WESTON CREEK CRICKET CLUB Magazine

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WESTON CREEK CRICKET CLUB Magazine

HOWZAT ?by QUICK SINGLE 5LAW 36 (For those who were wondering... ) StatesThe striker shall be out LBW in the circumstances set out below.(a)THE STRIKER ATTEMPTING TO PLAY THE BALLThe striker shall be out LBW if he first intercepts with any part of hisperson dress or equipment a fair ball which would have hit the wicketand which has not previously touched his bat or a hand holding the bat,provided that:i. Tha ball pitched,in a straight line between wicket and wicket oron the off side of the striker's wicket, or in the case of a ball interceptedfull pitch would have pitched in a straight line between wicketand wicket; andii. The point of impact is in a straight line between wicket and wicket,even if above the level of bails.(b)STRIKER MAKING NO ATTEMPT TO PLAY THE BALLThe striker shall be out LBW even if the ball is intercepted outside theline of the off stump if in the opinion of thr umpire, he has made nogenuine attempt to play the ball with his bat, but has intercepted theball with some part of his person and if the circumstances set out in(a) above apply.Before adjudicating in an LBW decision, an umpire could well remember the followingdimensions relating to wickets, popping,bowling and return creases:a. the bowler delivers the ball from wide of the crease (the return creaseis 4'4" away from the line between middle stumps),b. a batsman of average height plays forward (about 3' in front of the poppingcrease); andc. the point of impact on the pad is in a straight line between wicket towicket.For the batsman to be out LBW, the ball must be going to hit the stumps- BUTthe ball has from the point of impact to the stumps a distance to travel of7 feet( 3feet playing forward plus 4 feet between popping and the bowling creases)AND has to hit a target a mere 9 inches wide.Should the ball not deviate in direction most batsmen consider that the possibilityof Aich an event happening to be low. It should be remembered that itis not within an umpire's jurisdiction to convict a batsman on the weight ofprobability or beyond a reasonable doubt.If there is any doubt whatsoever thebatsman is NOT OUT.

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