Parks, Recreation, Greenways, and Open Space ... - Town of Apex

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Parks, Recreation, Greenways, and Open Space ... - Town of Apex

AcknowledgementsTown of Apex StaffADMINISTRATIVE STAFFJohn M. Brown: Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources DirectorRenee Matthai: Recreation Customer Service SupervisorCOMMUNITY CENTER STAFFStacey Stanley: Senior Customer Service RepresentativeRECREATION PROGRAM SUPERVISORSKarl Lyon: Recreation Program ManagerAdult Athletics - Softball, Basketball, Soccer, Tennis, VolleyballPatrick Fitzsimons: Recreation Program SpecialistYouth Athletics - Baseball, Softball, Basketball, Soccer, VolleyballLaura Carraway: Recreation Program SupervisorNon-Athletic Pre-school, Youth, Teen, Adult, Track-Out Camps and Summer CampsJessica Puckett, CPRP: Recreation Program SpecialistSenior Citizen programsHALLE CULTURAL ARTS CENTERDavid Wood: Cultural Arts Center ManagerRenee Anderson: Program and Marketing SpecialistAmy McClain: Administrative SpecialistPARK MAINTENANCECraig Setzer: Park Maintenance ManagerJosh Enoch: Park Maintenance SupervisorParks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Advisory CommissionAngela Reincke, ChairMike KanterGreg Coley, Vice-ChairCarol HoffmanScott Lassiter, Council LiaisonJulia EpplinJeff RoachTom ColwellConsultant TeamSara Burroughs, RLA: Sage DesignMelissa Miklus, ASLA: Alta/Greenways


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Table of Contents1Executive SummaryOverview 1-2Foundation, Discovery, and Analysis 1-4Providing a High Quality of Life 1-5Connecting Our Community 1-8Planning for Our Future 1-92 IntroductionOverview 2-23Project Vision 2-4Methodology 2-4Population and Growth Characteristics 2-5Zoning, Growth, and Planning 2-11Streams and Tributaries 2-11Regional Park Connections 2-13Parks, Recreation, and Cultural InventoryPark Classification and Zones 3-2Existing Facilities: Parks 3-3Existing Facilities Greenways 3-57Existing Programs 3-595 RecommendationsOverview 5-26Park Zones and Classifications 5-3Park Facilities 5-4Greenways and Connectivity 5-7Programs 5-17Special Populations 5-18Land Acquisition 5-19Policy Review 5-21Action StepsPrioritization 6-2Providing a High Quality of Life 6-3Connecting Our Community 6-6Planning for Our Future 6-8Funding Sources 6-97 AppendixOverview7-2Meeting Notes, Minutes, and Agendas 7-3Parks and Recreation Input Results 7-94Needs AssessmentPublic Input and Involvement Overview 4-2Community Events 4-2On-Location and Web-Based Survey 4-3Survey Results 4-3Customer Satisfaction Survey 4-6


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Section OneExecutive SummaryOverviewThe Town of Apex is an active community whichhas continued to grow over the last several years.According to 2010 census data, a growth rate of about85% resulted in a population of 37,476. The town’splanning department estimated the population at theend of 2012 to be approximately 40,000, illustratingsteady growth in spite of recent economic challenges.Apex has been lauded for its quality of life. In 2009,Forbes ranked it the 3rd “Best Place to Move inAmerica.” In 2007, CNN Money Magazine proclaimedApex to be the best in all of North Carolina and the14th best in the U.S. to live, work, and raise a family.Committed to maintaining high living standards, in2012 the town surveyed residents and users aboutparks, recreation, and cultural resources to identifywants, needs, and overall perceptions of level ofservices. Programs and facilities were also inventoriedand evaluated. The feedback and data will assist indeveloping a plan for the future.Apex Community Map: Existing Parks and Greenways.1-2 | Executive Summary


The department’s mission was the springboard for this plan’s vision.VISIONThe Apex Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Department provides programs, services, and facilitiesto the residents and visitors of Apex, North Carolina. Department initiatives should respond to the changingneeds of Apex’s growing population; reflect age, gender, ability, and cultural diversity; and demonstrateenvironmental responsibility and careful stewardship of all natural resources. Programming should beconducted year round and balance activities that are indoor and outdoor; active and passive; physical andintellectual. The programs, services and facilities should be implemented and managed to balance qualityand quantity of recreational experiences.PROCESSFOUNDATIONDemographics Past Plans Existing Facilities and ProgramsDISCOVERYCommittee Interviews Public Events Survey InventoryANALYSISStandards: Local and National Input Results Future GrowthPLANRecommendations + Action Steps + Staff Commitment1-3 | Section 1


The plan recommends clustering action items intothe following timeframe to help set a course forimplementation.• Immediate Needs (0-2 years): Elements residentsfeel are needed to meet current demand• Near Term Needs (3-5 years): Elements the townshould address through planning, funding allocation,grant sources, and/or land acquisition• Long Term Needs (5-7 years): Items that arepriorities as the town develops and the populationincreases.PROVIDING A HIGH QUALITY OF LIFEHigh quality parks, recreation facilities, and programshelp make Apex an attractive place to live andprovide a sense of pride and community identity.Park facilities serve as the “first impression” for acommunity. These recommendations will contributeto the quality of life for residents and users ofApex parks, recreational, and cultural resources.FACILITIESWhile residents are currently satisfied with the levelof service provided by many of the town’s recreationalofferings, the survey indicated additional facilities arealso desired to fulfill the interests of the community.IMMEDIATE NEEDS (0-2 YEARS)• Acquire or re-use existing space for downtownfestivals, concerts, and markets:• Re-use the train depot, if it becomes available,to serve as a downtown urban park, market,and street festival space.• Improve use of the Town Complex byencouraging partnerships between thecommercial district, downtown vendors, andprogrammers of concerts and events.• Acquire additional indoor space for senior, teen andfitness programming. This can be done through:• Expanding the community center; or• Re-using an existing building(s); or• Developing new facilities.• Provide additional unprogrammed open space andmulti-use fields. While the nature park will helpfulfill some of this need, the town should makeimprovements to existing parks where opportunityexists to allow for greater access to passive space, aswell as include passive and unprogrammed space infuture park development.• Incorporate walking and/or multi-use paths withinexisting parks and/or town facilities, such as theApex Community Center and Town Hall Complex,and link pedestrian systems where possible.• Expand recreational opportunities for teens byplanning for specialty facilities such as skate parksor plazas, climbing structures, zip-lines, and ropescourses.• Use PRORAGIS (Park and Recreation OperatingRatio & Geographic Information System), a nationaldatabase that allows park and recreation agenciesto benchmark with others, develop programs, andenhance overall community operations. The townshould begin by completing the “lite” or “quickstart” data collection version to receive access to thedatabase.• Acquire land for a sports complex (60-200 acres) inan underserved area as indicated on page 1-10.1-5 | Section 1


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013NEAR TERM NEEDS (3-5 YEARS)• Seek additional space for more health, wellnessand fitness related classes.• Provide unprogrammed open space and/ormulti-use fields.• Provide additional playgrounds, either in existingparks or as parks are developed.• Look for additional locations within existing parksto include volleyball and basketball courts.LONG TERM NEEDS (5-7 YEARS)• Develop a sports complex (60-100 acres) that cannot only meet active recreation needs, but alsoserve as an economic tournament venue for thetown. Elements may include:• 4-5 baseball/softball pinwheel• 2 basketball courts• 1 batting cage• 3 tennis courts• 1-2 volleyball courts• 3-4 multi-purpose fields• Incorporate additional dog park(s) in future parks,as needed.• Incorporate picnic shelters in future parks andmake park improvements for rental use.• Implement plan for additional indoor space viare-use, expansion, or new construction, including:• Gymnasium space• Multi-purpose space (3 rooms, minimum)• Rooms for senior programsNew facilities will be required to meet the needs of growing families in Apex.1-6 | Executive Summary


PROGRAMSRecreational preferences should guide the developmentof programs, cultural resources, and facilities. Apex is avery active community and residents would like to seeexpanded program offerings to support their interests.After each programming period, an assessment shouldbe conducted to gauge interest and inform adjustments.Evaluation may include: class schedules, number ofparticipants, frequency of class cancellations, feedbackregarding instructors, and general suggestions forimprovement. This will maintain an open dialoguebetween residents and the Department, ensuringflexibility and satisfying demand.Based upon current interests and program needs, theTown should do the following to expand and improveprograms:IMMEDIATE NEEDS (0-2 YEARS)• Create a strategic marketing plan to ensure residentsare aware of program variety and locations, andhave an opportunity to make recommendations onfuture offerings.• Improve the website so that it is easy to find programsby topic, facility type, and location.• Expand special events programming, such asconcerts, movies, and family friendly activities.• Examine partnership opportunities to celebrate theTown of Apex and its residents, such as installingwork by artists in community spaces.• Provide programs for underserved age groups:• Youth and teens;• Seniors;• Adults (18-54) who may need family orientedsupport, such as childcare or activities parentsand children can participate in simultaneously.• Hire or assign a staff person to serve as a Parks andRecreation planner for Apex. This person will helpoversee park, greenway, and open space elements,serving as a liaison between departments to ensurecoordination occurs for future parks, recreation, andconnectivity efforts.• Develop a list of website resources and links forresidents, including nearby programs, facilities, andservices for special populations. Links may include:• Transportation offerings (bus, ride shares,carpools, and shuttle services);• Senior resources;• Programs and resources for special populations;• Teen programs;• Accessible facilities.NEAR TERM NEEDS (3-5 YEARS)• As more indoor space becomes available, planfor additional classes in areas such as health andwellness, fitness, cooking, gardening, and arts andcrafts.• Hire a senior staff member who is qualified inTherapeutic Recreation to help shape programmingand resources for seniors and special populations.• Expand program offerings for underserved agegroups listed above as space becomes available.LONG TERM NEEDS (5-7 YEARS)Provide additional programs (type and/or frequency)as space and staff become available. Programs listed byresidents were:• Yoga, cooking, martial arts, gardening/communitygardens, dancing (several varieties listed), ropescourse/team building, babysitting, CPR, First Aid,bridge and other card games, Zumba, and Pilates.1-7 | Section 1


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITYGREENWAYSGreenways are the highest priority for Apex residents. Theydesire easy access to greenways from their homes, and wantto be able to travel to parks, commercial centers, work, andschools on a system of well connected paths and bicyclefacilities. Connecting to commercial districts and parks ratedhighly in the survey. Linking residents to all of these key areas canhave a positive impact on the health and wellness of residents,especially children. As such, the following recommendationsare made to improve community connectivity:IMMEDIATE NEEDS (0-2 YEARS)• Take steps for the feasibility study, acquisition, design, andconstruction of:• American Tobacco Trail (ATT) connections, including:• Jaycee Park to Downtown (1,500 LF);• Kelly Road Park to Apex Nature Park (1.2 miles);• Apex Nature Park to American Tobacco Trail(2.3 miles).• Middle Creek Greenway connection to ensure safecrossing at the future 540.• White Oak Creek Greenway through Apex and to theATT, working in collaboration with the Town of Cary.• Complete separately, or in conjunction, a bicyclemaster plan and pedestrian master plan to provide aninterconnected system of facilities (including routes,bike lanes, shared use lanes, bicycle parking facilities,sidewalks, intersection treatments, and signalization) andprioritize implementation. This will augment the existingprioritization in the Transportation Plan.• Create a user-friendly greenway map accessible online, inan application, and/or via hard copy.• Create a Master Wayfinding and Signage Plan (includedesign, typology, and placement standards). Install signageon existing greenways.• Provide safe crossings by completing intersectionimprovements as indicated in Greenway section of thisreport.NEAR TERM NEEDS (3-5 YEARS)• Plan, design and develop the Apex Barbecue RoadGreenway from Apex Nature Park to Salem Streetdowntown.• Complete a destination-based greenway system,providing connections between downtown, commercialcenters, parks, the library, Town Complex and schools(a connection from the Town Complex to the Eva PerryRegional Library is a top priority in the Near Term).• Explore converting the Shepherds Vineyard Greenwayfrom private to public.• Install wayfinding signage on new greenway facilities.• Complete intersection improvements (in Greenwaysection of this report) for routes as they are developed.LONG TERM NEEDS (5-7 YEARS)• Continue to develop identified greenways, completingcritical connections between residential areas, commercialcenters, parks, and other facilities.• Fully implement greenway wayfinding system and mapguide to show residents access points, trail lengths, andlocation of and distance to points of interest.• Continue efforts to expand the greenway system,including planning, designing, and developing the BondPark Connector Greenway, and Greenways in SE and NWApex, including Reedy Branch Greenway, and Green LevelChurch Multiuse Path.• Complete intersection improvements as greenways aredeveloped.• Seek opportunities to bridge gaps in the pedestriannetwork to improve connectivity.1-8 | Executive Summary


PLANNING FOR OUR FUTURELAND ACQUISITIONLand acquisition is strongly linked to facilities, greenways,and programs. In order to maintain a high quality of life inApex, more land should be acquired to ensure improvedconnectivity, open spaces for play and celebration, andfuture active recreation facilities. Land should also besought for underserved areas to accommodate newfacilities. Improving greenway connectivity will require theaddition of corridors, while increasing program optionswill necessitate more space in general.IMMEDIATE NEEDS (0-2 YEARS)• Acquire land for the Beaver Creek Greenway.Easements are already in place for Jaycee Park todowntown and Kelly Road Park to the future ApexNature Park. Easements are needed to connect theApex Nature Park to the American Tobacco Trail.• Acquire easements for the White Oak Creek andMiddle Creek Greenways.• Allocate land for downtown space through:• Re-using existing space, such as partnering withdowntown shops, stores, and restaurants forconcerts; or• Re-using the Depot if it becomes available; or• Acquiring additional land• Acquire indoor space for seniors and teens by:• Expanding the Community Center; or• Re-using an existing building(s); or• Developing new facilities• Acquire land for a sports complex (60-200 acres) in anunderserved area as indicated on page 1-10.NEAR TERM NEEDS (3-5 YEARS)• Acquire land or easements for the Apex BarbecueRoad multi-use path.LONG TERM NEEDS (5-7 YEARS)• Acquire land and/or easements for greenway trails.• Acquire land for an area or community sized park inone of the underserved sections identified on page1-10.The map to the right illustrates the needs of the Apexcommunity and the recommendations of this plan. Futuregrowth areas, potential available land, and communityneeds were assessed to identify areas for land acquisition(as indicated in red dashed circles). Top priority greenwaysare highlighted with green solid lines. These alignmentsare crucial to connecting people with places, and buildingpriority alignments ahead of roadway impacts.1-9 | Section 1


11Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 201315d5b111123Land AcquisitionPriorities:1. Acquire land and/oreasements to meetrecommendations forgreenway connectivity2. Seek space forcommunity gatheringdowntown3. Seek opportunitiesto expand indoorrecreational space forteens and seniors4. Explore opportunitiesfor passive & unprogrammedopenspace5. Acquire land and parkspace in underservedareas5a5c11-10 | Executive Summary


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Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Section TwoIntroductionOverviewThe Town of Apex is located in Central North Carolinaand is one of twelve municipalities within WakeCounty. The town is known for its unique downtowndistrict. The name - apex: the top or highest part- is a topographical reference as the town is thehighest point along the Chatham Railroad betweenJacksonville, FL and Richmond, VA.Apex’s downtown district remains the heart of thecommunity even as the town has expanded and grownto include several nodes and commercial centers.The landmark 1914 Apex Union Depot is evidenceof the historical significance of the railroad in thedevelopment of the town. This building has beenrestored and currently houses the Apex Chamberof Commerce and Visitor Center. The main street isthe divide between the Cape Fear and Neuse Riverwatersheds. The historical character, quality of life,and geographic characteristics are referenced in thetown motto: “Apex, the Peak of Good Living.”The town is experiencing significant populationgrowth, evidenced by a 300% increase (5,000 to20,212) from 1990 to 2000, followed by an 85%increase by 2010 (37,476). The Town of Apex Planningdepartment estimated the population at the endof 2012 to be 40,000. Despite a national economicdownturn, the community of Apex has continuedgrowing and therefore continues to require additionalservices and facilities to provide “good living” forresidents and visitors.Services and facilities contribute to nationalrecognition. Apex has been lauded for its quality oflife. In 2009, Forbes ranked it the 3rd “Best Place toMove in America.” In 2007, CNN Money Magazineproclaimed Apex to be the best in all of North Carolinaand the 14th best in the U.S. to live, work, and raisea family.2-2 | Introduction


Existing Facilities:Parks and GreenwaysIbunum sa ponsilia atia? Abemero con vivis huiuminterip imolique hoccivirio, nihinum la intilicio, pratemac te cone nit, quem, noredel udetrari fex nit. Ipternitapublici enatis verfena, se, Cupio, quam facturn icaedo,nos contrum nem arbit atio ta re, prit. Nam. Sernimerise, Catam norum ut Catissis; inum clestorturem ilicit.Bis. Palegeris senteris.Id ine tam, essinit, C. Sim publinius, Salem dinte Pondaperummo cones iniribu ltuus, culisulost fue Parkin nunturnitqua remus egitante, dius rei conit omnere estrata, consili citimax imorevivat opublici ia? quam ta renamseni fuit; C. Cae opternihil teatum perio, sum plicaec Hunter praesum StreetParkperemquem, culesiliis pris, contus consullemomacessit pescero publinHalletis silCulturalhil voltil utemquidem iu vensule geraela tientem etrorum ex morariptiliiKelly Road inprici Park publicaec ilin pate Arts in Center videfaceri se comaio, Community publica tam prox morbit, critiae stumus viverena, C.cre forum dum P. Nos M. Mae tum prarit. Batiam in CesigitCenterque avest pate, fac tes Ad dientiusquam quampatuusulici prox mumJayceemolicemParkipionsuam fortiamei huciaci pienihi Seagroves centis Farm horunumus rei inaris ca; essilis hilcum latius num tam. Nihine con terur. Roximurobus horteremedo, Park ut L. At ac renatium mo vitrobu lvivenanequa vivis, Catque adducep onfero verceperit int, territristi, or atabem pratu ex menatum scerviver utClairmontsed con si iaela terum at graciam. Vala nonficut conti, aperes, fac firiveri pestantis opoporus faccita bemquenos parit. West StreetParkParkquit. Natuustati publicam ingulum.Ovehemus, iam oripses nicae esi pertantili Sue seni HeltonMullemque mo in re, nonsuam es immoenihi, Ti.Apex Nature Park cae, Castia nonsu que aurbis vensuliu simis? Memorial Vivere Park Mulices cons cut rei publiquodi, comaxim antifec tamis? Maximis mo Catum inihinatus et viditum ut L.Nos mus, verum iam travo, ponsus? Um clegit; es!Erem erissic aestusu loctandier auci popubli cercesprae nocultuam. Mari pubit voltor qui prationdisinerdiocchus obsenit icasdam non hebate audendeopondactum iaedeortem Palerena, es nit, nihiliusvivitus adem quius conderips, inum ius oporaequitanit.Opios, caperei partem ad crissendam tam inti, quam,ses nonditum te morunte etil habus auciptiam publinside ia inpra egerimum ompes, ompra derfecere estis.Iquam. Hem etora remquam inam etoriorum convena,me fint. Nu et, nos, Palerum a rem mei inatumpoere crum, quitiss igilint roptiam nondam st auc finsenatoressim conirmacrum partia? Ponfin tem, nisedem culto ne ium, culicae in demus, non ina, audam,moere et; noximaio, Ti. Facem mo inati, consumpubliam nonventis bondam in Itatus, niamplissus,no. Catare in in se, ferio in temus. Verevivate nefaceportum demunt.Satimo elinum ponfenin desicaet vis Mulvide fectussiprit, quod cauc vid Apex norena, mis.Community ParkPatis nerestrum virita addum nit gractaris. Alabit. Iruncerni ticendam telum nore nos cont, ur ut adhus,dius, que nisti, faudesi gnorur, ut diorum tam perum se,int. Si fac ilis, con ser adhume tes nes, stam anunimistisquem hilinam vo, con sultorei iae orterum deniciptemus, Patum audeatiu eo co imora vivast gra deatasta, mantes hilici praedo, virmanum usperdiumenerenit? Utustamque et? Pat perudef ectuam unumno. Gratus, consuam me nos fue pracchil hicaetorterdiem vis, con test L. Obsenariam dien viverfecummenatus condac viconfitus liu videm rendiu is red pro,fachili quidiu consilibutem tante terra deoruntelus;nem Roma, ta rem catiam iam in deponsuam sedo,dea nos intius verra nirmacrent. Atum pori publicivicia? Odiostastium inte, quam patinem hoc, int,movigna timilin sicerri faucerrae confec recerrisquispost atrum usa adduciam ocus di intiae publin nessadio, elus, cips, nos, quam quone trum ium idem det?Palint.Tum res conumus est qua nem ocus horis vivides2-3 | Section 2


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013PROJECT VISIONThe project’s vision, below, was guided by the missionof the Apex Parks, Recreation, and Cultural ResourcesDepartment and Commission:The Apex Parks, Recreation, and CulturalResources Department provides programs,services, and facilities to the residents andvisitors of Apex, North Carolina. Departmentinitiatives should respond to the changingneeds of Apex’s growing population; reflectage, gender, ability, and cultural diversity; anddemonstrate environmental responsibility andcareful stewardship of all natural resources.Programming should be conducted yearround and balance activities that are indoorand outdoor; active and passive; physicaland intellectual. The programs, services andfacilities should be implemented and managedto balance quality and quantity of recreationalexperiences.The project team used the mission and vision toserve as checks and balances for the project process.The team surveyed residents in order to learn whatthey want and need from the Town of Apex Parks,Recreation, and Cultural Resources Department.These findings provided a foundation for creating aplan of action that fulfills the departmental missionand guides responsible program development andfacility improvements to better connect all residentsto the history, culture, and recreational resources ofthe Town.The following Measurements of Success wereestablished to help better understand what actionplan elements may be needed for implementing goals:• Provide recreational opportunities that suitresident needs within a service area as defined bydistance.• Create a park system that residents can access bywalking, biking, and driving.• Provide recreational opportunities that promotean “active” lifestyle to maintain a high quality oflife in Apex.• Provide opportunities for Apex residents to enjoynatural, historical, and cultural resources, andprotect these resources for future generations.• Ensure residents are satisfied with the types offacilities available, as well as their condition andmaintenance.METHODOLOGYIn order to learn about residents’ recreationalneeds and follow the vision created for the plan,a systematic planning process was employed. Thisprocess identified recreational needs, determined ifthe need was currently being met, and established aplan of action.The first step of the process is conducting athrough analysis of facility and program inventory.Understanding existing facilities and programs,coupled with a thorough review of existing planningefforts by the Town, revealed opportunities forplanning and implementation. Town site features,commercial centers, streams and tributaries, andparks and recreation facilities contribute to a holisticvision of livability. Matrices provide a detaileddescription of these existing conditions allowing forevaluation, quantification, and analysis.The second step of the process involved gatheringinput from Apex residents to assess their impressionsof current programs and facilities, and understandtheir needs. Public information gathering included2-4 | Introduction


attending public functions and conducting a recreationsurvey. Team members surveyed participants at localconcerts, races, and recreation registration events. Anonline survey posted through a project website wasannounced via e-blast, flyers, hard copy distributionin utility bills, Facebook links, and Town website links.All of the inventory, public comments, and directionfrom focus groups determines how Apex should plan forits future facilities and programs. Recommendationsare presented at the end of this report along withaction steps to guide the implementation process.These recommendations are presented by immediate(0-2 years), near term (3-5 years), and long term (5-7years) needs.steady 45%-50% growth rate since the 1990s, seeinga slight slow down in 2010 and 2011. Holly Springshas also experienced large growth rates over the pastdecade.AGEThe town of Apex has a fairly young population withthe 40-49 age bracket having the largest percentageof population at 19.5%, followed by children under 10years of age at 18.7%. The age ranges with the fewestpercentage of population are those 60 and over, withindividuals 60-69 at 4.8% and those over 69 at 3.7%.POPULATION AND GROWTHCHARACTERISTICSThe composition of citizens who currently live in Apexand the age, race, ethnicity, and characteristics of thegrowing population affect the quantity, location, type,and timing of park facilities and programs.The Town of Apex’s growth rate over the past twodecades is similar to its neighbors: Cary, HollySprings, and the City of Raleigh. The Town of Carysaw significant growth from 1990 to 2010 at a rateof about 100%, but that growth slowed significantlyfrom 2010 to 2012 to about 5%, while Apex growthcontinued steadily. The City of Raleigh maintained a2-5 | Section 2


Map 3: Race - Black or African AmericanMap 4: Race - OtherMap 3 indicates that there are very specific clusters of Apex residentswho identified themselves as “black or African American.” These clustersare primarily located along NC 55 in the southeastern portion of thecommunity. With the exception of a couple of Census Blocks located alongW. Williams Street, the majority of Apex has a very low percentage of“black or African American” population.Map 4 details the percentage of the total population of Apex residentswho identified themselves as a race other than “white” or “black or AfricanAmerican” persons. This category includes, but is not limited to, Asian,Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, American Indian or Alaska Native. Themap indicates that Apex as a whole, has very few persons (


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Map 5: Ethnicity - Hispanic or LatinoMap 6: Median Household IncomeThe next Census map, Map 5, depicts the percentage of the total populationof Apex residents that identified themselves as being of “Hispanic orLatino” origin. The map indicates that Apex as a whole, has very fewpersons of Hispanic or Latino origin living in the community. The highestpopulations (51 percent to 75 percent, and 76 percent to 100 percent) ofHispanic residents are located along W. Williams Street, just north of theintersection of US 1. North of S. Salem Street there are two Census Blockswith greater than 76 percent of the population identifying themselves asbeing of “Hispanic or Latino” origin or ethnicity.HOUSEHOLD INCOMEMap 6, shown on this page, illustrates the median household incomeby Census Block Group. The median household income in 2010 in NorthCarolina was $46,291, and for Wake County was $65,289. Comparatively,the median household income for Apex was $86,782. The areas just northof the downtown area, along US 64 near the intersection of US 64 and W.Williams Street and the intersection of US 64 and N. Salem Street, havepopulations with median household income levels below $46,986. Thisincome level is significantly lower than the median household income forthe Town of Apex. The majority of the community has median householdincome levels between $46,987 and $140,959.2-8 | Introduction


Map 7: Households with No Access to VehiclesMap 8: Households that Commute by Biking and WalkingPOPULATION WITHOUT ACCESS TO A CARMap 7 indicates the percent of households without access to a vehicle.Apex has Census Blocks with as high as 7.5 percent of households withoutaccess to a vehicle. The highest percentages of households without accessto a vehicle are located south of Olive Chapel Road, west of W. WilliamsStreet, and south of US 64, near Ten Ten Road. The areas of Apex locatedsouth of S. Salem Street, near Tingen Road have 3.1 to 6 percent ofhouseholds without access to a vehicle. The remainder of the householdsin the community fall within the 0.0 to 1 percent of households withoutaccess to a vehicle. Households in these areas have access to at least oneor more vehicles.Map 8, shown on this page, illustrates the percent of households thatcommute to work by walking or bicycling. The households along US 64near N. Salem Road and Old Jenks Road have the highest percentage ofhouseholds with residents who walk or bicycle to work. As many as 12percent of households in this area have residents who walk or bicycle towork. The southern portion of Apex, near Tingen Road, W. Williams Street,and Ten Ten Road also has higher percentages of households that commuteby walking or bicycling. The remainder of the community has between 0.0and 1 percent of households that commute by bicycle or by walking.The census data indicate Apex is comprised of pockets of suburbandensity, with no heavily dense urban core. An overwhelming majority ofthe citizens reported they consider their race to be “white” with minimal2-9 | Section 2


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Seagroves Farm Park provides a quiet place for observing pond wildlife. This can be beneficial for some special needs populations.evidence of those who consider themselves ethnically“Hispanic or Latino.” Salary reportings depict a wealthypopulation that has access to personal vehicles. Avery low percentage of the population commutes viabiking or walking, which can be influenced by culture,facilities, safety, land use, economics, and otherpersonal factors.SPECIAL POPULATIONSPrior to this study, representatives from the communityexpressed interest in the Town of Apex exploringways to better serve special population residents.For the purpose of this update, a standard definitionwas adopted to better evaluate the needs of specialpopulations in Apex. This is not a detailed study ofspecial populations, rather a general understanding ofthese populations and how they may or may not becurrently served by existing recreational services. Thisstudy defines special populations as:• Individuals with disabilities;• Individuals from economically disadvantagedfamilies, including foster children;• Single parents, including single pregnantwomen;• Individuals with limited English proficiency.According to the 2000 Census Summary, there areapproximately 1500 residents with disability statusages 5 and up. The largest disability age range is 21-64. On the recent Town of Apex parks and recreationsurvey, 288 respondents out of 1479 stated they area part of the following special population categories:individual with physical disability (89), individual withmental disability (58), economically disadvantagedfamily (31), single parents (78), elderly people needingassistance (25), and individuals with limited Englishproficiency (7). Of the residents who provided further2-10 | Introduction


clarification on their specific special population,autism and mobility impairments ranked among thehighest.The Town of Apex does not currently providerecreational programs specifically for specialpopulations but rather works to provide inclusiveprograms through existing efforts. While nearbycommunities such as Cary and Holly Springs provideresource services and partner programs for specialpopulations, the City of Raleigh is the only municipalitywith a special populations staff coordinator. Thereare not currently any Parks, Recreation, and CulturalResources staff certified in therapeutic recreationnor are there formally established partnerships withother agencies providing services. Based on surveycomments, the majority of the above respondentscurrently use the Town of Cary facilities and programswith a few responding they use Raleigh and HollySprings programs and facilities.ZONING, GROWTH, ANDPLANNINGThe population and area of Apex will continue togrow as the culture changes and demands on existingland within the Town limits and extraterritorialjurisdiction evolve. At the helm of this change is theTown’s planning department. Several documents,plans, and maps are available online to clarify existingzoning, zoning changes, current development, andoverall planning documents. Zoning documents andmapping indicate a large area of rural residentialland in the west, northwest, and southeast. As thesedevelopments move forward, residents will be in needof park facilities in close proximity to their homes, asno park land exists in these areas. Future land use isdepicted in the 2025 Future Land Use Map.The map indicates an increase in high density housingwith the largest areas south of US 1 between 540and Williams Street, and near the junction of 540and S. Salem Street. These pockets of high density -particularly those serving as components of mixed-usedevelopment - will become nodes and demand publicopen space and greenway connectivity. For the mostcurrent zoning information, planning documents, andother maps, visit: http://www.apexnc.org/services/planning/documents-plans-maps.STREAMS AND TRIBUTARIESAs greenways are increasingly a large componentof parks and recreation resources, their locationand condition will be considered in this Plan. Awidely accepted planning practice is to site trailsalong streams and tributaries. For this purpose, it isimportant to understand the hydrologic system withinand adjacent to the Town.Apex sits on the peak of two watersheds, the NeuseRiver Basin and the Cape Fear River Basin. Theheadwaters of several tributaries are found in ornear Apex including: Beaver Creek, Reedy Branch,and tributaries from White Oak Creek, which flowinto the Harris Reservoir or Jordan Lake, eventuallyflowing into the Cape Fear River Basin. Some of thesetributaries are subject to the Jordan Lake Water supplywatershed buffer rules, which can be found on the NCDivision of Water Quality Website. Swift Creek and itstributaries flow into the Neuse River Basin.Tributaries within the Neuse River are subject toNeuse River Buffer (NRB) regulations as defined bythe NC Division of Water Quality. In general, theseregulations require undeveloped land to maintaina 50’ buffer from the tops of banks on both sides ofan existing tributary. These regulations protect thequality of water and provide a continuous naturalbuffer in the Neuse River Watershed. http://portal.ncdenr.org/web/wq/swp/ws/401/riparianbuffers/rules.2-11 | Section 2


HUNTER ST2025 Land Use PlanTown of Apex, North CarolinaParks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013E FERRELL RDCHAP EL HILL RDCARPENTER UPCHURCH RDDowntown InsetN SALEM STGREEN LEVEL CHURCH RDHIGH HOUSE RDKW YNW CARY PNW MAYNARD RDWHITE OAK CHURCH RDUPCHURCH STCHATHAM STHOLLEMAN STHUGHES STCENTER STN MASON STCASTLEBERRY RDkGREEN LEVEL WEST RDROBERTS RDTOLL")540NC 55 HWYH OL T RDOL D APEX RDW WILLIAMS STSW CARY PKWYS SALEM STE WILLIAMS STHORTO N RDB ARKE R RDNEW HILL OLIVE CHAPEL RDAmerican Tobacco TrailkWIMBERLY RDUS 64 HWY W£¤ 64kkk£¤ 1RI C HARDSON RDHUMIE OLIVE RDOLD US 1 HWYOLIVE CHAPEL RDFRI ENDSHIP RDJENKS RDNC 540 HWYKELLY RDGREEN LEVEL CHURCH RDAPEX BARBECUE RDWOO DS CREEK RD")S SALEM ST55TOLL")540W WILLIAMS STOLD JENKS RDAPEX PEWYTINGEN RDOLD HOLLY SPRINGS APEX RDHUNTER STDAVIS DRAPEX PEWYSALEM CHURCH RDN SALEM ST")LAURA DUNCAN RDCENTER STE WILLIAMS STNC 55 BYPASS55OLD RALEIGH RDN MAIN STLAKE PINE DR£¤ 64£¤ 1TEN TEN RDSTEPHENSON RDSMITH RDPENNY RDKILDAIRE FARM RDSUNSET LAKE RDHOLLY SPRINGS RD2025 Future Land Use MapDigital version can be found at:http://files.www.apexnc.org/docs/plan/2025LUPmap.pdfUS 1 HWYNEW HILL HOLLEMAN RDHOLLY SPRINGS NEW HILL RDNEW HILL RDW HOLLY SPRINGS RDSHEARON HARRIS RD¯GB ALFORD HWYS MAIN STBASS LAKE RDParcelStudy AreaLand Use Classification:Very Low Density ResidentialAVEN T FERRY RDThe Town of Apex Geographic Information Services (GIS)shall not be held liable for any errors concerning contentor postitional accuracy of this mapped information. Theuser must consult the primary sources from which theTown of Apex GIS compiled this product.HONEYCUTT RDLow Density ResidentialMedium Density ResidentialN BROAD STHigh Density ResidentialOffice EmploymentkkThe mixed-use (office and retail) area in the southwestern quadrant ofGreen Level Church Road and Green Level West Road is planned forsmall scale office and retail uses which are compatible with the architecture,mass, height, and building relationships of the Green Level Historic District,so as to preserve the character of existing development, to protect thevisual pattern of the community, and to promote harmony in the visualrelationships and transition between new and older buildings.Neighborhood Commercial Activity Center:Market forecasts suggest viability for one to two Neighborhood CommercialActivity Centers only. Not all sites depicted are anticipated for developmentover the long term.BARTLEY HOLLEMAN RDCASS HOLT RDSWEET SPRINGS RDREX R DNC 42COKESBURY RDAdopted by Town of Apex Town Council: May 18, 2004Amended:June 15, 2004 February 6, 2007 March 17, 2009August 3, 2004 March 6, 2007 April 21, 2009August 17, 2004 May 15, 2007 May 19, 2009October 19, 2004 August 7, 2007 April 20, 2010March 15, 2005 September 4, 2007 February 15, 2011June 7, 2005 October 2, 2007 April 19, 2011June 21, 2005 November 20, 2007 May 10, 2011July 19, 2005 December 4, 2007 March 20, 2012September 20, April 15, 2008 June 5, 20122005March 7, 2006 August 19, 2008 July 17, 2012June 20, 2006 October 21, 2008 September 18, 2012December 18, 2012BUCKHORN DUNCAN RDCASS HOLT RDMIMS RDDUNCAN COOK RDROUSE RDBURT RDO C HESTER RDW ACADEMY STWADE NASH RDSPENCE FARM RDFLEMI NG RDTHREE PONDS DRPINEY GROVE WILBON RDWAGSTAFF RDOLD POWELL RDWILBON RDPHELPS WEST RDFLEMIN G LOO P RDCommercialIndustrial EmploymentParkProtected Open SpaceSchoolLandfillMixed UseNote: Striped areas that do not have the mixed use designation (brown outline)indicate multiple land uses allowed with no requirement for mixed use.C OLEY FARM RDLand Use Plan Classification Allowable Zoning DistrictsVery Low Density Residential RA, RR, PUDLow Density ResidentialRA, RR, LD, PUDMedium Density ResidentialMD, PUD, MH, MHPHigh Density ResidentialHDSF, HDMF, PUD, TNDOffice EmploymentO&I, TF, PUD, MECCommercialB1, B2, PC, PUDIndustrial EmploymentLI, TF, PUD, MECMixed UseMORR*, PUD, TND, MEC, SDParks and Open SpaceCB*The MORR (Mixed Office-Residential-Retail) District is only allowed whereoffice, residential, and retail uses are depicted by the striped area within theMixed Use boundary.0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000Miles0 0.5 1 2 3S MAIN STHERBERT AKINS RDJAMES SLAUGHTER RDFeetPrepared by:Town of ApexPlanning DepartmentDecember 20122-12 | Introduction


One hundred year floodplain information is producedby FEMA and can be found on their website athttp://www.fema.gov. These areas have specificregulatory requirements and protective measures fordevelopment.In addition to the federal and state rules referencedabove, the Town of Apex has regulations in place thatprotect the watersheds within the town which areoutlined in the Town’s Unified Development Ordinance(UDO) 6.1 WATERSHED PROTECTION OVERLAYDISTRICTS. Areas within these overlay districts mustadhere to specific regulatory requirements includingbuffer and density requirements.Additionally, the UDO outlines flood protectionrequirements in an effort to promote the publichealth, safety, and general welfare of the Town andto minimize public and private losses due to floodconditions in specific areas as outlined in provisions6.2 FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION OVERLAY DISTRICT.REGIONAL PARK CONNECTIONSApex is located in southwest Wake County and locatedadjacent to Cary, NC, and Holly Springs, NC, both ofwhich provide their own recreation resources. Thestate capitol of Raleigh is also nearby with plentifulgreenways, recreation facilities, and programs. BondPark in Cary serves as a greenway hub, and boasts alake with boathouse, ropes course, picnic shelters,athletic fields, multi-use fields, and an educationcenter. In addition to these nearby towns, there areseveral regional facilities which provide open spaceand recreational opportunities for Apex residents.REGIONAL FACILITIESJordan Lake, located just west of Apex, is approximately15,000 acres with approximately 30,000 acres ofadjacent lands. The facility offers picnic areas, trails,boat launch areas, and camping.Harris Lake County Park is a Wake County runfacility located just southwest of Apex. A portion ofthis property has been developed as parkland andincludes trails, playgrounds, fishing, picnicking, andenvironmental education. This provides a muchneeded recreational resource to residents south andwest of Highway 1.FUTURE GREENWAY TRAILCONNECTIONSThe American Tobacco Trail (ATT) is a 30 mile rails-to-trails project that would provide a regional trailconnection for residents to downtown Durham nearthe Durham Bulls Athletic Park and to New Hill OliveChapel Rd. in western Wake County.Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve is located east ofApex off of Ten Ten Road and is a part of the Townof Cary Parks, Recreation, and Cultural ResourcesDepartment. The approximately 150 acre tractcontains trails, a stand of Hemlock trees, and a naturecenter with educational displays and environmentaleducation classes.Regency Park Symphony Lake is also a part ofthe Town of Cary Parks, Recreation, and CulturalResources Department Park System. Located east ofApex on Tryon Road, it houses the North CarolinaSymphony during the summer months. There is a longrange opportunity to link to park trails and Cary areagreenways.Bond Park is located northeast of Apex in Cary andserves as a regional facility for the Town of Cary. Thereis an opportunity to connect Apex residents to thispark by creating future trail connections northeast ofApex Community Park.2-13 | Section 2


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Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Section ThreeParks, Recreation, and Cultural InventoryPark Classification and ZonesThe Town of Apex uses a park classification system and designation of park zonesto help define the park types offered and where they may be found within theTown. As the community continues to grow and diversify, so will the need toprovide a variety of parks and facilities. The following is the current classification;it is recommended this system be updated to reflect current facilities anddemand for new ones. The adjustments to the park classification can be found inthe facilities recommendations section of this report. The existing park zones canbe found on the map to the right.Neighborhood Parks are typically the smallest and most numerous. They shouldbe in walking distance--1/4 to 1/2 a mile. Many of these parks have been createdas part of a neighborhood development and/or PUD to serve neighborhoodrecreational needs.Size: 3/4- 3 acres, optimal is 5-10 acres Service Area: 1/4-1/2 mileArea Parks serve a larger population and service area.Size: 20-50 acresService Area: 2+ miles.Community Parks range in size from 60- 100 acres. They typically serve theentire town, and offer a variety of programs and facilities. These sites should beconnected by greenways and/or sidewalks and have adequate parking facilities.Size: 50-200 acresService Area: ½ mile-3+ mile radius3-2 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Existing Facilities: ParksIn an effort to build on previous plans, the facility inventory chart below provides comparative data from the 2001Parks, Recreation, Greenways, and Open Space Master Plan. A complete inventory of each park’s facilities is provided.The Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Advisory Commission vetted several options for site specific inventoryand analysis, and selected the criteria deemed most appropriate to create the inventory matrix. Photographicdocumentation, counts, ratings, and commentary on strengths, challenges, and opportunities are included.Note: Complete inventories are not provided for the dog park at Hunter Street Park and Apex Nature Park due to construction.PARK TYPEPARK ACREAGEPARK ZONEAmphitheaterAuditoriumBaseballBasketballBatting CagesConcessionsDisc GolfDog ParkFootballGymnasiumHorseshoesMulti-Purpose FieldMulti-Purpose RoomPicnic ShelterPlaygroundSkate ParkSoccerSoftballSwimmingTennisTrailsVolleyballNAME/LOCATIONApex Community Center S 12.4 2 5 NApex Community Park^ C 160 2 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 6 Y 3Apex Nature ParkC 158.1 1 1 1 1 1 2Clairmont Park N 1.5 1 1 1 1 NHalle Cultural Arts Center S 0.16 1 3 NHunter Street Park A 12 1 1 1 1 1 YJaycee Park A 23 1 1 1 1 1 YKelly Road Park A 25 1 1 1 4m YSue Helton Memorial Park N 0.23 1 NSeagroves Farm Park N 11 1 1 YSalem Pond Park A 14.3 YWest Street Park N 1.3 1 1 1 N5/4mY^Under Construction C = community park (50-200 acres) M = Mini Court*Overall site acreage (including police station) A = area park (20-50 acres)N = neighborhood park (¾- 3 acres)3-3 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Here is where a caption will go for the photo.senihicit.Kelly Road ParkHictudetis. Maris. Sat oc manuntiam ses sperivessis,fac rehem idit, sent, urivitilis inam que fur atuiusquidela vit. Hoc tam. Simmoverniu ius fuid faturniamtam omnenatus, mus, Catemum porebatus hocciemobus caeludes! Ex sussendacta Satus nos senin tatiamsus cae maio consus, ut ficae ternius, utust? Nihiliuquostra vius tantem quam patilic ataler loca; iaes intes tuam is facideo, nota, cus, consus consum manumobusque rferit prae potis An Apex sena, Nature nonocre Park quasdaciorbit nosum intique iur hostrum eresult orteatum,nes ipse pubit vis, quideo, abem atiortus, catiferoripubliurnici pat, se culicatius essolis caet; non hostgraridin tanduc octorum essed inatam us auderteripatiam.Ti. et vis, P. Do, nos nosta, Catreorum invocul te in sicioCatiactam, omnihicamquo me dit L. Reis, ni silint?Opiorum nos, nostis. Gere in sent? Do, C. Ad publiissentil venatra venestr arissat audam, sil haed conret verficivit, ur, consularis confirm antrum achicapecividet; C. Inatis, quam peremque efaciem, omneset venes ant efex stere rest nit L. Acri tus. It? Avocanostionte, publictus anum pl. Verrio esent. Satquamiderdiem Romnoxi mihicatum peretienia nonimus,erum. Habere nordii sestantelis et forissultis. Uret iam.Existing Satus C. Facilities: Sciam pondi Parks publis menatorum hem adhus,mo C. Locae publiciam horaestiliam ommorei ssena,Salem PondParkHere is where a caption will go for the photo.Hunter StreetParknonsuliaeHalleconsterriumCulturalut omnesciestra ressedeapesil caes! Ultiaed Arts Center eortum sentiae ad caturs Community inatum.Iferum opoerbe fesimus vessupiondum tem Center audesmovite Jaycee publina, Parkmum. Terum det Cupimis. Maedemo Seagroves Farmaut vervirmihil habus audem tessenium Romni sul Parkhorisqu idemus con sedit omplium facisse, cumus,cone patum se, siceribus conem. SolutemClairmontocri etvignosti, West Catua StreetParkParkrec furori intem interfica quit, manumsidena, nihin ditur. Esimunum vidius, ad nunt? in det?involus fituam tescesis.Sue HeltonMemorial ParkIgnato ia et in tus Ahabunum quamdio rtientere numia re, cut vivit vilin re et alic tiusume conc intiam urisesent. Satim morae duc ipsediem poruredes ca reo,duconihi, consum moverum eniquis. Averem temtamquerum aliam se consus fatium que comnium adpris? Catuus, qui spere atum tatius dit, coniaed cretodaute, tum niuro vicio ublicae cons cone te, consimorusvocaet, octa moltuda mprorun clegilicae aur parebat.etiam imis, es fectum is, ne ia moris prit L. Deconsu llegilhoracturorus talabefactum etemquo consimmorbipare, scibute stimium pressoltor ad inatum meniumpero mortus rem iaeque in Ita, Cupere tem portudepsenimo et; nos ia depota mo esimur. Nostiorartumsatum nos labent. Adhui fue ips, nulti percena, ut L.Mius norionsum ad si cum aus.Abefeco nitabus iu se con sa L. contrum hos, mumocultus con re forum sena, ne ca rentime nterena,ApexCommunity Park3-4 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Apex Community CenterACRES 9.12 LOCATION 53 Hunter Street, within the Town Commons complex adjacent to Town HallTYPE Community Park PRIMARY USE Gymnasiums, Classrooms, Multi-purpose rooms3-5 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013The gymnasium hosts many programs and athletic events.A game room offers leisure activities.The Apex Community Center is centrally located and within the Town complex adjacent to Town Hall. The facility contains 4 multi-purpose rooms,including the Summit, Pinnacle, and Zenith rooms, all approximately 31’x31’ (which accommodate 65 people). The arts and crafts room is approximately22’x28’ and accommodates 20 people. In addition to the multipurpose room, there is a catering kitchen which can be rented or used as part ofprogramming. The Community Center contains two full size gymnasiums, associated restrooms, and changing room facilities. Each gym is 82’ X 109’(8,938 square feet). The first gym was built in 1998 with the original facility construction. The second was built in 2005 with the expansion of thebuilding. The center also contains a small resource room and game room.StrengthsThe facility is centrally located and highly visible due to its proximity to downtown and the Town Hall Complex. It is a newer facility and well maintained.Natural lighting throughout creates a bright atmosphere for users. Accessibility is convenient and ADA compliant with connections from the Town Hall,a large parking lot, and adjacent sidewalks.ChallengesThe building is quite active during peak use hours and can be loud and busy. The site has a variety of user groups ranging in age and ability. Carefulconsideration should be given to scheduling of programs to minimize overcrowding.Potential OpportunitiesThe hallway is wide, presenting an opportunity to install benches for parents waiting to pick up children, and children doing homework. Additionalopportunities exist for expansion of this facility to support increasing need for indoor programming. Consideration should also be given to supportfacilities on the campus, such as walking and fitness trails, play equipment, and children’s program space.3-6 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Apex Community ParkACRES 160 acres LOCATION 2200 Laura Duncan Road, between Laura Duncan Road and Lake Pine DriveTYPE Community Park PRIMARY USE Baseball, Tennis, Soccer, Volleyball, Picnic, Trails3-7 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Baseball field #3 is in excellent condition. Shade for spectators could be improved by building a structure and planting shade trees.The soccer field is well maintained and could also use additional shade for spectators.Multiple types of wayfinding are used throughout the park. A consistent system and map will help visitors navigate the park.3-8 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Apex Community ParkBaseball Field #3 and Soccer FacilityPark Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesParking 114/4HC Excellent Well paved with ample lightingPedestrian Access Fair The park should complete a trail systemconnecting each activity center.This would be safer than pedestrianswalking in the street.Bicycle Access/Parking Poor No bicycle parking is available.Signage: Internal Fair Should be upgraded to include mapsand consistent labeling.Sun/Shade Fair Shading spectator seating for bothfields would create a more pleasantenvironment for game observers.Circulation Good It is easy to move between thesefields, but as indicated in pedestrianaccess, a continuous trail throughoutthe park would help separate vehiclefrom pedestrian and bicycle traffic.Safety/Security Good The field areas are open and visible.The soccer field should have additionallighting.Picnic Tables/Benches/Picnic 2 bleachers at baseball field Fair Bleachers should be added to theSheltersoccer field area.Trash/Recycling Receptacles 2 trash / 2 recycling Excellent Sufficient for this area.Baseball 1 Excellent The field is in excellent condition withgood lighting.Soccer 1 Excellent The field condition is excellent, butcould use spectator seating and additionallighting.Lights Good Add for soccer field.Water Fountains 1 Good In working condition.3-9 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Field #2 is well maintained and provides ample shade for spectators above the retaining wall.A paved trail connects baseball field #2 to the restrooms and playground area.The playground equipment is in good condition, but the surface needsreplenishing.A soft surface trail access is near the restroom facility and playground.3-10 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Apex Community ParkBaseball Field #1, Restrooms, and PlaygroundPark Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesParking 32/3HC Good Parking is in good conditions and nearthe field.Pedestrian Access Good A path connects the baseball field andrestroom/playground area.Bicycle Access/Parking Poor No bicycle parking is available.Signage: Internal Fair Should be upgraded to include mapsand consistent labeling.Sun/Shade Excellent Well shaded areas above the field andaround the playground.RestroomsGoodCirculation Good Easy access from ballfield to restrooms.Safety/Security Good Wooded - but open.Picnic Tables/Benches/PicnicShelterbleachers at baseball field/2 picnictables in shaded area/ 2 benches atplaygroundGoodTrash/Recycling Receptacles 4 trash / 3 recycling GoodPlayground 1 Good Play equipment is in good conditionsbut the surface mulch needs to bereplenished.Baseball 1 Excellent Field in excellent condition withample shade surrounding the field forspectators.Lights Excellent Well lighted field and parking lot.Water Fountains Good At restroom facility.3-11 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Baseball Field #1 is in great condition adjacent to ample parking, batting cages, and the trail system entrance.Pitching and batting cages are located near Field #2.Baseball Field #2, Batting Cages, Greenway, Fit-TrailThe Fit-Trail signage and stations should be updated to reflect the park system signage.Park Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesParking 51/1HC/Gravel lot: 27 Good Parking in good condition and welllighted.Pedestrian Access Fair Greenway system and Fit-Trail shouldconnect via a trail along ChardstoneCourt.3-12 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Apex Community ParkPark Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesBicycle Access/Parking Poor Bicycle parking should be added.Signage: Internal Fair Should be upgraded to include mapsand consistent labeling. The fit trailand greenway system should havesignage with coordinating styles andcolors of the park system overall.Sun/Shade Excellent Excellent shaded Fit-Trail and battingcages, good shading around thebaseball field.Circulation Fair A more interconnected trail systemwould help pedestrians and cyclistsnavigate this area.Safety/Security Good Field and cages are open and visible.Picnic Tables/Benches/PicnicShelter2 bleachers/2 picnic tables Good Could add additional seating alongthe retaining wall.Trash/Recycling Receptacles 3 trash Good Need to add recycling bins to thefield. Greenway trail should have trashand recycling at trailhead area andother trail junctions.Baseball 1 Excellent Excellent condition and well lighted.Track/Walking Trail Greenway and Fit-Trail Good The Greenway Trail needs a moresignificant entrance with maps of thegreenway within the park, and thoseconnected to this greenway in theoverall Apex Greenway System. TheFit-Trail needs upgraded signage andstations.Lights Good Well lighted field and parking.Exercise Equipment Fair-good Some fit trail equipment needs to beupgraded.3-13 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Any entry court provides space for information kiosks and users waiting for one of the six tennis courts.The basketball courts should have a couple benches for players and a few spectators or those waiting to use the courts.A large and small picnic shelter accommodate groups ofdifference sizes.A small, fenced soccer practice field is located near the picnic shelters.3-14 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Apex Community ParkThe playground location works well with the picnic shelters and adjacentactivities.The volley ball courts are in good condition but could use some edging tocontain the sand.Tennis, Basketball, Volleyball, Playground, and Picnic SheltersPark Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesParking 109/8HC Excellent Well spaced throughout uses in thearea.Pedestrian Access Good Greenway entrance is located nearshelters. More connections should bemade throughout this area and otherplaces within the park.Bicycle Access/Parking Poor Bicycle parking should be added neartennis courts and other uses. Bicycleswere parked on the retaining wall nearthe tennis courts.Signage: Internal Fair Information kiosk and signage shouldbe updated throughout this area toindicate uses and rules.Sun/Shade Excellent Mixture of sun and shade is excellentfor all uses.Restrooms 1 Shelter Excellent Vending located outside building.3-15 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Park Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesCirculation Fair Paths need to connect all uses.Safety/Security Good Well lit open area.Basketball Court (outdoor) 4 - 1 fenced for roller hockey Good Courts are well lighted.Swing Set 4 belt/4 infant GoodPicnic Tables/Benches/PicnicShelterTrash/Recycling ReceptaclesTennis: 2 bleachersVolleyball: 1 picnic tablePlayground: 1 picnic table/1 benchShelter 1: 13 picnic tablesShelter 2: 7 picnic tablesTennis: 5 trashBasketball: 2 trash/1 recycleVolleyball: 1 trashPlayground: 1 trashShelters: 6 trash/3 recycleMultiuse/soccer practice: 1 trashGoodBenches and tables are well distributedthroughout the area. Three grillsand one water spigot are available inthe picnic area.Trash and recycling should be distributedevenly throughout.Playground Good Sign indicates ages 2-12 but is moreappropriate for ages 2-5. The sign isrequired by the manufacturer.Soccer 1 Good Practice field or multiuse field - fencedbut not lighted.Sand Volleyball 3 Good Well lit. Sand needs barrier to protectoverflow onto grass. Courts arenot accessible - an accessible routeshould be added to the picnic tableadjacent to the courts.Tennis Courts 6 Good Good condition with lighting. Cracksin surface of southeast court shouldbe repaired.Track/Walking Trail Excellent Greenway entrance is located nearuses, but should have a trail map.Lights Good Well lit overall.Water Fountains Tennis: 1 (spigot at shelters) Good3-16 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Apex Community ParkStrengthsThis park is easily accessible by car with ample parking distributed throughout the various activity centers. The variety of activities increase the opportunityto serve multiple genders, ages, and interests within the Apex community. Around the lake, there are over three miles of walking trails which include fitnessstations, contributing to the general health of the community. Although a large park, the design provides small pockets of activity, allowing guardians toeasily observe children, minimizing the conflicts between activities, and providing a natural wooded experience within a highly developed suburban area.Access points from both the east and west sides of the lake, as well as the spurs into adjacent neighborhoods, creates a well connected network of pathsand parking. Picnic shelters, boating, fishing, and other uses make this park a unique destination.ChallengesA more comprehensive wayfinding and signage program will help visitors navigate the various areas of the park as well as help users understand the varietyof activities available to them. For example, sand volleyball was highlighted by several residents as a desired activity in the town, and the community parkcontains three courts. However, the activity area is on a hill behind a row of vegetation; unless users are aware of the location, they may not know thisresource is available.SENSORY OBSERVATIONSApex Community park has a good balance of passive and active recreation activities and facilities, as well as a good separation between uses via vegetation,water, and/or topography.PHYSICAL SETTING AND ACTIVITY LEVELNot all facilities have an easily accessible route, either due to topography, such as the lower baseball fields, or surface type, such as the sand volleyballcourts. However, other baseball fields within the park are accessible and sites such as the volleyball courts could provide an accessible route in the future.(See the inventory matrix for facility specific access). During all site visits, the park was quiet and offered several different types of activity, either passive oractive. Noise and activity level increases during organized sporting and special events. Therefore, there is overall moderate activity at this site.Potential OpportunitiesApex Community Park could benefit a larger population by creating a few additional connections. The future bicycle facilities being constructed along LauraDuncan Road will increase the ability of residents to safely travel to the park. Additionally, a greenway in the utility corridor with a separated grade crossingfor pedestrians and cyclists across US 64 could connect residents south of US 64 - including users of the Eva Perry Regional Library. The Town is planningto construct a 10’ wide multi-use path along Laura Duncan Road from US 64 to Apex Community Park. Construction on that project will likely take place inthe fall of 2013 or spring of 2014.More shade opportunities and improved drainage near the tennis area would help those waiting and watching. Additional picnic areas, beaches, andseating could expand opportunities for use at this park, specifically near the Lake Pine side. Lastly, as part of the overall recommendations, signage andidentification will be discussed; this could specifically help at park entries and trail heads.3-17 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Bicycle parking should be added to the tennis court plaza area.3-18 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Apex Nature ParkACRES 160 LOCATION Western Apex off of Apex Barbecue Road and Evans RoadTYPE Community Park PRIMARY USE Passive and Active Recreation: Multi-use fields, Soccer fields, Tennis, Trails, Dog park,Amphitheater, Playground3-19 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Apex Nature Park Phases I and IIThese two phases are currently under construction and will provide passive and active activities in the western part of the town.PHASE 1 WILL INCLUDE:Dog Park, amphitheater, restroom, walking trails, disc golf, open play area, and connection to the overall Greenway network.PHASE 2 WILL BE MORE ACTIVE AND IS PLANNED TO INCLUDE:Multi-use and soccer fields, tennis courts, playground, picnic shelter, walking trails, and park maintenance facility.3-20 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Clairmont ParkACRES 1.5 acres LOCATION 801 East Chatham StreetTYPE Neighborhood Park PRIMARY USE Playground (ages 5-12), Picnic, Basketball3-21 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Clairmont Park has a natural landscape with large trees providing shade to the playground and unprogrammed areas.StrengthsClairmont Park is a peaceful, shaded park suitable for children’s play, family gatherings, and pick-up basketball games. Located just east of downtown,this park is within walking distance for residents in the community east of Salem Street and North of Williams Street, including Apex Middle School. Theopen lawn and wooded area provide a flexible space for families and groups. A sidewalk and path leading to the shelter allow for access to this structure.ChallengesGrass was observed growth through the mulch in the playground area, suggesting the mulch is too compacted and requires replacement. It appearsthere is a makeshift bocce court located between the two play areas that needs to be completed. The cobra light between the playground and shelterwas broken at the time of the study and should be repaired, or removed, and replaced with more pedestrian scale lighting suitable for a park.SENSORY OBSERVATIONSThe park provides a pleasant neighborhood setting for passive and active recreation. There are both sunny and shady spots, and effective separation offeatures.PHYSICAL ACCESS AND ACTIVITY LEVELThe site currently has one accessible route to the existing shelter. This could be improved by installing sidewalks and paths to connect each programmedarea within the park. There is low to moderate activity level on this site.Potential OpportunitiesWhile the park appears to be in great condition and well used, a few improvements will help integrate it into the overall system and create a saferspace for residents of Apex. The title signage should be updated to reflect the new signage plan and include a planting area. Pedestrian scaled lightingwill enhance the aesthetics, while improving visibility at night, therefore contributing to perceived safety of the park and East Chatham Street. Featureaccess could be improved, and removal of the chain link fence and/or replacement with something consistent with the neighborhood would help makethis a more welcoming space. Support facilities such as bike racks, benches, and picnic areas would increase use.3-22 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Clairmont ParkPark Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesParkingon streetPedestrian Access Good Sidewalk present along park but notthroughout neighborhood. Peoplelikely feel safe walking in the street.Bicycle Access/Parking Good No bicycle parking or bike facilitiesleading up to the park, but the park isin a neighborhood and cyclists wouldmost likely feel comfortable riding inthe street.Signage: Title 1 Good The sign is in good condition butshould be replaced to match the parksand recreation signage. Planting areaaround sign needs attention.Sun/ShadeExcellentCirculation Good No accessible routes throughout butacceptable for this type of park.Safety/SecurityGoodBasketball Court (outdoor) 1 GoodSwing SetPicnic Tables/Benches/PicnicShelterTrash/Recycling Receptacles2 belt swings1 shelter/1 picnic table2 trash/1 recyclingPlayground 1 Good Grass is coming up through the mulchand may be too compacted.Lights 1 cobra Poor BrokenOpen Play Space Good Plenty of unprogrammed space withample shade trees.3-23 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Grass is beginning to grow through the mulch, suggesting the surfaceneeds to be replaced.The basketball court provides physical activity for a variety of ages.3-24 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Halle CenterACRES N/A LOCATION 237 North Salem StreetTYPE Cultural Arts Facility PRIMARY USE Galleries, Studios, Arts Programs3-25 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013The downtown location contributes to the localeconomy.Different room sizes are available for classes, lectures,and art displays.Services include a catering kitchen, storage,elevator, built in coat closet, and built in bar.StrengthsThe Halle Cultural Arts Center serves a core function of the Department by providing a permanent venue for performances, art displays, art lessons, andlectures. The location downtown contributes to economic development as attendees to classes, shows, and other activities at the center are adjacentto the shops and restaurants in the core of historic Apex. The gallery space allows for multiple artists and types of creative work to be displayed and theclassrooms are an appropriate size for cultural-based classes. Events requiring catering services have access to a kitchen space, and the performancearea upstairs makes efficient use of space with a built-in roll-away closet and bar amenities.ChallengesOne of the main challenges of the Halle Center is access to the building from the parking lot. Uneven pavement, a narrow driveway, and the inability forphysically challenged patrons to easily gain access to the building present a problem. Survey respondents requested several programs that are currentlyoffered at this facility, indicating a need for improved outreach and awareness.3-26 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Halle CenterSENSORY OBSERVATIONSThe Halle Center is a quiet facility with great lighting and interior access to indoor facilities. However, it is expected that during an event there is a high noiselevel in the auditorium.PHYSICAL ACCESS AND ACTIVITY LEVELThe structure itself is accessible once inside. The access to the site is not desirable as mentioned above. Improvements should be made from the parking areato the back door of the site where the access ramp is located and/or at the front of the facility. Improved access would serve all residents, including seniors,people with mobility impairments, and families with strollers. This improved identification and access could potentially stimulate use.Potential OpportunitiesThe Halle Cultural Arts Center has the potential to serve a wider audience, but will require upgraded building access. With this improvement, and anawareness program, the Halle Cultural Arts Center can provide small theater groups, schools, companies, and the Town with performance and meetingspaces central to the downtown, with safe, accessible building entrances. By activating the space with more Town programming, and renting the space forprivate use, the Halle Cultural Arts Center will be seen as an asset to the Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Department, as well as to the economicdevelopment of Salem Street.Park Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesParking 23/1 HC Fair No “T” or turnaround is available,pavement is uneven and difficultfor physically challenged and agingpatrons.Pedestrian Access Fair Sidewalks are present along the frontof the building but circulation fromthe parking lot to the building frontis unsafe. Pedestrians are forced toshare a narrow driveway with vehicleswhich is challenging before and afterevents.Bicycle Access/Parking 4 racks Good Parking is good but there are nobicycle facilities near or around theCenter.Signage: Title 1 Excellent Attractive and legible.Signage: Internal Several Excellent Well branded, legible, includes braille.Internal Facilities3 Galleries1 Studio Classroom150 Seat Theatre3-27 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013The historic performance space is suitable for small shows, class plays, graduations, and lectures.Access is challenging, with uneven pavement, anarrow driveway, and no accessible call button.3-28 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Hunter Street ParkACRES 12 Acres LOCATION 1250 Ambergate Station, across from Apex Town HallTYPE Area Park PRIMARY USE Baseball, Soccer, Walking, Running/FUTURE: Dog Park3-29 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013The baseball field at Hunter Street Park is well maintained and serves multiple purposes. Students from Thales Academy use the outfield for group activities.StrengthsHunter Street Park is well maintained, and is conveniently located near schools, residential neighborhoods, and Salem Street. The fields are in immaculatecondition. A playground and bathroom facility are currently under construction. The elevated walking trail provides excellent views into the park andallows guardians to observe children’s activity while also exercising and socializing with other adults. Ample, well-lighted parking provides enough spacefor the park to host multiple planned activities while leaving room for others who want to walk the trails, or (in the future) use the dog park (currentlyunder construction).ChallengesThe park signage typology should be used, in scale with the park type, to create an identifiable park system. A potential safety concern is the rail lineadjacent to the walking trail. Currently, there is no physical barrier between the tracks and the park. While this provides convenient access to the parkfrom the adjacent neighborhood, potential conflict may be a concern. Young children should be supervised and appropriate signage and education canprevent conflicts. Preserving the neighborhood connection is important, but if issues arise, a fence can be installed.Potential OpportunitiesThe elevated trail presents a great opportunity to provide additional seating for the soccer field; along the edge of the trail overlooking the field is a greatvantage point for spectators. Additional trees could also be planted, or a shade structure added, to provide a more comfortable experience for those onthe sidelines. There is also an opportunity for a fitness trail component.SENSORY OBSERVATIONSThe park is adjacent to a school and typically peaceful. However, during periods of high use, such as sporting events and school activities, the noise levelsincrease. Adjacent train service also contributes to periodic noise.PHYSICAL ACCESS AND ACTIVITY LEVELThere are accessible routes to each feature. Active use areas are predominantly in the sun. The soccer field is partially enclosed and the dog park will befully enclosed. There is a high activity level on this site.3-30 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Hunter Street ParkPark Assets/Amenity Quantity ConditionNotesPoor/Fair/Good/ExcellentParking 138/5HC Excellent Well lighted.Pedestrian Access Good Complete sidewalk on east side ofentrance into park.Bicycle Access/Parking Two racks, three stalls each Good Bikes have access via walking trail andbike parking is near ball fields.Signage: Title 1 Good Sign is in good condition, but shouldbe a larger size.Signage: Internal Multiple Good Regulatory Only. Hours are clearly indicated.Could use additional internalsignage to name/mark fields.Sun/Shade Good Well shaded seating for baseball field.Street trees will improve shade conditionon trail as they mature. Additionalshade needed on soccer field.Restrooms 1 n/a New (not complete @ inventory)Circulation 1 main walking trail Good Access could be improved to trail byadding stairs near future restroomfacility or soccer field.Safety/Security Excellent Well lighted with excellent visibility.Picnic Tables/Benches/PicnicShelter4 on trail/2 on soccer field/2 bleacherat baseball field/2 dugout benchesat baseball fieldGoodGreat seating throughout. Soccer fieldcould use spectator seating.Trash/Recycling Receptacles 8 trash/2 recycling/2 doggie stations Excellent Well placed throughout the park.Playground 1 n/a New (not complete @ inventory)Baseball 1 baseball/softball Excellent Outfield and infield in great condition.Soccer 1 Excellent Turf in great condition.Dog Park 1 n/aTrack/Walking Trail Excellent Mile markers should be added toenhance user experience.3-31 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013The walking trail provides a great view of the park. The slope along the soccer field could be used for additional spectator seating.The walking trail surrounds a heavily programmed park, providing views tohigh activity spaces.The park entrance is accessible and attractive.Park Assets/Amenity Quantity ConditionNotesPoor/Fair/Good/ExcellentLights parking/field/street lights Excellent Ample lightingOpen Play Space none Fair The only non-programmed space isthe trail. With the proximity of thepark to the Town and school, it coulduse more open play space.Water Fountains 3 Excellent Drinking fountains are well placed andin working condition.3-32 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Jaycee ParkACRES 23 acres LOCATION 451 NC Hwy 55, West Williams StreetTYPE Area Park PRIMARY USE Softball, Soccer, Picnic, Playground3-33 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013The playground is located between the softball field and soccer fields and is well connected with accessible paths.A greenway connection surrounds the perimeter of the softball field.Park Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesParkingUpper Lot: 44/2HCExcellentLower Lot: 40/7HCPedestrian Access Good A greenway connects the park toresidential neighborhoods and otherparks.. Street access is not supportedwith a sidewalk.3-34 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Jaycee ParkPark Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesBicycle Access/Parking Fair The greenway provides access, howeverthere is no bicycle parking.Signage: Title Fair In ok condition but should be replacedwith new signage package.Signage: InternalGoodSun/Shade Good Additional trees and shade structurescould be added to soccer and softballfields for spectator comfort.Restrooms Excellent 2 shrubs at entrances should be removedto provide sight lines to doorsfrom parking lot.Circulation Good A 5’ path connects all uses.Safety/Security Good Remove shrubs as restroom.Picnic Tables/Benches/PicnicShelterShelter: 6 picnic tablesSoftball field: 2 bleachersPlayground: 1 picnicExcellentThe picnic shelter also has a grill.Trash/Recycling Receptacles 7 trash/1 recycle Good Balance recycle and trash receptacles.Playground 1 Excellent Accessible via path, contains shadeand picnic table.Softball 1 Excellent Well lighted, fenced, no accessibleroute to dugouts.Batting Cages 1 ExcellentSoccer 2 half or 1 large Excellent Fields in good conditions, fenced, andappears to be flexible to serve regulationgames as well as smaller fields fortots and youth players.Track/Walking Trail Good Beaver Creek Trail connects to park.90 degree turns can be challengingfor cyclists, creating a turning radiuswill help reduce user conflict.LightsGood3-35 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013A facility for the Apex boy scouts is located within thepark.A picnic shelter and grill are adjacent to thesoftball field.Two large shrubs outside the bathroomentrances should be removed.StrengthsThe greatest strength of this park is the connection to the Beaver Creek Greenway. This links residents to the park as well as creates a connection toKelly Road Park. The park is well maintained and the uses are complimentary, with younger children able to use the playground during older childrens’soccer and softball games.ChallengesThe site does not contain much unprogrammed open space for users; therefore, unless you are familiar with the site through scouting or sports you maynot realize it exists or understand that features can be used when not reserved.SENSORY OBSERVATIONSThe site is set back from the roadway and buffered on each side with vegetation and there is good separation between uses. There is not a lot of shadenear use areas.PHYSICAL ACCESS AND ACTIVITY LEVELEach of the features on site have an accessible route; the park is low use during weekdays, but has a high activity level during high use times (after schooland weekends).Potential OpportunitiesEntry signage to this park can be updated to include the Beaver Creek Greenway. With ample parking, and restroom facilities, this park can be a trailhead.Serving this purpose would also require updating the existing map kiosk to show the entire greenway system, key locations along the trail, greenwayrules, and distances of trail segments. The playground area can also be expanded to include activities for a wider range of youth; adding a swing set is aneasy method for providing activity for many ages. This site could be improved to provide picnic areas and potentially hiking or passive rest areas in theunprogrammed parts of the park. A critical connection for this site is the completion of the greenway trail to downtown Apex. This, along with improvedvisual access at the entry, will make the park more accessible to residents.3-36 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Kelly Road ParkACRES 25 acres LOCATION 1609 Kelly Road, behind Olive Chapel Elementary SchoolTYPE Area Park PRIMARY USE Playground, Tennis, Baseball3-37 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013The baseball field is in great condition and well positioned near the restroom and picnic facilities.Vending and a picnic shelter are components ofthe restroom building.Several monuments, art pieces, plaques, and other special touches are located in the park. This creates a sense of community and ownership.Park Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesParking 82/4HC ExcellentPedestrian Access Good Connected to the school via a sidewalkand connected to neighborhoodsvia the greenway.Bicycle Access/Parking Good Well connected via the greenway,bicycle parking should be added.Signage: Title Fair Signage should be updated.3-38 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Kelly Road ParkPark Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesSignage: Internal Fair Internal regulation signage can alsobe updated to look like Apex Parksand Recreation signage.Sun/Shade Good Trail around park is well shaded.RestroomsGoodCirculation Good Play area and baseball field are wellconnected via a loop trail. A crosswalkor trail should create a connection tothe tennis courts.Safety/Security Good While shaded, the park still has opensight lines.Swing SetGoodPicnic Tables/Benches/PicnicShelterTrash/Recycling ReceptaclesBaseball: 2 bleachersRestroom Shelter: 6 picnicPlayground: 7 picnic and variousbenchesLoop Trail: x benchesTennis: 2 bleachersPlayground: 4 trash/2 recycleTennis: 1 trashExcellentGoodAmple seating throughout the park.Should balance out the recycling andtrash receptacles.Playground Excellent Well designed with many personaltouches from the community.Tennis 1 full/4 half Excellent Great condition, well lighted.Baseball 1 Excellent Well lighted, fenced, in excellentcondition.Track/Walking Trail Loop trail and greenway connection GoodLights Good Parking, baseball, and tennis arelighted.Water Fountains 1 Fair May want to consider adding fountainsat the tennis court.3-39 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013The playground is well integrated with benches, swings, open areas, climbing, and a variety of activities for ages 2-12.Tennis courts are located just inside the park entrance with a small parking area attached to the sidewalk access.StrengthsThis park is well connected to the adjacent school as well as neighborhoods to the east via the Beaver Creek Greenway. As a community project,KidsTowne creates a sense of ownership by all who donated and volunteered to create a special place for families in the Apex community. A sense ofownership usually results in a heightened awareness of what is going on in the park and overall maintenance and care. With multiple uses for multipleage children, Kelly Road Park can serve the entire family with tennis, play, and baseball.ChallengesWhile the grounds and facilities are excellent, one factor that could pose a problem in the future is the proximity of the school. During field analysis,several cars were observed parked in the circulation route of the parking lot waiting to pick up students. If this use increases, and conflicts with an eventat the park, this can become a problem for visitors to the park. The parking lot is not designed to accommodate the volume and traffic pattern employedby vehicles waiting for students. School pick up conflicts should be monitored by Apex Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Staff to avoid a largescale problem.SENSORY OBSERVATIONSKelly Road park is a fairly active park. It is heavily utilized and has several park features near to each other and to the adjacent school. There is a goodbalance of sun and shade, but the park is predominantly active and has quite a bit of noise.PHYSICAL ACCESS AND ACTIVITY LEVELEach of the site features is accessible through a paved trail system. Even though the site does have varied topography, features can be accessed throughthe network of trails. The activity level at this park is very high; it would be helpful to add “pockets” for rest and/or quiet spaces for those who haveadverse reactions to high activity and stimulation.3-40 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Sue Helton Memorial ParkACRES ¼ Acre LOCATION Inside Perry Farms, 201 Matney LaneTYPE Neighborhood Park PRIMARY USE Playground3-41 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013This small neighborhood park is great for families with young children, and provides a peaceful retreat for reading and socializing with neighbors.StrengthsCharlotte Sue Helton Memorial Park is well maintained and tucked into a safe neighborhood. Walking and biking with small children to this park is safefor families in the surrounding homes. While the play equipment is not new, a collection of fruit on the top platform provides evidence of use. Theplayground is aimed at 2-5 year old children, however any age child or adult can enjoy this space as a quiet place to read or meet friends.ChallengesWhile the location is convenient for residents of the neighborhood, it also discourages public use. The park seems more like a private green space forthe development. Another challenge of the park is accessibility. Only one side of the park is connected with a ramp and sidewalks are not presentthroughout the neighborhoods to provide clear connections separate from vehicular traffic. Not a challenge, but an oddity, each of the benches/picnictables within the park are different. Eventually, all furnishings should be the same and fit the standard of the Parks and Recreation system. Lighting isalso a challenge at night and should be added to increase visibility after dark.SENSORY OBSERVATIONSThe site is situated in a quiet neighborhood and is a passive recreation site.PHYSICAL ACCESS AND ACTIVITY LEVELWhile the site has paved trails and walkways, they are very narrow and have steps to the gazebo feature. General site access could be improved forusers. The site has a low activity level.Potential OpportunitiesImproved site access and consistency in furnishings and signage will help residents understand this is part of the Town park system and not a privatepark.3-42 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Sue Helton Memorial ParkPark Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesParking none marked Visitors likely walk from their homes,but drivers could park on the street.Pedestrian Access Fair Parks is within a neighborhood withno sidewalks. Visitors would likely bewalking in the street. One sidewalkwithin the park site has a curb ramp,the other has a full 18’’ curb.Bicycle Access/Parking Good There is no bicycle parking present,but not needed. Visitors would likelybike in the neighborhood streets andnot lock up their bikes.Signage: Title 1 Good The sign is in good condition butshould be changed in the future to fitinto the parks and recreation signagepackage.Signage: Internal 1 regulatory/1 monument Good The regulatory sign looks like itmatches the parks and recreation signage.The monument sign is in greatcondition but could use a landscapesurround as it is just a bare concretepedestal.Sun/Shade Excellent A gazebo and large hardwoods provideample shade.Circulation Good Sidewalks are present throughout,with one curb cut ramp access, andone side of the gazebo with rampaccess.Safety/Security Excellent The parks is visible and free of visualobstructions and tucked into a safeneighborhood.Picnic Tables/Benches/PicnicShelter3 picnic tables (2 wood/1 metal)/1bench in gazeboGoodIn good conditions, but a hodgepodgeof materials.3-43 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Park Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesTrash/Recycling Receptacles1 trash/1 recyclingPlayground 2-5 year old Fair The playground area was not accessiblebut equipment was in goodcondition. More mulch is needed inthe playground area.BaseballLights none Lights should be added to create asafer space after dark.Multiple types of signs are located in this park. The title signage should be upgraded, and the memorial signage can be enhanced with vegetation.3-44 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Seagroves Farm ParkACRES 11 Acre LOCATION Inside Seagrove Farms, 201 Parkfield DriveTYPE Neighborhood Park PRIMARY USE Walking, Running, Fishing/FUTURE: Playground3-45 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013A walking trail loops around the back of the pond and connects to the sidewalk in Seagroves Farm.StrengthsSeagroves park is relatively new and provides a beautiful setting for a short walk, picnic, or quiet place to read. The pond features a boardwalk andoutlook suitable for fishing or relaxing. A trail surrounding the pond weaves through the woods and connects to paths in an adjacent neighborhood.Ample parking is provided, and a restroom facility and playground are currently under construction.ChallengesOne challenge of this park is the location. Being tucked into a neighborhood presents the park as a private amenity. It may be beneficial to place signageor an identifying park feature along Center Street so residents know this resource is available for public use.SENSORY OBSERVATIONSThe park provides a quiet setting for passive recreation in the neighborhood. There is noise from Center Street but the existing vegetation buffers mostof it. A variety of spaces offer options to enjoy shade and sun; the addition of passive amenities would enhance the opportunity to chose these spaces.PHYSICAL ACCESS AND ACTIVITY LEVELThe site has a paved trail around it, and access to each site feature. There is moderate activity level on this site.Potential OpportunitiesSignage along Center Street would help identify the park as accessible to the public and not as a part of a neighborhood. Additional passive elements canbe added over time including picnic areas, walking trails, and plant identification. Since many residents can walk and/or bike to the park, bicycle parkingshould be provided. There is a small wooded area near the fishing pier that could offer nature trails with plant identification. Additionally mile markersand fitness stations could be added.3-46 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Seagroves Farm ParkPark Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesParking 15/1HC ExcellentPedestrian AccessExcellentBicycle Access/Parking Good No bicycle parking - see plans.Signage: Title 1 ExcellentSignage: Internal Multiple Regulatory ExcellentSun/ShadeExcellentRestrooms/shelter 1 Excellent Newly constructed, in great conditionwith picnic tables under shelterCirculation Good Bridge grade is not consistent - otherwise,circulation around park is great.Safety/Security Good No lights in the park, but daytimesafety is good with great visibilityaround the pond and trail.Picnic Tables/Benches/PicnicShelter1 picnic/3 benches/4 planters Good More picnic tables could be addedaround the pond.Trash/Recycling Receptacles 4 trash/1 recycling/3 dog stations ExcellentPlayground Young children Excellent New small age equipment with accessiblepoured in place safety surface.Track/Walking Trail need length Excellent One board is peeling up on thelookout.Lights 0 Poor Should be lights in the parking lot andpedestrian lights on the greenway.Open Play Space Good Adequate for park type - wooded.3-47 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013New park signage is used at Seagroves.A fishing pier is a unique feature of Seagroves Farm Park.3-48 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Salem Pond ParkACRES 14.3 Acres LOCATION 6112 Old Jenkins RoadTYPE Area Park PRIMARY USE Walking, Running, Education, Open Play3-49 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013A pond, greenway, and open space create a quiet passive park next to Salem Elementary.Salem Pond Park has a large open unprogrammed space.Title and regulatory signage should be updated and interpretive signage needs to be replaced due to disrepair.3-50 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Salem Pond ParkPark Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesParking 24/0HC Poor Need to mark an accessible space.Pedestrian Access Fair The park is well connected to theschool and shopping center, but thetrail from the parking lot exceeds a12:1 slope.Bicycle Access/Parking Fair No bicycle parking.Signage: Title Fair Should be updated.Signage: Internal Fair Interpretive signage is in disrepair andshould be replaced - either by theParks department, or service group.Sun/Shade Fair Shaded seating areas could be carvedout around the pond.CirculationGoodSafety/Security Fair Some vegetation should be trimmedto improve sight lines across the pondand around the trail. Lights shouldalso be added as students may beusing this trail before sunrise or aftersunset depending on the season.Trash/Recycling Receptacles 1 dog/1 trash/1 recycle Good Should add additional dog stationsand trash stations if seating areas arecreated.Track/Walking Trail Fair Slopes and maintenance should beexamined to create a smooth, accessiblesurface.Open Play Space Excellent Excellent unprogrammed space.Works well adjacent to school.3-51 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Segments of the trail are in need of repair and the pump station facilities are outdated.StrengthsBeing located adjacent to a school is a great opportunity for education and recreation for students. The large, unprogrammed space offers endlessopportunities for gym classes, fairs, and outdoor learning. Parents can also benefit from the park by using the space to walk or exercise before droppingoff or picking up students.ChallengesThe trail is in need of repair, as is the interpretive signage. Access to, and separation from the school is not ideal. The sidewalk should continue andconnect to the trail instead of emptying into the parking lot. The fence along the sidewalk is not attractive, nor is the pump house area.SENSORY OBSERVATIONSThe park is a quiet passive recreation setting even though it is located next to a school and commercial center. There is noise from the adjacent school,but due to existing vegetation, you can find quieter areas; there are shade and sun opportunities.PHYSICAL ACCESS AND ACTIVITY LEVELThe site has a paved trail around it, but due to age of the trail, improvements are needed to make a fully accessible route. There is low activity on thissite.Potential OpportunitiesWith a few cosmetic upgrades and better access to the school, this park could be an asset to health and learning at Salem Elementary and MiddleSchools. Programs and field days can be held in the open fields, and science classes can use the pond for wildlife exploration, water quality testing, soilsampling, and more. Thinking of the space as an amenity for those parents and guardians who escort their children to school may open opportunitiesfor the park to be a travel corridor - via walking or cycling - or an exercise and play area for families waiting for students to finish school or after schoolactivities. Proximity to the school and educational partnerships may avail the site of grant opportunities to fund improvements. Specific elements liketrail resurfacing, shelter, picnic areas and benches, interpretation, and maintenance of field space will enhance use.3-52 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


West Street ParkACRES 1.3 Acres LOCATION 108 West StreetTYPE Neighborhood Park PRIMARY USE Playground, Basketball3-53 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Additional tables should be added under the shelter.The mulch surface is well maintained but the playground equipment needs to bereplaced soon.StrengthsWest Street park is a small neighborhood park serving West, Harwood, and Lynch Street residents. The location is walkable for families in this area andis just a few blocks from the activity center of Salem Street. The picnic shelter, with the addition of tables, could be a great location for neighborhoodgatherings as the rolling topography and shade provide ample room for small games and group outdoor activities.ChallengesWhile most visitors to this location would likely walk or park on-street, the few parking spaces are gravel and the one accessible space is not trulyaccessible, as there is no smooth, hard surface or sidewalks connecting from the space to areas within the park. The playground is also in need of anupdate, including ADA access to the equipment. One additional challenge is safety and use. The water fountain was vandalized, causing a water leak. Anupdate in the playground equipment can encourage use, and additional pedestrian scale lighting can contribute to safety and decreased opportunitiesfor vandalism.SENSORY OBSERVATIONSThe park has a quiet neighborhood passive recreation setting. There is not a lot of noise; there are shade and sun opportunities; and there are passiveand active recreation activities and good separation between features.PHYSICAL ACCESS AND ACTIVITY LEVELThe site does not currently have accessible routes to existing site features. There is an opportunity to provide access to each feature, but topography onthe site might make access between each feature challenging; there is a low activity level on this site.Potential OpportunitiesWith the above mentioned improvements of adding lighting, replacing playground equipment, defining parking, and creating more seating under thepicnic shelter, the space will be more attractive to families and small groups. The park signage should also be updated to fit into a Town signage package.3-54 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


West Street ParkPark Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesParking 3 spots Poor Gravel pull-off. One space markedwith an accessible sign but the spaceis not accessible.Pedestrian Access Fair New sidewalks surround the park butthere are no paths leading into thepark itself.Bicycle Access/Parking noneSignage: Title 1 Fair Old sign, needs to be updated to fitinto the overall parks and recreationsignage program. There are no wayfindingsigns leading people to thepark from Williams and Salem.Signage: Internal 2 Fair Regulatory only.Sun/Shade Excellent Great hardwood trees with ampleshade.Restrooms 1 portable unit Poor The unit is on a slope and does notlook accessible.Circulation Poor No accessible routes between uses inthe park.Safety/Security Good Visible but doesn’t seem to be wellused. The water fountain was vandalizedand there is trash scatteredthroughout.Basketball Court (outdoor) 1 Good Asphalt is in good condition and basketsare intact.Swing Set 1 - 2 infant seats Excellent Unit looks fairly new and in goodcondition.Picnic Tables/Benches/PicnicShelter1 picnic shelter/1 picnic table/1 grill Good Not accessible, but in good condition.Trash/Recycling Receptacles 2 trash/1 recycling3-55 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Park Assets/Amenity Quantity Condition NotesPlayground 1 - 5 and under Fair Crack in the slide surface. In faircondition overall with well maintainedmulch surface. No accessible route.Lights 1 cobra light Fair Not very well placed in the woods,could use additional lighting throughoutthe park.Open Play SpaceAmple open play space with rollingtopography.Water Fountains 1 Poor Vandalized - cut water line.The basketball court is in good condition and should be monitored seasonally for goalrepair and surface cracks on the court.Vandalism in a park can deter use. During the evaluation, parkstaff responded immediately to correct the leak. Access to theplayground is in need of maintenance and repair.3-56 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Existing Facilities: GreenwaysThe demand for greenways, and access to daily needs via walking and biking facilities, is exploding across the nation. Communitiesare applying for walk and bike friendly status and newcomers research neighborhoods based on Walk Scores®. Apex is located inproximity to major multi-county trails, including the American Tobacco Trail, and towns with extensive greenway systems. Currently,the Apex greenway system is comprised of approximately 26 miles of trails, with the majority classified as recreational. The longesttrail in Apex is the Beaver Creek Greenway which has been developed as a result of the input from the 2001 recommendations. Thistrail and other highlighted connections continue to be a priority for residents.LENGTH (MILES)WIDTH (FEET)PublicPrivateAsphaltBoardwalkCrushed StoneConcreteEXISTING GREENWAYS & TRAILS1. Evans Rd Multi UseSide Path0.657 10 X X2. Apex Peakway MultiUse Side Path0.288 10 X X3. Beaver CreekGreenway4.959 X X X X4. Charleston VillageGreenway0.358 X X5. Community LakeTrail2.409 X X6. Haddon HallGreenway (small 1.605 8-10 X x X Xportaion is private)7. Hunter Street ParkTrail0.722 X X8. Salem Pond ParkGreenway0.530 X X X9. Shepherd Vineyard 1.431 5-8 X X X3-57 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013485Here is where a caption will go for the photo.senihicit.Hictudetis. Maris. Sat oc manuntiam ses sperivessis,fac rehem idit, sent, urivitilis inam que fur atuiusquidela vit. Hoc tam. Simmoverniu ius fuid faturniamtam omnenatus, mus, Catemum porebatus hocciemobus caeludes! Ex sussendacta Satus nos senin tatiamsus cae maio consus, ut ficae ternius, utust? Nihiliuquostra vius tantem quam patilic ataler loca; iaes1intes tuam is facideo, nota, cus, consus consum manumobusque rferit prae potis An sena, nonocre quasdaciorbit nosum intique iur hostrum eresult orteatum,nes ipse pubit vis, quideo, abem atiortus, catiferoripubliurnici pat, se culicatius essolis caet; non hostgraridin tanduc octorum essed inatam us auderteripatiam.Ti. et vis, P. Do, nos nosta, Catreorum invocul te in sicioCatiactam, omnihicamquo me dit L. Reis, ni silint?Opiorum nos, nostis. Gere in sent? Do, C. Ad publiissentil venatra venestr arissat audam, sil haed conret verficivit, ur, consularis confirm antrum achicapecividet; C. Inatis, quam peremque efaciem, omneset venes ant efex stere rest nit L. Acri tus. It? Avocanostionte, publictus anum pl. Verrio esent. Satquamiderdiem Romnoxi mihicatum peretienia nonimus,erum. Habere nordii sestantelis et forissultis. Uret iam.Existing Satus C. Facilities: Sciam pondi Greenwayspublis menatorum hem adhus,mo C. Locae publiciam horaestiliam ommorei ssena,nonsuliae consterrium ut omnesciestra ressedeapesil caes! Ultiaed eortum sentiae ad caturs7inatum.Iferum opoerbe fesimus vessupiondum tem audesmovite publina, mum. Terum det Cupimis. Maedemoaut vervirmihil habus3audem tessenium Romni sulhorisqu idemus con sedit omplium facisse, cumus,cone patum se, siceribus conem. Solutem ocri etvignosti, Catua rec furori intem interfica quit, manumsidena, nihin ditur. Esimunum vidius, ad nunt? in det?involus fituam tescesis.2Ignato ia et in tus Ahabunum quamdio rtientere numia re, cut vivit vilin re et alic tiusume conc intiam urisesent. Satim morae duc ipsediem poruredes ca reo,duconihi, consum moverum eniquis. Averem temtamquerum aliam se consus fatium que comnium adpris? Catuus, qui spere atum tatius dit, coniaed cretodaute, tum niuro vicio ublicae cons cone te, consimorusvocaet, octa moltuda mprorun clegilicae aur parebat.etiam imis, es fectum is, ne ia moris prit L. Deconsu llegilhoracturorus talabefactum etemquo consimmorbipare, scibute stimium pressoltor ad inatum meniumpero mortus rem iaeque in Ita, Cupere tem portudepsenimo et; nos ia depota mo esimur. Nostiorartumsatum nos labent. Adhui fue ips, nulti percena, ut L.Mius norionsum ad si cum aus.Abefeco nitabus iu se con sa L. contrum hos, mumocultus con re forum sena, ne ca rentime nterena,6Here is where a caption will go for the photo.93-58 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Existing ProgramsProgram demand changes over time with growing populations, demographic shifts, cultural interests, regionalofferings, and national trends. Currently the population of Apex has expressed an interest in youth program needs,and overall programs that focus on improved health and wellness. By offering a variety of programs and providingan open dialog between the Department and users, the Town of Apex can prepare for and adapt to the demandsof their population. The below table illustrates the current program schedule offered by the Town.Youth Athletic Program Ages Served Male/Female Where HeldFall Soccer Ages 5-14 Both Park, schoolSpring Soccer Ages 5-14 Both Park, schoolYouth Basketball Ages 7-15 Both ACC, schoolYouth Volleyball Ages 10-15 Girls ACCFall Softball Ages 7-15 Girls Park, schoolSpring Softball Ages 7-15 Girls Park, schoolFall Baseball Ages 9-14 Boys Park, schoolSpring Baseball Ages 9-14 Boys Park, schoolAdult Athletic Program Ages Served Male/Female Where HeldFall Softball 17 and up Male ParksSpring Softball 17 and up Male ParksWinter Basketball 17 and up Male ACCSpring Basketball 17 and up Male ACCFall Soccer 17 and up Both ParksSpring Soccer 17 and up Both ParksSand Volleyball 17 and up Both ParksIndoor Volleyball 17 and up Both ACCTennis Ladder 17 and up Both Parks3-59 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Adult Instructional Program Ages Served Male/Female Where HeldTennis Lessons 17 and up Both ParksWee-Tots & Toddlers 10-36 mos Both ACCPreschool Education Adventures Ages 3-4 Both ACCBoogie Babies 10-36 mos Both ACCWee-Painters Ages 2-4 Both ACCWee-Critters Ages 3-5 Both ACCJumpStart for Preschoolers Ages 3-5 Both ACCKindertots Age 2 Both ACCKindergym Ages 3-5 Both ACCKinderdance Ages 3-5 Both ACCPreschool Swimming (TAC) Ages 3-5 Both TACPreschool Yoga Ages 3-5 Both ACCTech Tots Ages 3-5 Both ACCPreschool Art Ages 3-5 Both ACCJunior Engineering Ages 6-9 Both ACCArt Ventures Workshops Ages 6-10 Both ACCJumpStart Sports Ages 5-7 Both ACCElementary Engineering Ages 10-12 Both ACCArt 4U2 Ages 7-11 Both ACCComputer Explorers Ages 6-13 Both ACCBabysitting Training Ages 11-15 Both ACCHapkido Youth Beginner Ages 9-12 Both ACCHapkido Youth Intermediate Ages 9-12 Both ACCHapkido Youth Int Ext Ages 9-12 Both ACCDigital Moviemaking Ages 9-13 Both ACCHapkido Teen/Adult Beginner 13 and up Both ACCHapkido Teen/Adult Intermediate 13 and up Both ACCHapkido Teen/Adult Int Ext 13 and up Both ACCHapkido Advanced 13 and up Both ACCBallroom Dance 16 and up Both ACCBallroom Dance Strictly Latin 16 and up Both ACCDance Fitness 16 and up Female ACC3-60 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Adult Instructional Program Ages Served Male/Female Where HeldPilates 16 and up Both ACCNia Non-Impact Fitness 16 and up Both ACCDecorating 14 and up Both ACCSAT Assistance Ages 15-17 Both ACCHealth & Wellness Seminars 16 and up Both ACCJumpStart Preschool Camp Ages 3-5 Both ACCPreschool Fun Camp Ages 3-5 Both ACCCurious Kids Preschool Nature Camp Ages 3-5 Both ACCPreschool Art Camp Ages 4-5 Both ACCYouth Art Camp Ages 6-12 Both ACCJumpStart Sports Camp Ages 5-10 Both ACCMini Youth Basketball Camp Ages 6-10 Both ACCYouth Basketball Camp Ages 8-13 Both ACCDrills & Thrills Basketball Ages 7-14 Both ACCSummer Fun Days Camp Ages 6-11 Both ParkFun Days Track Out Camp Ages 6-11 Both Park3-61 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Youth sports camps are important for building skills and teamwork.Apex offers many programs for the senior population.3-62 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Existing Programs By AgeThe table below illustrates the age served by each of the existing Apex programs. Gender is indicated by “M”for male, “F” for female, and “B” for programs serving both genders. This chart illustrates service gaps by age.Program 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25Fall Soccer B X X X X X X X X X XFall Soccer B X X X X X X X X XSpring Soccer B X X X X X X X X X XSpring Soccer B X X X X X X X X XBasketball B X X X X X X X X XWinter Basketball M X X X X X X X X XSpring Basketball M X X X X X X X X XVolleyball F X X X X X XSand Volleyball B X X X X X X X X XIndoor Volleyball B X X X X X X X X XFall Softball F X X X X X X X X XFall Softball M X X X X X X X X XSpring Softball F X X X X X X X X XSpring Softball M X X X X X X X X XFall Baseball M X X X X X XSpring Baseball M X X X X X XTennis Lessons B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XTennis Lessons B X X X X X X X X XTennis Ladder B X X X X X X X X XLacrosse Clinic B X X X X X X XSoftball Clinic F X X X X X X XHealth FairBBridgeBBingoBSilver CardioB3-63 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 201326 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55+ ProgramFall SoccerX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Fall SoccerSpring SoccerX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Spring SoccerBasketballX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Winter BasketballX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Spring BasketballVolleyballX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Sand VolleyballX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Indoor VolleyballFall SoftballX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Fall SoftballSpring SoftballX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Spring SoftballFall BaseballSpring BaseballX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Tennis LessonsX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Tennis LessonsX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Tennis LadderLacrosse ClinicSoftball ClinicX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Health FairX BridgeX BingoX Silver Cardio3-64 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Program 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25Steel StrongZumba GoldLine Dancing - Ultra BeginnerLine Dancing - Beginner ILine Dancing - Beginner IIT’ai Chi ChihYoga for Seniors - BeginnersYoga for Seniors - IntermediateBBBBBBBBYoga for Seniors - AdvancedWee-Tots & Toddlers (10-36months)BB X X XPreschool Education Adventures B X XBoogie Babies (10-36 months) B X X XWee Painters B X X XWee-Critters B X X XJumpStart for Preschoolers B X X XKindertots B XKindergym B X X XKinderdance B X X XPreschool Swimming (TAC) B X X XPreschool Yoga B X X XTech Tots B X X XPreschool Art B X X XJunior Engineering B X X X XArt Ventures Workshops B X X X X XJumpStart Sports B X X XElementary Engineering B X X XArt 4U2 B X X X X X3-65 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 201326 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55+ ProgramXXXXXXXXXSteel StrongZumba GoldLine Dancing - Ultra BeginnerLine Dancing - Beginner ILine Dancing - Beginner IIT’ai Chi ChihYoga for Seniors - BeginnersYoga for Seniors -IntermediateYoga for Seniors - AdvancedWee-Tots & Toddlers (10-36months)Preschool Education AdventuresBoogie Babies (10-36 months)Wee PaintersWee-CrittersJumpStart for PreschoolersKindertotsKindergymKinderdancePreschool Swimming (TAC)Preschool YogaTech TotsPreschool ArtJunior EngineeringArt Ventures WorkshopsJumpStart SportsElementary EngineeringArt 4U23-66 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Program 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25Computer Explorers B X X X X X X X XBabysitting Training B X X X X XHapkido Youth Beginner B X X X XHapkido Youth Intermediate B X X X XHapkido Youth Int Ext B X X X XDigital Moviemaking B X X X X XHapkido Teen/Adult Beginner B X X X X X X X X X X X X XHapkido Teen/Adult IntermediateBHapkido Teen/Adult Int Ext BHapkido Advanced B X X X X X X X X X X X X XBallroom Dance B X X X X X X X X X XBallroom Dance Strictly Latin B X X X X X X X X X XDance Fitness F X X X X X X X X X XPilates B X X X X X X X X X XNia Non-Impact Fitness B X X X X X X X X X XDecorating B X X X X X X X X X X X XSAT Assistance B X X XHealth & Wellness Seminars B X X X X X X X X X XJumpStart Preschool Camp B X X XPreschool Fun Camp B X X XCurious Kids PreSch. Nature Camp B X X XPreschool Art Camp B X XYouth Art Camp B X X X X X X XJumpStart Sports Camp B X X X X X XMini Youth Basketball Camp B X X X X XYouth Basketball Camp B X X X X X XDrills & Thrills Basketball B X X X X X X XSummer Fun Day Camp B X X X X X X3-67 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 201326 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55+ ProgramComputer ExplorersBabysitting TrainingHapkido Youth BeginnerHapkido Youth IntermediateHapkido Youth Int ExtDigital MoviemakingX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Hapkido Teen/Adult BeginnerXHapkido Teen/AdultIntermediateHapkido Teen/Adult Int ExtX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Hapkido AdvancedX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Ballroom DanceX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Ballroom Dance Strictly LatinX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Dance FitnessX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X PilatesX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Nia Non-Impact FitnessX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X DecoratingSAT AssistanceX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Health & Wellness SeminarsJumpStart Preschool CampPreschool Fun CampCurious Kids PreSch. Nature CampPreschool Art CampYouth Art CampJumpStart Sports CampMini Youth Basketball CampYouth Basketball CampDrills & Thrills BasketballSummer Fun Day Camp3-68 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


Program 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25Fun Days Track Out Camp B X X X X X XIndoor Concerts B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XJazz Concerts B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XOrchestra Concerts B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XPizza and a Show B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XLive Theatre B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XH a l l e C e n t e r P r o g r a m sDance Performances B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XDances B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XSpecial Events B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XArt Shows B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XBook Launches B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XPoetry Readings B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XOutdoor Concerts B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XHistorical Society Presentations B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XMorning Movies B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XPlay-On B X X XCreative Drama B X XApex Players B X X X XJoy of Colored PencilsBGroup Voice B X X X X X X X XHilarious Homeschoolers B X X X X XGo Medieval Camp B X X X X X X XCreative Players Camp B X X XApex Players Camp B X X X XPage to Stage Camp B X X X X XKids on Stage Camp B X X X XWild Outside, Wild Inside B X X X X X X XPastels: Fast and Fabulous B3-69 | Section 3


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 201326 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55+ ProgramFun Days Track Out CampX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Indoor ConcertsX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Jazz ConcertsX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Orchestra ConcertsX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Pizza and a ShowX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Live TheatreX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Dance PerformancesX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X DancesX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Special EventsX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Art ShowsX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Book LaunchesX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Poetry ReadingsX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Outdoor ConcertsX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Historical Society PresentationsX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Morning MoviesPlay-OnCreative DramaApex PlayersX Joy of Colored PencilsGroup VoiceHilarious HomeschoolersGo Medieval CampCreative Players CampApex Players CampPage to Stage CampKids on Stage CampWild Outside, Wild InsideX Pastels: Fast and Fabulous3-70 | Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Inventory


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Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Section FourNeeds AssessmentPUBLIC INPUT ANDINVOLVEMENT OVERVIEWPublic involvement is imperative in parks and recreationplanning. In addition to analyzing demographicsand comparing trends, there is no better gauge foridentifying needs than asking users for their desires,opinions, and ideas. For this plan, public input wasgathered by consulting the Parks, Recreation, andCultural Resources Advisory Commission, distributinghard-copy and electronic surveys, and attending“piggy-back” events. The electronic survey wasaccessible via a project website, project Facebookpage, the Town website, and computer kiosks in theCommunity Center. To stimulate awareness of theplan, information cards were distributed at Parksand Recreation facilities, the project team manneda booth at community events, and the Town postedannouncements and news on their website, sent emailblasts out to past and present users, and included thesurvey in utility bill distribution.COMMUNITY EVENTSIn lieu of arranging public open houses or workshops,it is more effective to “go where the people are.” Aspart of the planning process, events were identifiedApexParks & Recreation Master PlanIt’s Time for You to Decide!More Parks?Different Facilities?New classes & workshops?Tell us what YOU would like to see!For more information about the project, visitwww.apexparksplan.com.Contact: John Brown ‌ Director of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources919.249.3344 ‌ john.brown@apexnc.orgExample ofInformation Cards:four differentmessages weredistributedthroughout theApecommunity to raiseawareness of theproject.Parks & RecreatiIt’s Time to Grow!What types of parks would YOUR family enjoy?Where do YOU want to go on a greenway?What classes would YOUR kids think are fun?Tell us what YOU would like to see!For more information about the project, visitwww.apexparksplan.com.4-2 | Needs AssessmentContact: John Brown ‌ Director of Parks, Recreation and Cultural919.249.3344 ‌ john.brown@apexnc.org


Apex Parks, Recreation, and CulturalResources Master Plan project website.that would be suitable to attend with a teamequipped with information about the plan,existing conditions maps, surveys, informationcards, and general parks and recreationinformation. Booths were set up during ApexConcerts on the Lawn, sports registration at theCommunity Center, and during the Apex TurkeyTrot. Attendees were invited to share theirvision for the park plan, comment on the map toaddress geographic gaps in service, indicate ideallocations for greenways, communicate theirneeds for programs, and complete a survey inperson,or online.ON-LOCATION AND WEB-BASED SURVEYAs a key component of the plan, the Townprepared a survey to assess residents’ needs,attitudes, and opinions related to improvingparks and recreation facilities, programs,and services. The survey was voluntary andinvited individuals to comment openly. Whilenot statistically significant, the informationcaptured was valuable in providing insight into localpublic opinion and offering a framework that reflectscurrent priorities of the community while planning forfuture needs. Most residents who feel invested in thequality of life that parks and recreation programs offerappreciate the opportunity to offer feedback to shapethe future of Apex facilities and program variety.SURVEY RESULTSThe survey consisted of 23 questions, including anopen-ended response, tailored to capture user needs.Results of the survey indicated that most respondentswere female (64.5 percent), between 35-44 years ofage (46.1 percent), and lived within the Town limits ofApex (92.2 percent). A vast majority of respondentsindicated there were teens in their household (74.1percent), while other households included a personwith a physical disability (15.5 percent) or mentaldisability (10.1 percent). Single parents comprised13. 6 percent of respondents. Many respondents havelived in the Apex area for 6-10 years (29.2 percent).The following summary provides highlights of thesurvey results.4-3 | Section 4


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013ACCESS TO PARKS AND GREENWAYSVIA BICYCLING AND WALKINGSeveral questions asked respondents about bicyclingand walking to an Apex park from their residence (seechart below). While 35.88 percent of respondentsselected “none” (meaning they do not walk or bikeanywhere from their homes), greenways topped outin the access group with 33.73 percent indicating theycurrently walk or bike to these facilities from theirhomes. The most popular parks to bike or walk towere Kelly Road Park (25.9 percent), Apex CommunityPark (17.3 percent) and the Apex Community Center(16.6 percent). Both Jaycee Park and the Halle CulturalArts Center were indicated as bikeable and walkableby around 11 percent of the respondents.When respondents were asked the types of activitiesthey wanted to walk or bike to, top responses includedparks (86.1 percent), recreation areas (72.6 percent),restaurants (53.4 percent), and grocery stores (48.8percent). There was a high level of interest in placesto walk/ride from, including neighborhoods (70.6percent); parks (67.6 percent); recreation areas(54.8 percent); and restaurants (39.2 percent). Manyrespondents’ open-ended answers expressed a desireto walk or bicycle for short trips, such as to the postoffice, downtown, and other greenway trails.The vast majority of respondents indicated that accessto greenways or trails would encourage them to walkor bike more frequently (87.6 percent), followedby the development of bike lanes (53.3 percent),having a park close to their home (47.5 percent), andimproved crossings at intersections (46.3 percent).Many open-ended responses called for more facilities,such as sidewalks, bicycle lanes, and bicycle racks, anda better understanding of where facilities are located,indicating a need for improved signage and mapping.4-4 | Needs Assessment


ARTS AND CULTUREThe Halle Cultural Arts Center provides concerts,performances, visual arts presentations, specialevents, community engagements, facility rentals,and educational programs. Visitation to the facilitywas mixed, with 60.8 percent of respondents havingvisited and 39.2 percent never visiting the facility.When asked to indicate why, many open-endedresponses included lack of interest, lack of knowledgeabout the facility, or lack of promotional materials.Arts and cultural programs included music, movies,theater, art, and lectures. Interest in children/familyplay participation was expressed by 40 percent ofrespondents. Other categories with a high rating ofinterest were movies (32.6 percent); dinner theater(30.4 percent); contemporary band (32.4 percent); andplays (31.2 percent). Categories of less interest weredrama and theater classes (31.4 percent); performingarts classes (26.3 percent); and arts/lecture classes(both categories were 20 percent). When askedabout supporting a public art installation program,the majority of respondents were supportive (57.7percent); while 11.5 percent were not supportive, and30.8 percent responded, “don’t know.”FACILITY AND PROGRAM USEAlmost three quarters of respondents indicated thatthey use neighboring town facilities or programs (72.1percent). The most popular facilities and programsbeing used outside of Apex included Cary Tennis Park,Cary and Raleigh parks and greenways, and Cary dogparks (as indicated by open-ended responses).As an exercise in preference and personal importance,participants were asked to rate how they would spend$100 on facilities and programs. The question allowedfor any distribution of funds – from $100 on oneoption to spreading the total across all categories.The most popular preference was greenways andtrails (65.3 percent), followed by playgrounds (32.6percent); an amphitheater (31.8 percent); and dogparks (27.5 percent). However, an analysis of the sumsindicates further separation and a different order orpreference. Greenways and trails were funded fora total of $60,000 with dog parks coming in secondat $12,699, an amphitheater at third ($11,780) withthe fourth highest funded facility being playground($11,368).SPECIAL EVENTSRespondents were asked to indicate where theywould prefer to attend a family concert if the Town ofApex hosted the event. Locations ranked as follows:downtown (39.2 percent); in a park (33.3 percent);and town hall campus (27.5 percent). Popular parklocations included Apex Community Park and KellyRoad (based on open-ended responses).Top responses for preferred events among respondentswere community festivals (53.9 percent); concerts(45.6 percent); and outdoor movies (30.3 percent).Lower event preferences included community runsand parades. Open-ended responses were widelyvaried, from a desire to see more seasonal events,pet-related events, and food fairs.4-5 | Section 4


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013PROGRAM PARTICIPATION AND USERNEEDRespondents were asked to rate the top five activitiesthey and their family enjoy within Apex. The toprankedresponses included: aquatics/swimming (40.2percent); swimming (38.3 percent); biking (37.8percent); hiking (32.7 percent); and fitness programs(31.8 percent).Respondents were asked to indicate age groups forwhich they wanted additional programs. The questionwas based on a sliding scale of “very important”to “very unimportant.” The most popular “veryimportant” age groups were youth 12 and under(70.1 percent); teens (58.9 percent); and adults (41.6percent).OPEN SPACE AND GREENWAYSTo determine areas of need for additional greenways,respondents were asked to rank their preferencesbased on map “zones.” The highest preferences forzones with additional greenways were Zone 3 (62.1percent); Zone 4 (38.3 percent); and Zone 8 (38.1percent).A similar question structure was provided for openspace and parks in “zones” of Apex. The highestrankingzones were Zone 3 (60.5 percent); Zone 8(43.4 percent); and Zone 7 (41 percent).Zone Map usedin survey.CUSTOMER SATISFACTIONSURVEYThe Town completed an in-house customersatisfaction survey in the fall of 2011 to understandcitizen satisfaction with the quality of servicesprovided by the Parks, Recreation, and CulturalResources Department. The purpose of the study was4-6 | Needs Assessment


to assist town leaders in setting budgeting prioritiesand establishing policy decisions.A total of 450 responses were gathered over the courseof one month. Seventy-seven percent of respondentswere female, with the majority ages of the membersin each household being between 35 and 54.The top Apex recreation facilities and parks thatrespondents had visited in the last year were (in orderof popularity): the Apex Community Center, ApexCommunity Park, Kelly Road Park, Halle Cultural ArtsCenter, local greenways, and Jaycee Park.When asked to rate various community parks andrecreation facilities and efforts, adequate maintenanceand repair of existing facilities was listed as mostimportant. Additional greenway trails ranked as thenext most important, followed by additional activerecreation facilities. A skateboard park and communitycenter were ranked as the lowest in priority.When asked about what factors would encouragemore use of recreational programs and facilities, thetop two responses were more activities and moreknowledge about the programs offered. In the openendedresponses, many respondents indicated accessto more senior programs and health programs wouldbenefit the community. These findings are consistentwith the recent survey .John Brown sharing greenway plans with citizens of Apex at a concert on the lawn.4-7 | Section 4


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Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Section FiveRecommendationsOVERVIEWRecreation professionals, including the National Recreationand Park Association, have traditionally offered guidance tocommunities by publishing “ratios” for parks, facilities, and/orprograms based upon acres or facilities per thousand people.Ratios were adapted over the years using a variety of methods bya number of communities, resulting in noticeable inconsistency.These inconsistencies in supply and demand resulted inmodifications to the industry standard methods for parks andrecreation planning. Instead of population ratios, planningmethods include analyzing demographics, current demand, futuredemand, cultural trends, city or town capacity, and other relevantfactors. Consulting with residents through various outreach effortshelps define and measure the current level of service and futuregrowth opportunities for facilities and programs. A clear visionand specific goals maintain the focus of the planning process andare cross-checked to ensure recommendations and action stepscomply with the original intent of the study.The Town of Apex Parks, Recreation, and Cultural ResourcesAdvisory Commission strives to achieve the Departmental andMaster Plan vision by using the following goals as a measure ofsuccess:• Provide recreational opportunities that suit resident needswithin a service area as defined by distance.• Create a park system that residents can access by walking,biking, and driving.• Provide recreational opportunities that promote an “active”lifestyle to maintain a high quality of life in Apex.• Provide opportunities for Apex residents to enjoy natural,historical, and cultural resources, and protect these resourcesfor future generations.• Ensure residents are satisfied with the types of facilitiesavailable, as well as their condition and maintenance.Recommendations and prioritization evolve from overlapping andanalyzing the 2001 Parks, Recreation, Greenways, and Open SpaceMaster Plan; related plans, including the 2011 TransportationPlan; facility and program inventory; the cultural and demographicmakeup of Apex and anticipated growth; adjacent facilitiesand programs; and community, staff, and stakeholder input.Recommendations are presented in four key areas: Park Facilities,Greenways and Connectivity, Programs, and Land Acquisition.Before recommendations are made, the system needs to beclassified, or defined, to plan for diverse offerings. Classificationsare crafted based on the current and future composition of theTown - including density, residential areas, commercial centers,and population demographics.5-2 | Recommendations


PARK ZONES AND CLASSIFICATIONZONESIn past Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Plans,the Town of Apex divided the town into eight ParkZones. While this method helped identify geographicgaps, it does not provide standard measures withineach zone. Further, review of reference material anddiscussions with staff revealed that these zones are notused anywhere but in the 2001 Parks, Recreation, andCultural Resources Master Plan. Residents and townstaff typically reference facilities geographically bymajor roadway. For example, areas north of highway64 (east or west); areas located between highway 64and US 1; and areas south (east or west) of US 1. ThisPlan recommends discontinuing the use of park zonesin favor of geographic and directional referencing.CLASSIFICATIONSAs the community grows and diversifies, the supply ofparks and facilities will need to respond to changingpatterns. The following classification is a modificationof the existing park types as defined in the 2001Plan. Adjustments in size and service area respondto resident needs and recommendations for futurefacilities and programs:Pocket Parks/Urban Parks: Pocket parks are urbandowntown spaces that can meet a variety of needsincluding: green space, urban play space, areas forresting, or public art space. It is recommended thistypology be added in response to resident need formore urban public space.Size:Service Area:Typically 0-1/4 acresApex Downtown districtNeighborhood Parks: These are currently in theclassification system and were the smallest, mostnumerous type of park in the Town. These shouldbe within walking distance of homes. Many of theseparks have been created as part of a neighborhooddevelopment and/or PUD to serve neighborhoodrecreational needs. This Plan recommends increasingthe service area to ½ mile, which is typical ofneighborhood parks.Size:Service Area:3/4- 3 acres,optimal is 5-10 acres1/4-1/2 mileArea Parks: These serve a larger population andare accessible by walking, biking, and driving. Theytypically provide support facilities such as restroomsand parking.Size:Service Area:20 acres-50 acres1-2 milesCommunity Parks: range in size with multiple usesprovided and are typically created to serve the entiretown. It is recommended these sites be connectedthrough Greenways and/or sidewalks with adequateparking facilities.Size:Service Area:50-200 Acres½ mile- 3+ mile radius.Greenways: are linear parks which may includetrails and paths, and may be along stream corridors,abandoned railways, or utility easements. Trailsand paths should provide connections to and fromresidential neighborhoods, parks, schools, commercialcenters, and local areas of interest. Due to the demandfor this type of park it is recommended this become apark classification type in addition to a type of facilityto underscore the need for future acquisition anddevelopment.Size:Service Area:Length varies based uponconnections and destinationsvaries and is based uponhow many communityelements are connected andwhere connections are made.5-3 | Section 5


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Pocket and Urban Parks serve multiple purposes from daily lounging, to serving as rentable space, and becoming “rooms” for large events.Specialty Use Facility: Specialty facilities provide aspecific recreational resource not typically found in atraditional park setting and/or park typology. Examplesof specialty facilities and/or parks in the Town of Apexare Halle Cultural Arts Center, Apex Community Center,and Hunter Street Dog Park. A Specialty Park or facilitycan be separate or a facility or use provided as part ofa larger park offering. It is recommended this typologyis added to the classification system as recreationalneeds continue to diversify with population growth.Shared Used Facilities: are facilities that are usedand/or managed in partnership with another agencyor provider. An example of shared used facilities inApex is the partnership with Wake County Schools forfacility use at area elementary and middle schools.Another type of shared use facility would be apartnership between municipalities.PARK FACILITIESWhere Residents Participate inRecreationOverall, the Apex Parks and Recreation facilities are ingood condition. Most parks are well maintained withupdated equipment, clean restrooms, well-manicuredfields, and a variety of active play spaces.Apex Nature Park will provide additional trails,playgrounds, tennis courts, soccer fields, picnicshelters, a dog park, and disc golf course, augmentingcurrent offerings.The survey revealed a large demand for greenways.Comparing Apex to adjacent communities, the Townis behind in supplying accessible walking and bikingfacilities for residents. Cary supplies over 40 milesof greenways, with more under construction, andRaleigh boasts almost 100 miles. Many residents aretraveling to Cary, Raleigh, and Holly Springs to usethe connected network of trails for recreation andexercise.With future planning efforts, Apex has the opportunityto build trails to address the recreation, exercise,and transportation desires of the community. Bystrategically planning for alignments that connectneighborhoods to parks, neighborhoods tocommercial centers, parks to parks, and greenways toother greenways, Apex can become a component ofan interconnected regional system.The survey revealed other top priorities for facilities:1. Downtown festival space and expanding thedowntown areaTanner Springs ParkPortland, OR5-4 | Recommendations


2. Unprogrammed open space and multi-use fields3. Playgrounds4. Amphitheater5. Dog parks6. Future Active and Passive RecreationDowntown SpaceMany members of the community expressed an interestin Town festivals and events. Concerts are currently heldon the lawn at the community center and downtownin the parking lot fronting the Chamber of Commercebuilding. Survey respondents prefer a downtown location,but the facility lacks the area and design to facilitatelarge crowds, tents, and vendors. Local merchants andthe Town economy would benefit from hosting eventswithin, near, and in partnership with merchants in thehistoric downtown area. While the community centerlawn is not far from Salem Street, no visual connectionexists to encourage attendees to circulate throughoutthe shops and restaurants before or following events. Itis recommended the Town partner with local vendors tocreate events that support and encourage participationon town campus and promote circulation to and fromthe downtown core.Unprogrammed SpacePublic input and facility inventory indicated that whileApex offers many ballfields and tennis courts, there is adeficiency in unprogrammed open space. As the Townacquires additional land for parks and designs futurefacilities, emphasis should be placed on providingunprogrammed open space and space for other sports,such as lacrosse, which ranked highly as a need in theopen ended portion of the survey. The park inventoryalso highlights opportunities to improve usage of areaswithin existing parks. These spaces serve the communityby allowing groups to assemble for activities, such asultimate frisbee, flag football, kickball, remote controlaircraft flights, kite flying, and picnicking. Both wide openfields and acres of wooded land can serve this purpose,and would complement the existing facilities.PlaygroundsPlaygrounds are currently being constructed at HunterStreet Park, Seagroves Farm Park, and Phase Two ofthe Apex Nature Park. This should alleviate some of thepressure for additional playgrounds; however, thereare still underserved areas of Apex that should includeplaygrounds in the land acquisition and park designprocess. Additionally, continued use of poured in placeand manufactured surfacing will help improve access tothese facilities for all Apex residents.Amphitheater and Dog ParkPlans for the Apex Nature Park include both anamphitheater and dog park. The amphitheater and dogpark openings at Hunter Street and Apex Nature Parkshould be announced via media outlets, at other parkfacilities, and through the department website. TheAmphitheater will likely fill the need expressed for thattype of facility, however, additional dog park locationsshould be identified for future park land acquisition toserve the areas without easy access to these two sites.Active RecreationResidents are satisfied with the current level of servicefor active recreation offerings. However, in order tomaintain these high level offerings, the Town needs toplan for future population growth over the next 7 to 10years. Active facilities include multi-use fields, soccerfields, softball fields, basketball courts, and tenniscourts. In order to best serve the Town and residents itis recommended these facilities be planned as a sportscomplex. This packaging of multiple fields will requireacquisition of a larger park space with multiple uses thatcan serve a variety of interests, and become a venue forhosting tournaments. This can be an economic generatorby bringing people to area restaurants, overnightaccommodations, and shops.5-5 | Section 5


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013This flexible urban space at the American Tobacco Campus in Durham, NC, serves as a model for the type of space Apex citizens need: flexible, multipurpose,staging areas that are not solely used for events, hard and soft surfaces, accessible, and located in the core of the downtown.Other NeedsDog walking, lacrosse, fishing, in-line skating,climbing, zip-lines, ropes courses, and skateboardingranked high in the open ended section of the “otheractivities” residents would like to see offered by theTown. Survey participants also expressed a desirefor more teen programs. Several of these activitieswere also mentioned in the 2001 report. The townshould provide for these activities in future parkdevelopment.Cultural ResourcesThe Halle Cultural Arts Center is well positioned in thedowntown area. This location allows for the Centerto mutually benefit the businesses on Salem Street.Existing and new programs offered at the Halle Centershould be created to encourage use of the downtownbefore or after classes or events. While the proximityto other economic generators is an advantage, accessto the building is difficult. Additional signage is neededto indicate where to park and to warn of a pedestrianpresence along the alley next to and behind thebuilding. Uneven pavement is not only a problemfor vehicles accessing the parking area, but also forpedestrians moving from cars to the front entranceof the building. Users, particularly those with physicalchallenges, find it difficult to navigate the pavementand gain access to the building. A pedestrian path (astriped walkway at a minimum) should be added toprovide space for people to walk from the front of thebuilding to the parking lot. An ADA accessible rampand alert/automatic door system should be installedat the back of the building to enable entry by thosewith mobility challenges.5-6 | Recommendations


Residents would like to expanded offerings that aregeared toward family participation, such as movienights, plays, and classes involving the entire family.NEXT STEPSTo address the needs of the community and providefacilities that are well maintained and accessible,Apex should:1. Focus on developing a comprehensive greenwaysystem (See Greenways and Connectivity).2. Look for ways to include walking facilities and/or trails within current parks and town facilities,such as the Town Complex.3. Look for partnerships to host downtownfestivals and concerts (See Land Acquisition).4. Add facilities for indoor programming gearedtoward seniors and teens via community centerexpansion, reusing an existing structure, orbuilding a new facility.5. Plan for unprogrammed open space in futurepark designs (see underserved areas of town onthe land acquisition map).6. Target underserved areas for future park sitesand a sports complex.7. Improve physical access and awareness of theHalle Center.8. Examine opportunities to incorporateplaygrounds into existing and future parks.9. Provide an equal balance of active and passiverecreational offerings in future park sites.10. Incorporate specialty recreation features andfacilities into future park development projects.GREENWAYS AND CONNECTIVITYHow To Connect ResidentsGreenways and the ability to walk or bike within thecommunity overwhelmingly surfaced as priorities forsurvey participants. Eighty-six percent of respondentsindicated a need for greenway connections betweenparks and seventy percent desire links from theirhomes to commercial centers. Running and walkingwere also a favorite activity among those surveyed.With only 26 miles of existing greenway, residentsare dramatically underserved and turning to otherareas including Cary, Raleigh, and Holly Springsto fulfill their recreation requirements. Howeverthis does not address the challenge of access togreenways from their homes to Apex commercialcenters. This need is also evident in the 2011 ApexTransportation Plan Update.Objective 5:Promote a pedestrian-friendly environment byfilling in gaps and improving interconnectivity in thesidewalk system.Action Step 5.2:Coordinate with the Parks, Recreation, and CulturalResources Department to create a greenwaynetwork that allows people to walk both forrecreation and for transportation.Objective 8:Support more bike lanes and trails to parks andcommunity activity centers.Action Step 8.2:Coordinate with the Parks, Recreation, and CulturalResources Department to identify future activitycenters.5-7 | Section 5


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Creating a well-connected network of greenways,sidewalks, and bicycle facilities will enhance thelivability of Apex and address the desires of thecommunity - both present and future. Greenwaysshould radiate from the downtown center; connectthe park system; provide links from residences to dailyneeds; support economic development by steeringvisitors into the community; and provide a series ofrecreational loops varying in length.Currently, the majority of greenways in Apex arelocated along waterways and within parks. To becomea component of the Town’s infrastructure and providethe desired transportation function, the definitionof greenways will extend beyond paths in naturalPriorities listed in the 2011 ApexTransportation Update include:• Proximity to pedestrian/bicycle generator• School• High Density Residential• Office• Park• Connection to regional trails/routes• Location along thoroughfare or collectorstreet• Prime connection within the transportationnetwork• Proximity to minority or low-income area• Support for transportation as primaryfunction as opposed to recreationareas along creeks and streams. Multiuse sidepathsare types of greenways that are located within theright of way separated from vehicular movement.These sidepaths provide highly visible routes alongexisting roads serving both pedestrians and cyclists.One benefit of multiuse sidepaths is the perceivedsafety for inexperienced cyclists and families -therefore supporting efforts to increase bicycling as atransportation mode.Other likely alignments for greenways are along utilitycorridors. These cleared corridors often provideideal routes from neighborhoods to commercialcenters. Other potential routes are rail lines, bothactive and non-active. Rails-With-Trails and Rails-To-Existing and Planned Road Widths and ROW WidthsThe chart below indicates sidepaths with a verge have the potential to fit within the current and future ROW -even with proposed road width increases. Feasibility studies will provide further information including physicalbarriers such as utilities.Road NameRoad WidthIn FeetROW WidthIn Feet2010 2035 2010 2035 10’PathFit 2010 Fit 203512’PathVerge 10’Path12’PathApex Barbecue Rd 20/21 30 60 100 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓Apex Peakway 28/71 71 60/100 100 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓Davis Drive 24/32 75 30/60 100 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓E Williams Street 24/69 43/75 100 100 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓Evans Road*Green Level Church 18 43/75 60 70/100 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓Humie Olive Rd 19 30 60 65 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓Hunter Street 27/35 35/43 60/80 60/80 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓Kelly Rd 19/27 75 60 100 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓Laura Duncan Road 20 43/75 60/75 65/105 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓N Salem Street 22/36 36/41 20/60 50/70 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓Old Raleigh Road Varies 43 70 70 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓Olive Chapel 18/32 30/75 60 70/100 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓S Salem 22/43 35/75 50/60 50/100 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓Vision Drive*Williams Street 36/64 43/69 100/150 100/150 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓*Not included in 2011 Apex Transportation PlanVerge5-8 | Recommendations


Trails projects are becoming more prevalent across thecountry. A comprehensive bicycle and pedestrian planshould complement this greenway system with on-roadbike facilities and a network of sidewalks. This web oftravelways for cyclists and pedestrians will also contributeto the economic development of the Town. Commercialcenters and the core of downtown will prosper by beingsafely connected to neighborhoods. Linkages from theAmerican Tobacco Trail and adjacent Town greenways willalso help drive visitors to retail and restaurant venues inthe community.To create an environment replete with safe, healthy,bicycle and pedestrian access, priorities should include alegible wayfinding system, a destination-based greenwaysystem, and intersection improvements.Grenways and Multi-Use Side PathsGeneral Design PracticesDescriptionMulti-use paths can provide a desirable environment, particularly for recreation and usersof all skill levels preferring separation from traffic. Bicycle paths should generally providedirectional travel opportunities not provided by existing roadways.GuidanceWidth• 10 feet is recommended in most situations and will be adequate for moderate to heavyuse.• 12 feet is recommended for heavy use situations with high concentrations of multipleusers. A separate track (5’ minimum) can be provided for pedestrian use.Terminate the path where it is easily accessible to and fromthe street system, preferably at a controlled intersection or atthe beginning of a dead-end street.10’-12’dependingon usageLateral Clearance• A 2 foot or greater shoulder on both sides of the path should be provided. An additionalfoot of lateral clearance (total of 3’) is required by the MUTCD for the installationof signage or other furnishings.Overhead Clearance• Clearance to overhead obstructions should be 8 feet minimum, with 10 feet recommended.Striping• When striping is required, use a 4 inch dashed yellow centerline stripe with 4 inch solidwhite edge lines.• Solid centerlines can be provided on tight or blind corners, and on the approaches toroadway crossings.5-9 | Section 5


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Shared Use Paths AlongRoadwaysPay special attention to the entrance/exit of the pathas bicyclists may continue to travel on the wrongside of the street.DescriptionA shared use path allows for two-way, off-street bicycle useand also may be used by pedestrians, skaters, wheelchairusers, joggers and other non-motorized users. These facilitiesare frequently found in parks, along rivers and beaches,and in greenbelts or utility corridors where there are fewconflicts with motorized vehicles.Along roadways, these facilities create a situation where aportion of the bicycle traffic rides against the normal flowof motor vehicle traffic and can result in wrong-way ridingwhere bicyclists enter or leave the path.The AASHTO Guide for the Development of BicycleFacilities generally recommends against the developmentof shared-use paths directly adjacent to roadways.Guidance• 8 feet is the minimum allowed for a two-way bicyclepath and is only recommended for low traffic situations.• 10 feet is recommended in most situations and will beadequate for moderate to heavy use.• 12 feet is recommended for heavy use situations withhigh concentrations of multiple users such as joggers,bicyclists, rollerbladers and pedestrians. A separatetrack (5’ minimum) can be provided for pedestrian use.W11-15, W16-9Pin advance ofcross street stopsignCrossings shouldbe stop or yieldcontrolled• Bicycle lanes should be provided as an alternate (moretransportation-oriented) facility whenever possible.5-10 | Recommendations


Wayfinding SystemA comprehensive wayfinding system for Apexshould be approached from both recreation andtransportation perspectives. As the system ofinterconnected greenways, multiuse sidepaths, andsidewalks expands and gaps are filled, residentsand visitors will be able to access longer recreationloops, schools, commercial centers, and other parkswithout using personal vehicles. For economicdevelopment purposes, signage should be placedalong the American Tobacco Trail and adjacent Towngreenways to drive traffic to Apex commercial centersand the downtown. Through travels of the AmericanTobacco Trail and those using the Holly Springs andCary greenways are more likely to use services in Apexif maps and travel times are clearly posted.Components of a successful wayfinding system includestandards for logos, color, typography, and symbols. Allof these elements create an identity package for signtypes, such as trailhead identification, trail markers,mile markers, pedestrian directionals, regulatorysignage, confidence markers, interpretive signage,and information kiosks. The same package can also beused to create a hierarchy of signage for different parktypes: regional, community, and neighborhood.Two types of maps should be used in the wayfindingsystem. Trail maps should be included at trailheadsand major spurs. Items included on the map shouldbe the trail alignment, mileage of the trail, parkingareas, restrooms, spurs, adjacent road names, andadjacent neighborhoods. Large maps showing theentire greenway system should be placed at majortrailheads, parks, downtown, and on the AmericanTobacco trail. Existing and future trails, commercialcenters, important landmarks, and mileage shouldbe indicated on these maps. Walk and bike times andother information can also be included to educate andinform the public about the ease of using the systemto navigate Apex.Destination-Based Greenway SystemThe recommended greenway system includeswaterway alignments and multiuse sidepaths aspreviously described. These routes radiate from thecenter of the downtown, connect parks to parks,and connect people to their daily needs. The TownTypologies and designs from the 2006 Greenway Standards created for Raleigh, NC by DJS Design.5-11 | Section 5


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Bond Park in Cary, NC, serves as a hub for several greenways. The map kiosk includes information about trails and areas sites.5-12 | Recommendations


needs to focus on a connected system that provideslinks to currently missing sections, and allows forresidents to get to and from their neighborhoods,parks, and commercial centers. This system will growand change as new residential and commercial areasare developed. Schools and libraries should also beaccessible by bicycle and foot and are emphasized inthe network. In addition to driving the local economy,a master plan of route alignments addressesthe needs indicated by survey participants. Thecommunity needs safe walking and bicycling pathsthat connect to parks (86 percent), recreation areas(72 percent), restaurants (53 percent), grocery stores(48%), and neighborhoods (47 percent). Four criticalconnections revealed from survey questions and freeresponse comments are: (1) American Tobacco Trailto downtown Apex via the Beaver Creek Greenway;(2) Old Raleigh Road Multiuse Sidepath linkingdowntown, town hall, commercials centers, the EvaPerry Regional Library, and community park; (3) ApexBarbecue Road Greenway from Apex Nature Park toSalem Street downtown; (4) Bond Park ConnectorGreenway. These four routes are the first priority forfurther feasibility studies and construction documentdevelopment.PROPOSED MULTI-USE SIDE PATHS AND GREENWAY TRAILS1. Apex Peakway Multi Use Side Path 5.633 10-12 X X2. Apex Barbecue Road Multi UseSide PathLENGTH (MILES)WIDTH (FEET)2.113 10-12 X X3. Reedy Branch Greenway 2.139 10-12 X X4. Beaver Creek South Trail 0.352 6 X X5. Charleston Village Connection 0.034 10-12 X X6. West Middle Creek Greenway 1.714 10-12 X X7. E Williams St Multi Use Side Path 0.866 10-12 X X8. Davis Dr Multi Use Side Path 0.813 10-12 X X9. Evans Rd Multi Use Side Path 0.426 10-12 X X10. Green Level Church Multi UseSide Path1.942 10-12 X X11. Humie Olive Rd Multi Use SidePath0.846 10-12 X X12. Hunter St Multi Use Side Path 0.465 10-12 X XPublicPrivateAsphaltBoardwalkConcreteLENGTH (MILES)WIDTH (FEET)PublicPrivateAsphaltBoardwalkPROPOSED MULTI-USE SIDE PATHS AND GREENWAY TRAILS13. Kelly Rd Multi Use Side Path 1.399 10-12 X X14. Middle Creek Greenway 3.806 10-12 X X15. N Salem St Multi Use Side Path 1.424 10-12 X X16. Old Raleigh Rd Multi Use SidePath1.662 10-12 X X17. Beaver Creek Greenway 0.189 10-12 X X18. Haddon Hall Multi Use Side Path 0.144 10-12 X X19. Laura Duncan Rd Multi Use SidePath1.605 10-12 X X20. Olive Chapel Multi Use Side Path 1.923 10-12 X X21. S Salem Multi Use Side Path 3.134 10-12 X X22. Vision Dr Multi Use Side Path 0.519 10-12 X X23. White Oak Greenway 2.109 10-12 X X24. William StMulti Use Side Path 0.163 10-12 X XConcrete5-13 | Section 5


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013231022245818 193131512162017427114119216Proposed Greenways5-14 | Recommendations


Intersection ImprovementsIn addition to providing a system with logicalconnections from starting points to destinations,intersections, conflict points, and transitions are alsocritical to a successful, safe travelway. Greenwayssometimes intersect roads where there are nocrossing facilities. Safe mid-block crossing treatmentsor signage routing users to the nearest intersection arenecessary. These intersections are also critical points.Safety measures include pedestrian countdownsignals, high visibility crosswalks, curb ramps,pedestrian refuge islands, and parallel connections.Community input suggest fourteen key intersectionsin need of safety analysis and planning.These intersections should be considered prioritiesfor the Town’s improvement plans. A bicycle andpedestrian plan for the Town can further identifyintersections in need of facilities, and prioritize whichfacilities should be implemented immediately andthose that can be constructed at a later date.Key Intersection Improvements• Kelly Road and Beaver Creek Commons Drive• Kelly Road and Olive Chapel Road*• Kelly Road and Beaver Creek Greenway~• Olive Chapel Road and Beaver Creek Greenway• West Williams Street and Haddon Hall Drive^• Salem Street and Williams Street^• North Salem Street and the Apex Peakway• Apex Peakway and Ambergate Station• Laura Duncan Road and the Apex Peakway• Laura Duncan Road and Hunter Street• Hunter Street and the Apex Peakway• Center Street and the Apex Peakway• US 64 and Laura Duncan Road^• US 64 and Olde Raleigh Road*Proposed pedestrian crossing from 2011 Apex Transportation Plan.^Existing pedestrian crossing from 2011 Apex Transportation Plan.This area should be studied to understand why this intersection is stillperceived as unsafe.~Proposed pedestrian bridge from 2011 Apex Transportation Plan.NEXT STEPSTo fulfill the needs of the community and providea system of greenways, multiuse sidepaths, bikefacilities and sidewalks, the Town should:1. Complete feasibility studies and designdevelopment for the top priority greenwaysystem connections:A. American Tobacco Trail to downtown Apex viathe Beaver Creek Greenway;i. Jaycee Park to Downtown (1500 l.f.)ii. Kelly Road Park to Apex Nature Park (1.2miles)iii. Apex Nature Park to the American TobaccoTrail (2.3 miles)B. Connect downtown to Apex Community parkeither byi. Old Raleigh Road Multiuse Sidepathlinking downtown, town hall, commercialscenters, the Eva Perry Regional Library,and community park orii. by making Shepherds Vineyard a publicgreenway;C. Complete the Middle Creek GreenwayConnection from existing neighborhoods alonghighway 55 to the Holly Springs Greenwaynetwork to ensure connectivity under the future540;D. Work in partnership with the Town of Cary tocomplete the White Oak Creek Greenway;E. Apex Barbecue Road Multi-use Path from ApexNature Park to Salem Street downtown;F. Bond Park Connector Greenway.2. Complete separately, or in conjunction, abicycle master plan and pedestrian master planto provide an interconnected system of facilities(including routes, bike lanes, shared use lanes,bicycle parking facilities, sidewalks, intersectiontreatments, and signalization) and prioritizeimplementation. This will augment the existingprioritization in the Transportation Plan.5-15 | Section 5


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Intersection Improvements5-16 | Recommendations


3. Take ownership and assume maintenanceresponsibilities of Shepherd’s VineyardGreenway to provide access for the public use.4. Develop a comprehensive wayfinding systemdesign package.5. Complete a wayfinding system plan.PROGRAMSWhat Residents Are Doing for RecreationThe Town of Apex provides a variety of recreationalprograms. Survey respondents expressed a need toexpand existing programs in general, and to betterreach youth under 12, teens, seniors, and provideoverlapping programs for parents with children.Several survey respondents requested programs thatare currently offered by the town. However, times,days, or locations may not be accessible for thedesired user group. Additionally, outreach methodsor marketing may not be reaching the desired user.The town should create a use matrix for programs todetermine if an overlap may occur for adult programsand youth programs, or seek to offer a childcareprogram that allows for increased adult participation.There are in demand programs at the communitycenter; due to space limitations, the town shouldlook for partnerships to meet demand or look foradditional indoor program space.Residents expressed strong interest and support forspecial events such as outdoor movie night, runningevents, festivals, concerts, and family oriented specialevent programs. The town should expand theseprograms to supplement the existing special eventofferings, specifically creating activities that are familyoriented.Staff should evaluate participation numbers, waitlists, and receive input on instructors on a seasonalbasis in order to make appropriate adjustments inwhat is offered, who is teaching, and when and whereprograms are provided.Focus group members expressed a desire for asenior center. This may allow for relocation of thesenior exercise classes which result in more use ofthe Community Center facilities for other in demandprograms. This would also provide a central locationfor seniors with potential partnerships for futuretransportation.The greenway looping around Hunter Street Park is perfect for everyday recreation and group walks.5-17 | Section 5


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013The Town completed a study of the use of theTunstell House; while this report does not makerecommendations for a separate senior facility,there is a need for additional indoor program space.Consideration of this report and these findings shouldbe evaluated when moving forward with creation ofadditional indoor space.NEXT STEPS1. Create a strategic marketing plan to ensureresidents are aware of programs, wherethey are offered, and that they can makerecommendations on future offerings.a. Website Improvements - need to navigateofferings by facility/program/age2. Expand Special Events and Program offerings.3. Provide programs for the “gap ages”: Youth toage 12, and teens (based on existing age chartfor program offerings and survey results)4. Provide adult programs (18-54) with familyoriented support; adult/child programs at sametime and place, or childcare program expansionat the same time as adult programs.a. Schedulingb. Access5. Provide Health and Wellness related programsand classes.6. Provide a broader range of program offerings,such as cooking, arts and crafts, and fitness andwellness programs.7. Examine ways to support public art programs inthe community through partnerships.8. Provide additional programs and resources forseniors.9. Address need for additional special populationsprogram integration.SPECIAL POPULATIONSResidents have expressed a need for specialpopulations program offerings and/or expandedresources for special populations within the town.Since the Town does not provide special populationprograms separate from other programs, a focusgroup was formed to start evaluation of this needand how to respond to it. It appears the majorityof respondents stated they currently go to otherlocations for programs and/or recreational services.According to a study completed by ManagementLearning Laboratories for the Town of Cary, theCity of Raleigh is the nearest municipality with acomprehensive program for special populations,employing a coordinator who specifically organizesprograms. According to the study, the adjacent Townof Holly Springs also offers a program called BuddySports. The program offers various sports sessions inpartnership with the local high school. Teens assist atthe program as “buddies” and assist participants withskill instruction. Since Cary commissioned this study,it can be assumed that they are exploring ways toprovide recreational services for special populations.Creating partnerships with Cary may be possible toprovide these services to Apex residents.Special Population RecommendationsThe Town of Apex currently provides recreationalprograms for special populations by request and/or inclusion in existing programs. The town shouldconsider a separate study to determine actual needfor programs and/or staffing for programs. Thefollowing recommendations are a way for the Town tostart improving access for special populations.NEXT STEPS1. If the town needs to hire additional Parks,Recreation, and Cultural Resources programstaff, it is recommended hiring an individualwith therapeutic recreation training and/or5-18 | Recommendations


experience--not to serve solely as a specialpopulations coordinator, but to provide theexpertise necessary to create and/or expandinclusive programs.2. Develop a list of resources and links for residentsto have an understanding of nearby programs,facilities, and services for special populations.Place the associated links on the town Parks andRecreation Page as a “resources link.”a. Transportation offerings (bus, ride shares,carpools, and shuttle services)b. Senior resourcesc. Special Population Programs and Resourcesd. Teen programse. Accessible facilities3. Look at partnership opportunities with othertowns, such as Holly Springs and the Town ofCary and other municipalities and programs foroutreach.4. Appoint a Parks and Recreation AdvisoryCommission member to serve as a liaison/Commission member for special populations,programs, and facilities.5. Consider creating a town access boardcomprised of individuals with a vested interestin identifying town resources for improvedinclusion, access, and communication ofresources.6. Consider a separate study to assist inaccomplishing the above steps for recreationalinclusion in the town.LAND ACQUISITIONHow to Plan For Future Recreational NeedsLand for recreation and open space can be acquireda variety of ways. In general, land can be donated,purchased, acquired through easement, acquiredthrough granting agencies, and dedicated throughpolicy. The Town has several methods for landdedication and protection, which are further outlinedin the policy section of this report. Some of thesemethods are Overlay Districts, Article 6 sections6.1 and 6.2; Recreation land dedication section 7.3Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Sites; and throughgeneral development standards, Section 8.1 ResourceConservation Areas (RCA’s), all found in the TownsUnified Development Ordinance (UDO). Additionalinformation for land acquisition strategies and localresource partnerships and programs can be found ona comprehensive resource links page with the WakeCounty Open Space Program: http://www.wakegov.com/parks/openspace/Pages/Resources.aspxTo ensure the Town can meet recreational needs andprotect its natural and cultural resources, acquisitionstrategies should reflect the values of conservationand preservation. Town residents have expressedtrails and greenways remain the highest priority forrecreation facilities. Acquisition strategies outlinedabove should reflect resident priorities as follows:1. Acquire land to meet Greenway Connectivityrecommendations2. Seek opportunities for Expanded IndoorRecreational Space for teens and seniorsthrough expansion, re-use, or new development3. Looks for opportunities for passive & unprogrammedopen space4. Acquire land and park space in underservedareas on service area map to provide a SportsComplex (60-100 AC)5. Continue to acquire and protect significantCultural Resource Properties6. Continued protection of Natural AreasLand that is acquired for the underserved areasshould balance active and passive recreationalofferings. Residents have expressed interest in a widevariety of recreational features, and while passive5-19 | Section 5


11Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 201315c5d111132Land AcquisitionPriorities:1. Acquire land and/oreasements to meetrecommendations forgreenway connectivity2. Seek space forcommunity gatheringdowntown3. Seek opportunitiesto expand indoorrecreational space forteens and seniors4. Explore opportunitiesfor passive & unprogrammedopenspace5. Acquire land and parkspace in underservedareas5a5b15-20 | Recommendations


Acquiring additional land will allow the Town to provide more open, unprogrammed space, like the field at Salem Pond Park.unprogrammed open space is in demand now,the Town will need to plan for growth and futurepopulations by maintaining a quality level of servicefor more traditional facilities such as soccer, tennis,baseball, and basketball.POLICY REVIEWThe Town of Apex is challenged with meeting therecreational needs of its population as it continues togrow. Current policy requires subdivided land providefor future residents by contributing to the parks,recreation, greenways, open space, and culturalresource needs of this community.The Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) outlinesland dedication, or fee in lieu, when a residentialdevelopment is submitted for approval. The policyis written to meet the recreational needs of thepopulation caused by an increase in residentialinventory.As recommend in 2001, it should remain a priorityto amend and strengthen language in section 7.3 ofthe UDO to support greenway dedications to meetresident needs. Greenways are the highest priority fortown residents and as such a more detailed outlineof how this dedication can be quantified should beincluded in section 7.3 Park, Recreation, and OpenSpace Sites.Additionally, consideration should be given to a“greenway overlay district” to include non-residentialland dedication where a greenway is proposed. This isan integral part of a town wide transportation networkand may require additional means for dedication toprovide desired connections. Continued efforts towork with state, regional, and local agencies shouldbe maintained so connections that are not only madein town, but to and from the Town, are considered aspart of a town-wide transportation plan and vision.5-21 | Section 5


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Greenway connections between key destinations likeresidential communities, business parks, commercialcenters, and public facilities are essential to meetingthese transportation needs. These destinations andlocations were highlighted by residents in the needsassessment as key locations for pedestrian and bicycleconnectivity. The town should evaluate commercialsite design requirements to include comprehensivetrail connections and support facilities.5-22 | Recommendations


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Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Section SixAction StepsPRIORITIZATIONPublic input and assessment of existing facilities led tothe development of action items. This section offersguidance on priorities, timelines and funding.This plan recognizes that development patterns,resident interests, and funding options may changeover time. Town staff should move forward with therecommendations detailed in section 5, while adjustingpriorities when appropriate to reflect the community’sevolving needs and interests.The following Measurements of Success were establishedto help better understand what action plan elementsmay be needed for implementing goals:• Provide recreational opportunities that suit residentneeds within a service area as defined by distance.• Create a park system that residents can access bywalking, biking, and driving.• Provide recreational opportunities that promote an“active” lifestyle to maintain a high quality of life inApex.• Provide opportunities for Apex residents to enjoynatural, historical, and cultural resources, and protectthese resources for future generations.• Ensure residents are satisfied with the types offacilities available, as well as their condition andmaintenance.Recommendations are segmented into four main actionitem categories:1. Facilities: Where Apex residents participate inrecreation2. Programs: What residents are doing for recreation3. Greenways: How to Connect residents4. Land Acquisition: How to Plan for Future recreationalneedsThe plan recommends clustering action items intothe following timeframe to help set a course forimplementation.• Immediate Needs (0-2 years): Elements residentsfeel are needed to meet current demand• Near Term Needs (3-5 years): Elements the townshould address through planning, funding allocation,grant sources, and/or land acquisition• Long Term Needs (5-7 years): Items that are prioritiesas the town develops and the population increases.6-2 | Action Steps


PROVIDING A HIGH QUALITY OF LIFEHigh quality parks, recreation facilities, and programshelp make Apex an attractive place to live and providea sense of pride and community identity. Park facilitiesserve as the “first impression” for a community. Theserecommendations will contribute to the quality of lifefor residents and users of Apex parks, recreational,and cultural resources.FACILITIESWhile residents are currently satisfied with the levelof service provided by many of the town’s recreationalofferings, the survey indicated additional facilities arealso desired to fulfill the interests of the community.IMMEDIATE NEEDS (0-2 YEARS)• Acquire or re-use existing space for downtownfestivals, concerts, and markets:• Re-use the train depot, if it becomesavailable, to serve as a downtown urbanpark, market, and street festival space.• Improve use of the Town Complex byencouraging partnerships between thecommercial district, downtown vendors,and programmers of concerts and events.• Acquire additional indoor space for senior, teenand fitness programming. This can be donethrough:• Expanding the community center; or• Re-using an existing building(s); or• Developing new facilities.• Provide additional unprogrammed open spaceand multi-use fields. While the nature park willhelp fulfill some of this need, the town shouldmake improvements to existing parks whereopportunity exists to allow for greater accessto passive space, as well as include passive andunprogrammed space in future park development.• Incorporate walking and/or multi-use paths withinexisting parks and/or town facilities, such as theApex Community Center and Town Hall Complex,and link pedestrian systems where possible.• Expand recreational opportunities for teens byplanning for specialty facilities such as skate parksor plazas, climbing structures, zip-lines, and ropescourses.• Use PRORAGIS (Park and Recreation OperatingRatio & Geographic Information System), anational database that allows park and recreationagencies to benchmark with others, developprograms, and enhance overall communityoperations. The town should begin by completingthe “lite” or “quick start” data collection versionto receive access to the database.• Acquire land for a sports complex (60-200 acres)in an underserved area as indicated on page 1-10.NEAR TERM NEEDS (3-5 YEARS)• Seek additional space for more health, wellnessand fitness related classes.• Provide unprogrammed open space and/or multiusefields.• Provide additional playgrounds, either in existingparks or as parks are developed.• Look for additional locations within existing parksto include volleyball and basketball courts.6-3 | Section 6


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013LONG TERM NEEDS (5-7 YEARS)• Develop a sports complex (60-100 acres) that cannot only meet active recreation needs, but alsoserve as an economic tournament venue for thetown. Elements may include:• 4-5 baseball/softball pinwheel• 2 basketball courts• 1 batting cage• 3 tennis courts• 1-2 volleyball courts• 3-4 multi-purpose fields• Incorporate additional dog park(s) in future parks,as needed.• Incorporate picnic shelters in future parks andmake park improvements for rental use.• Implement plan for additional indoor space viare-use, expansion, or new construction, including:• Gymnasium space• Multi-purpose space (3 rooms, minimum)• Rooms for senior programsAmphitheaterAuditoriumBaseballBasketballBatting CagesDisc GolfDog ParkGymnasiumMulti-Purpose FieldMulti-Purpose RoomPicnic ShelterPlaygroundSoccerSoftballTennis (Full Court)VollyballLONG TERMNEEDSTotal Existing Facilities 1 1 5 5 3 1 2 2 3 9 10 9 4 1 6 3Service Population =40,000Anticipated 2023Population = 55,340Future facilties to beadded (2023)40000 40000 8000 8000 13333 40000 20000 20000 13333 4444 4000 4444 10000 40000 6667 133331 1 7 7 4 1 3 3 4 12 14 12 6 1 8 42 2 1 1 1 2 3 4 3 2 2 1Red denotes facilities that are not currently meeting demand. Additions are indicated to meet existing demand and plan for future growth.6-4 | Action Steps


PROGRAMSRecreational preferences should guide thedevelopment of programs, cultural resources, andfacilities. Apex is a very active community and residentswould like to see expanded program offerings tosupport their interests. After each programmingperiod, an assessment should be conducted to gaugeinterest and inform adjustments. Evaluation mayinclude: class schedules, number of participants,frequency of class cancellations, feedback regardinginstructors, and general suggestions for improvement.This will maintain an open dialogue between residentsand the Department, ensuring flexibility and satisfyingdemand.Based upon current interests and program needs, theTown should do the following to expand and improveprograms:IMMEDIATE NEEDS (0-2 YEARS)• Create a strategic marketing plan to ensureresidents are aware of program variety andlocations, and have an opportunity to makerecommendations on future offerings.• Improve the website so that it is easy to findprograms by topic, facility type, and location.• Expand special events programming, such asconcerts, movies, and family friendly activities.• Examine partnership opportunities to celebratethe Town of Apex and its residents, such asinstalling work by artists in community spaces.• Provide programs for underserved age groups:• Youth and teens;• Seniors;• Adults (18-54) who may need familyoriented support, such as childcareor activities parents and children canparticipate in simultaneously.• Hire or assign a staff person to serve as a Parksand Recreation planner for Apex. This personwill help oversee park, greenway, and openspace elements, serving as a liaison betweenBasketball courts are great for programs as well as pick-up games.6-5 | Section 6


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013departments to ensure coordination occurs forfuture parks, recreation, and connectivity efforts.• Develop a list of website resources and links forresidents, including nearby programs, facilities,and services for special populations. Links mayinclude:• Transportation offerings (bus, ride shares,carpools, and shuttle services);• Senior resources;• Programs and resources for specialpopulations;• Teen programs;• Accessible facilities.NEAR TERM NEEDS (3-5 YEARS)• As more indoor space becomes available, planfor additional classes in areas such as health andwellness, fitness, cooking, gardening, and artsand crafts.• Hire a senior staff member who is qualifiedin Therapeutic Recreation to help shapeprogramming and resources for seniors andspecial populations.• Expand program offerings for underserved agegroups listed above as space becomes available.LONG TERM NEEDS (5-7 YEARS)Provide additional programs (type and/or frequency)as space and staff become available. Programs listedby residents were:• Yoga, cooking, martial arts, gardening/community gardens, dancing (several varietieslisted), ropes course/team building, babysitting,CPR, First Aid, bridge and other card games,Zumba, and Pilates.CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITYGREENWAYSGreenways are the highest priority for Apexresidents. They desire easy access to greenways fromtheir homes, and want to be able to travel to parks,commercial centers, work, and schools on a system ofwell connected paths and bicycle facilities. Connectingto commercial districts and parks rated highly in thesurvey. Linking residents to all of these key areas canhave a positive impact on the health and wellness ofresidents, especially children. As such, the followingrecommendations are made to improve communityconnectivity:IMMEDIATE NEEDS (0-2 YEARS)• Take steps for the feasibility study, acquisition,design, and construction of:• American Tobacco Trail (ATT) connections,including:• Jaycee Park to Downtown (1,500 LF);• Kelly Road Park to Apex Nature Park(1.2 miles);• Apex Nature Park to AmericanTobacco Trail (2.3 miles).• Middle Creek Greenway connection toensure safe crossing at the future 540.• White Oak Creek Greenway through Apexand to the ATT, working in collaboration withthe Town of Cary.• Complete separately, or in conjunction, a bicyclemaster plan and pedestrian master plan toprovide an interconnected system of facilities(including routes, bike lanes, shared use lanes,bicycle parking facilities, sidewalks, intersectiontreatments, and signalization) and prioritize6-6 | Action Steps


implementation. This will augment the existingprioritization in the Transportation Plan.• Create a user-friendly greenway map accessibleonline, in an application, and/or via hard copy.• Create a Master Wayfinding and Signage Plan(include design, typology, and placementstandards). Install signage on existing greenways.• Provide safe crossings by completing intersectionimprovements as indicated in Greenway sectionof this report.NEAR TERM NEEDS (3-5 YEARS)• Plan, design and develop the Apex Barbecue RoadGreenway from Apex Nature Park to Salem Streetdowntown.• Complete a destination-based greenway system,providing connections between downtown,commercial centers, parks, the library, TownComplex and schools (a connection from theTown Complex to the Eva Perry Regional Library isa top priority in the Near Term).• Explore converting the Shepherds VineyardGreenway from private to public.• Install wayfinding signage on new greenwayfacilities.• Complete intersection improvements (inGreenway section of this report) for routes asthey are developed.LONG TERM NEEDS (5-7 YEARS)• Continue to develop identified greenways,completing critical connections betweenresidential areas, commercial centers, parks, andother facilities.Playgrounds were listed as one of the priorities for residents. Spaces for rest and shade are important components of playgrounds.6-7 | Section 6


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013• Fully implement greenway wayfinding system andmap guide to show residents access points, traillengths, and location of and distance to points ofinterest.• Continue efforts to expand the greenway system,including planning, designing, and developing theBond Park Connector Greenway, and Greenwaysin SE and NW Apex, including Reedy BranchGreenway, and Green Level Church Multiuse Path.• Complete intersection improvements asgreenways are developed.• Seek opportunities to bridge gaps in the pedestriannetwork to improve connectivity.PLANNING FOR OUR FUTURELAND ACQUISITIONLand acquisition is strongly linked to facilities,greenways, and programs. In order to maintain a highquality of life in Apex, more land should be acquiredto ensure improved connectivity, open spaces for playand celebration, and future active recreation facilities.Land should also be sought for underserved areas toaccommodate new facilities. Improving greenwayconnectivity will require the addition of corridors,while increasing program options will necessitatemore space in general.IMMEDIATE NEEDS (0-2 YEARS)• Acquire land for the Beaver Creek Greenway.Easements are already in place for Jaycee Park todowntown and Kelly Road Park to the future ApexNature Park. Easements are needed to connectthe Apex Nature Park to the American TobaccoTrail.• Acquire easements for the White Oak Creek andMiddle Creek Greenways.• Allocate land for downtown space through:• Re-using existing space, such as partneringwith downtown shops, stores, andrestaurants for concerts; or• Re-using the Depot if it becomes available;or• Acquiring additional land• Acquire indoor space for seniors and teens by:• Expanding the Community Center; or• Re-using an existing building(s); or• Developing new facilities• Acquire land for a sports complex (60-200 acres)in an underserved area as indicated on page 1-10.NEAR TERM NEEDS (3-5 YEARS)• Acquire land or easements for the Apex BarbecueRoad multi-use path.LONG TERM NEEDS (5-7 YEARS)• Acquire land and/or easements for greenwaytrails.• Acquire land for an area or community sized parkin one of the underserved sections identified onpage 1-10.FUNDING SOURCESFEDERAL FUNDING SOURCESFederal funding is typically directed through stateagencies to local governments, either in the form ofgrants or direct appropriations, independent fromstate budgets, where shortfalls may make it difficult toaccurately forecast available funding for future projectdevelopment. Federal funding typically requires a local6-8 | Action Steps


match of approximately 20%, but there are sometimesexceptions, such as the recent American Recoveryand Reinvestment Act stimulus funds, which did notrequire a match. Since these funding categories aredifficult to forecast, it is recommended that the localjurisdiction work with its MPO, in the case of Apex,the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization(CAMPO), on getting pedestrian projects listed in theState Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), asdiscussed below.The following is a list of possible federal fundingsources that could be used to support construction ofmany bicycle and pedestrian improvements. Most ofthese are competitive, and involve the completion ofextensive applications with clear documentation of theproject need, costs, and benefits. However, it shouldbe noted that the FHWA encourages the constructionof pedestrian facilities as an incidental element oflarger, ongoing projects. Examples include providingpaved shoulders on new and reconstructed roads, orbuilding sidewalks, trails and marked crosswalks aspart of new highways.Moving Ahead for Progress in theTwenty-First Century (MAP-21)The largest source of federal funding for bicycleand pedestrian projects is the US DOT’s Federal-AidHighway Program, which Congress has reauthorizedroughly every six years since the passage of theFederal-Aid Road Act of 1916. The latest act, MovingAhead for Progress in the Twenty-First Century (MAP-21) was enacted in July 2012 as Public Law 112-141.It replaces the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, EfficientTransportation Equity Act – a Legacy for Users(SAFETEA-LU), which was valid from August 2005 -June 2012.MAP-21 authorizes funding for federal surfacetransportation programs, including highways andtransit for the 27 month period between July, 2012and September, 2014. It is not possible to guaranteethe continued availability of any listed MAP-21programs, or to predict their future funding levelsor policy guidance. Nevertheless, many of theseprograms have been included in some form since thepassage of the Intermodal Surface TransportationEfficiency Act (ISTEA) in 1991, and thus may continueto provide capital for active transportation projectsand programs.In North Carolina, federal monies are administeredthrough the North Carolina Department ofTransportation (NCDOT) and Metropolitan PlanningOrganizations (MPOs). Most, but not all, of theseprograms are oriented toward transportation versusrecreation needs, with an emphasis on reducing autotrips and providing inter-modal connections. Federalfunding is intended for capital improvements andsafety and education programs, and projects mustrelate to the surface transportation system.There are a number of programs identified withinMAP-21 that are applicable to bicycle and pedestrianprojects. These programs are discussed below.More information: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/map21/summaryinfo.cfmTransportation AlternativesTransportation Alternatives (TA) is a new fundingsource under MAP-21 that consolidates three formerlyseparate programs under SAFETEA-LU: TransportationEnhancements (TE), Safe Routes to School (SR2S), andthe Recreational Trails Program (RTP). These fundsmay be used for a variety of pedestrian, bicycle, andstreetscape projects, including sidewalks, bikeways,multi-use paths, and rail-trails. TA funds may alsobe used for selected education and encouragementprogramming, such as Safe Routes to School, despitethe fact that TA does not provide a guaranteed setasidefor this activity as SAFETEA-LU did. Unless6-9 | Section 6


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013the governor of a given state chooses to opt out ofRecreational Trails Program funds, dedicated funds forrecreational trails continue to be provided as a subsetof TA. MAP-21 provides $85 million nationally for theRTP.Complete eligibilities for TA include:1. Transportation Enhancements as defined bySection 1103 (a)(29). This category includesthe construction, planning, and design of arange of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure,including “on-road and off-road trail facilities forpedestrians, bicyclists, and other non-motorizedforms of transportation, including sidewalks,bicycle infrastructure, pedestrian and bicyclesignals, traffic calming techniques, lightingand other safety-related infrastructure, andtransportation projects to achieve compliancewith the Americans with Disabilities Act of1990.” Infrastructure projects and systems thatprovide “Safe Routes for Non-Drivers” is a neweligible activity. For the complete list of eligibleactivities, visit:http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/transportation_enhancements/legislation/map21.cfm2. Recreational Trails. TA funds may be used todevelop and maintain recreational trails andtrail-related facilities for both non-motorizedand motorized recreational trail uses. Examplesinclude hiking, bicycling, in-line skating,equestrian use, and other non-motorized andmotorized uses. These funds are available forboth paved and unpaved trails, but may not beused to improve roads for general passengervehicle use or to provide shoulders or sidewalksalong roads.Recreational Trails Program funds may be usedfor:• Maintenance and restoration of existingtrails• Purchase and leasing of trail constructionand maintenance equipment• Construction of new trails, includingunpaved trails• Acquisition of easements of property fortrails• State administrative costs related to thisprogram (limited to seven percent of astate’s funds)• Operation of educational programsto promote safety and environmentalprotection related to trails (limited to fivepercent of a state’s funds)NC’s dedicated annual RTC funds for 2012 total$1,506,344. See this link for funding levels insubsequent years: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/MAP21/funding.cfm.3. Safe Routes to School. The purpose of SafeRoutes to Schools is to promote safe, healthyalternatives to riding the bus or being driven toschool. All projects must be within two miles ofprimary or middle schools (K-8).Eligible projects may include:• Engineering Improvements. Thesephysical improvements are designed toreduce potential bicycle and pedestrianconflicts with motor vehicles. Physicalimprovements may also reduce motorvehicle traffic volumes around schools,establish safer and more accessiblecrossings, or construct walkways, trails orbikeways. Eligible projects include sidewalkimprovements, traffic calming/speedreduction, pedestrian and bicycle crossingimprovements, on-street bicycle facilities,6-10 | Action Steps


off-street bicycle and pedestrian facilities,and secure bicycle parking facilities.• Education and Encouragement Efforts.These programs are designed to teachchildren safe bicycling and walking skillswhile educating them about healthbenefits and environmental impacts.Projects and programs may includecreation, distribution and implementationof educational materials; safety based fieldtrips; interactive bicycle/pedestrian safetyvideo games; and promotional events andactivities (e.g., assemblies, bicycle rodeos,walking school buses).• Enforcement Efforts. These programs aimto ensure that traffic laws near schools areobeyed. Law enforcement activities applyto cyclists, pedestrians and motor vehiclesalike. Projects may include developmentof a crossing guard program, enforcementequipment, photo enforcement, andpedestrian sting operations.4. Planning, designing, or constructing roadwayswithin the right-of-way of former Interstateroutes or divided highways. At the time ofwriting, detailed guidance from the FederalHighway Administration on this new eligibleactivity was not available.Average annual funds available through TA overthe life of MAP-21 equal $814 million nationally,which is based on a 2% set-aside of total MAP-21 allocations. Current projected obligations forNC are available at this website: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/MAP21/funding.cfm. Note thatstate DOT’s may elect to transfer up to 50% ofTA funds to other highway programs, so theamount listed on the website represents themaximum potential funding.Remaining TA funds (those monies not redirectedto other highway programs) aredisbursed through a separate, competitivegrant program administered by NCDOT.Local governments, school districts, tribalgovernments, and public lands agencies arepermitted to compete for these funds.Surface Transportation ProgramThe Surface Transportation Program (STP) providesstates with flexible funds which may be used for avariety of highway, road, bridge, and transit projects. Awide variety of bicycle and pedestrian improvementsare eligible, including on-street bicycle facilities,off-street trails, sidewalks, crosswalks, bicycle andpedestrian signals, parking, and other ancillaryfacilities. Modification of sidewalks to comply withthe Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is also aneligible activity. Unlike most highway projects, STPfundedbicycle and pedestrian facilities may be locatedon local and collector roads which are not part of theFederal-aid Highway System. 50% of each state’s STPfunds are suballocated geographically by population;the remaining 50% may be spent in any area of thestate.Highway Safety Improvement ProgramMAP-21 doubles the amount of funding availablethrough the Highway Safety Improvement Program(HSIP) relative to SAFETEA-LU. HSIP provides $2.4billion nationally for projects and programs thathelp communities achieve significant reductionsin traffic fatalities and serious injuries on all publicroads, bikeways, and walkways. MAP-21 preservesthe Railway-Highway Crossings Program within HSIPbut discontinues the High-Risk Rural roads set-asideunless safety statistics demonstrate that fatalitiesare increasing on these roads. Bicycle and pedestriansafety improvements, enforcement activities, traffic6-11 | Section 6


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013Apex residents indicated they would like more passive spaces, like the pier shown here at Seagroves Park.calming projects, and crossing treatments for nonmotorizedusers in school zones are eligible for thesefunds.Transportation for Elderly Persons andPersons with DisabilitiesThis program can be used for capital expenses thatsupport transportation to meet the special needs ofolder adults and persons with disabilities, includingproviding access to an eligible public transportationfacility. More information: http://www.fta.dot.gov/funding/grants/grants_financing_3556.htmlLand and Water Conservation FundThe Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF)provides grants for planning and acquiring outdoorrecreation areas and facilities, including trails.Funds can be used for right-of-way acquisition andconstruction. The program is administered by theDepartment of Environment and Natural Resourcesas a grant program for states and local governments.Maximum annual grant awards for countygovernments, incorporated municipalities, publicauthorities, and federally recognized Indian tribes are$250,000. The local match may be provided with inkindservices or cash. More information: http://www.ncparks.gov/About/grants/lwcf_main.phpRivers, Trails, and ConservationAssistance ProgramThe Rivers, Trails, and Conservation AssistanceProgram (RTCA) is a National Parks Service (NPS)program providing technical assistance via direct NPSstaff involvement to establish and restore greenways,rivers, trails, watersheds and open space. The RTCAprogram provides only for planning assistance—thereare no implementation funds available. Projects areprioritized for assistance based on criteria includingconserving significant community resources, fosteringcooperation between agencies, serving a largenumber of users, encouraging public involvement6-12 | Action Steps


in planning and implementation, and focusing onlasting accomplishments. This program may benefittrail development in North Carolina locales indirectlythrough technical assistance, particularly forcommunity organizations, but is not a capital fundingsource. More information: http://www.nps.gov/ncrc/programs/rtca/ or contact the Southeast Region RTCAProgram Manager Deirdre “Dee” Hewitt at (404) 507-5691.STATE FUNDING SOURCESThe North Carolina Department of Administrationoffers a North Carolina Funding Resource guide thatoutlines opportunities and sources available forimproved education and health for children: http://www.doa.state.nc.us/yaio/documents/publications/FGR.pdfNorth Carolina Department ofTransportation (NCDOT) StateTransportation Improvement ProgramNCDOT’s Policy to Projects process uses data regardingpavement condition, traffic congestion and road safety,as well as input from local governments and NCDOTstaff, to determine transportation priorities. Thisapproach ranks projects for all modes of transportationin priority order, based on the department’s goalsand also determines which projects are included inthe department’s State Transportation ImprovementProgram (STIP), a federally mandated transportationplanning document that details transportationimprovements prioritized by stakeholders for inclusionin the Work Program over the next seven years. TheSTIP is updated every two years.The STIP contains funding information for varioustransportation divisions of NCDOT, including: highways,aviation, enhancements, public transportation, rail,bicycle and pedestrians, and the Governor’s HighwaySafety Program. Access to many federal funds requirethat projects be incorporated into the STIP. STIP is thelargest single source of funding within SAFETEA-LUand NCDOT.To access the STIP: http://www.ncdot.org/planning/development/TIP/TIP/. For more about the STIPprocess: http://www.ncdot.org/performance/reform/Spot Improvement ProgramThe Division of Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation(DPBT) budgets $500,000 per year for “spot” safetyimprovements throughout North Carolina. Eligibleimprovements include drain grate replacement,bicycle loop detectors, pedestrian signals and othersmall-scale improvements. These funds are used forsmall-scale projects not substantial enough to beincluded in the STIP. Proposals should be submitteddirectly to the Division of Bicycle and PedestrianTransportation.Bicycle and Pedestrian Planning GrantInitiativeThe Bicycle and Pedestrian Planning Grant Initiativeis a matching grant program administered throughNCDOT that encourages municipalities to developcomprehensive bicycle plans and pedestrian plans.The Division of Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation(DPBT) and the Transportation Planning Branch (TPB)sponsor this grant. All North Carolina municipalitiesare eligible and are encouraged to apply. Fundingallocations are determined on a sliding scale based onpopulation. Municipalities who currently have bicycleplans or pedestrian plans, either through this grantprogram or otherwise, may also apply to update theirplan provided it is at least five years old.More information: http://www.ncdot.gov/bikeped/planning/6-13 | Section 6


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013North Carolina Department ofEnvironment and Natural ResourcesThe North Carolina Department of Environment andNatural Resources Division of Coastal Managementoffers the Public Beach and Coastal Waterfront AccessFunds program, awarding $500,000 to $1 milliona year in matching grants to local governments forprojects to improve pedestrian access to the state’sbeaches and waterways. Eligible applicants includethe 20 coastal counties and municipalities therein thathave public trust waters within their jurisdictions.More information: http://www.nccoastalmanagement.net/Access/about.htmlThe North Carolina Division of Parksand RecreationThe North Carolina Division of Parks and Recreationand the State Trails Program offer funds to helpcitizens, organizations and agencies plan, develop andmanage all types of trails ranging from greenways andtrails for hiking, biking and horseback riding, to rivertrails and off-highway vehicle trails.More information: http://www.ncparks.gov/About/grants/main.phpThe North Carolina Parks andRecreation Trust Fund (PARTF)The Parks and Recreation Trust Fund (PARTF) providesdollar-for-dollar matching grants to counties,incorporated municipalities and public authorities,as defined by G.S. 159-7. Through this program,several million dollars each year are available to localgovernments to fund the acquisition, developmentand renovation of recreational areas. A localgovernment can request a maximum of $500,000with each application. An applicant must match thegrant dollar-for-dollar, 50% of the total cost of theproject, and may contribute more than 50%. Theappraised value of land to be donated to the applicantcan be used as part of the match. The value of in- kindservices, such as volunteer work, cannot be used aspart of the match.More information: http://www.ncparks.gov/About/grants/partf_main.phpRecreational Trails ProgramThe Recreational Trails Program (RTP) of the federaltransportation bill provides funding to states todevelop and maintain recreational trails and trailrelatedfacilities for both nonmotorized and motorizedrecreational trail uses. Examples of trail uses includehiking, bicycling, in-line skating, and equestrian use.These funds are available for both paved and unpavedtrails, but may not be used to improve roads forgeneral passenger vehicle use or to provide shouldersor sidewalks along roads. Recreational Trails Programfunds may be used for:• Maintenance and restoration of existing trails• Purchase and lease of trail construction andmaintenance equipment• Construction of new trails, including unpavedtrails• Acquisition or easements of property for trails• State administrative costs related to this program(limited to seven percent of a state’s RTP dollars)• Operation of educational programs to promotesafety and environmental protection relatedto trails (limited to five percent of a state’s RTPdollars)In North Carolina, the Recreational Trails Program isadministered by the North Carolina Division of Parksand Recreation. This grant is specifically designed topay for recreational trail projects rather than utilitariantransportation-based projects. Grants are for up to$75,000 per project, and applicants must be able tocontribute 20% of the project costs with cash or in-6-14 | Action Steps


kind contributions. Projects must be consistent withthe Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor RecreationPlan (SCORP).More information: http://www.ncparks.gov/About/trails_grants.phpAdopt-A-Trail ProgramThe Adopt-A-Trail (AAT) Program is a source of smallfunds for trail construction, maintenance, and landacquisition. The program funds $108,000 annually inNorth Carolina, and awards grants up to $5,000 perproject with no local match required. Applications aredue in February. More information is available fromRegional Trails Specialists and the Grants Manager.More information: http://www.ncparks.gov/About/grants/docs/AAT_info.pdfLOCAL GOVERNMENT FUNDINGSOURCESMunicipalities often plan for the funding of pedestrianfacilities or improvements through development ofCapital Improvement Programs (CIP). In Raleigh, forexample, the greenways system has been developedover many years through a dedicated source of annualfunding that has ranged from $100,000 to $500,000,administered through the Recreation and ParksDepartment. CIPs should include all types of capitalimprovements (water, sewer, buildings, streets, etc.)versus programs for single purposes. This allowsmunicipal decision-makers to balance all capitalneeds. Typical capital funding mechanisms includethe following: capital reserve fund, capital protectionordinances, municipal service district, tax incrementfinancing, taxes, fees, and bonds. Each category isTennis is a top activity enjoyed by residents. As the population grows, the demand for courts will likely increase.6-15 | Section 6


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013described below. A variety of possible fundingoptions available to North Carolina jurisdictions forimplementing pedestrian projects are describedbelow. However, many will require specific local actionas a means of establishing a program, if not already inplace.Capital Reserve FundMunicipalities have statutory authority to createcapital reserve funds for any capital purpose,including pedestrian facilities. The reserve fund mustbe created through ordinance or resolution that statesthe purpose of the fund, the duration of the fund, theapproximate amount of the fund, and the source ofrevenue for the fund. Sources of revenue can includegeneral fund allocations, fund balance allocations,grants and donations for the specified use.Capital Project OrdinancesMunicipalities can pass Capital Project Ordinancesthat are project specific. The ordinance identifies andmakes appropriations for the project.Local Improvement Districts (LIDs)Local Improvement Districts (LIDs) are most oftenused by cities to construct localized projects suchas streets, sidewalks or bikeways. Through the LIDprocess, the costs of local improvements are generallyspread out among a group of property owners withina specified area. The cost can be allocated based onproperty frontage or other methods such as traffic tripgeneration.Municipal Service DistrictMunicipalities have statutory authority to establishmunicipal service districts, to levy a property tax inthe district additional to the citywide property tax;proceeds provide services in the district. Downtownrevitalization projects are one of the eligible usesof service districts, and can include projects such asstreet, sidewalk, or bikeway improvements within thetaxing district.Tax Increment FinancingProject Development Financing bonds, also known asTax Increment Financing (TIF), is a relatively new toolin North Carolina. It allows localities to use future gainsin taxes to finance the current improvements thatwill create those gains. When a public project (e.g.,sidewalk improvements) is constructed, surroundingproperty values generally increase and encouragesurrounding development or redevelopment. Theincreased tax revenues are then dedicated to financethe debt created by the original public improvementproject. Streets, streetscapes, and sidewalkimprovements are specifically authorized for TIFfunding in North Carolina. Tax Increment Financingtypically occurs within designated developmentfinancing districts that meet certain economic criteriathat are approved by a local governing body. TIF fundsare generally spent inside the boundaries of the TIFdistrict, but they can also be spent outside the districtif necessary to encourage development within it.Installment Purchase FinancingAs an alternative to debt financing of capitalimprovements, communities can execute installmentor lease purchase contracts for improvements. Thistype of financing is typically used for relatively smallprojects that the seller or a financial institutionis willing to finance or when up-front funds areunavailable. In a lease purchase contract, thecommunity leases the property or improvement fromthe seller or financial institution. The lease is paidin installments that include principal, interest, andassociated costs. Upon completion of the lease period,the community owns the property or improvement.While lease purchase contracts are similar to a bond,this arrangement allows the community to acquirethe property or improvement without issuing debt.These instruments, however, are more costly thanissuing debt.6-16 | Action Steps


TaxesMany communities have raised money for generaltransportation programs or specific project needsthrough self-imposed increases in taxes and bonds.For example, Pinellas County residents in Floridavoted to adopt a one cent sales tax increase, whichprovided an additional $5 million for the developmentof the overwhelmingly popular Pinellas Trail. Salestaxes have also been used in Allegheny County,Pennsylvania, and in Boulder, Colorado to fund openspace projects. A gas tax is another method used bysome municipalities to fund public improvements. Anumber of taxes provide direct or indirect funding forthe operations of local governments. Some of themare:Sales TaxIn North Carolina, the state has authorized a salestax at the state and county levels. Local governmentsthat choose to exercise the local option sales tax (allcounties currently do) use the tax revenues to providefunding for a wide variety of projects and activities.Any increase in the sales tax, even if applying to a singlecounty, must gain approval of the state legislature. In1998, Mecklenburg County was granted authority toinstitute a one-half cent sales tax increase for masstransit.Property TaxProperty taxes generally support a significant portionof a municipality’s activities. However, the revenuesfrom property taxes can also be used to pay debtservice on general obligation bonds issued to financegreenway system acquisitions. Because of limitsimposed on tax rates, use of property taxes to fundgreenways could limit the municipality’s ability to raisefunds for other activities. Property taxes can provide asteady stream of financing while broadly distributingthe tax burden. In other parts of the country, thismechanism has been popular with voters as long asthe increase is restricted to parks and open space.Note, other public agencies compete vigorously forthese funds, and taxpayers are generally concernedabout high property tax rates.Excise TaxesExcise taxes are taxes on specific goods and services.These taxes require special legislation and fundsgenerated through the tax are limited to specific uses.Examples include lodging, food, and beverage taxesthat generate funds for promotion of tourism, andthe gas tax that generates revenues for transportationrelated activities.Occupancy TaxThe NC General Assembly may grant towns theauthority to levy occupancy tax on hotel and motelrooms. The act granting the taxing authority limits theuse of the proceeds, usually for tourism-promotionpurposes.FeesA variety of fee options have been used by localjurisdictions to assist in funding pedestrian and bicycleimprovements. Enabling actions may be required for alocality to take advantage of these tools.Stormwater Utility FeesGreenway trail property may be purchased withstormwater fees, if the property in question is usedto mitigate floodwater or filter pollutants. Stormwatercharges are typically based on an estimate of theamount of impervious surface on a user’s property.Impervious surfaces (such as rooftops and paved areas)increase both the amount and rate of stormwaterrunoff compared to natural conditions. Such surfacescause runoff that directly or indirectly discharge intopublic storm drainage facilities and create a needfor stormwater management services. Thus, userswith more impervious surface are charged more forstormwater service than users with less impervioussurface. The rates, fees, and charges collected for6-17 | Section 6


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013stormwater management services may not exceedthe costs incurred to provide these services.Streetscape Utility FeesStreetscape Utility Fees could help support streetscapemaintenance of the area between the curb and theproperty line through a flat monthly fee per residentialdwelling unit. Discounts would be available for seniorand disabled residents. Non-residential customerswould be charged a per-foot fee based on the lengthof frontage streetscape improvements. This amountcould be capped for non-residential customerswith extremely large amounts of street frontage.The revenues raised from Streetscape Utility Feeswould be limited by ordinance to maintenance (orconstruction and maintenance) activities in supportof the streetscape.Impact FeesDevelopers can be required to pay impact feesthrough local enabling legislation. Impact fees, whichare also known as capital contributions, facilitiesfees, or system development charges, are typicallycollected from developers or property owners at thetime of building permit issuance to pay for capitalimprovements that provide capacity to serve newgrowth. The intent of these fees is to avoid burdeningexisting customers with the costs of providing capacityto serve new growth so that “growth pays its ownway.”In North Carolina, impact fees are designed to reflectthe costs incurred to provide sufficient capacityin the system to meet the additional needs of agrowing community. These charges are set in a feeschedule applied uniformly to all new development.Communities that institute impact fees must developa sound financial model that enables policy makersto justify fee levels for different user groups, and toensure that revenues generated meet (but do notexceed) the needs of development. Factors used todetermine an appropriate impact fee amount caninclude: lot size, number of occupants, and types ofsubdivision improvements. A developer may reducethe impacts (and the resulting impact fee) by payingfor on- or offsite pedestrian improvements that willencourage residents/tenants to walk or use transitrather than drive. Establishing a clear nexus orconnection between the impact fee and the project’simpacts is critical in avoiding a potential lawsuit.ExactionsExactions are similar to impact fees in that theyboth provide facilities to growing communities.The difference is that through exactions it canbe established that it is the responsibility of thedeveloper to build the greenway or pedestrian facilitythat crosses through the property, or is adjacent tothe property being developed.In-Lieu-Of FeesAs an alternative to requiring developers to developa greenway or pedestrian facility that would servetheir development, some communities providea choice of paying a front-end charge for off-siteprotection of pieces of the larger system. Paymentis generally a condition of development approvaland recovers the cost of the off-site land acquisitionor the development’s proportionate share of thecost of a regional facility serving a larger area. Somecommunities prefer in-lieu-of fees. This alternativeallows community staff to purchase land worthy ofprotection rather than accept marginal land thatmeets the quantitative requirements of a developerdedication but falls short of qualitative interests.Bonds and LoansBonds have been a very popular way for communitiesacross the country to finance their pedestrian andgreenway projects. A number of bond options arelisted below. Contracting with a private consultantto assist with this program may be advisable. Since6-18 | Action Steps


onds rely on the support of the voting population,an education and awareness program should beimplemented prior to any vote. Billings, Montana usedthe issuance of a bond in the amount of $599,000 toprovide the matching funds for several of their TEA-21 enhancement dollars. Austin, Texas has also usedbond issues to fund a portion of its bicycle and trailsystem.Revenue BondsRevenue bonds are bonds that are secured by a pledgeof the revenues from a specific local governmentactivity. The entity issuing bonds pledges to generatesufficient revenue annually to cover the program’soperating costs, plus meet the annual debt servicerequirements (principal and interest payment).Revenue bonds are not constrained by the debtceilings of general obligation bonds, but they aregenerally more expensive than general obligationbonds.General Obligation BondsCities, counties, and service districts are typicallyable to issue general obligation (G.O.) bonds that aresecured by the full faith and credit of the entity. Ageneral obligation pledge is stronger than a revenuepledge, and thus may carry a lower interest ratethan a revenue bond. The local government issuingthe bonds pledges to raise its property taxes, or useany other sources of revenue, to generate sufficientrevenues to make the debt service payments on thebonds. Frequently, when local governments issue G.O.bonds for public enterprise improvements, the publicenterprise will make the debt service payments onthe G.O. bonds with revenues generated through thepublic entity’s rates and charges. However, if those raterevenues are insufficient to make the debt payment,the local government is obligated to raise taxes oruse other sources of revenue to make the payments.Bond measures are typically limited by time, based onthe debt load of the local government or the projectunder focus. Funding from bond measures can beused for right-of-way acquisition, engineering, design,and construction of pedestrian and bicycle facilities.Voter approval is required.Special Assessment BondsSpecial assessment bonds are secured by a lien onthe property that benefits from the improvementsfunded with the special assessment bond proceeds.Debt service payments on these bonds are fundedthrough annual assessments to the property ownersin the assessment area.State Revolving Fund LoansInitially funded with federal and state money, andcontinued by funds generated by repayment of earlierloans, State Revolving Funds (SRFs) provide lowinterest loans for local governments to fund waterpollution control and water supply related projects,including many watershed management activities.These loans typically require a revenue pledge, like arevenue bond, but carry a below market interest rateand limited term for debt repayment (20 years).FUNDS FROM PRIVATE FOUNDATIONSAND ORGANIZATIONSMany communities have solicited greenway andpedestrian infrastructure funding assistance fromprivate foundations and other conservation-mindedbenefactors. Below are several examples of privatefunding opportunities available in North Carolina.Land for Tomorrow CampaignLand for Tomorrow is a diverse partnership ofbusinesses, conservationists, farmers, environmentalgroups, health professionals and community groupscommitted to securing support from the public andGeneral Assembly for protecting land, water andhistoric places. The campaign is asking the NorthCarolina General Assembly to reject legislation thatthreatens to reduce funding of conservation focusedtrust funds. Land for Tomorrow will enable North6-19 | Section 6


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013The Halle Cultural Arts Center provides flexible space for small classes. This Center is an ontapped resource that could host more programs.Carolina to reach a goal of ensuring that workingfarms and forests; sanctuaries for wildlife; landbordering streams; parks and greenways; land thathelps strengthen communities and promotes jobgrowth; historic downtowns and neighborhoods; andmore, will be there to enhance the quality of life formany generations. In 2011, the Land for TomorrowCampaign suffered an 85 percent budget cut andfuture program funding is uncertain.More information: http://www.landfortomorrow.org/Walmart State Giving ProgramThe Walmart Foundation financially supports projectsthat create opportunities for better living. Grantsare awarded for projects that support and promoteeducation, workforce development/economicopportunity, health and wellness, and environmentalsustainability. Both programmatic and infrastructureprojects are eligible for funding. State GivingProgram grants start at $25,000, and there is nomaximum award amount. The program accepts grantapplications on an annual, state by state basis January2nd through March 2nd.Online resource: http://walmartstores.com/CommunityGiving/8168.aspx?p=8979The Rite Aid Foundation GrantsThe Rite Aid Foundation supports projects thatpromote health and wellness in the communities thatRite Aid serves. Award amounts vary and grants areawarded on a one year basis. A wide array of activitiesare eligible for funding, including infrastructure andprogramming.Online resource: http://www.riteaid.com/company/community/foundation.jsfZ. Smith Reynolds FoundationThis Winston-Salem-based Foundation has beenassisting the environmental projects of localgovernments and non-profits in North Carolina formany years. They have two grant cycles per year andgenerally do not fund land acquisition. However, theymay be able to offer support in other areas of openspace and greenways development.More information is available at http://www.zsr.org.Bank of America CharitableFoundation, Inc.The Bank of America Charitable Foundation is one ofthe largest in the nation. The primary grants programis called Neighborhood Excellence, which seeks to6-20 | Action Steps


identify critical issues in local communities. Anotherprogram that applies to greenways is the CommunityDevelopment Programs, and specifically the ProgramRelated Investments. This program targets lowandmoderate-income communities and serves toencourage entrepreneurial business development.More information: http://www.bankofamerica.com/foundation.American Greenways Eastman KodakAwardsThe Conservation Fund’s American Greenways Programhas teamed with the Eastman Kodak Corporation andthe National Geographic Society to award small grants($250 to $2,000) to stimulate the planning, design anddevelopment of greenways. These grants can be usedfor activities such as mapping, conducting ecologicalassessments, surveying, holding conferences,developing brochures, producing interpretive displays,incorporating land trusts, and building trails. Grantscannot be used for academic research, institutionalsupport, lobbying or political activities. Currently, thegrant program is on hold until further notice.More information: http://www.conservationfund.org/kodak_awards.The Trust for Public LandLand conservation is central to the mission of theTrust for Public Land (TPL). Founded in 1972, the Trustfor Public Land is the only national nonprofit workingexclusively to protect land for human enjoyment andwell being. TPL helps conserve land for recreation andspiritual nourishment and to improve the health andquality of life of American communities.More information: http://www.tpl.orgNational Trails FundThe American Hiking Society created the NationalTrails Fund in 1998 as the only privately supportednational grants program providing funding tograssroots organizations working toward establishing,protecting, and maintaining foot trails in America. Thesociety provides funds to help address the $200 millionbacklog of trail maintenance. The National Trails Fundgrants help give local organizations the resources theyneed to secure access, volunteers, tools and materialsto protect America’s cherished public trails. To date,the American Hiking Society has granted more than$240,000 to 56 different trail projects across the U.S.for land acquisition, constituency building campaigns,and traditional trail work projects. Awards range from$500 to $10,000 per project. Projects the AmericanHiking Society will consider include:• Securing trail lands, including acquisition of trailsand trail corridors, and the costs associated withacquiring conservation easements.• Building and maintaining trails that will result invisible and substantial ease of access, improvedhiker safety, and/or avoidance of environmentaldamage.• Constituency building surrounding specific trailprojects, including volunteer recruitment andsupport.More information: http://www.americanhiking.org/Local Trail SponsorsA sponsorship program for trail amenities allowssmaller donations to be received from both individualsand businesses. Cash donations could be placed intoa trust fund to be accessed for certain construction oracquisition projects associated with the greenways andopen space system. Some recognition of the donorsis appropriate and can be accomplished through theplacement of a plaque, the naming of a trail segment,6-21 | Section 6


Parks & Recreation Plan Update | 2013and/or special recognition at an opening ceremony.Valuable in-kind gifts include donations of services,equipment, labor, or reduced costs for supplies.Corporate DonationsCorporate donations are often received in the formof liquid investments (i.e. cash, stock, bonds) andin the form of land. Municipalities typically createfunds to facilitate and simplify a transaction from acorporation’s donation to the given municipality.Donations are mainly received when a widelysupported capital improvement program isimplemented. Such donations can improve capitalbudgets and / or projects.Volunteer WorkResidents and other community members are excellentresources for garnering support and enthusiasm for agreenway corridor or pedestrian facility. Furthermore,volunteers can substantially reduce implementationand maintenance costs. Individual volunteers fromthe community can be brought together with groupsof volunteers from church groups, civic groups,scout troops and environmental groups to workon greenway development on special communityworkdays. Volunteers can also be used for fundraising,maintenance, and programming needs.6-22 | Action Steps

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