SAAarchaeologicalrecord - Society for American Archaeology

saa.org
  • No tags were found...

SAAarchaeologicalrecord - Society for American Archaeology

IN MEMORIAMARTICLEvania State University. There have been four symposiaorganized with the participation of over 50 specialists. Abilingual volume of memoirs was published in 2003,Urbanism in Mesoamerica (INAH and Pennsylvania StateUniversity). Two more meetings are scheduled for thefirst stage of this project, now directed by Angel GarcíaCook and William T. Sanders.Another field of interest for Mastache was the history ofarchaeological investigations in Mesoamerica. WithCobean, she published several essays including “LaArqueología” (in La Antropología en México, 1988, vol. 5,edited by Carlos García Mora and María de la Luz Berrocal,INAH) and “Mesoamerican Studies” (in The OxfordEncyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures, 2001, vol. 2, editedby David Carrasco).In recent years, Mastache had an increasing interest inMesoamerican iconography and religions. An importantachievement was her hypothesis that the principal pyramidsof Teotihuacán, Tula, and Tenochtitlan were dedicatedto similar deities and shared specific political andreligious functions, indicating nearly two millennia ofcultural continuity in Mesoamerica (“Ancient Tollan:The Sacred Precinct,” by Mastache and Cobean, RES 38:101–133, Harvard University).During over four decades in the INAH, Mastache sometimesoccupied administrative positions. During part ofthe 1960s, she was head of the archaeological permitsoffice at the INAH. During the 1990s, she directed theDepartamento de Monumentos Prehispánicos, whereshe initiated wide-ranging programs for the conservationand investigation of over 120 archaeological sitesthat are open to the public.Guadalupe Mastache’s brilliant career showed how acreative and energetic scholar can contribute majorresearch, yet provide key administrative leadership andchange professional and public communications inarchaeology. Her family, friends, and colleagues canonly say adios with the greatest sadness.—Robert H. Cobean and Barbara L. StarkRobert H. Cobean is an archaeologist with the Direcciónde Estudios Arqueológicos in the Instituto Nacional deAntropología e Historia in Mexico. Barbara L. Stark is aProfessor in the Department of Anthropology at ArizonaState University.HOMBURG, from page 23

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines