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november 2 0 1 2

White Sands©Paul Schranzone step removed from the contemporaneousand allows the painter toadd, subtract or interpret the“moment in time” at a later date.With the advent of digital imagingit’s become possible for a photographerto create a “synthetic” moment intime. Using multiple images taken atvaried times and places, the photographercan create an image whichnever existed, nor can it ever exist.It’s the synthetic capabilitiesinherent in Digital Imaging Schranzfinds intriguing and increasinglysatisfying. As he observed, it’s onlyhuman to eventually become boredwith your subject matter if youcontinue to make the same kind ofphotograph time after time.With Digital Imaging Schranz isable to explore subject matter fromPoint Lobos Rock©Paul Schranzdifferent angles, and to tell a storyin his “synthetic” images.From his synthetic images havecome collages constructed using thetools in Photoshop. As Photoshophas developed over the years itsoptions and capabilities haveexpanded exponentially, broadeninghorizons with techniques such asFocus Stacking, High DynamicRange and Panoramas.Early digital cameras capturedan image, and in the beginningthat was enough. But as camerasimproved in quality, resolution andspeed, it’s become possible, forexample, to construct a panoramicMurphysboro©Paul Schranz 2012image using a hand held digitalsingle lens reflex (DSLR.) In fact,Schranz says, it seems the handheldcamera produces an even betterpanoramic image than one weldedto a tripod. The panorama isproduced by taking multiple images,each overlapping the next by about30%. The images are opened inPhotoshop Layers, aligned, thenblended and stitched using thePanorama effect in PS6.Schranz described his method ofcreating a macro image withabsolute depth of field. The imageis in sharp focus from the surfacenearest the lens to the surface atgreatest distance from the lens.Anyone who has used a largeformat camera to photograph aDouble Door Swiss©Paul Schranzrose at close range, for example,knows it is impossible to retainsharp focus from front to rearbecause depth of field at macrodistances is simply too shallow.But with a DSLR camera on atripod it is possible to capturemultiple images, each focused at adifferent depth on the object.Then, with the Focus Stackingeffect, available since CS5, onlythe “in focus” portion of eachimage is “blended” into the final“stacked focus” image. The resultis an image in sharp focus fromfront to rear. “Impossible!,” you say?Try it.Far from the final subject of hishigh speed presentation was adiscussion of High Dynamic Range.Familiar to every photographer isTumacacori©Paul Schranz 2012


Bleeding Rose©Paul Schranz 2012the dilemma of a potential imagewith such a wide range of exposuremaking it impossible to print withall parts of the image visible withinan acceptable range.Carrying this further, HDR nowmakes it possible, with a latermodel DSLR, to capture imagesimpossible in any case with film.Schranz showed a nightFrench Market Station©Paul Schranz 2012photograph of a New Orleans trainstation. Some newer cameras havethe ability to capture acceptableimages at ISOs or speeds exceeding10,000 with some approaching20,000. This means an ability toshoot, handheld, in little more lightthan total darkness!There’s no getting around it:Digital Imaging is here to stay.Schranz observed the options forphotographers using film grownarrower by the day. Droppingdemand led Kodak to stop makingmuch of its film. Large format filmis still available, but who knows howlong that will last? True, companiesin Eastern Europe continue toproduce films of smaller size, buteven those must be feeling thepressure of digital imaging, and intime that market, too, will narrow.What’s the future of film basedphotography? According to Schranz,there will likely always be a nichemarket for film, but quality productsin large quantities will becomeincreasingly rare and equally expensive.Make the most of DigitalImaging, and the wondrous toolsof Photoshop. Take a class orworkshop in tools such as HDR,Stacked Focus or Panorama, andexplore a new face of photographyin 2013!Lady of the Lake©Paul Schranz 2012Man and the Moon©Paul Schranz 2012Susan 50A©Paul Schranz 2012Texture - paint©Paul Schranz 2012


MissionSanAntoniodePadua,Jolon,California©CraigAlanHuberSince 2008 photographer Craig Alan Huber has been on a mission. Working from his basein Woodinville, Washington, Huber recently completed personal pilgrimages to all twenty-oneCalifornia Missions. To better understand their heritage, Huber traveled to the town of Petraon the island of Mallorca, Spain where he visited the birthplace of Fray Junípero Serra thefounder of the California mission chain.Huber’s goal was to capture the Spirit of each Mission - communicating the essence of thebeautiful historic buildings, artifacts, and tradition. Working with a 5x7 view camera in thefield and the resulting negatives in his darkroom, Huber crafted rich photographic prints inplatinum/palladium to tell the visual story. He discovered each Mission has its own characterand feel making it distinctive and worthy of notice. The platinum print aesthetic worksespecially well for these images of ‘Old California’.During his visit to Mission San Antonio de Padua, Huber became aware of the mission’sdire need for an earthquake retrofit; required by California but not funded by the state. Tohelp, he has chosen 13 of his favorite Mission images for a 2013 Calendar celebrating the300 th anniversary of the birth of Fray Junípero Serra. With the help of a generous benefactorand the talented design and printing team at Casey Printing in King City, California, thecalendar was created and printed in exquisite duotone. It was important to Huber that thecalendar reproductions had the ‘feel’ of the original platinum prints.All proceeds from this Serra 300 th Anniversary 2013 Calendar go to the Mission SanAntonio de Padua restoration fund. Support this worthy cause by purchasing a calendar.Here’s the site: www.savesanantonio.org/junipero-serra-300th-anniversary-calendar.html.

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