issue 2 08 - APS Member Groups - Australian Psychological Society

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issue 2 08 - APS Member Groups - Australian Psychological Society

Community psychologies14The praxis collective, as do we ascommunity critical psychologists, strived toproblematise ideologically reactionary aspectsof mainstream ‘knowledge andpractice’ (rather than collude with them),develop epistemologically sophisticatedknowledgementing practices (rather thandefault to formulaic methodology), developinnovative socio-structural inter- and preventions(rather than default to traditionalintra-psychic blame or change), collaboratewith collectives (rather than work unilaterallyon or for individuals), promote social change(rather than psychological adaptation), engagein emancipatory process and outcome throughprogressive redistribution of power (rather thancollude with or contribute to oppressive (re)distribution of power), make processes ofpsychological oppression visible and contestthem (rather than camouflage, mystify andcollude with them), provide new legitimatedknowledge, demonstrate new ways ofproducing knowledge which are participatoryand socially just, and offer new ways to peopleto engage with us in emancipatory socialresearch. Note that here we are, effectively,making explicit a community criticalpsychology to which we are committed whichis implicit in the praxis described.We believe that community psychologyis becoming increasingly endangered as acritical alternative to mainstream disciplinaryideology, theory, procedure and practice. Webelieve that community psychology isbecoming increasingly colonised anddominated by acritical United Statesianversions of community psychology. However,we also believe this transformation is notinevitable and could be checked or reversed bycommunity psychologists taking a critical turnin theory, ideology and practice and engagingin praxis, building upon work such as that wehave described above.ReferencesDalton, J. H., Elias, M. J., & Wandersman, A.(Eds.). (2001). Community psychology:Linking individuals and communities.London: Thomson Learning.Fox, D., & Prilleltensky, I. (Eds.). (1997).Critical psychology: An introduction.London: Sage.Foucault, M. (1977). Discipline and punish:The birth of the prison. London: PenguinBooks.Freire, P. (1972). Pedagogy of the oppressed.Harmondsworth: Penguin.Fryer, D. (2008a). Some questions about “TheHistory of Community Psychology”. Journalof Community Psychology, 36, 572-586.Fryer, D. (2008b). Power from the people?Critical reflection on a conceptualisation ofpower. Journal of Community Psychology,36, 238-245.Hunt, P. (1966). A Critical Condition. In P.Hunt (Ed), Stigma: The experience ofdisability. London: Chapman.Laing, A. (2008). Changing disabling places.Unpublished PhD thesis. Stirling: Universityof Stirling.Nelson, G. and Prilleltensky, I. (Eds.). (2005).Community psychology: In pursuit ofliberation and well-being. Basingstoke:Palgrave Macmillan.Oliver, M. (1992). Changing the social relationsof research production. Disability andSociety, 7, 101-116.Orford, J. (1992). Community psychology:Theory and practice. Chichester: Wiley.Orford, J. (2008). Community psychology:Challenges, controversies and emergingconsensus. Chichester: Wiley.Prilleltensky, I. (1994). The morals and politicsof psychology: Psychological discourse andthe status quo. Albany, NY: State Universityof New York.Prilleltensky, I. and Nelson, G. (Eds.). (2002).Doing psychology critically: Making adifference in diverse settings. Basingstoke:Palgrave Macmillan.Rappaport, J. (1977). Community psychology:Values, research and action. New York:Holt, Rinehart and Winston.SCRA Executive Committee. (2007). SCRA’sVision Statement Clarified. The CommunityThe Australian Community Psychologist Volume 20 No 2 December 2008