issue 2 08 - APS Member Groups - Australian Psychological Society

groups.psychology.org.au

issue 2 08 - APS Member Groups - Australian Psychological Society

Neighbourhood and adolescence47reporting several moves since his parents’marriage break up.ProcedureThe stages undertaken in Photovoice areimportant in setting the scene for the process aswell as utilising the opportunities it provides todiscover meaning. The induction workshopprovided an opportunity for the researcher tomeet with the participants, explain the purposeof the project, establish ground rules about theuse of the camera and begin initial datacollection through discussions which tookplace. Participants then collected thedisposable cameras to capture their day to daylives. The cameras were returned and thephotographs developed by the researcher.Individual interviews took place with eachparticipant using the photographs to explorewhat is important in their lives.A constructivist, grounded theoryapproach was used in the development of theresearch project and data analysis. Interviewswere transcribed and an initial thematic dataanalysis was undertaken by the researcher todevelop common themes arising from thediscussions and to consider what issues mayrequire further elucidation. Small discussiongroups were then held to explore issues withina small group setting. Further transcription andthematic data analysis then took place toidentify common themes between the twogroups of participants as well as within groups.Copyright release forms were signed by theparticipants and their parents authorising therelease of photographs for the purposes ofacademic publications.Results and DiscussionLong and Perkins (2007) describedPSOC as a multilevel construct with both placeand social elements, which are inextricablybound. They also suggested that PSOC isclosely related to social capital and otherfactors, including place attachment andcommunity satisfaction. The participants in thepresent study were asked to explore the waythey spend their time in their neighbourhood.In keeping with Long and Perkins’ argument,the participants from both groups relayed socialexperiences with neighbours as well as the roleof the neighbourhood as a place from whichthey gain access to the broader community andactivities outside of the neighbourhood.Mead (1984) referred to theneighbourhood as a place for children to learn tobecome members of their society throughexploration and adaptation. The role of variousadults in the neighbourhood was consideredcrucial in this regard. The importance of theneighbourhood in the lives of the participantswas explored in the present study. It was foundthat the participants from both groups ofparticipants identified relationships withneighbours. This often involved ambivalence asneighbours were identified as providing support,but also surveillance of their life. As outlined byMead, the neighbourhood increasingly served asa gateway from home to the external worldwhere the participants accessed communities ofinterest and ventured to meet friends or visitfamily.Regardless of which school theparticipants attended, those who had resided attheir current home for most of their lives tendedto know more neighbours than those who hadrecently moved. This supports researchundertaken by Chipeur et al. (1999) which foundthat adolescents who had lived at their currentaddress for 10 or more years reported moresupport in their neighbourhoods than those whohad lived there for less than 10 years. Thissuggests that these participants’ needs weremore likely to be met in their neighbourhood ifthey knew more neighbours. However, some ofthe participants in the present study who hadresided in their neighbourhood for a long timereported not talking to some of their neighboursor not knowing those neighbours who were newto the neighbourhood.Conversely, another participant detailedregular activities undertaken in her street withneighbours such as an annual street barbecue.She reported that she knew people in everycouple of houses. Another participant, who hadrecently moved, stated that although he had notThe Australian Community Psychologist Volume 20 No 2 December 2008

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines