,000 $270,000 $750,000Number of Vehicles: 25 7 5 4 9Bus Equipment $337,250 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $837,250Maintenance Equipment $2,500 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $52,500Office/Computer Equipment/Soft. $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $110,000Transit Enhancements $54,750 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $55,000 $604,750Miscellaneous $23,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $273,000Bus Wash $147,434 $147,434Parking Lot Resurfacing $250,000 $250,000Expansion Vehicles $400,000 $400,000Bus Stops to ADA Accessibility Standards $200,000 $200,000 $300,000 $700,000Transit Transfer Center Enhancements $100,000 $100,000 $200,000Passenger Amenities $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $500,000Equip Buses with Stop Announcement System $50,000 $50,000Project Totals $737,500 $1,842,434 $1,020,000 $1,920,000 $1,045,000 $415,000 $945,000 $995,000 $145,000 $1,165,000 $1,165,000 $11,394,934*Capital Revenues, including open grants, are sufficient to fund the entire capital program9-14Plan Development and Capital & Operating

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