Preparing for Disaster - Florida Alliance for Safe Homes

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Preparing for Disaster - Florida Alliance for Safe Homes

DISASTERSUPPLY KITIf disaster should hit your community, public services likewater and electricity may be shut off. You may not be able toget to a store for food, supplies and medicine. In a worstcase you may have to evacuate. Having a disaster supply kitprepared ahead of time is critical.Gather the following supplies in an easy-to-carry containersuch as a plastic tote or duffel bag:Keeping SafeAfter DisasterYou still need to take steps to keep you andyour family safe even after the immediatedisaster threat has passed.Getting Back HomeStay tuned to local news organizationsfor important announcements, bulletins,and instructions.You may not have immediate access toyour home. Roads could be blocked, powerlines could be down, and people may betrapped and in need of assistance.Make sure that you have current identification.You may have to pass throughidentification checkpoints before beingallowed access to your home/neighborhood.DrivingAvoid driving, as roads may be blocked.Avoid sight-seeing, or entering a disasterravagedarea unnecessarily. You could bemistaken for a looter.If driving cannot be avoided, do notattempt to drive through floodwaters.Remember the slogan, “Turn Around, Don’tDrown ® ”, as there could be unseendangers, such as downed power lines,debris or a washed out roadway.Avoid downed power lines, even if theylook harmless. Avoid metal fences andother metal objects near downed lines.Power OutageDO NOT use matches or lighters in adisaster ravaged area until all gas lines arechecked for leaks. Keep flashlights andplenty of batteries at hand.Avoid turning the power on at your homeif flooding is present. Have a professionalconduct a thorough inspection first.When using a generator, make sure tooperate it outdoors and away from openingsin the home, including air-conditioningunits.Telephone lines will likely be busy in thearea. Use a phone only for emergencies.Clean-UpConsider having professionals/licensedcontractors inspect your home for damageand help in repairs. This includes electricians,as well as professionals to inspectgas lines, remove uprooted trees, andcheck plumbing. Downed or damaged treescan contain power lines that pose anelectrocution threat.Use a camera or camcorder to recordthoroughly any damage done to your homebefore repairs are attempted.Food & WaterFlooding brings with it the risk of waterbornebacterial contaminations. You shouldassume that the water is not safe and useproperly stored water or boil your tapwater.Identify and throw away any food thatmay not be safe to eat. This includes foodthat may have come into contact with floodwaters and perishable foods (includingmeat, poultry, fish, eggs, leftovers) thathave been above 40 degrees Fahrenheit fortwo or more hours.• Water – at least one gallonper person per day for at leastthree days (two quarts fordrinking, two quarts for foodpreparation and sanitation)• Nonperishable food – at leasta three- to seven-day supply(consider purchasing MREs, orMeals Ready to Eat, from armysurplus stores or online)• Prescription medicines andtheir original bottles• Battery-operated radio• Blankets and pillows• Manual can opener• Dust masks• Extra cash• Extra clothing (at leastone complete changeof clothing)• Eye protection• First aid kit• Flashlight and batteries• Garbage bags and plastic ties• Hygiene products• Identification• Moist towelettes• Paper cups, plates,and plastic utensils• Notepad and pencil• Plastic sheeting• Plastic storage containers• Soap• Special supplies for infantsincluding diapers and formula• Special supplies for petsincluding pet food, pet crates,and proof of vaccinations• Tape• Toilet paper• Utility knife• Work gloves• Other items specificto your family


DISASTER SAFETYTHROUGH PARTNERSHIPACADEMIC PARTNERSAustin CollegeCentral US Earthquake ConsortiumInternational Code CouncilTexas Tech Wind Scienceand Engineering Research CenterActuarial FoundationNATIONAL PARTNERSAmerican Red CrossAmerican Society of Home InspectorsCitigroupFEMAFirewiseInstitute for Business and Home SafetyNational Roofing Contractors AssociationNational Storm Shelter AssociationNational Weather ServiceNationwideNeighborWorks Insurance AllianceSt. Paul TravelersState Farm Insurance CompaniesThe Home Depot FoundationThe Home Depot, Inc.The Salvation ArmyUSAAREGIONAL PARTNERSApalachee Regional Planning CouncilRocky Mountain Insurance Information AssociationSouthwestern Insurance Information ServiceTampa Bay Regional Planning CouncilSTATE PARTNERSAlabama Department of InsuranceArkansas Department of InsuranceBuilding Officials Association of FloridaCitizens Property Insurance CorporationDisaster Contractors NetworkFlorida Department of Community AffairsFlorida Department of Environmental ProtectionFlorida Department of Financial ServicesFlorida Division of ForestryFlorida Emergency Preparedness AssociationFlorida Fire Chiefs AssociationFlorida Highway PatrolFlorida Insurance CouncilFlorida SelectGeorgia Department of InsuranceGeorgia Emergency Management AgencyIndependent Insurance Agents of TexasInsurance Council of TexasKentucky Division of Emergency ManagementKentucky Office of InsuranceKentucky Weather Preparedness CommitteeNew Jersey Office of Emergency ManagementNew York State Insurance DepartmentNorth Carolina Department of InsurancePoe Financial GroupTexas Department of InsuranceTexas Department of Public SafetyTravelers of FloridaVirginia Bureau of InsuranceVirginia Department of Emergency ManagementVolunteer FloridaWest Virginia Insurance CommissionMake Your Home Disaster Resistant with FLASH’sBlueprint for Safety ®ProgramYou now know the steps you can take to better prepareyourself and your family for possible disaster. But whatabout your home? Your house is not only your biggestfinancial investment, it will most likely be your shelter ina disaster.FLASH’s Blueprint for Safety ® educational program isdesigned to provide you with accurate, current and reliableinformation about disaster-resistant building techniques andfeatures for your home.• That a home’s windows, exterior doorsand garage doors can be especially vulnerablein a hurricane or other windstorm?• Whether you live in an area proneto flooding?• What a “defensible space” is and howit helps firefighters protect your homefrom wildfire?• That, in an average year, hail causesmore than $1.6 billion worth of damageto residential roofs in the U.S.?DO YOU KNOW:With FLASH’s Blueprint for Safety website(www.blueprintforsafety.org) you canfind the answers to home safety questionsand discover how to strengthen your homeagainst disaster. Learn how to reinforceyour home’s roof against high winds. Findout what you can do to make your home’sroof less likely to catch fire from firebrandssuch as burning leaves. Explore youroptions for protecting your home’s windows,exterior doors and garage doors fromwind storms such as hurricanes – you caneven get a cost estimate.Visit www.blueprintforsafety.organd www.flash.org today!COMMUNITY PARTNERSBrevard PreparesCity of Anderson, IndianaCity of Deerfield Beach, FloridaDuval PreparesHernando County Emergency ManagementHillsborough County Office of Emergency ManagementHome Builders Association of Greater DallasMiami-Dade Emergency ManagementTulsa PartnersVolusia PreparesLEADERSHIP PARTNERSWalter A. Bell, Alabama Insurance CommissionerJeb Bush, Florida GovernorJane L. Cline, West Virginia Insurance CommissionerErnie Fletcher, Kentucky GovernorTom Gallagher, Florida Chief Financial OfficerAlfred W. Gross, Virginia Insurance CommissionerGlen Jennings, Executive Director, Kentucky Officeof InsuranceJim Long, North Carolina Commissioner of InsuranceJohn W. Oxendine, Georgia Insurance & Fire SafetyCommissionerRick Perry, Texas GovernorMike Pickens, Arkansas Insurance CommissionerRESOURCE PARTNERSDuPontFamilySafePGT IndustriesSimpson Strong-TieSmart VENT, Inc.Ventilated AwningsWayne-Dalton1427 East Piedmont Drive, Suite 2Tallahassee, FL 32308www.flash.orgToll-Free (877) 221-SAFENON PROFIT ORG.U.S. POSTAGEPAIDTALLAHASSEE, FLPERMIT NO. 283

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