issue 2 08 - APS Member Groups - Australian Psychological Society

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issue 2 08 - APS Member Groups - Australian Psychological Society

Editorial5Lauren BreenWelcome to the latest issue ofAustralian Community Psychologist (ACP).This issue is the first to be produced by thenew Editorial Board consisting of myself (asEditor), Carol Tutchener (St Kilda YouthService), Meg Smith (University of WesternSydney), Tahereh Ziaian (University of SouthAustralia) and Anne Sibbel (ReflectivePractice). I am very excited to be Editor, butI take on the role with some trepidation asDawn Darlaston-Jones has left some(figuratively) large shoes to fill. I also want toacknowledge and thank Dawn for her work inmanaging the review process of one paperincluded in this issue.In recent years, the journal hasdeveloped in leaps and bounds under Dawn’sdirection. The journal has gained an ISSN, isindexed in PANDORA, an Australiandatabase and initiative of the AustralianNational Library (http://pandora.nla.gov.au/tep/84823) and moved to its current on-lineformat, and as a result, is disseminated to andaccessed by an international audience. Whilestill maintaining a very local flavour, thejournal has included articles from the UnitedKingdom, Canada, New Zealand/Aotearoa,and the United States. The journal is alsolisted in the Excellent in Research inAustralia (ERA) journal rankings (http://www.arc.gov.au/era/indicators.htm).Whether we like it or not, metrics-basedratings systems are used to assess the impactand quality of research. My concern withthese systems is that researchers workingwithin emerging fields or from nontraditionalepistemologies andmethodologies may experience greaterdifficulties in promoting the quality of theirresearch, gaining competitive funding, andachieving promotion, which furthermarginalises already marginalised research(ers) and further strengthens the status quo(Cheek, Garnham, & Quan, 2006; Rappaport,2005). Indeed, the ‘research enterprise’ is andincreasingly entrepreneurial wherebyresearchers are ‘rewarded’ for maintaining theprevailing state of affairs. The ERA initiative isdesigned to prevent any advantage of onediscipline or study area over others (Carr, 2008;Universities Australia, 2008), but the extent towhich it will be successful in achieving equityremains to be seen. It is it is however importantthat the journal is included in the rankingsystem.This general issue brings together sevenpapers from around Australia and the world.First, David Fryer and Adele Laing apply acritical community psychology framework topose and answer some questions concerning thedefinitions and uses of community psychology.They warn of the increasing colonisation ofindigenous community psychologies and of theincongruence between critical communitypsychology theory and practice. Theirtheoretical examination is followed by fiveempirical papers. Nadya Surawski, AnnePedersen, and Linda Briskman tackle animportant yet under-researched topic – theimpact of acting as a refugee advocate – and indoing so, make an important addition to theliterature. They demonstrate the financial,emotional, and interpersonal effects of acting asa refugee advocate in Australia. The risk ofburnout and potential for long-term harm hasimplications for advocates’ ability to continuein this role in the face of adversarialgovernment policy. Romina Iebra Aizpurúa andAdrian Fisher present their study of theacculturation experiences of Latin Americanwomen in Australia and demonstrate thatacculturation is a lengthy and ongoing processrather than short-term and finite. Lyn O’Gradyand Adrian Fisher utilise an innovativemethodology, Photovoice, to privilege theperspectives and experiences of young peopleand their neighbourhoods. Lynn Priddis, GailWells, Kathie Dore, Janelle Booker, and NoelHowieson describe a collaborative communitydevelopment partnership between a universityThe Australian Community Psychologist Volume 20 No 2 December 2008

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