architecture program report - University of Massachusetts Amherst

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architecture program report - University of Massachusetts Amherst

ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM REPORT

Volume II

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Architecture+Design Program

September 2009


ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM REPORT

Volume II

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Architecture+Design Program

Department of Art, Architecture, and Art History

College of Humanities and Fine Arts

457 Fine Arts Center

Amherst, MA 01003

Tel 413-577-1575

Fax 413-545-3929

schreiber@art.umass.edu

Robert Holub, Chancellor

James Staros, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

Joel Martin, Dean, College of Humanities and Fine Arts

William Oedel, Chair, Department of Art, Architecture and Art History

Stephen Schreiber, Director, Architecture+Design Program

7 September 2009


TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. INTRODUCTION TO THE PROGRAM VOLUME I

2. PROGRESS SINCE LAST SITE VISIT VOLUME I

3. CONDITIONS FOR ACCREDITATION VOLUME I

VOLUME II

4. SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

4.1 Student Progress Evaluation Procedures 1

4.2 Studio Culture Policy 3

4.3 Course Descriptions 5

4.4 Faculty Résumés 40

4.5 Visiting Team Report from the Previous Visit 92

4.6 Annual Reports

2


4. SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

4.1 STUDENT PROGRESS EVALUATION PROCEDURES

Supplemental information to the APR must include the following:

• A description of the procedures for evaluating student transfer credits and advanced placement

BFA-Design

Undergraduate application to the Architecture+Design Program at the University of Massachusetts at

Amherst is a two-part process. Prospective students apply concurrently to the University and to the

Program. Students can enter the BFA-Design program one of three ways:

• By applying directly to the BFA-Design major as a high school senior. This process requires a

portfolio that is reviewed by Architecture+ Design faculty.

• By applying directly to the BFA-Art major as a high school senior. This process requires a

portfolio that is reviewed by Studio Art faculty. The student then applies to the BFA-Design

major at the end of the freshman year after completing the Foundations sequence. (Typically,

no portfolio is required to move from the Art to Design major, if a GPA of 3.25 or higher has

been maintained in Foundations classes)

• By applying to BFA-Design major from another major at UMass, or as a transfer from another

institution. This process also requires a portfolio. Transfer credits from appropriately accredited

institutions are evaluated by the UMass through the transcript review process; credits

recognized by the university are then evaluated against Department and Program

requirements. Questions and evaluations concerning Architecture+Design course work

completed at other institutions are resolved by the Program Director through portfolio and

syllabus review. Content is also compared to NAAB student performance criteria for

appropriate courses.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

All applicants to the Master of Architecture program, who have completed prior undergraduate or

graduate coursework in architecture, must submit design portfolios and transcripts from all previous

colleges/universities they attended (regardless of whether or not they graduated) in order to be

considered for course waivers and advanced standing. In addition to this, students with foreign

degrees must provide transcript evaluations that translates course grades and credits to U.S.-based

grading standards.

After admissions decisions are made, the director conducts a formal review of transcripts and

portfolios from all successful applicants who have earned pre-professional architecture degrees from

schools with NAAB programs, or equivalent, to determine the number of course waivers given and

placement within the design studio sequence

Waivers (with reduction in credit hours) can be given for coursework equivalent to introductory

courses (500 level) in the 3 year Master of Architecture curriculum. The program may ask the student

for more information— e.g., course syllabi--if questions arise relative to the content of certain courses

that are being considered as the basis for graduate-level course waivers. In order for a course to be

waived it must achieve parity in content, credit hours, and in relevant NAAB criteria. (For example,

history courses must cover the same time periods and geographic emphases—non-western and

western traditions—as UMass courses). In order for courses to be waived, students must have earned

a “B” or better grade.

3


In addition to grade reviews, portfolios are assessed to determine studio waivers and placement.

Studio waivers and placement are based on the comparable quality and level of development of

previous design projects to the master’s core studio sequence. If a student is placed in the advanced

design sequence, previous work must be deemed exceptional and the appropriate credit hours of core

design studios are waived.

All students who are issued course waivers are then issued a form which specifies all courses waived

(and all remaining courses to be taken at UMass).

Students who have completed graduate-level coursework elsewhere are eligible to receive up to 12

credit hours of course waivers at UMass, if those courses were completed with a “B” or better grade.

This course must have been completed as part of an accredited program at another institution, or

graduate courses at UMass taken under a non-degree seeking status.

• A description of the procedures for evaluating student progress, including the institutional and

program policies and standards for evaluation, advancement, graduation, and remediation.

BFA-DESIGN

All students are updated regarding the status of their credit distributions prior to advising periods

through a categorized audit sheet of all courses taken (in residence and transfer); this audit sheet is

also available electronically via the UMass website (SPIRE).

There is a major checkpoint at the end of the sophomore year. At this point, in order to continue in the

program, students must have maintained a 3.25 in all required department Foundations classes

(including Arch-Des, Art and Art-Hist) and completed most general education requirements. Students

with less than a GPA between 3.0 and 3.25 must submit a portfolio which is reviewed by the faculty.

(The faculty may require additional coursework). Students with less than a 3.0 GPA cannot continue

as BFA-Architecture majors. (They can, however, retake core course to improve GPA).

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

Student progress in the Master of Architecture program is evaluated at regular intervals. The first

major check occurs after the first year. The second one occurs prior to Research Forum (masters

project planning).

Students also meet with faculty advisors each semester before signing up for the next semester’s

classes. Graduate students must maintain an overall average of 3.0 (“B”) in the courses which a

student is offering to satisfy degree requirements, a minimum standard for satisfactory work is a 3.0

average. A student who in any two semesters, consecutive or otherwise, has semester averages of

below 2.8 is subject to academic dismissal. A student must make satisfactory and reasonable

progress toward completion of a degree program within the Statute of Limitations for that degree. A

student who is not making satisfactory or reasonable progress is subject to termination.

4


4.2 STUDIO CULTURE POLICY

Supplemental information to the APR must include the school’s current studio culture policy.

STUDIO GUIDELINES

THE STUDIO

The studio is a learning environment that is directly affected by its qualities as a physical place. Each

studio should maintain a well ordered and constructive working environment by keeping trash picked up,

neatly storing projects, and looking out for the security of the studio. Recycling of paper, cardboard and

chipboard is mandatory - use the appropriate containers.

Each individual studio class is responsible for the condition of the studio. If you come into the room and

it needs some straightening up, please act in the interest of the collective good and clean up. At the end

of the Fall semester the studios must be cleaned and work stored and/or well organized. At the end of

the Spring semester all work must be removed, the studios must be broom cleaned and prepared for the

Junior/Senior show.

Students must use caution when using all materials. Read all safety and health literature supplied with

materials. Aerosol sprays and solvents should only be used with adequate ventilation and not be used in

the studios. Exercise caution when cutting materials with sharp blades. Recycling and the proper

disposal of hazardous waste is mandatory.

Keys for the studio can be ordered and are available through Jean in the Program’s main office.

ATTENDANCE

The general university rules and regulations regarding attendance, withdrawals, add / drops,

incompletes and grading are followed by this program. The Program encourages sensible time

management practices for students and faculty. Attendance to all studios, lectures and reviews is

mandatory. You must be in studio on time and you must work in studio during class time. More than two

absences from class will affect your grade and may lead to failure; two lates are equal to one absence. If

you are ill or have an emergency leave a message for your instructor via email or with the Art

department’s main office. You should also contact a classmate to find out the material you have missed.

It is your responsibility to obtain any assignments and make up any missed work. If you feel your

absence qualifies as an excused absence, please provide a note from a doctor to your studio instructor.

PARTICIPATION

Your participation and progress is important. The material presented and projects assigned in all

courses is cumulative. The assignments will be graded not only on the concept and ideas in your

project, but also on the quality of drawings, models, verbal / written presentation and how well your

project’s concept and ideas have been expressed in your design. You are required to pin-up your work

at the time when a project is due and participate in discussion of all the projects in the class.

DOCUMENTATION and COLLECTION OF WORK

At the end of each semester, each student is required to submit a Compact Disk with documentation of

ALL WORK from the semester. Work for Studio classes may include, but not limited to: photos of all

models and 3-D work and high resolution scans or digital copies of all process sketches and finished

drawings.

Your documentation should cover the project's evolution as well as its final representation. Grades will

not be issued until the CD is submitted.

In addition, selected projects will be collected and retained by the University, you will have

limited access to your the projects once they are collected, so be sure they are thoroughly

documented. These projects are a required part of the accreditation process for our program.

Work from lecture and seminar classes should include hard copies of all written assignments, papers

and exams.

GRADING

5


Your grades will be determined using the criteria described below. Projects will be evaluated according

to the concept, development, craft, and degree of difficulty and completeness. Your evaluation will take

into account both the tangible things which are evident in the work, but also those things which are not

so evident and are often ephemeral such as, passion, dedication, determination and persistence. The

following standards will be used in assigning grades:

A

Truly extraordinary work, which has gone far beyond the description of the stated problem. Work that

makes evident a significant understanding of the problem, shows exceptional competence in the

required skills, extraordinary craft and exhibits an advanced conceptual clarity and depth. The student

exhibits an attitude of exploration, of open-mindedness, and a willingness to benefit from criticism.

A- or B+

Exemplary work, which is attended with initiative beyond the description of the stated problem. The

problem is well understood and the work shows competence, excellent craft and conceptual clarity and

depth. The student exhibits an attitude of exploration, of open-mindedness, and benefits from criticism.

B

Good work that shows an understanding of the problem, displays a conceptual foundation and is well

crafted. Shows overall competency, as well as, mastery in some areas. Is attended with an open and

inquisitive attitude.

B- or C+

Acceptable work but with some deficiencies. Shows an understanding of the problem, but there is a

need for some improvement to be at the appropriate level for the class / assignment.

C

Work which meets the minimum requirements of the problem and course. The problem is only partially

understood and there is a clear need for improvement to be at the appropriate level for the class /

assignment. Students should make every effort to meet with their instructor to identify their strengths

and weaknesses.

C- or D+

Work which does not show an understanding of the problem, and demonstrates deficiencies in the

mastery of skills, self-motivation and respect for criticism. Students should meet with the professor and

discuss their course of study.

D

Unacceptable work which does not meet the requirements of the problem or course, shows a serious

deficiency in the mastery of skills, and suggests that this course of study may be inappropriate for the

student.

F

A grade of “F” is obvious

LATE / INCOMPLETE WORK

Students may be given an extension in the event of medical or emergency circumstances only. Late

work will only be accepted at the discretion of the instructor. Incompletes will only be considered if a

request is made in writing, the extenuating circumstances are explained and are consistent with

University policies.

6


4.3 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Supplemental information to the APR must include for each required and elective course in the accredited

degree program a one-page description with an overview, learning objectives, course requirements,

prerequisites, date(s) offered, and faculty member teaching it.

7


ARCH-DES 211 The City 3 credits

Instructor: Page

Catalogue Description:

This seminar investigates the history of American cities, with an emphasis on the 20th century. Using readings in

history, architecture, urban ethnography, and literature, this course seeks to uncover the largely invisible forces

that have created the physical shape and social experience of the modem American city.

Learning Objectives:

Following the Shaker proverb -- "Every force evolves a form" -- we will pay special attention to the ways in which

urban change has been reflected and refracted in the forms and spaces of the city. We will also be charting the

reverse of the Shaker proverb by asking how the physical structures of American urban life - not simply

buildings, but highways, suburbs, natural landscapes - become themselves forces in shaping individual and

communal lives in the city.

Course Requirements:

This course will require extensive readings and a series of short writing assignments culminating in a longer

research paper.

Texts:

LeGates and Stout, The City Reader, 2nd edition.

Conn and Page, Building the Nation, selected chapters to be distributed via email

Lisa Tolbert, Constructing Townscapes: Space and Society in Antebellum Tennessee

David Scobey, Empire City

Arnold Hirsch, Making the Second Ghetto: Race and Housing in Chicago, 1940 to 1960

Richard W. Longstreth, City Center to Regional Mall: Architecture, the Automobile, and Retailing in Los Angeles,

1920-1950

Andres Duany, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream

Prerequisites:

None

8


ARCH-DES 300 Design I 4 credits

Instructors: Brause, Krupczynski, Miller Pollin

Course description:

This course offers an exploratory introduction to strategies and concepts of design. Design is presented as an

experimental practice where invention and investigation play essential roles. Students examine design as a

discipline that does not produce answers or solutions to problems, but instead creates imaginative and open

responses to the question of how form and space are organized and understood.

While this class presents basic concepts and themes that will familiarize the student with architecture and

design, it also acts to question and contextualize many of the cultural assumptions about design. Links across

the divisive discussions of form/function, theory/practice and beauty/utility will be sought.

Learning objectives:

• Engagement with a process-oriented approach to design.

• Investigate a variety of design methodologies for the resolution of abstract problems.

• Learn abstract and critical thinking skills and link them to concrete realization.

• Understand the visual and verbal vocabulary of architecture and design.

• Understand and use the process of critique through desk crits, informal pin-ups and formal

presentations.

• Gain practical drawing, digital representation and model making skills.

• Develop an awareness of the importance of visual, verbal and writing skills for design communication.

• Break down pre-conceived ideas of the nature of architecture and design.

• De-familiarize the familiar through analysis and root projects in a re-visioning of everyday

experience.

• Value qualitative as well as quantitative approaches to design

Course requirements:

In a studio setting, a series of themed workshops allow students to work on a range of projects. Through the

making of drawings, collages, photographs, digital images and models students investigate design issues. Guest

lecturers, extensive readings, writing and class discussions supplement the studio work.

1. PROJECTS

There will be several projects throughout the semester. Some projects will be divided into two to three

assignments. Some projects begin with an assigned reading(s) and/or a presentation as well as an outline of

assignments and due dates.

Project development will occur both in the studio and at home. In an introductory class such as this, it is

anticipated that students skills may vary, so the required responses to assignments will have some flexibility--yet

this is a design studio and there is a strong emphasis on clear and intentional expression of your ideas.

2. WRITING ASSIGNMENTS

Students will write responses to any assigned readings. Your response should be at least a half page wordprocessed

(no hand written responses). Bring in two copies, one to hand in and one for use in class. The

response must do both of the following: Summarize the themes and ideas in the reading. For longer readings

and those with multiple parts, you may focus on a particular idea and not the entire piece. Reflect on the ideas in

the reading. Agreeing or disagreeing is fine, but give concrete reasons for your positions.

In a sense, you are writing a discussion topic/question that would be appropriate for the reading and which we

will use for class discussion. You must hand in the writing assignment at the start of the class and I will pick two

or three at random and ask those students to present their ideas and start the class discussion.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Design major and minors, and Five College exchange students.

9


ARCH-DES 301 Design II 4 credits

Instructors: Brause, Krupczynski, Schreiber

Course description:

This studio’s central focus is to introduce skills and thought processes required for the study of architectural and

interior design. Students explore the interrelationship of composition, form, space, light and use. Projects

provide a creative framework for investigating and understanding the fundamental elements and ideas

necessary to produce meaningful spaces.

Skills in hand drafting, free-hand drawing and model making are continually developed, and digital

representational techniques are introduced and integrated as analytical and representational tools. Design

methodologies stress process, inventive analysis, transformation, interpretation and discovery. Students develop

a visual language that allows for communication of spatial ideas while comprehending the constraints and

possibilities inherent in the act of making. Links between craft and imagination are developed and strengthened.

Texts and other mediums are incorporated as a way of introducing other “spaces” - narrative, critical, cinematic,

speculative - thus expanding our field of sources and ideas.

Learning objectives:

• Continue to explore process-oriented approaches to design.

• Explore the relationship between form/space making and program

• Analyze architectural precedents and examine the spatial and formal principles inherent in architecture.

• Investigate a variety of design methodologies for the resolution of spatial problems.

• Develop increased abstract and critical thinking skills and link it to concrete realization.

• Continue to develop hand drafting, freehand drawing and model making skills.

• Continue to develop visual, verbal and writing skills for design communication.

• Apply digital representation skills.

• Understand and use the process of critique through desk crits, informal pin-ups and formal presentations.

• Break down pre-conceived ideas of the nature of architecture and design.

Course requirements:

In a studio setting, a series of themed focuses allow students to work on a range of projects. Through the

making of drawings, collages, photographs and models students investigate design issues. Guest lecturers,

extensive readings, writing and class discussions supplement the studio work.

1. PROJECTS

There will be several projects throughout the semester. Some projects will be divided into two to three

assignments. Each project will begin with an assigned reading(s) and/or a presentation as well as an outline of

assignments and due dates. Project development will occur both in the studio and at home. In this design studio

there is a strong emphasis on good craft and clear/intentional expression of your ideas.

2. WRITING ASSIGNMENTS

Students will write a variety of written response papers during the semester. The length of your response will be

discussed in class (no hand written responses). Bring in two copies, one to hand in and one for use in class. Do

not only summarize the contents, but also find the comparative links and develop new reflections that grow out

of these texts. Agreeing or disagreeing is fine, but you must give concrete reasons for your positions.

In a sense, you are writing a discussion topic / question that would be appropriate for the reading and which we

will use for class discussion. You must hand in the writing assignment at the start of the class and I will pick two

or three at random and ask those students to present their ideas and start the class discussion.

Prerequisites:

ARCH-DES 300

10


ARCH-DES 397G/697G Great Spaces 3 credits

Instructor: Miller Pollin

Course Description:

This course investigates identifiable characteristics of a wide variety of remarkable architectural spaces. These

spaces range from classic examples such as the Pantheon in Rome to twenty first century spaces designed by

contemporary architects such as Rem Koolhaas and Herzog & De Meuron. Lectures will include a descriptive

survey of these spaces selected from a broad spectrum of historic periods and cultures. The case studies

presented provide the basis for class discussion and analysis of what comprises memorable space-most

particularly interior space. Lectures address not only the specific attributes of the case studies shown in digital

format but also the more general social and cultural forces out of which these spaces have evolved.

Discussions and presentations are intended to stimulate critical thinking about social, religious, economic and

technical contextual influences on the formation of architectural space. Sources of inspiration and provocation

for designers are drawn from both the constructed environment as well as the natural environment. Space types

ranging from public to very private and from vernacular or indigenous to “high art” are mined for their informative

qualities for the emerging architect or interior designer.

Learning Objectives:

•To broaden the student’s general perspective on a wide variety of effective spaces and encourage critical

thinking about the spaces we encounter both routinely and occasionally

•To provide research references for developing approaches to architectural and interior design

•To challenge preconceived notions of the relationship between programmatic space, space planning, and

meaningful space making

•To heighten awareness of evolving attitudes about habitable space over time and in various cultures

•To begin to assess the designer’s role as well as the user’s role in spatial perception, use and interpretation

All classes with the exception of student presentation days will be in lecture format integrated with visual images

of projects. Case studies will be shown in order to magnify a particular point or more general issues. Historic

examples will not be shown in chronological order but rather shown as they reinforce certain design

characteristics. Lectures will be interspersed with class discussion sessions.

Course requirements:

Student participation in class is encouraged. Students must maintain a well-organized notebook of information

taken from the lectures. Student notes as well as material from reading assignments will provide study material

for 3 quizzes given during the semester. A final exam will be given at the semester’s end.

During the semester teams of four (4) students will be required to present a well-researched project selected

from a list provided by the instructor. As part of this group assignment, students will be required to visit the site,

photograph the building’s interior, exterior and its surroundings. Students will also be required to conduct in

depth research on the selected structure and its architect. These research projects will be documented on a CD

in Powerpoint and turned in to the instructor near the end of the semester. The instructor will select several for

in-class presentation. These will be selected on the basis of research content and clarity of presentation. Those

that are not shown in class will be made available for other students in the course to view independently.

Texts:

Class handouts

Recommended Books:

Glancy, Jonathan, The Story of Architecture, DK Publishing, London, England

Leach, Neil (ed), Rethinking Architecture, Routledge Press New York New York (selected chapters)

Gideon, Sigfried, Time, Space & Architecture

Bachelard, Gaston, Poetics of Space

Curtis, William, Modern Architecture

Prerequisites: none

11


ARCH-DES 400 Design III 4 credits

Instructors: Brause, Miller Pollin, Schreiber

Catalogue Description:

Development of a conceptual basis for design and planning. Basic spatial concepts, design skill development

and communications skills applied to presentation of design solutions. Model-making, 2-D presentations of

abstract and simple spaces. Enriched by an historic overview of 20th-century architecture and design, including

products, furniture and major trends. Students must successfully complete this studio in order to enroll in any

subsequent design courses.

Learning Objectives:

We will start by undertaking primary research into existing precedents. We will develop, share and use a

vocabulary of existing designs in a manner intimately relevant to our own design process. In doing so, we will

gain critical insights into other architects’ design and problem-solving processes. This may reveal differences in

ways of thinking and making; of conceiving, composing, and assembling. Through this process we will deepen

our awareness of the development of our own architectural intentions.

In these studies, we will also investigate ergonomics to understand the human body as a generator of

architectural form and scale.

We will continue to clarify the meaning ofprogram.” We will continue to explore notions of site and context,

both found and constructed, and at its different scales - from that of the detail to that of the landscape.

Students will be encouraged to take advantage of the studio environment for expanding collective inquiry and to

use their presentations as a means to clarify their own intentions and build a shared body of knowledge.

Course Requirements:

The studio will be a series of projects of varying lengths designed to take students through architectural

problems of differing scales. The projects will be developed through making drawings, models, photographs,

and presentation boards with some writing. Presentation requirements will be coordinated with A+R1 so

students should expect and benefit from the overlap between these courses. Research assignments and

reading are integral to the studio work. Graphic and verbal presentation should be both expressive and precise.

There will be preliminary and final reviews of most projects. Some will be “in-house” and some will have outside

critics. Presentations should feature convincing evidence of design process as well as final drawings and

models.

Students should plan to develop their projects between studio sessions and to be prepared to meet during studio

hours. Individual desk critiques will offer the opportunity to engage in direct discussion with the faculty member

about their work in progress. Students should also expect to work on some group projects.

Text:

All readings will be distributed in class or available on the class SPARK website.

Prerequisite:

ARCH-DES 301

12


ARCH-DES 401 Design IV 4 credits

Instructors: Brause, Chao, Lugosch, Mann, Miller Pollin, Schreiber

Course Description:

Design IV builds on areas of inquiry pursued in earlier studios. We will start by undertaking a group research

project that will set the course for the in-depth exploration of a complex building type: a small elementary school.

This semester-long project will proceed by moving between pragmatic and poetic methodologies as we interpret

both the functional and meaningful criteria of this rich program.

From our group research, we will expand our inquiry through individual conceptual experimentation, returning to

ground ourselves in real-world parameters. Our investigations will move between analytic and synthetic

modalities as we explore local sites with both empirical and theoretical lenses. Precedent studies will emphasize

conceptual, spatial, organizational and material strategies.

We will investigate different scales from the individual experiential realm of the classroom to the communal

realm of the complex. The length of this project will stress iteration, multiple modes of exploration and integration

of prior knowledge. It is intended that a disciplined and thorough three-dimensional investigation will result in a

carefully prepared, beautifully crafted and graphically sophisticated final presentation.

Learning Objectives:

• Develop an individual design process through iteration in sketching, drawing and modeling.

• Understand diagramming as an analytical and generative tool.

• Understand precedent research as a conceptual tool.

• Investigate different methodologies for design.

• Develop an awareness of the importance of reading and writing in the design process.

• Develop multi-scalar thinking to expand the range of scales and level of detail at which one designs.

• Gain experience working with a real client and real sites.

• Gain practical documentation and presentation skills.

• Study and apply relevant codes.

• Understand the role of the studio environment for expanding collective inquiry

• Understand the role of presentations as a means to clarify one’s own intentions and build a shared body

of knowledge.

Course Requirements:

This studio will be one semester long project divided into a series of exercises of varying lengths designed to

take students through a large architectural project from different angles of inquiry. The project will be developed

through making drawings, models, photographs, and presentation boards.

RESEARCH

There will be one group presentation and publication. Fieldwork, research assignments and reading are integral

to the studio work. Graphic and verbal presentation should be both expressive and precise. Students should be

particularly prepared during this studio course to work in groups. The first part of the semester will be team

directed. Each student will have a specific assignment but full and supportive participation in the group project is

required. Class participation is particularly important to sustain this group process.

REVIEW/CRITIQUE

Students should plan to develop their projects between studio sessions and to be prepared to meet during studio

hours. Individual desk critiques will offer the opportunity to engage in direct discussion with the faculty member

about their work in progress. There will be preliminary and final reviews at each stage of this project. Some will

be “in-house” and some will have outside critics. Presentations should feature convincing evidence of design

process as well as final drawings and models.

Analysis and Representation II will proceed concurrently with this course. There may be opportunities to work on

studio projects during A+R labs and to build digital, analytical and presentation skills in A+R that will enrich

presentation of studio projects.

Text:

Prerequisites:

Arch-Des 400

13


ARCH-DES 403 Design V 3 credits

Instructors: Chao, Williams, Luarasi

Catalogue Description:

In-depth exploration of increasingly complex planning with significant emphasis on cost, special detailing,

behavioral and architectural programming, social context of design and planning and opportunities to work with

actual clients. Problem-solving for mass housing, entertainment, commercial, and institutional environments

includes a focus on code analysis, program definition and development, cost and construction issues, creativity

and communication and an integration of presentation with construction documentation. Continued exploration

of design through written, visual, and dimensional opportunities. Extensive out of class work, portfolio

development, advanced presentation techniques, and class participation/attendance required.

Learning Objectives:

Design V builds on skills and areas of knowledge gained from previous studios. Analysis and design through the

iterative use of drawings, models and the exchange with your instructors will expose you to the process of

creating architecture. The initial assignment will take you through a small-scale program at a local site that will

allow you to focus on tectonic development. During the bulk of the course you will have the opportunity to

perform an in-depth exploration of a complex planning project with significant emphasis on multiple scales,

spatial development, behavioral and architectural programming, social influences on design and a review with

actual clients.

Projects in this studio explore more complex architectural structures and problem solving with attention to the

interrelationship of concept and realization. Context (urban, suburban, and/or rural) is critically considered and

analyzed as an important part of the design process. Practical integrations of material, structure, building

systems and detail will be explored.

• Continuation of all aspects of design introduced or developed in previous design studios

• Further development of individual design processes and individual methods of expression

• Study of the role of social responsibility and ethics in design

• Introduction to the impact of structure on both interior architecture and architecture

• Introduction to the importance of various building systems such as heating and cooling systems on

design

• Introduction to more complex building programs

• Development of sensibilities about lighting both natural and artificial in the built environment

• Investigation of existing prominent built environments through selected case studies

• Emphasis on the importance of research in all stages of the design process

Course Requirements:

The studio will be a series of assignments of varying lengths designed to propel students through architectural

problems of differing scales. The projects will be developed through making drawings, models, diagrams, and

presentation boards with some writing. Reading assignments are integral to the studio work and will be

discussed in class. Graphic and verbal presentation should express your original ideas through precise means in

order to provoke meaningful discussion. Extensive out of class work, advanced presentation techniques, and

class participation/attendance is required. There will be preliminary and final reviews of the assignments. Some

will be “in-house” and some will have guest critics. Presentations should feature convincing evidence of design

process through carefully crafted final drawings and models. Students should plan to develop their projects

between studio sessions and to be prepared to meet during studio hours. Individual desk critiques will offer the

opportunity to engage in direct discussion with the faculty member about their work in progress. Students should

also expect to work on a group project.

Text:

Prerequisites:

ARCH-DES 401

14


ARCH-DES 404 Design VI 3 credits

Instructors: Krupczynski, Zekos

Course Description:

The studio’s central focus is to develop strategies related to effective and innovative community-based design

practices and projects. Students engage in critical and reflective research with local community based

organizations in order to clarify, envision and realize their design needs. Projects and proposals that emerge

from this process promote the community’s cultural, social and economic advancement through innovative

design.

Through a series of projects and assignments that allow students to meet, interact and collaborate with

community members, students develop methods for engaging and responding to community needs. The studio

supports progressive university-community partnerships, promotes reciprocal learning and teaches the value of

collaborative design practices through sustained and valued partnerships with community-based organizations.

Project realization will include graphic/information design strategies as well as a small-scale design intervention

that will be developed in detail.

Learning Objectives:

• Link the community, social and cultural contexts of architecture through process-oriented approaches to

design.

• Negotiate and support dialogue between political/educational/social/historic/cultural/constructional

territories and forces

• Engage and use cultural critique/investigative research/inventive analysis in the production of alternative

design projects

• Catalyze the material, symbolic and cultural capital that is present in any community

• Evolve critical practices that work to create spaces that reveal, instigate and challenge dominant social and

political structures and within those spaces acknowledge the fluid and multiple characteristics that make up our

public sphere in the support of a process of social transformation and change

• Make explicit issues of political, cultural and social relationships

• Construct community identity in authentic and transformative ways—rather than through idealized and

traditional images, and spaces that predominate much of today’s community-based work.

• Move beyond models of consensus—to models of tactical collaboration, reciprocal cooperation and

creative conflict

• Recognize that the “community” is intrinsically linked to the production of its space, and that critical

architectural practices contribute as dynamic partners in that production.

• Continue to develop design communication abilities through effective and integrated visual, digital, verbal

and writing skills.

• Breakdown pre-conceived ideas of the nature of architecture and design.

• Measure your work as architects and designers not by the forms that we create, but through social

formations we provoke and support as cultural agents

Course Requirements:

The primary activity of the studio is a series of focused projects/assignments that allow students to develop an

architectural project through the making of drawings, photographs and models. There will be both preliminary

and final reviews of most assignments. All presented work must be well crafted and hung with care. Process

development as well as final drawings are expected at all reviews. Extensive class discussions, readings and

written responses supplement the studio work.

Text:

All readings will be distributed in class or available on the course web/blog.

Prerequisite:

ARCH-DES 403 or permission of the instructor

15


ARCH-DES 500 Graduate Design Studio I 6 credits

Instructors: Krupczynski, Mann, Schreiber

Course Description:

Design is often presented as a means of providing “solutions” to the “problems” of living. This purely pragmatic

approach frequently overlooks the rich qualitative research and reflection that is possible through design. In this

introductory graduate studio we will explore design as an experimental practice where invention and

investigation play essential roles. Design is considered as a discipline that does not only produce answers or

solutions to “problems”, but also creates imaginative and open responses to the question of how space is

conceived of, structured, inhabited and understood.

While this class presents basic concepts, methodologies and themes that will familiarize the student with the

language of architecture and design, it also acts to question and contextualize many of the cultural assumptions

about design. Links across the divisive discussions of will/intuition, abstraction/perception, form/function,

craft/imagination, theory/practice and beauty/utility will be sought.

Texts, films, contemporary art practices and other non-architectural mediums are discussed as a way of

introducing other “spaces” - narrative, critical, speculative - thus expanding our field of sources and ideas.

Learning Objectives:

• Engagement with a process-oriented approach to design.

• Investigate a variety of design methodologies for the resolution of abstract problems.

• Learn abstract and critical thinking skills and link it to concrete realization.

• Understand the visual and verbal vocabulary of architecture and design.

• Understand and use the process of critique through desk crits, informal pin-ups and formal presentations.

• Gain practical drawing, digital imaging and model making skills.

• Develop an awareness of the importance of visual, verbal and writing skills for design communication.

• Breakdown pre-conceived ideas of the nature of architecture and design.

• De-familiarize the familiar through analysis and root projects in a re-visioning of everyday experience.

• Value qualitative as well as quantitative approaches to design.

Course Requirements:

The primary activity of the studio is a series of focused projects/assignments that allow students to develop work

through the making of drawings, photographs and models. Extensive class discussions, readings and written

responses supplement the studio work. There will be some research papers/presentations required (related to

the studio projects). Working individually and collaboratively, students continue to develop iterative design

processes that draw from investigative research, individual experiences and a growing design vocabulary.

Text:

All required readings will be distributed in class, made available on-line or available through the 5-College library

system.

Prerequisite:

Restricted to Architecture + Design graduate students or permission of instructor.

16


ARCH-DES 501 Graduate Design Studio II 6 credits

Instructors: Lugosch, Mann, Krupczynski, Miller Pollin

Catalogue Description:

Studio projects emphasize the evolution of an interior design project through careful attention to program and

site. Students analyze the physical spaces that surround them, paying careful attention to issues of materiality,

dimension, color, and light. A series of exercises, including analysis of built projects, encourages understanding

of the history of the discipline and the importance of creative thinking. Emphasis is on acquiring the skills

necessary to communicate design intention.

Learning Objectives:

Gain practical hand drafting, freehand drawing and model making skills.

Engage with a process-oriented approach to design.

Learn abstract and critical thinking skills and link it to concrete realization.

Understand the visual and verbal vocabulary of architecture and design.

Breakdown pre-conceived ideas of the nature of architecture and design.

Root design in the study and understanding of human scale and inhabitation.

De-familiarize the familiar through analysis and root projects in a re-visioning of everyday experience.

Understand and use the process of critique through desk crits, informal pin-ups and formal presentations.

Develop an awareness of the importance of visual, verbal and writing skills for design communication.

Introduce the role of research in design.

Value qualitative as well as quantitative approaches to design.

Course Requirements:

Arch-Des 501 is a studio class which will meet twice weekly. The normal studio day will consist of desk critiques

for each student or group pin-ups or reviews. Final project reviews for all studios will be held during the last

week of the semester, to which all students should try to attend.

PROJECTS:

There will be several projects throughout the semester. Some projects will be divided into two to three

assignments. Each project will begin with an assigned reading(s) and/or a presentation as well as an outline of

assignments and due dates. Project development will occur both in the studio and at home. In an introductory

class such as this, it is anticipated that students skills may vary, so the required responses to assignments will

have some flexibility—nonetheless a high level of performance within one’s abilities is expected.

SKETCHBOOK:

Students should purchase a 5x9 (or larger) sketchbook and complete out-of-class exercises throughout the

semester. Some assignments will be taken from the book Design Drawing by Francis D.K. Ching.

You are expected to use your sketchbook as a daily tool for seeing and/or imagining. You will be required to do

additional drawings during the course of the semester. These may be sketches for your design projects or

sketches from life: exterior views, people, still lives, interiors....a schedule of sketchbook assignments will be

given out separately.

DIGITAL SKILLS AND PRESENTATION:

One of the assigned projects will be a research project involving a digital presentation. Digital skills introduced

in Analysis and Representation, including Photoshop and PowerPoint will be applied.

Text:

Handouts of required readings will be provided on SPARK.

Prerequisite:

ARCH-DES 500

17


ARCH-DES 510 Furniture Technology & Design 3 credits

Instructors: Mann

Course Description:

This course provides a broad-based introduction to furniture design. We will explore furniture as a response to

fundamental human needs, furniture as a bearer of the body, furniture as a material expression and construct,

furniture as it shapes space, and furniture as an emblem of material culture. There will be a particular focus on

issues of Universal Design. Design and design research will be done through sketches, models, full-scale

mock-ups, measured drawings and other graphical media. Writing, field trips, and independent research will be

components of the class.

Learning Objectives:

• Development of individual design process

• Development of analytical and verbal presentation skills

• Introduction to social, cultural, material and technical aspects of furniture design

• Introduce Proxemics, Ergonomics and Anthropometrics

• Incorporate Universal Design and Eco-Design principles

• Introduce design detailing, materials and terminology

• Create a context for understanding the legacy of furniture technology & design

Course Requirements:

Arch-Des 510 is a lecture/workshop class which will meet twice weekly. The normal class day will consist of a

lecture or of a discussion of readings with in-class work sessions, or of a pin up of design projects.

Grades will be based on the following:

1. Class attendance and participation

2. Timely completion of assignments

3. Quality of work

4. Quality of presentation and final projects

5. Attendance at classes and field trips

Text:

All required readings will be provided as pdf’s on the SPARK course website. In addition, you are required to

subscribe to Metropolis Magazine for this course, which will also give you access to their excellent website.

Key books:

Cranz, Galen, The Chair, W.W. Norton & Co., New York City, New York, 1998.

Fuad-Luke, Alastair, The Eco-Design Handbook, Thames and Hudson, London, 2002.

McDonough, William, Braungart, Michael, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, North Point

Press, 2002.

Postell, Jim. Furniture Design, John Wiley & Sons, New York City, New York, 2007.

Saville, Laurel, Design Secrets: Furniture, Rockport Publishers, Gloucester, Massachusetts, 2006.

Prerequisites:

Required Undergrad, elective Grad (Prerequisites: Admission to M.S. Design or M. Arch or by permission of

instructor)

18


ARCH-DES 520 Building Physics I 3 credits

Instructor: Marsden, Fisette

Catalogue Description:

Energy conservation in contemporary residential construction. Emphasis on: energy efficient building materials,

products and construction technology; alternative energy sources; passive solar design; environmental

concerns, regulatory issues and building codes.

Learning Objectives:

"Energy Efficient Housing" presents residential energy conservation as a primary energy resource. Energy

conservation is the most cost-effective, environmentally safe method for lowering energy costs and reducing

dependence on a finite supply of fossil fuel. Conservation must not be confused with personal sacrifice or going

without. It means being smarter and using better, more efficient technology. Students explore alternative

sources of energy, but primary discussion in Energy Efficient Housing involves technical issues, dealing with

building methods and materials used to save energy while at the same time improving comfort and performance.

Political, economical and environmental issues are inextricably connected to conservation and enter into

classroom dialogue. Classroom lectures focus on the fundamentals of residential energy use involving: energysaving

materials and products; energy-efficient technology and design; sustainable construction; alternative

energy sources; affordable housing, political impact and regulatory developments.

Course Requirements:

1) Students are expected to play an active role in classroom learning by participating in group discussions. This

means that students must research discussion topics prior to class and be prepared to participate.

2) Regular class attendance is expected. Guest lecturers may be invited to present an overview of projects

they are currently involved with. Attendance is mandatory for these presentations.

Texts:

Energy Crafted Home Builders Guide, West River Communications, Inc., 1991. Sponsored and written by

Northeast Utilities.

Insulate and Weatherize by Bruce Harley, The Taunton Press, 2002

Prerequisites:

19


ARCH-DES 540 Analysis & Representation I 3 credits

Instructors: Luarasi, McKee, Nobre

Course Description:

The intention of this lab is to strengthen a student's ability to represent and present their ideas visually. The lab

will build upon the drafting and representation skills students already possess and introduce new software

programs and techniques. Students will develop design skills by conceptualizing and representing architectural

ideas and making aesthetic judgments about presentation design.

Learning Objectives:

The aim of this class is to introduce students to a variety of representational and visualization techniques.

Through an array of material studies the students will be exposed to graphite, linear and planar elements, paper,

plaster, scanning and other digital/pixel processes.

Course Objectives:

Undergraduate: The early weeks of the class will center around the idea of images and representation; how we

perceive an image and the strength of perception. Students will critique a variety of posters, ads, and projects on

their successful representation of an idea. Students will read about the process these designers went through

and form their own opinions about why something is effective or not. This will create an arena for discussions

about thinking and creating; of theory and process. These discussions and exercises will help students to

become mindful of their own processes and their own design.

Concomitantly, students will advance their knowledge in a number of programs through instructor-led tutorials

and working labs. These programs include modeling programs such as Google Sketch-up and Autodesk's

Autocad and graphics programs such as Adobe Photoshop; Adobe Illustrator and Adobe InDesign. Students will

learn from each other through mini critiques and group discussions throughout the semester.

Graduate:

The first part of this class will be virtually blended with the first three weeks of your studio class. The

assignments will cover three techniques: Photographic analysis and representations, Rule-Based Drawing and

Modeling with Linear and Planar Elements. In the second part of the class, you will produce five assignments

that represent five different analysis and representation techniques: Analog Drafting, Paper Modeling,

Photoshop Filtering and Scanning, Collage composition and Digital Modeling. The emphasis in learning these

techniques will be on Information-Based Design, parametric design and modeling, repetition, variation and

generative form-finding. These techniques will be related to particular (con)-texts that will be part of your design

studio thematic later on in the semester. The third part of the class will be channeled again with your studio

work. It will continue with the digital modeling technique. You will learn Rhino by using the material of your

design studio project. Illustrator will also be introduced in order to provide you the necessary skills to organize,

(re)present and document your design information. The assignment of this part of the class will consist in the

digital modeling and the presentation (aspect) of your studio project.

Course Requirements:

Undergraduate: Presentation: Each student will be assigned a grade each time they pin-up. There will be two

grades given, one for the progress the student made on the quality of the drawing and one for the presentation.

The total of those grades will make up the final grade for the pin-up.

Sketch Book: A sketchbook/notebook that is used for both Design Studio III and Analysis and Representation

will be required. This book should be used as a tool to help students document thoughts and synthesize studio

design ideas with Analysis & Representation presentation tools and processes. Sketchbooks will be collected

and reviewed periodically throughout the semester.

Graduate: Pin-Ups and Reviews will happen on a weekly basis. You will (re)present your production at the end

of each week. You should have a specific agenda for discussions and a clear graphic and textual record of work

done since your last critique. The transition from one stage of the process to the other and its documentation is

crucial in developing your analytical, representational and design skills. You ought to organize your

presentations of Pin-Ups very rigorously, since they are part of your design ideas and sensibility.

Text:

Co-requisite:

ARCH-DES 400 or ARCH-DES 500

20


ARCH-DES 541 Analysis & Representation II 3 credits

Instructors: Luarasi, McKee, Nobre

Course Description:

Visual communication skills necessary and related to interior/architectural design presentation. Black and white

and color presentations. Techniques include perspective, axonometric, and medium exploration.

Learning Objectives:

Undergraduate: The intention of this lab is to strengthen a student's ability to represent and present their ideas

visually. The lab will build upon the drafting, modeling and representation skills students already possess and

introduce new software programs and techniques. Students will develop design skills by conceptualizing and

representing architectural ideas and making aesthetic judgments about presentation design.

This lab will be taught in conjunction with Design Studio 2. While throughout the semester the skills and

techniques taught in this lab will be used in reference to the studio 2 projects many times there will be a clear

distinction between assignments given in lab and assignments given in studio.

Graduate: A lot of advances have taken place in design technology in the last decade. The digital technology

has offered new horizons on how to rethink architectural production. This technology is not bound anymore in

the ready-made software technology, which is simply a digitalized version of the traditional drafting board, but is

offering new customized parametric tools and methods that make possible a parametric, performance and

information-based approach to design. This class will tap on this open source digital intelligence and deploy in

different aspects of the studio project, such as conceptual diagramming, programming, form-making, structure,

skin and tectonics.

Course Requirements:

Undergraduate: This class provides a cooperative learning environment for students to learn techniques and

share opinions. Presentation requirements will be coordinated with Design Studio III so students should expect

and benefit from the overlap between these courses. As inspiration from outside projects, media and reading

are integral to the studio work, students will be required to bring in outside materials multiple times throughout

the semester.

Since this lab is a cooperative learning environment, students are also expected to participate in discussions

regularly. Along with group conversations, individual desk critiques will offer the opportunity to engage in direct

discussion with the faculty member about their work in progress.

Graduate: Pin-Ups and Reviews will happen on a weekly basis. You will (re)present your production at the end

of each week. You should have a specific agenda for discussions and a clear graphic and textual record of work

done since your last critique. The transition from one stage of the process to the other and its documentation is

crucial in developing your analytical, representational and design skills. You ought to organize your

presentations of Pin-Ups very rigorously, since they are part of your design ideas and sensibility.

Text:

Prerequisite:

ARCH-DES 540

21


ARCH-DES 550 Tectonics I 3 credits

Instructor: Fisette

Course Description:

Analysis and review of the entire light-frame construction process, from regulation and design through site

preparation, project management, and ultimate delivery of a completed structure.

Learning Objectives:

Principles of Light-Frame Structure Technology provides students with an understanding of the construction

industry, processes and building materials used in contemporary residential and light-frame construction. The

entire residential construction process is reviewed: from regulation and design through site preparation, project

management, and ultimate delivery of a completed structure. Close attention is paid to the sequence of events

as they occur in most construction projects. Leading-edge products and technologies are analyzed and

compared to more familiar ones. Students investigate basic structural loading, recognize load paths and use

span tables to size structural elements for a variety of basic applications.

Throughout the semester, focus is drawn to the structural performance of various building elements, materials,

systems, and strategies used to construct enduring and sensible homes. Coursework is tied closely to the

arrival of new products, technologies and regulatory issues affecting the construction industry. This course

investigates the products, systems and participants that shape the building-materials and construction industry.

Course Requirements:

Grading 20% Exam #1

20% Exam #2

25% Final Exam

15% Homework, reports and class contribution

20% 4 quizzes

Text:

Fundamentals of Residential Construction, by Edward Allen and Rob Thallon, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2006.

Supplemental readings will be distributed in class and posted on the web page,

http://courses.umass.edu/bmat313

22


ARCH-DES 600 Graduate Design Studio III 6 credits

Instructor: Lugosch, Miller Pollin

Course Description:

Principles and process of architecture and site. Projects developed and presented by student with individual

attention from instructor. Each project reviewed by open jury system with visiting critics. Readings from texts and

journals. Design projects, sketch problems.

Learning Objectives:

This studio is a collaboration with the graduate students in landscape architecture. The emphasis during the

first portion of the semester will be on site planning. Continuous linkages will be made among the disciplines of

architecture, landscape architecture and planning. Landscape architecture and planning graduate students will

team up with graduate architecture students to inventory and research a specific site in the region. Research

will include site history, history of the surrounding context, demographics, regional employment, local codes and

planning efforts, natural features, critical cultural phenomena and sensory factors. Based on this research

students will learn to evaluate the site in terms of its assets and deficits.

Simultaneously, a series of short studio design exercises will be given. These exercises will focus on spatial

typologies in planning that are the result of direct relationships between built form and open space within

communities. Special topics within the studio will be Transit Oriented Design (TOD), Smart Growth

Communities and sustainability.

The second portion of the site will allow a finer grain collaboration between students in landscape architecture

and architecture students. Students will be asked to select a portion of team-generated master plans. They will

examine this smaller portion at a larger scale and generate schematic designs that weave together exterior and

interior space.

The studio will also be a continuation of the design methodologies studied in ARCH-DES 501--design

methodologies that stress; process, inventive analysis, media transformation, interpretation and discovery.

The importance of clear visual and verbal communication in the design process will also be emphasized.

Carefully crafted presentations will be an integral part of the studio work in this course.

Students will learn site research methodologies; site analysis; interdisciplinary team dynamics and importance of

the collaborative; process; programming; continued development of the individual design process; the role of

precedents and case studies in architecture, planning and landscape architecture; key considerations in

involvement with local, municipal and regional; planning groups/governing bodies; incorporation of health and

safety factors in the design development process; and further development of methods of communicating design

ideas through verbal, graphic/digital and three dimensional means.

Course Requirements:

The primary activity of the studio will be collaborating with landscape architecture graduate students as well as

planning students to produce a series of site planning design options for a complex program on a high impact

regional site. Studio time will be used to share research and analysis and to work with instructors and peers to

continue the design process from site planning through selected individual building design.

Work will be reviewed and discussed in individual desk critiques, informal pin-up sessions and more formal final

reviews in the studio.

Class discussions, readings and written responses will supplement the studio work.

Prerequisites:

ARCH-DES 501

23


ARCH-DES 601 Graduate Design Studio IV 6 credits

Instructors: Lugosch, Miller Pollin, Schreiber

Course Description:

The intentions of the studio are to build on areas of inquiry pursued in earlier studios, adding a layer of study that

explores the potential for materials and construction to enrich, embody, and communicate the meanings of

space, form, and program. The focus is integrated sustainable systems.

Learning Objectives:

Graduate Design IV is a special topics studio.. Iteration in drawing, modeling and diagramming will be

emphasized as a tool to pursue this goal. Multi-scalar thinking will be stressed to expand the range of scales and

level of detail with which students design. Relevant codes will be studied and applied. Precedents and readings

will be reviewed critically.

Course Requirements:

The studio will consist of projects of varying lengths designed to take students through architectural problems of

differing scales. The projects will be developed through making drawings, models, photographs, and

presentation boards with some writing. Research assignments and reading are integral to the studio work.

Graphic and verbal presentation should be both expressive and precise.

The students will be accountable for producing a building that draws together concerns for:

• sensitive site treatment (both experientially and environmentally)

• a critical theoretical position about architectural design and its broader cultural role

• an awareness of the building’s role in enhancing and nurturing the everyday life and functions that

occur within it

• creation of sophisticated architectural form

• use of appropriate experiential character to reinforce moods and feelings

• responsible use of material resources, at best in a sustainable sense

• sensitive reaction to climatic conditions

• clear definition of structural, technical and circulation systems

• awareness of safety and regulatory compliance

architecture which makes a clear contribution to its culture and the future

Text:

Prerequisite:

ARCH-DES 600

24


ARCH-DES 602 Graduate Design Studio V 6 credits

Instructors: Luarasi, Lugosch, Miller Pollin, Mann, Krupczynski

Course Description: This studio is advanced and comprehensive in all the aspects and complexities that

comprise contemporary architectural practice today. It is also integrative in integrating both these aspects and

the various degrees of design knowledge and intelligence you have acquired so far in your design studio

development.

Learning Objectives:

This studio will focus on the notion of information based design and the design of diagram/ideogram as an

informational placeholder and generative form-finding tool.

Research: Research will be an imminent attribute of this studio. It will consist of reading specific texts, precedent

studies and gathering informational data. However, this studio will focus on a particular form of research, that is,

on Design as a form of research. The primary goal of this form of research is not simply to gather data, but

rather design this gathering and interpolate/manipulate the data in order to create a design intelligence that

could and should be used in the architectural design. In other words the goal of Design as a Form of Research is

to set the cognition forth, to release it, initiate it, and let it happen…. Evidently there is a strong affinity between

this form of research and the aspect of analysis and representation.

Site/Context/Program/Typologies: Specific urban/rural sites/landscapes will be given to the students. However,

each student will approach the questions of context, program and typology vis-à-vis his/her design research.

The design research phase will lead each student choose a context, program and typology that will be

materialized into a building form.

Building systems/Tectonics/Fabrication Strategies/Prototyping: The studio will address the aspects of materiality,

building systems, tectonics, fabrication, circulation, egress circulation system, life safety protocols and

handicapped accessibility.

Sustainability: This studio will engage with the practices of sustainability in architecture today. However the

challenge will be to see the notion of sustainability not only as a technical aspect of architectural design, but an

organizational, cultural and aesthetic one as well.

Course Requirements:

The first part of the course will include diagramming and mapping exercises that may operate geologically,

biologically or linguistically. Whether they are analogue or digital, they should operate parametrically, capable of

producing not a single result, but series, repetition, multiplicity and variation. Simultaneously, students will work

with a series of precedent studies of contemporary ideas and typologies. This phase will lead to the formulation

of a particular context, program and typology in a particular site. The second part of the studio will consist in

building design and development.

Texts:

“A Thousand Plateaus – Capitalism and Schizophrenia”, Chapter 10, “Becoming Intense, Becoming Animal,

Becoming Imperceptible…” by Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari,* “A Thousand Years of Nonlinear History” by

Manuel De Landa, “Earth Moves” by Bernard Cache*, “Folds, Bodies & Blobs – Collected Essays” by Greg

Lynn* “the metapolis dictionary of advanced architecture”, “European Cities, the Informational Society, and the

Global Economy,” by Manuel Castells and “Praxis” magazine

Prerequisites:

ARCH-DES 601

25


ARCH-DES 620 Building Physics II 3 credits

Instructors: Mann

Course Description:

This course is an introduction to architectural lighting from both sunlight and artificial sources. The course also

introduces basic concepts of architectural acoustics. Physical fundamentals of light, environment, materials,

vision and perception and electricity are discussed and expanded through problems of building and building

component design. Design solutions will be explored through case studies and field trips, accompanied by

technical calculations and specifications for energy consumption and light behavior using standard industry

methods. Students will also do research on various aspects of lighting, including cultural, psychological and

physiological conditions and impacts of this essential component of our environment.

Learning Objectives:

Using a highly integrated approach, you will learn quantitative and qualitative aspects of light and acoustics and

be able to apply this knowledge towards the design of buildings and environments that are responsive to

environmental and human needs.

This course is both technical and creative. The course is taught primarily through lectures, assigned readings

and field trips, with designed, researched, or calculated assignments. Website modules will be accessed for

some assignments. Students are expected to make significant progress from class to class and to have the

appropriate documentation of the assigned work to show the instructor during the assigned class time and at

pin-ups. You will be expected to produce models, sketches, drafted and dimensional drawings, and even fullsize

mock-ups for design problems, depending on the assignment. Modest purchases of lighting equipment will

be required on an as-needed basis. From time to time, group projects and activities may require coordinated

activity in and out or the classroom. Your contribution to such activities will also be assessed in your grading.

The final project will be integrated with an assignment from studio.

Field trips and guest lectures will be components of the class. In addition, attendance at a minimum of two A+D

program lectures accompanied by written summaries will be required as part of this class, unless they are

already required elsewhere.

Course Requirements:

Projects and assignments will be individually graded according to the quality of research, thought process and

problem solving, design process, execution and presentation. Assignments and reading, quizzes 20% of grade,

projects 50% of grade, final project 15% of grade, class and trip attendance, notes and sketches and

participation 15% of grade.

Texts:

Lechner, Norbert, Heating, Cooling, Lighting: Design Methods for Architects, 2nd edition, Wiley, 2000.

All readings will be available on the class website for downloading.

Prerequisites:

Building Physics I or permission of instructor

26


ARCH-DES 630 Philosophy of Architecture & Design 3 credits

Instructor: Page, Dillon

Course Description

This course is an intensive reading and writing course on the central theories and philosophies shaping

architectural discourse in the 20 th century, with an emphasis on the past forty years.

Learning Objectives

The course will look at some of the key thinkers and theoretical approaches that have shaped 20 th century

architecture (phenomenology, structuralism, postmodernism) and then move to a chronological focus on the

past few decades of architectural culture. The goal of the course is twofold: to gain some mastery over the

foundations of contemporary architectural theory, and, equally, to understand how architects and designers can

put these theoretical explorations to work in their own practice.

Course Requirements

1. Readings -- The heart of the course is an intense engagement with the readings

2 Weekly journal - To augment your reading, and to develop your capabilities as writers on architecture, for each

class you will write a 2-3 page essay in which you engage with the readings for the week. I will

sometimes insist on a focused critique of one of the readings, or ask you to go to visit a particular

building and write about it. But in other weeks, I will leave it open, and encourage you to write on

whatever was inspired by the readings. We will spend some class time most weeks discussing

approaches to architectural writing. You may skip two weeks.

2. Group project -- The concept of beauty, which largely fell out of favor as a way of talking about architecture for

the past two decades, is returning in new guises. The class project will be to examine the key writings

on beauty, the central intellectual problems around the idea, and to put together a one-day symposium

in the spring of 2007 which will bring together scholars and practitioners together to wrestle with these

ideas.

Text

K. Michael Hays, ed., Architecture Theory since 1968

Neil Leach, ed., Rethinking Architecture (“L” in the syllabus)

Elaine Scarry, On Beauty and Being Just

Strunk and White, Elements of Style

Prerequisites:

Admission to MArch or MS

27


ARCH-DES 650 Tectonics II 3 credits

Instructor: Clouston

Course Description

Introduction to the mechanical behavior of building materials for students of construction technology and

architecture. Basic structural concepts, including statics and strength of materials, are addressed in a practical

hands-on manner.

Learning Objectives:

Mechanics of Building Materials for Construction introduces students of Architecture and Construction

Technology to the mechanical behavior of building materials. Fundamental structural concepts of Statics and

Equilibrium are addressed and applied to statically determinate systems. Force and moment analysis is followed

by Strength of Materials, where students learn to determine stress and strain in simply supported beams. Next,

students are introduced to beam design with deflection, shear and bending stress evaluation. Finally, the

concepts of column design, lateral buckling and stability are discussed. Case studies and practical applications

are employed throughout the course through in-class examples and illustrations, homework assignments and 2

hour/week problem solving sessions.

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. analyze external and internal forces in statically determinate plane structures

2. calculate stresses and strains in axial members

3. determine bending and shear stresses in simple beams

4. understand the concept of stability with slender columns

5. be able to solve simple beam design equations

Course Requirements:

Lectures: Class will meet for a 50 minute session on Wednesday and Friday mornings to introduce and discuss

new topics and to go through sample problems.

Labs/problem solving sessions: Class will meet for 115 minutes on Monday mornings for a problem solving

tutorial. Working in interdisciplinary groups, students will solve questions that are similar to the homework

questions to be completed the following week.

Assignments: Homework will be assigned every Monday during the lab. Due dates will be 5pm the following

Monday. Assignments must be submitted on time. Late submittal (without PRIOR Professor approval) will result

in a 5% penalty for each day that it is late (including weekends). NO assignments will be accepted after

homework solutions have been handed out.

Exams: There will be two mid-term exams and one final exam. All exams will be closed book but cheat sheets

and calculators will be allowed.

Grading and Evaluation

Exam #1: 20%

Exam #2: 20%

Final exam: 25%

Weekly assignments: 30%

Lecture and lab participation: 5%

Text:

B. Onouye and K. Kane, Statics and Strength of Materials for Architecture and Building Construction. Upper

Saddle River, New Jersey, Prentice Hall, 3 rd ed., 2007

Prerequisite:

MATH 104 or equivalent and Physics 131

28


ARCH-DES 652 Building Physics III 3 credits

Instructor: Curcija

Course Description:

Introductory course in the science of energy and moisture transfer performance of commercial and residential

buildings. Today’s architectural students don’t learn enough about basic physics principles of modern buildings,

which results in some poor decisions during the building design process. In addition to form and appearance,

architects need to be cognizant of the effects of their buildings on human comfort, health, and energy use. This

course offers basic concepts and principles of building physics in a non-intimidating way so that non-science

student can easily grasp these concepts and adopt them in their future practice.

Learning Objectives:

The objective of the course is to teach basic principles of thermal and moisture performance of building

structures and systems and to provide insight into the effects that these phenomena may have in the design of

the building. After completing this course, architect should have fairly good idea about the consequences of the

design decisions on energy performance of a building, possible health hazards, and human comfort implications.

Introductory computer simulation methods and tools will also be covered. The course will also include project,

which will consist in using computer tool in early stages of design of a building. The project is planned to be a

group effort with divided responsibilities between group members. The result of the project will be documented in

the Term Project Report.

Course content includes:

� Fundamentals of heat transfer and moisture transfer (introduction)

� Heat and moisture transfer in building structures

� Thermo-physical properties of materials

� Weather data and climatic conditions

� Performance of building envelopes

� Performance of windows and other fenestration

� Performance of building foundations

� Performance of roof and attic spaces

� Insulation

� Air infiltration

� Moisture control in building structures

� Daylighting

� Energy use in buildings

� Cooling and heating load calculation basics

� Overview of mechanical systems

� Integrated performance of a building

� Term project

Course requirements:

Active participation in the classroom and regular attendance are strongly encouraged. Grades will be assigned

based on the following percentages:

� Attendance: 10%

� Homework: 20%

� Exams: 40%

� Term Project: 30%

Text:

Handout materials

Prerequisites:

Physics, calculus

29


ARCH-DES 653 Tectonics III 3 credits

Instructor: Civjan, Schreyer

Course Description:

In this course we will explore the interrelations between loads, structural systems, materials and construction

methods. Topics addressed are building layout, design, structural detailing, and documentation of predominantly

large-scale buildings and structures made of steel, aluminum, concrete, masonry and wood (glulam and heavytimber).

Students will be exposed to a wide range of topics and will be encouraged to develop an integrated approach to

planning that considers efficient structural solutions. Concept-based design projects and assignments will

provide an opportunity to practice this. An emphasis is placed on research, software-based structural design,

detailing, and project documentation.

Learning Objectives:

Structural Components

Resisting loads

Seeking equilibrium

Designing using software, optimal design

Materials: Properties, uses and detailing

Design of structural systems and members

Axial members

Beams and trusses

Preliminary sizing

Optimal shapes

Arches and domes

Tensile structures

Lateral bracing systems

Introduction to the principles of structural systems, design and behavior as they relate to large-scale construction

projects. The course includes detailing, documentation issues relating to structural and cladding systems. Students

will gain an understanding in transferring loads to foundations through a variety of structural systems, basic design of

structural elements, and material selection. These issues will be addresses relating to the building envelope as well

as the structural components.

Course Requirements:

Your course grade will consist of these components (some are group work):

45% - approx. 6 Assignments

50% - 2 Design Projects

5% - Participation

Text:

Wayne Place, Architectural Structures. 2007, J. Wiley & Sons

Prerequisites:

Tectonics II

30


ARCH-DES 660 Business of Building 3 credits

Instructor: Damery, Dietz

Course Description

Introduction to issues affecting the operation of a professional interior design/architecture office: programming,

office structures, liability insurance, project scheduling, IDP and RE orientation, code search, cost estimating,

portfolio and interviewing procedures. Includes field trips.

Learning Objectives

Students interested in design and construction of structures will develop an understanding of the professional

practice of architecture. Managing a project, contracts, marketing, scheduling, personnel, leadership,

interpersonal communication, human behavior, finance, budgeting, ethical and legal considerations.

Students will gain understanding of and will hone verbal, writing, and research and collaborative skills. They will

also be exposed to and gain awareness in the areas of:

• Critical Thinking Skills • Contracts and Specifications

• Human Behavior • The Legal Context of Architectural •Legal

Responsibilities Practice

• Building Economics and • Firm Organization and Management

Costing • Leadership

• Technical Documentation • Ethics and Professional Judgment

1. Client Role in Architecture - Understanding of the responsibility of the architect to elicit, understand, and

resolve the needs of the client, owner, and user.

2. Architect’s Administrative Roles - Understanding of obtaining commissions and negotiating contracts,

managing personnel and selecting consultants, recommending project delivery methods, and forms of service

contracts.

3. Architectural Practice - Understanding of the basic principles and legal aspects of practice organization,

financial management, business planning, time and project management, risk mitigation, and mediation and

arbitration as well as an understanding of trends that affect practice, such as globalization, outsourcing, project

delivery, expanding practice settings, diversity, and others.

4. Professional Development - Understanding of the role of internship in obtaining licensure and registration and

the mutual rights and responsibilities of interns and employers.

5. Leadership - Understanding of the need for architects to provide leadership in the building design and

construction process and on issues of growth, development, and aesthetics in their communities.

6. Legal Responsibilities - Understanding of the architect’s responsibility as determined by registration law,

building codes and regulations, professional service contracts, zoning and subdivision ordinances,

environmental regulation, historic preservation laws, and accessibility laws.

7. Ethics and Professional Judgment - Understanding of the ethical issues involved in the formation of

professional judgement in architectural design and practice.

Course Requirements

Students are expected to have read the text and course packet material prior to each class lecture. The lectures

are designed to reinforce and expand on the readings. Students are encouraged and will be called on to

participate and contribute in class discussions, in-class exercises, group work and case presentations. Case

presentations are graded on a group basis.

Homework Assignments (23@ 2% each ) 46%

Case Studies (2 @ 10% each ) 20%

Exams (2 @ 10% each ) 20%

Final Exam 14%

Total 100%

Texts:

The Architecture Student’s Handbook of Professional Practice, John Wiley and Sons Inc.

Ebert, Ronald J. and Ricky W. Griffin, Business Essentials, 5th Edition, Prentice-Hall

Prerequisites:

31


ARCH-DES 670 Research Forum 3 credits

Instructors: Lugosch, Page, Dillon

Catalogue Description:

Design criticism, current design literature, man/environment problems, design education, sociology of design,

energy conservation through design, etc. Guest speakers, possibly one or two field trips; each participant

prepares a class presentation on a chosen topic.

Learning Objectives:

A Masters Project is a year long, self initiated major research and design project which reflects your area of

interest. The expectations for Masters Projects are for a truly significant project, though large size and

programmatic complexity are not necessarily the primary determinant. The significance of the project may

emerge from the types of research themes that accompany and are implemented through the design phase of

the project.

This course is a research seminar designed to help students in the Architecture and Design program identify

topics and pursue research that will support the spring Master’s thesis project semester. Through readings, site

visits, and intensive sharing and critiquing of topics and research proposals, the class aims to have each student

be fully prepared to produce outstanding, innovative thesis projects.

Course Requirements:

The central assignment of the course is to produce a research paper on your topic. The paper will have two

parts: a serious examination, conducted through scholarly journal and books, of an important design issue and

a detailed description of a specific site, building, or landscape that will serve as the focus of the spring design

semester. There will be several short writing assignments throughout the semester.

Project Binder The main product of the workshop is a Workshop Project Binder in which you will compile the

research completed during the semester. I suggest lightweight plastic sleeves in a roomy binder that can hold a

variety of research items from clippings to material samples to code research, to your writings and graphics.

The Project Binder that you develop during this semester’s workshop will evolve into your Degree Project Book

as you supplement the Workshop Binder with additional writing/analysis/documentation of your design process

and completed design over the course of your Degree Project Design semester. Two copies of the Degree

Project Book must be handed in at the end of your Degree Project Design semester in the week following your

oral presentation.

Weekly discussion will focus on the nature of thesis concepts and how research and writing can help to hone

interests. In addition, practical issues of how to assemble program and site material will be reviewed.

You are required to complete the following and submit your work at the start of the Masters Project Research

Seminar fall semester. Minimum requirements: a summary of a minimum of 5 influential readings related to your

project proposal; a bibliography of additional proposed readings; an analysis of

art/architecture/poetry/dance/joinery in tribal cultures … expressions that you find inspirational; initial site

proposal(s); and a statement of the focus of your Masters project; your thesis.

The Masters Project Research Forum Fall Semester is to provide you with the opportunity to further the predesign

explorations begun over the summer; to discuss ideas, shape the scope of your project, elaborate and

complete design preparations, continue initial concept and design explorations. Successful completion of

minimum requirements outlined below is required to continue into Master Project Design. The pre-design

preparations completed during the fall will be handed in at the end of the fall semester in the ongoing

development of the Master Project Binder. Minimum Requirements: Expanded research with written summaries;

continued concept development; refined thesis, completed “Letter of Intent”; site documentation in CAD; site

analysis; completed building program based on an analysis of the use and users for your building; and

regulatory research.

Texts:

Alain de Botton, Architecture of Happiness (Vintage paperback)

Wayne C. Booth, The Craft of Research (University of Chicago Press), 3 rd edition

Strunk and White, Elements of Style

Prerequisite: Admission to final year of MArch or MS Design program

32


ARCH-DES 799 [formerly 699] Masters Project 9 credits

Instructors: Luarasi, Lugosch [coordinators]

Course Description

Coursework under the direction of faculty for the completion of project by candidates for the degree of Master of

Architecture and Master of Science in Design.

Learning Objectives

The final studio in the Graduate Design sequence encourages students to engage in increasingly independent

work that will be presented in both a review and a final book outlining their process over the course of the

semester and their final designs. The Masters Project should address questions, as appropriate, related to the

changing character of the city, the nature of social/cultural institutions, and the context in which their project is

situated. The area of research must be developed into highly articulated projects. These must express a

substantial degree of resolution and be presented with attention to all aspects of design from technical details to

overall planning. The projects should advance all areas covered in the comprehensive studio (including building

systems, ADA, and safety). They should also consider issues of sustainability, ethics, cost analysis, and

materiality.

Course Requirements

Each student has an assigned committee, comprised of three members of the graduate faculty. Four formal

committee review meetings, each with a set of required submissions, are scheduled at appropriate intervals

during the semester. These meeting agendas are:

1. Alternative Partis -- site & building strategies are to be studied, documented and presented;

2. Schematics -- in-depth development and refinement of a chosen parti is presented;

3. Design Development -- presentation makes clear that all major design decisions have been made, including

wall sections illustrating materials and the integration of all building technologies;

4. Final Committee Review -- determination is made at this review as to whether the project is acceptable and

can be presented to the full faculty and invited guests

Text

The Blind Watchmaker – Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe without Design, Richard Dawkins,

W. W. Norton & Company, New York, London, 1996

Earth Moves – The Furnishing of Territories, Bernard Cache, MIT Press, 1995

the metapolis dictionary of advanced architecture – city, technology and society in the information age

Specific readings, related to students’ topics, are assigned.

Prerequisites:

Graduate Design V, Research Forum

33


ARCH-DES 700 Integration 3 credits

Instructors: Miller Pollin, Williams

Course Description:

Professional design procedures consisting of complete design solutions from inception to completion of project.

Theory and practice seminar discussions to enlarge knowledge and understanding of the practice of designing

interiors in architecture.

Course Objectives:

The intent of this course is to teach the skills necessary to proceed from a Schematic Design Phase, consisting

of those drawings illustrating a project’s scale and relationship of components, to the Design Development

Phase, consisting of those drawings and other documents necessary to fix and describe the size and character

of the project as to architectural, structural, mechanical and electrical systems and materials. Primary emphasis

will be placed on the selection and dimensional interrelationship between building systems and their

appropriateness, cost and code requirements. Further emphasis will be placed on the historical comparisons

and precedents for similar design elements. This ability to understand the “how to” of construction is critical to

the future practitioners place in the profession.

The central focus of this course is to integrate architectural design with site conditions, structural systems,

construction details, environmental systems, life-safety systems, building envelope systems, code analysis,

program definition and development and the social context of design. The coursework will be complex; including

both a mixed-use programmatic aspect as well as a hybrid structural system. Students will be guided through a

complex design process into the production of a set of integrated design development drawings and an outline

specification. These documents highlight the professional design procedures and documentation that takes

place in architectural practice. During the semester various links will be made to course content in the following

A + D program courses:

Tectonics I, II, III

Business of Building

Building Physics

Methods for resolving design issues in a complex program

Examining environmental implications for architectural design and development strategies

Understanding the criteria used for selecting structural, mechanical and building envelope systems and

materials

Examine critical regional phenomena in the natural and built environment

Organization of design development drawings as precursor to developing construction documents

Review the process of creating specifications

Awareness of accessing the Uniform Building Code, energy codes and local building codes

Preparation of a preliminary budget using contractors estimating methods

Course Requirements:

Projects: You will be developing a design project previously completed in another studio. Initial class sessions

will assess the project and discuss strategies for moving it into design development.

Design Development will be the second phase of the project. In this phase students will work in conjunction with

the principal professor as well as professors from collaborating departments on campus. The product of this

process will yield an integrated set of digital drawings that include the following: site plan, dimensioned floor

plans, roof plan, elevations, building sections, wall sections, details, and window and door schedules. Students

will be required to select mechanical systems and produce schematic HVAC layouts and preliminary electrical

plans.

Students will assemble an outline specification and have the opportunity to discuss their decisions with a

building contractor.

Students will prepare a preliminary budget for the project.

Texts:

The Studio Companion: Rules of Thumb for Preliminary Design, by Edward Allen & Joseph Iano, 4th Edition

Fundamentals of Building Construction, by Edward Allen & Joseph Iano, 5th edition

Prerequisite:

ARCH-DES 602

34


ART-HIST 191A Introduction to Architecture and the Built Environment 3 credits

Instructor: Rohan, Vickery

Course Description:

This is an introductory lecture course that is a foundation both for those who have a general interest in

architecture and for those who will pursue architecture, design, preservation and planning as a career.

Learning Objectives:

The class covers the history of architecture from antiquity to the present in a fashion that is both thematic and

chronological. Lectures and discussions examine significant examples of western and non-western buildings,

complexes and cities from Europe, the Middle East, the Americas, China, Japan and India. Exemplary

structures, such as the Parthenon in Greece and the Ise Shrine in Japan, will be compared in order to

understand how different cultures approach similar architectural problems. In addition to an awareness of the

broader issues that contribute to the formation of the built environment (materials, technology, patronage, power,

labor), students will develop research skills, learn to read architectural plans and acquire a working vocabulary

of architectural terms. These skills will be useful for taking upper level courses in architectural history and can

be called upon throughout life. Students will also be encouraged to think about issues of sustainability and the

built environment throughout the course, in order to better understand humankind’s relationship between

buildings and the environment and subsequently to have a better understanding of the issues we face today.

Course Requirements:

Papers: The first 3-5 page assignment is a comparison of the Acropolis, Athens with the Ise Shrine, Japan, due

Friday feb. 23. The second 5 page assignment is a descriptive exercise of Pennsylvania Station, New York

designed to help your skills in reading and analyzing plans and images, due Friday April 10. The final 6-7 page

paper is an analysis of an actual building on campus that can be visited and described in light of issues addressed in

the class and in the readings (due Monday May 4).These assignments will be explained in greater detail on separate

handouts and dates may change. Plagarism, especially from internet sources such as Wikipedia, will result in lower

grades or failure.

Exams: All exams use slides. There is a quiz (Wed. February 11), midterm (Wed. March 11) and a cumulative final

(date and time to be announced). For the mid-term and final you will be asked to identify and compare images of

structures discussed in class and found in the textbook. There will be review sheets for these exams listing these

structures. For each building you will have to know its name, location, architect, dates and why it is significant. You

will be expected to interpret and cite the readings for the exam. The final is a cumulative exam using material from

the entire course. Exams must be taken as scheduled, or else a legitimate excuse from the dean’s office must be

presented. This means you should not book a flight that conflicts with quizzes or exams!!

Final grades will be determined by the grades that are received on the following: a quiz (5%), a mid-term exam

(20%), a final exam(25%), written assignment #1, (15%), written assignment #2 (15%) and a seven page final

paper (20%). Late assignments will be penalized unless the student reaches an agreement with their teaching

assistant.

Texts:

Marian Moffett, Michael Fazion, Lawrence Wodehouse. Buildings Across Time: An Introduction to World Architecture

(McGraw Hill, 2009, 3 rd edition) and The Penguin Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture are the required text

for the course. Both are available at Amherst Books.

Prerequisites:

None

35


ART-HIST 342/642 19th Century Architecture 3 credits

Instructor: Rohan

Course Description:

Architecture as art, proper architectural terms, architecture as tool of society. Flow of architectural style from

1750 to 1900 in Europe and America; attempts to account for frequent changes in style, beginning with

Romanticism, continuing through variety of tastes of the mid-century, concluding with rise of the skyscraper and

early Frank Lloyd Wright. Architecture as humanistic study; basic for architects, regional planning, landscape

and town planning, and preservation.

Learning Objectives:

This lecture class surveys the practice of architecture in Europe and America from the mid-eighteenth-century to

the early 1900s. It looks at the economic, social and political forces that led to the creation of new building

types, institutions and technologies peculiar to the nineteenth century. In a chronological fashion, the course

focuses on seminal figures, monuments, urban environments and movements- such as Schinkel, Ruskin, Violletle-Duc,

Frank Lloyd Wright, Hausmann’s Paris, Olmstead’s Central Park, Gothic Revival, Arts and Crafts, and

Art Nouveau. A particular emphasis will be placed upon architecture’s relationship to history and labor. The

architect’s role as a critic seeking social reform will also be stressed, Students will develop a working vocabulary

of germs that will be used on quizzes and exams. It is helpful for those taking 343, 20 th Century Architecture in

the Spring.

Course Requirements:

A quiz (5%) Sept. 17, mid-term exam (15%) Oct 20, final exam (20%), short 5-page paper (20%) due Oct. 15 in

class, a 10-12 page research paper (40%) due Friday, Dec.3 in class. Graduate student requirements are

different.

Texts:

Barry Bergdoll’s European Architecture 1750-1900 and Henry-Russell Hitchcock’s Architecture: Nineteenth and

Twentieth Centuries are required. Both are available at the textbook annex. Other readings will be on reserve

and there may be some supplements.

Prerequisite:

ART-HIST 110 or 115.

36


ART-HIST 343/643 20th Century Architecture 3 credits

Instructor: Rohan, Dillon

Course Description:

Recognition and explanation of stylistic trends of our era, beginning with Frank Lloyd Wright and other 20th

century innovators, ending with contemporary developments. Changing theories of modern architecture and

their historical sources; views of modern architects through reading and critiquing. Preparation for careers in

architecture, environmental design, interior decoration and art history.

Learning Objectives:

This lecture course uses the primary ideologies of the 20th century—socialism, capitalism, and globalism—to

examine the architecture, design and theory of the Modernist movement from 194 to the present. It considers

the work of the founding figures—Wright, Mies, Gropius, and Le Corbusier—and significant themes such as the

individual vs. the collective; European vs. American ideals; the contributions of non-western cultures, such as

Japan; and the impact of war, mass-culture and new technologies. Graduate students have their own discussion

section.

Course Requirements:

Quiz - 5%

Midterm - 20%

2 short assignments - 15% each

Final paper–20%

Final exam–25%

Other papers or quizzes might be assigned as the instructor sees fit.

Text:

Kenneth Frampton, Modern Architecture: A Critical History (Thames & Hudson, 4th edition)

Other articles on reserve indicated on syllabus.

Prerequisites:

ART-HIST 110, 115 or 191A

37


BMATWT 597E Building Energy and Environmental Systems 3 credits

Instructor: Hoque

Course Description:

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of building environmental systems from an energy

efficient perspective.

Learning Objectives:

There are three phases of learning objects in this course. The first phase, building science principles, will cover

an overview of thermodynamics, energy auditing and accounting, and heat transfer calculations. Content of this

phase includes thermal comfort, moisture and humidity, air quality, sensible and latent flows through opaque

building elements, heat flow through air movement and radiation, and heat flow through glazing elements.

The thermal control systems phase will address climate responsive systems, the design of active heating

systems, the design of active cooling systems, and air supply (including ventilation and exhaust systems).

Content of this phase includes passive heating and cooling strategies, hydronic heating, hot-air systems, heat

recovery, refrigeration cycles and dehumidification, heat pumps, and ventilation and exhaust systems.

The final phase looks at plumbing (water and waste systems) and fire protection. Content of this phase includes

water supply, liquid waste, solid waste, and fire alarm systems.

Course Requirements:

ASSIGNMENTS AND EXERCISES: 5 exercises, 20% of grade

QUIZZES: 3 quizzes, 30% of grade

FINAL PROJECT and FINAL PRESENTATION: Group project, 50% of final grade

Text:

Richard Janis and William Tao: Mechanical and Electrical Systems for Buildings

Prerequisites:

ARCH-DES 520/BMATWT 211 or permission of instructor

38


BMATWT 597P Project Management for Design and Construction 3 credits

Instructor: Pavlova-Gillham

Course Description:

This class introduces the fundamental concepts of project management for design and construction and is

suitable for students in various disciplines, particularly architecture, engineering, construction, information

technology and management. Topics to be discussed include project initiation, planning, implementation,

monitoring, control and closeout; effective documentation, scope/quality, budget and schedule definition; team

organization, contracts and negotiation, risk management, legal, environmental and other issues throughout the

project life cycle.

Learning Objectives:

To understand the scope of projects in contemporary organizations, including the phases of a project life cycle

To identify the characteristics of different project types and organizational structures

To gain experience with techniques of design and construction project management for balancing the three

primary objectives of scope, budget and schedule

To enhance the following attributes of future professionals through individual and group assignments, case

studies, in-class discussions, presentations and exercises:

• Technical skills

• Communication skills

• Decision-making skills

• Problem-solving skills

• Interpersonal skills

• Leadership skills

Course Requirements:

Lectures and Readings: 1 weekly 3 hr. class with lecture and practice/discussion will provide a platform for

introducing and reviewing key concepts, case-studies, and examples for review of current issues. Students are

expected to have completed assigned readings before class in order to participate effectively in class discussion

and practice assignments.

Assignments: individual assignments will be handed out in class and posted on the course web page. These

expand on the practiced work and may have “research components” where students need to gather information

needed to complete a task.

Team Project: at the beginning of the semester the class will be split into small groups. Each group will study

two existing projects, will develop a case study for each one in terms of stakeholders, individual responsibilities,

technical breakdown, budget, and schedule, and will analyze the projects from a management perspective. The

groups will also manage their own teamwork as a project. Teams will make final oral and written presentations

to the class. Individuals will evaluate team dynamics and project outcomes according to the concepts learned.

Text:

Lock, Dennis: Project Management, 9 th Edition, Gower Publishing Company, Burlington, VT, 2007 ISBN:

978056608772-1

Class Handouts and E-Reserves

Prerequisites:

Juniors, Senior and Graduate Students Only

Dates Offered:

Spring 2009

39


CEE 211 Perspectives on the Evolution of Structures 3 credits

Instructor: Arwade

Catalogue Description:

Learn how to interpret and understand the built environment through technical, visual, and social analysis and

critique of bridges, buildings, and designers.

Learning Objectives:

Students should leave this course with an ability to interpret the built environment from the perspective of the

structural engineer.

Topics Covered:

• The development of long span bridge forms

• Development of high rise building forms

• Development of reinforced concrete bridge and shell forms

• The role of structural considerations in determining structural forms

• The rise of sustainability in the design of high rise buildings

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

For the structures discussed in class you should be able to:

1. identify from an image a structure’s designer and location

2. explain how form relates to forces in the structure

3. explain the social, symbolic, and scientific significance of the structure (GWB, Eiffel Tower, Hancock, and

Salg. at least)

4. explain qualitatively how the loads are transferred by the structural system to the ground

5. perform simple calculations to determine the forces in the main structural members

For structures which you encounter in the world around you, you should be able to:

1. explain qualitatively the means by which loads are transferred to the ground

2. evaluate the qualifications of the structure as a work of structural art

3. research the social, symbolic and scientific aspects of the structure and express your findings clearly in

written, graphical, and spoken form

Course Requirements:

Students’ performance in the class will be assessed through a midterm exam, homework assignments and a

final project based on the following weighting:

Homework 1/3

Midterm 1/3

Final Project 1/3

Text:

Billington, DP (1983) The Tower and the Bridge. Princeton Architectural Press, Princeton, NJ.

Prerequisites:

R1 math.

40


HACU 293 Architectural Theory: Structure + Culture + Text 4 credits

Instructor: Koehler (Hampshire College)

Catalogue Description:

This course is a focused examination of architectural theories, ranging from the canonical writings of Vitruvius to

the ideas of contemporary architects like Koolhaas, Libeskind, and Diller & Scofido, with an emphasis on

twentieth-century architects (Le Corbusier, Gropius, Venturi, Tschumi, etc.) and philosophers (Benjamin,

Heidigger, Bachelard, etc.).

Learning Objectives:

Concepts of space, experience, and technology will be discussed as well as the social, cultural, economic and

political issues that are raised in writing about and for the built environment. Students will be responsible for

serious weekly readings of treatises, essays, and books, as well as the visual analysis of plans, pictures and

structures. Each student will develop a substantial research project that reflects an awareness of art historical

methodologies, as well as keep a journal of reading and looking responses.

Course Requirements:

This course is based upon our shared discussion of architectural texts. We meet once a week. Attendance is

mandatory, participation in discussion is essential, as is preparation for class. Each student will be required to

lead class discussion at one point in the semester—by preparing questions about and critical analyses of a

specific reading.

You should keep a journal that is composed of your reading responses, your analysis of buildings that we will

visit throughout the term, and your response to current issues in and writings about architecture and the built

environment.

Each student will also be responsible for a final “state of the research” presentation and annotated bibliography.

This project will be a serious and critical reading of selected texts (books, essays, and articles) about a particular

theme in contemporary architectural debates.

Texts:

Rethinking Architecture: A Reader in Cultural Theory, edited by Neil Leach (London and New York: Routledge,

1997)

Rethinking Technology: A Reader in Architectural Theory, edited by William W. Braham, Johnathan Hale (London

and New York: Routledge, 2006)

Recommended: Architecture/Theory since 1968, edited by K. Michael Hays (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1998)

Prerequisites:

Dates Offered:

Spring 2009

41


4.4 FACULTY RÉSUMÉS

Supplemental information to the APR must include a maximum two-page résumé for each faculty member

teaching in the accredited degree program.

Art, Architecture, Art History (Architecture+Design Program)

Caryn Brause Lecturer

Maria Chao Lecturer

Charlie Curcjia Lecturer

Kerry Dietz Lecturer

David Dillon Lecturer

Joseph Krupczynski Associate Professor

Skender Luarasi Assistant Professor

Kathleen Lugosch Professor

Ray Kinoshita Mann Associate Professor, Graduate Director

Caitlin McKee Teaching Assistant

Sigrid Miller Pollin Professor

Max Page Professor

Stephen Schreiber Professor, Program Director

Blake Williams Lecturer

Erika Zekos Lecturer

Art, Architecture, Art History (Art History Program)

Timothy Rohan Associate Professor

Meg VIckery Lecturer

Building Materials and Wood Technology

Peggi Clouston Assistant Professor

David Damery Associate Professor

Paul Fisette Professor

Simi Hoque Assistant Professor

Ludmilla Pavlova-Gillham Lecturer

Alexander Schreyer Lecturer

Engineering

Sanjay Arwade Assistant Professor

Scott Civjan Associate Professor

Hampshire College: Humanities, Arts, and Cultural Studies

Karen Koehler Associate Professor of Art and Architectural

History

42


CARYN BRAUSE Instructor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

May 1996

May 1988

1988

Design studios

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE Charlottesville, VA

Master of Architecture

AIA CERTIFICATE OF MERIT from the Henry Adams Fund

WEEDON EAST ASIA TRAVEL FELLOWSHIP for study and travel in China,

1994

GOVERNOR’S FELLOWSHIP IN ARCHITECTURE 1993-1996

ELLA AND MILTON GRIGG ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP 1995-1996

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA Philadelphia, PA

Bachelor of Arts, magna cum laude

major: design of the environment

PENNSYLVANIA ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS Philadelphia, PA

studies in drawing, painting, sculpture, etching, art history

1986–1987 HEBREW UNIVERSITY SCHOOL FOR OVERSEAS STUDENTS Jerusalem,

Israel

studies in archeology, architecture, history

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2008–2009

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS DEPT OF ART, ARCHITECTURE & ART

HISTORY Amherst

Instructor, Coordination of Analysis and Representation laboratory

1993–1996 UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE Charlottesville, VA

Teaching Assistant, Seminar Leader, Research Assistant

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2006–2008

1997–2004

1996–1997

1992

1989–1991

1990–1991

1989

1987–1988

1986–1987

C BRAUSE ARCHITECTURE Northampton, MA

principal: registered architect in Massachusetts and New York State, NCARB

certified

THOMAS DOUGLAS ARCHITECTS Northampton, MA

project architect for commercial and residential projects

CR STUDIO ARCHITECTS, PC New York, NY

ASSOCIATE 2002

project management and marketing responsibilities, real estate research and

product development

SMITH-MILLER + HAWKINSON ARCHITECTS New York, NY

architectural intern

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE Virginia

interpretive ranger

HUBBELL STUDIO Santa Ysabel, CA

apprentice to sculptor: work in stone, metal, wood, glass, and tile, community

design – build projects

JULIAN COMMUNITY PLANNING GROUP

land use subcommittee, scenic highway subcommittee

US FOREST SERVICE Arizona, California

wilderness ranger

RAHENKAMP ASSOCIATES Philadelphia, PA

landscape architecture and land planning

DICKSON DEMARCHE & ASSOCIATES Westport, CT

landscape architecture and land planning

43


RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

2005

Winter 2005

Winter

2004/2005

Jan./Feb. 2005

July 2003

June 2003

2003

SERVICE

REGISTRATION

Published Projects

INTERIORS FOR UNDER 5s Melissa Jones

projects featured project: Discovery Center at the American Museum of Natural

History

“Interior Sights” URBAN LAND Magazine

featured project: Discovery Center at the American Museum of Natural History

“Two 9/11 Competitions – One Winner” COMPETITIONS Magazine

featured project: Memorial Cove, New Jersey 9/11 Memorial Competition

“Lofty Thinking” BREATHE Magazine

featured project: Collector’s Loft

“The Wonder Years” CONTRACT Magazine

featured project: Discovery Center at the American Museum of Natural History

“Admission: Possible” CONSULTING-SPECIFYING ENGINEER Magazine

featured project: Discovery Center at the American Museum of Natural History

ELEMENTS, ARCHITECTURE IN DETAIL Oscar Riera Ojeda and Mark Pasnik

featured project: Eileen Fisher Showroom

Massachusetts, New York

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AWARDS

NCARB

2004

COMMUNITY COVE NEW JERSEY 9/11 MEMORIAL COMPETITION

second stage finalist

2002

PEEP SHOW COMPETITION

third place winner

1998

AFRICAN BURIAL GROUND MEMORIAL PROJECT COMPETITION

AIA New York City Chapter Project Design Award

1998

EILEEN FISHER SHOWROOM

AIA New York City Chapter Interior Design Award

1998

EILEEN FISHER STORE

AIA New York City Chapter Architectural Design Citation

1994

VIRGINIA AIA STUDENT DESIGN COMPETITION

certificate of honor

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

2009

2008

2008–present

2006–present

2000–2009

C BRAUSE ARCHITECTURE

FIDDLE LAKE BOATHOUSE

design services: rebuilding a family cabin to optimize boats, beds and breezes

BRICKHOUSE COMMUNITY RESOURCE CENTER

pro bono services: new facade, entry sequence and interior design for a teen

center in an historic firehouse

ROCKVILLE RESIDENCE

design services: landscape and architectural additions to knit a mid-century

house into its suburban site

ROE HOUSE

design and construction: ongoing renovations and energy retrofits for an intown

1920’s residence

WESTPORT BUNGALOW

design services: additions, renovations and cabinetry designs for a craftsman

bungalow

44


MARIA CHAO Lecturer

TEACHING

EDUCATION

May 1999

Design studios

Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY

Masters of Architecture

Thesis: Creating Community: a study of merging adaptive reuse and community

outreach through integrating a children’s foster home in an urban infill setting

December 1995 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

Bachelors of Environmental Design in Architecture

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2008–2009 Adjunct Professor for undergraduate level studio courses

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

1997–1999 Teaching Assistant for Structures I, II, III undergraduate level courses

Syracuse University

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2007–present

1999–2006

1996

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

Owner/designer, CHAOdesigns LLC, Amherst, MA

Designer, William McDonough + Partners, Charlottesville, VA

Architectural Intern, Holmes.King.Kallquist & Associates, Architects, Syracuse,

NY

LEED 2.0 Accredited professional

Associate AIA member

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

2010 exhibit

April 2009

Ongoing

Ongoing

November 2008

October 2008

Fall 2008

Spring 2008

Spring 2008

UMass potential exhibitor in ‘Greening the Valley’

RDC, speaker of ‘Modern + Green: a case study in Amherst

Marvin/Integrity windows Case Study candidate

Center for Ecological Technology, case study participant

Amherst History Museum House Tour

NESEA, Green home tour

LEED house tours, four to be scheduled for early fall 2008

Daily Hampshire Gazette, interviewed for article in ‘Home’ section

New York Times, interviewed for article

45


DRAGAN CURCIJA Lecturer

TEACHING

EDUCATION

Building Physics III

1992

Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

1982

B.Sc., Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

University of Massachusetts, Graduate Student Advisor and Chair of M.S.

Thesis and Ph.D. dissertation committees

1989–1995 University of Massachusetts, Instructor

University of Massachusetts, Senior Research Fellow

Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2005–present

2005–present

2005–present

2004–present

2003–2005

2002–present

2001–present

1999–2003

1998–2004

1996–present

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

April 2005

February 2005

Advanced Framing Systems for Commercial Windows. Subcontract to

TRACO Windows. Principal Investigator.

Development of a Procedure for U-Factor Rating of Domed Skylights.

National Fenestration Rating Council. Principal Investigator.

Consultant to AAMA Skylight Council. Energy Performance of Skylights.

Investigation of Heat Transfer Effects of Sloped and Ventilated Internal

Cavities of Fenestration Systems. National Fenestration Rating Council.

Principal Investigator.

IGU Durability Knowledge Database, Phase II. Subcontract to Aspen

Research. Principal Investigator.

Fenestration Energy Efficiency in Transitional economy Countries, Phase I

and II. Oak Ridge Nation al Laboratory. Principal Investigator.

Technical Support to NFRC. National Fenestration Rating Council. Principal

Investigator.

Consultant to Guardian Industries Corp., Research and Development

Center. Computer modeling of fenestration and glazing products.

Fenestration Thermal Performance Research, University of Massachusetts,

Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Principal Investigator

and Leader of Building Energy Efficiency Program (BEEP).

Consultant to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Windows and

Daylighting group, Berkeley, CA. Development of computer program tools

THERM and WINDOW.

”Real-time simulations of the durability of Insulating Glass Units”. 10DBMC

International Conference on Durability of Building Materials and

Components. Lyon, France. (with I. Dukovski, H. Velthuis, J. Fairman, M.

Doll)

“Two-Dimensional Conduction and CFD Simulations of Heat Transfer in

Horizontal Window Frame Cavities”. ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 111, Pt. 1.

(with A. Gustavsen, D. Arasteh, C. Kohler)

46


December 2004

September 2004

January 2004

SERVICE

1985–present

1996–present

1995–present

1999–present

REGISTRATION

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

1985–present

1989–present

1996–present

1999–present

1995–present

AWARDS

1993

1989

1985

1985

”Component Modeling Methodology for Predicting Thermal Performance of

Non-Residential Fenestration Systems”. Thermal Performance of Building

Envelopes IX, Clearwater, FL. (with M.S. Bhandari, M. Manteghi, and B.V.

Shah)

“New Rating System for Non-Residential Fenestration Products”. Energy

Efficient Windows - 4 Conference. Krasnoyarsk, Russia.

“Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics and Conduction

Simulations of Heat Transfer in Window Frames with Internal Cavities - Part

1: Cavities Only”. ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 110, Pt. 1. (with A.

Gustavsen, C. Kohler, D. Arasteh)

ASHRAE, American Society for Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning

Engineers, Inc., Member

TC 4.5 Fenestration - Handbook Subcommittee Chairman

ASTM, American Society for Testing and Materials, Member

Chairman of the Condensation Resistance Task Group

NFRC, National Fenestration Rating Council, Associate Member,

Chairman of the Thermo-Physical Properties Subcommittee

ISO, International Standards Organization

Member of TC 163/WG2 and WG14

IEA, International Energy Agency

U.S.A. representative and co-leader of project A1 for the Task 27.

ASHRAE, American Society for Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning

Engineers, Inc., Member

ASME, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Associate Member

ASTM, American Society for Testing and Materials, Member, Chairman of

the Condensation Resistance Task Group

ISO, International Standards Organization, Member of TC 163/WG2 and

WG9

NFRC, National Fenestration Rating Council, Associate Member, Chairman

of the Thermo-Physical Properties Subcommittee

Distinguished Teaching Award - Honorable Mention, Mechanical

Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts

ASHRAE Grant-in-Aid, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air

Conditioning Engineers, Inc.

ASHRAE Best Paper Award for 1984, American Society of Heating,

Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., 1985.

Annual October Award for scientific work in 1984, Parliament of the City of

Belgrade

47


KERRY L. DIETZ Lecturer

TEACHING Business of Building

EDUCATION

University of Michigan

1977

Master of Architecture

Kent State University

1975

Bachelor of Science in Architecture

Continuing Education Courses in Real Estate, Business Management, Risk

Reduction, Building Science and Technology, NFPA Life Safety Code,

Arbitration

and Mediation

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Dietz & Company Architects was founded in 1985 by Kerry Dietz as a general

practice architectural firm specializing in multifamily and elderly housing,

educational institutions, healthcare, and historic renovation. Ms. Dietz provides

overall management for the company and serves as principal-in-charge for all

projects.

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

Publications

“Battered Women's Shelter” in More Than Housing, Lifeboats for Women and

Children by Joan Sprague

“Scattered Site Housing in Holyoke” in The Affordable Housing Challenge by

Anne Gelbspan

SERVICE and PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

American Institute of Architects, Communities by Design, Sustainable Design

Assessment Team (SDAT), Affordable Housing Advisor for Kaua’i, Hawai’i

American Institute of Architects’ 2006 Housing and Residential Design

Knowledge

Community Housing Awards, Advisory Group Chair

American Arbitration Association, Construction Panel Member

Capital Funds Review Subcommittee of the Corporate Support Scheduling

Committee, Member

Citizens Housing Advocacy and Planning Association, Board Member

Connecticut Construction Advisory Council of the American Arbitration

Association, Member

Pioneer Valley Planning Commission, City of Springfield Representative

Springfield Planning Board, Chair

Sumner Avenue Elementary School, Business Partner

Society for College and University Planning, Member

Community Advisory Committee of the Springfield Zoning Ordinance Revision

Project, Member

48


University of MassachusettsAmherst, Department of Architecture and Design,

Advisory Council, Member

University of MassachusettsAmherst, Department of Architecture and Design,

National Accreditation Team 2007, Member

Springfield Technical Community College, Architectural Technology Program,

Advisory Council, Member

WFCR, NPR Radio for the Pioneer Valley, Capital Campaign Co-Chair, 2008-

2011

REGISTRATION

Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, Vermont, North Carolina, Rhode Island, New Hampshire

NCARB certified

LEED AP

RECENT PROJECTS

HOUSING

Village at Hospital Hill

Northampton, MA

Principal

Dietz & Company Architects was charged with designing the affordable housing

component of this planned mixed-use community located at the former site of

the historical Northampton State Hospital.

Village at Hospital Hill: Ice Pond Drive

Northampton, MA

Principal

Ice Pond Drive represents the first off-site phase of this mixed-used

development which will eventually contain over 200 units of housing. This

project consists of 6 new homes on a wooded rural site; 2 of the homes have

attached barrier-free one-bedroom apartments. All homes on the site were

designed to blend with the styles typical to this area and have exceeded

EnergyStar® specifications for energy efficiency.

Village at Hospital Hill Phase II

Northampton, MA

Principal

Schematic design of 33 affordable housing units located in two new apartment

buildings and several townhouse buildings as part of the new mixed-use

community at the Village at Hospital Hill.

Dutch Point Homeownership

Hartford, CT,

Principal

HOPE VI project design for a mix of 2 and 3 story townhouses for 65 units of

market rate housing in this historic neighborhood.

Burts Pit Road Housing

Northampton, MA

Principal

Providing design and construction administration services for 10 new units of

green, fully accessible special needs housing contained in 2 group homes.

YWCA – Phase II

Springfield, MA

Principal

Currently in the construction document phase, this 32,000 square foot two-story

building for transitional living will be LEED Silver certified. The two-story building

will host 21 housing units.

49


MB Properties for Preservation of Affordable Housing, Inc.

Various Locations

Principal

Renovations to four distinctly different properties:

Dom Narodowy Apartments in Chicopee, MA – A 50-unit elderly housing

project

Bay Meadow Apartments in Springfield, MA – 148 units of family housing

Chestnut Gardens Apartments in Lynn, MA – 65 units of elderly housing

Bridle Path Apartments in Randolph, MA – A 104-unit elderly housing complex

50


DAVID DILLON Lecturer

TEACHING Junior Year Writing, Philosophy, 20 th C. Architecture

EDUCATION

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

Boston College, B.A. Literature, magna cum laude

Harvard University, MA. Literature

Harvard University, Ph.D Literature and Art History (Renaissance Studies)

Harvard University, GSD, Loeb Fellow

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Lecturer

Southern Methodist University, Assistant Professor of English

The Dallas Morning News, Architecture Critic, 1983- present

D Magazine (Dallas), Senior Editor

Visiting Critic and Lecturer at Harvard, University of Texas, Rice University,

University of Arkansas, the University of New Mexico and other institutions.

Peer Reviewer for the GSA’s Design Excellence Program. Juror for ATF

Headquarters, Washington, DC, Austin Federal Courthouse and Tuscaloosa

Federal Courthouse.

Juror for AIA National Design Awards, Presidential Design Awards and

American Society of Landscape Architects Design Awards Jury.

Member of the FDR Memorial Advisory Committee and advisor to the World

War II Memorial in Washington DC.

Commentator for NPR

Advisor to and participant in Architecture at the Crossroads (BBC Television)

and Divided Highways (PBS).

Contributing editor to Architectural Record, Landscape Architecture and other

publications.

Writing: Experience and Expression (D.C.Heath)

Dallas Architecture: 1936-1986 (Texas Monthly Press)

The Architecture of O’Neil Ford (University of Texas Press)

The FDR Memorial (Spacemaker Press)

The Miller Garden: Icon of Modernism (Spacemaker Press)

Extending the Legacy: Planning the Nation’s Capital for the 21 st Century

(NCPC)

America’s House: The Plan for the White House and President’s Park (White

House Architectural Foundation)

Kallmann McKinnell & Wood (Edizioni Press)

More than 200 articles in national and international design publications including

Architectural Record, Domus, Landscape Architecture, Planning, Preservation

and Urban Land

REGISTRATION and PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AWARDS

51


Rotary International Fellow, University College, London and the British Museum

Loeb Fellow, Graduate School of Design, Harvard

Associated Press Managing Editors Award for Criticism

Art World/Manufacturer’s Hanover Award for Criticism (three times)

Association of Sunday and Features Editors Award

Flowers Award for Criticism, Texas Society of Architects (three times)

Texas Society of Architects Honorary Membership

Five-time Pulitzer Prize nominee for Criticism

52


JOSEPH KRUPCZYNSKI Associate Professor

TEACHING Design studios

EDUCATION

1999–2001

1982–1987

1978–1982

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2002–present

2001–2002

1999–2001

1997–1999

1988–1990

1985, 1986

1983–1985

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2001–present

1995–2001

1992–1994

1992

1988–1991

1986

1985

1985–1987

1983–1984

SERVICE

Master of Science in Design, University of Massachusetts

The Cooper Union, Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture

Parsons School of Design, Department of Environmental Design,

BFA with Honors

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Asst/Assoc Professor

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Visiting Assistant Professor

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Teaching Associate

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Lecturer

Parsons School of Design, Department of Continuing Education, Instructor

Parsons School of Design, Department of Environmental Design, Instructor

Parsons School of Design, Department of Environmental Design, Teaching

Assistant

studio projects, Principal Designer, Northampton, MA

Thomas Douglas Architects, Project Designer/Detailer, Northampton, MA

Wormser and Associates Architects, Project Designer/Detailer, New York

Architrope Architects, Project Designer/Detailer, New York, New York

Averitt Associates Architects & Planners, Project Designer/Detailer, New

York

Tod Williams/Billie Tsien Associates, Designer/Draftsman, New York

Kutnicki / Architect, Designer/Draftsman, New York, New York

Interiors Magazine, New York, New York, 1985-1987

Daniel Brown and Associates, Draftsman, New York, New York

2006

Public Art Committee of the Northampton Arts Council, Chair

2005

Five College Lecture Series coordinator

REGISTRATION and PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AWARDS

May 2008

2007

2005–2006

2003–2004

2003

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

Antonia Pantoja Award (Award for Service to the Latino community in Western

Massachusetts)

Latino Scholarship Association, Holyoke MA

Award for “Faculty Making a Difference in the Community”

The Five College Committee for Community-Based Learning, Five College

Inc.

College Outstanding Teaching Award, College of Humanities and Fine Arts

Lilly Teaching Fellowship, UMASS Amherst

Historic Northampton Award, for Cafe Casablanca

University of Massachusetts Chancellor’s Show, Amherst, MA

53


2008

2007

2006

2006

2005

2005

2005

2005

2005

2005–2007

VCA Offices. Northampton, MA. Principal Designer

Design of Offices for Woodworking Firm.

Lechonera and Farm Store. Holyoke, MA. Principal Designer

Schematic design for Restaurant on an urban farm.

Stockholm Public Library Competition. Stockholm, Sweden. Principal Designer

Competition entry for addition to historic library.

Skinner Building Study. Holyoke, MA. Principal Designer/Team Leader

Development report and analysis.

Sunderland Memorial Competition. Sunderland, MA. Principal Designer

Design of a memorial park

Urban Habitat Competition. Charlottesville, VA. 2005. Principal Designer

Competition entry for the design multi-family housing on the site of Trailer Park.

Alvarez Residence. Northampton, MA. 2005. Principal Designer

Design for Kitchen and dining room in an existing home.

Ice Pond House. Northampton, MA. 2005. Principal Designer

Design for a three-bedroom house in new residential development area.

Hein/Hemment House. Amherst, MA. 2005. Principal Designer

Design of a small house.

One West Street. Hadley, MA. Principal Designer

Design for renovations of an historic house on the Connecticut River.

Selected Grants:

Pioneer Valley Planning Commission (PVPC) subcontract for “Re-Thinking

Downtown Westfield”:

This project is a collaboration with PVPC, who has sub-contracted the "Center

for Design Engagement" to organize community engagement, a six day

charette, and to develop design recommendations for a re-vitalization

project for downtown Westfield, MA. Funding comes from a $75,000 grant

from the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community

Development, to develop both a needs assessment and a downtown

action plan for Westfield.

Principal Investigators: Joseph Krupczynski

Period of Grant: February 2009 – August 2009

Amount Awarded: $10,000

CHFA Visioning Grant

Support for the development of a “Center for Design Engagement” within the

Architecture + Design Program at UMass

Principal Investigator: Joseph Krupczynski, Kathleen Lugosch, Max Page

Period of Grant: Fall 2008/Spring 2009

Amount Awarded: $10,000

AIA 150 Grant (with Erica Gees)

In support of a “Sustainable Design Assessment Team” review of downtown

Holyoke, MA. Work includes community charettes and youth

programming to examine the community’s needs within the built

environment.

Principal Investigator: Erica Gees and Joseph Krupczynski

Period of Grant: Spring/Fall 2007

Amount Awarded: $15,000

54


SKENDER LUARASI Assistant Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

2002–2004

Analysis and Representation I & II

Master’s Project

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

1995–2000 BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

WENTWORTH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2007–present

2005–2007

2004

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2006

2005

2000–2005

1999–2000

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

2008–

construction to

start in 2009

2007–

construction to

start in 2009

2000–2003

2003

Spring 2009

SERVICE

REGISTRATION

Assistant Professor of Architecture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Assistant Professor of Architecture, Washington State University

Teacher Assistant at Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Design Studio, Level III. Instructor: Mark Goulthorpe

KENNEDY & VIOLICH ARCHITECTS, Boston Massachusetts

Mark Goulthorpe - DeCoi ARCHITECTS, MIT Digital Design Group

FINEGOLD ALEXANDER + ASSOCIATES INC., Boston Massachusetts

WELDON PRIES ARCHITECT, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Built projects

Mid-rise Residential Project

Tirana, Albania

“Kamiak” Hotel

Tirana, Albania

Chin-Feman Residence

Concord, Massachusetts

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AWARDS

Competitions

Participated in the International Competition for World Trade Center Memorial in

New York.

Conferences

ACSA: 97th Annual Meeting

Housing Hybridity in Tirana, Albania: prototyping dwelling, social capital, and

emergent local-global relations (in collaboration with John Abell)

Massachusetts, architect, 2009 (pending)

55


2002

Exhibition at MIT: Of the sixty students submitting their Studio II projects,

my work and five other students’ work were considered the best and became

part of NAAB exhibit for the year 2002

2000

AIA Award: CERTIFICATE OF MERIT from the HENRY ADAMS FUND

For Excellence in the Study of Architecture

2000

First Prize for Architectural Proposal of the City of North Adams, MA:

Undergraduate Thesis

1994

First Prize in ARCHITECTURAL COMPETITION for entry to POLYTECHNIC

UNIVERSITY OF ALBANIA.

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

January 2009

January 2008

Spring 2007

Spring 2006

Fall 2005

Lectures

Lecture at Polis University, Tirana, Albania:

“Ideogramming – Geological Materialities, Vectorial Fields and Parametric

Design”

Lecture at UFO University, Tirana, Albania:

“Algorithmic and Parametric Design”

Lecture at the Interdisciplinary Design Institute at Washington State University in

Spokane: “Architectural Composition, Algorithmic Thinking and Ideogramming”

Lecture at the Department of Architecture at Washington State University in

Pullman: “Design Operators”

Lecture at the Department of Architecture at Washington State University in

Pullman: “Urban Ideograms”

56


KATHLEEN LUGOSCH Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

1983

1974

1972–1973

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2006–present

2001–2006

2002–2005

2001-2005

1995–2001

1988–1994

1984–1986

1981–1983

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

1986–present

1983–1986

1982–1983

1981–1983

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

2006–present

Summer–Fall

2006

REGISTRATION

Design Studios

MS, M.Arch Degree Project Research Forum

MS, M.Arch Degree Project Design

Independent Study, Practicum

Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Master of Architecture

St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY, Bachelors of Arts, Fine Arts

Universidad de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

University of Massachusetts, Department of Art, Architecture and Art History

Full Professor

Associate Professor

Assistant Professor

Director, Architecture + Design

Director, Interior Design/Architectural Studies

University of Massachusetts, I. D./A. S., Visiting Instructor and Guest Critic

Boston Architectural Center, Boston, MA, Instructor and Guest Critic

Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Teaching Assistant

Lugosch Architects, Amherst, MA, Principal

Graham Gund Architects, Cambridge, MA, Project Architect

Leers Weinzapfel Associates, Boston, MA, Architectural Designer

David Handlin, Cambridge, MA, Architectural Designer

Henry Street Attainable Housing, Multi-phase studio / project exploring

issues relative to the design and construction of “attainable” housing.

Phase 1: Symposium exploring housing options

Phase 2: Vertical Design Studio

Phase 3: complete a set of construction documents for the prototypical

house and to bring the design through the Amherst Town regulatory

bodies.

Phase 4: Construction Studio: Spring 2007.

Phase 5: Site and duplex documentation

Phase 6: Town of Amherst Zoning Board, 2007-2008.

Phase 7: Fall 2008-2010. Land Transfer Completed. House redesigned

to reduce costs and approach Zero Net Energy.

Salamander Crossing Studio: Collaborative Studio Project (in

development). Partnership team: Professor Mark Lindhult,

Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning and Niels LaCour,

Amherst Town Planning, Cinda Jones, Cowls Lumber. Project

definition: to have Landscape Architecture/Architecture Student

Teams explore non-traditional, small town multiple housing options

for a 500 acre parcel of land owned by Cowls Lumber, with the

intention of contributing to the Town of Amherst redesign of Zoning

Regulations.

1986

Registered Architect, Commonwealth of Massachusetts #6682

1993

Energy Crafted Home Certified

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

1986–present

2002–2005

Member, American Institute of Architects

Member, Illuminating Engineering Society of North America

57


AWARDS

2003

2002

2002

2001–2003

2002

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

2008-2009

2007-2009

2008

2006–present

2009-present

2009-present

2006–present

2005–2006

2005–2006

2004–2006

2006

2003–2005

2003–2005

2005

2005

2004

Lighting for Tomorrow, Energy Efficient Luminaire Design

Honorable mention: Lugosch + Licis Portable

Phase 2 Invitational Competition 2004

WM AIA Honor Award: Private Residence Renovation and Addition

WM AIA Awards Traveling Show

Healey Travel Grant, The phenomena of light in architecture

St. Lawrence University Invitational Retrospective Print Show

Center for Design Engagement: Incorporation and application for nonprofit

status with Professors Joseph Krypczynski and Max Page.

Founding Member of PeaPod Homes LLC, assembled housing

designed to approach zero net energy. Project design team included

Hernan Barufaldi, University of Massachusetts Architecture + Design

Alumna; Dr. Charlie Curcija, Design Builder Software; Erik Wight,

Keystone Code.

Lecture: “Pre-Fab” at the Third Annual Massachusetts Architecture

Symposium (and ACSA Northeast Conference, and 2 nd Annual Wood

Symposium).

"Built Architecture". Exploration of the design, construction and delivery

processes to be employed in the in environmentally responsible

residential architecture. Research includes: reduction in building

footprint and environmental impact, programmatic preferences in

"small" homes, alternative materials, methods of manufacture, and

BIM technology.

Proposal: Feasibility Study for Spear Memorial Library. With map-lab

and UMass alumna Stephen Moore.

Feick renovation – design considerations including material and

processes for a client with extreme chemical sensitivities.

Rodgers Lakeside Home, Belchertown, MA. design of 1800 s.f. summer

home.

Miller House Addition, Heath, MA. Addition of garage, Entry, Master

Bedroom to a house designed by LugoschArchitect in 1989.

Mottern, Northampton, MA. Apartment Build-out exploring low cost design

features.

Fishman Vacation Home, Tolland, MA. 2,000 s.f. new construction lakeside

vacation home to replace a house destroyed in fire. Regulatory issues:

Conservation Commission, Neighborhood Approval Committee.

Perlman Renovation, Northampton, MA.

Western Mass Residence, Shutesbury, MA. Passive solar design featuring

energy conserving materials and detailing

Kane/Levit "Flying Porch" Shutesbury, MA. Detached 2nd floor Screen

Room with storage below.

Murphy Renovation/Addition. Amherst, MA. Harmonizing a

contemporary renovation/addition with a 70’s house. Integration of

natural and artificial lighting into new and existing structures.

Competitions

Sunderland Vietnam Memorial Competition and Exhibit, Sunderland, MA

Designers Lighting Forum, New York. Invitational Exhibit: The Flowering of

Fluorescent.

58


RAY KINOSHITA MANN Associate Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

1988

1983

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2001–present

Spring 2002

1998–2001

1995–1998

1987–1988

1987

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Constructed Space, Design Investigation

Design I , Design II, Design III, Design IV (undergraduate and graduate)

Construction Methods + Materials

Architectural Lighting (Building Physics II)

Furniture Design & Technology

Design Theory Seminar

Advanced digital design

BFA, MS, MArch Thesis supervision

Independent Study, Practicum

Research forum

Harvard Graduate School of Design, Master of Architecture, with distinction

Harvard-Radcliffe College, Bachelor of Arts in Visual and Environmental

Studies (minor in Structural Engineering), magna cum laude

UMass. Associate Professor of Architecture+Design

Acting Area Coordinator

UMass. Assistant Professor of Interior Design and Architectural Studies.

UMass. Lecturer in Interior Design and Architectural Studies.

Harvard Graduate School of Design, Studio Assistant.

Harvard Graduate School of Design, Career Discovery Program, Instructor

1990–present R K Studio, Amherst, Massachusetts. Principal Architect

Residential, commercial, cultural, and institutional projects.

1988–1992 The Stein Partnership, New York City, New York, Design Associate,

Women's Rights National Historical Park.

1988–1990 The Marshall Kinoshita Partnership, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Design Partner, residential projects.

1987–1988 Rafael Moneo, Architect, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Design Assistant,

Cultural and ecclesiastical projects (Joan Miro Museum, Dominican

monastery).

1986

Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Design

Assistant, Civic projects (The Hague City Hall competition).

1984–1985 Jeremiah Eck, Architect, Boston, Massachusetts. Design Assistant,

Residential projects (Waxman Residence, BSA Award).

1980–1982 Harvard University Office for Energy Management, Cambridge,

Massachusetts. Energy Auditor, Lighting Designer.

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

2003–present

2002–present

2001

2001

SERVICE

1997–2003

1997–1999

REGISTRATION

Woman Building –the life and work of architect Itsuko Hasegawa

Memory, Culture, Care –responsive design for Alzheimer’s care

environments

“From the Gecko,” Boston Magazine, Best of Boston Issue, August.

“Elegant Setting for a High-Wire Act,” Boston Globe.

American Association of University Women, Selected Professions

Fellowships (Chair 2001-2003).

Town of Amherst Planning Board, member.

Registered Architect: Massachusetts #8921, New York #021912, Vermont

#003-0002118, Arizona #30377, NCARB Certification #43,058

59


PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

2004–2005 ACADIA member

1996–2003 American Institute of Architects, Western Massachusetts Chapter

AWARDS

2001–2002

2001

2001

1999–2000

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

2006–present

2006–present

2006–present

2006–present

2005–present

2005–present

2005–present

completed 2006

completed 2005

completed 2004

completed 2001

completed 2001

1998–2001

completed 2000

Five College/Graham Foundation grant($10k) for curriculum development.

Best of City Search 2001, Best Restaurant Design (editorial & audience

winner)

Conde Nast Traveler, Salamander Restaurant named Top 100 Tables in the

US

Faculty Grant for Teaching, University of Massachusetts, $1,500.

Evaluation of Terrazzo Cracking in Elevated Walkways

Annie Oakley Center, Greenville, Ohio, new construction, schematic design.

Mann Residence, Hadley, Massachusetts, new construction.

Women’s Rights National Historical Park, consultation.

Firestone Weiss Residence, Longmeadow, Massachusetts, new

construction.

Thompson Cardasis Residence, Leverett, Massachusetts, new construction.

The Ark, phase II: fountain, altar and signage, Amherst, Massachusetts.

Welsch Residence, North Andover, Massachusetts, new construction.

The Ark Five College Episcopal Center, Amherst, Massachusetts, addition.

Machover/Kinoshita bath suite and studio barn, renovation.

Vilar Center Temporary Offices, MIT Media Lab, Cambridge,

Massachusetts, renovation,.

Salamander Restaurant, Boston, Massachusetts, new construction,.

M.N. Spear Memorial Library, Shutesbury, Massachusetts, schematic

design.

“Brain Opera,” with MIT Media Lab, House of Music, Vienna, permanent

installation

60


CAITLIN MCKEE Teaching Assistant

TEACHING

EDUCATION

Analysis and Representation I & II

2005–2009 UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST

Masters of Architecture Degree – Concentration: Sustainability

1998–2002 LEHIGH UNIVERSITY

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Architecture - Minor: Studio Art

Graphics Lab Technician - Media Productions Teaching Assistant - Design

Studio II & Painting I

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2007–2009 UMass Amherst

Teaching Assistant

Assisted teaching two Building Materials & Wood Technology Classes

Co-taught a graphics lab in the Architecture Department for two semesters,

created curriculum and syllabi.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2006–2007

2006–2007

2005–2006

November 2005

2004–2005

2003–2004

Amherst College Physical Plant

Designer

Consulting

Designer

Haley Design

Drafter/Designer/Builder

World Hands Project

Volunteer Builder

HCA Partners, Inc.

Jr. Draftsperson

BRYAN BOWEN ARCHITECTS

Architectural Intern

61


SIGRID MILLER POLLIN Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

Undergraduate Design Studios

Graduate Design Studios

Constructed Space

Great Spaces

1972–1975 M. Arch, Columbia University

1967–1971 BA, Vassar College Art History

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

1998–present

1985–1998

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

1998–present

1995–1998

1984–1995

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

2009

2008

2008

2005

2004

2003

2003

2003

2008

2008

2008

2008

2007

2007

2007

2005

2003

SERVICE

REGISTRATION

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

Full Professor- Architecture + Design University of Massachusetts Amherst

Asst. Prof, Assoc. Prof, Full Professor, Dept Chair–Dept. of Architecture

California State Polytechnic University Pomona

Miller Pollin AIA Architects , Amherst, MA

Principal/Partner Siteworks Architecture, Venice, CA and Riverside, CA

Principal Miller Pollin AIA Architects , Riverside, CA

Mitchell Giurgola Associates, New York NY

Johnson & Burgee, New York, NY

Prentice, Chan, Olhausen Architects New York, NY

Project Publications:

Architect’s Residence and Studio New England Cable News

Architects and Their Gardens by Lucy Rosenfeld

Hampshire Gazette, “Designer of South Amherst Home Is Inspired by New

England Traditions”

Contract Magazine Multi-tasking Gordon Hall UMass Amherst

LA Architect Fashion as Inspiration

Gordon Hall “Outdoor Classrooms” citation Architecture Magazine

Western Massachusetts AIA News Landscape Of Learning

World Trade Center Competition Entry with historian Max Page

Lectures/Exhibitions

Recent Architecture: Lecture Herter Gallery UMass Amherst

Recent Architecture Solo Exhibit Herter Gallery UMass Amherst

The Architect’s Garden by Lucy Rosenfeld

The Future of Architecture Commonwealth College UMass Amherst

Feature Article Hampshire Gazette Sept 21 2007

Titles Invited Exhibit sponsored by University Gallery UMass Amherst

Matereality Exhibit Boston Society of Architects

Exhibit of Unbuilt Work Boston Society of Architects

Designing in New England: Gordon Hall at UMass Amherst

By Sigrid Miller Pollin in Four Centuries of Architecture in New England

Current Member Western Massachusetts AIA Executive Board

Registered architect: MA, CA, NV, NY

62


1979–present

1998–present

1998–present

2003–present

1992–1995

AWARDS

2009

2009

2004

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

Member AIA

NCARB

Western Massachusetts AIA

Executive Board of Western Mass. AIA

Past Memberships:

Editorial Board Architecture California

Elected to American Institute of Architects College of Fellows (FAIA)

Western Massachusetts AIA Award of Merit for 1290 Residence and Studio

Nominated for UMass Amherst Distinguished Teaching Award

Finalist National AIA Award Mt. Vernon Ave Residences, Riverside CA

AIA Inland California Award of Excellence for Interior Design

Award of Honor Inland Design Institute Loring Building

First Award of Honor Colton Sr. Housing International Design Competition

Travel & Design Fellowship Curtin University, Perth Australia

AIAIC Award of Excellence 3.5 Houses Riverside CA

Architectural Design:

Residential Projects

Wicks-Lim Residence Affordable Compact Residence Amherst, MA

Sun Rock Master Plan for 4 Affordable Residences Amherst MA

Pollin-Galay Residence Tel Aviv, Israel

Millington Residence, Pelham, MA

1290 House, Amherst, MA

The Octagon House, Monson, MA

Barkley Residence Laguna Beach CA

House I, House II,& House III Riverside CA

Teller Residence House for a Magician Las Vegas,NV

South East Green Mixed Use Project, Amherst, MA

Avalon/El Segundo Sr. Housing Watts, CA

Commercial Projects

All Fired Up! Restaurant, Hadley MA

World Savings & Loan Bank Sun City, CA

World Savings & Loan Bank Lake Elsinore CA

Educational Projects

M5 Digital Commons Interior Design Electrical and Computer Engineering

University of Massachusetts Amherst

A new 7 acre campus for Dance, Theater, Fine Arts and Media Arts-150,000

square feet of performing, visual, and media arts space in collaboration with

Riverside Community College

Gordon Hall UMass Amherst MA

Telecommunications Offices UMass Amherst, Amherst, MA

Master Plan & Schematic Design Riverside School for the Arts Riverside CA

Community Projects

Fais-One Performing Arts Center, Harlem New York

63


MAX PAGE Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

United States urban and architectural history, historic preservation, United

States social and cultural history, the place of memory

1995

University of Pennsylvania, Ph.D. in History.

Dissertation: "The Creative Destruction of New York City: Landscape, Memory,

and the Politics of Place, 1900-1930.”

1988

Yale University, B.A. magna cum laude in History

Summer 1991 Harvard University GSD, summer architectural program

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2009–present Professor of Architecture and History, University of Massachusetts

2009

Fulbright Fellow in Buenos Aires

2003–2004 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow

2001–2009 Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts, Department of Art

1999–2001 Visiting Professor, Department of History, Yale University

1998–1999 Leverhulme Visiting Research Professor, University of Nottingham

1996–1999 Assistant Professor of History and Director, Heritage Preservation Georgia

State University

1995–1996 Lecturer, Department of History, University of Pennsylvania

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

2008

2003

2003

2005

2003

2003

2005

2004

Books

The City’s End: Two Centuries of Fantasies, Fears, and Premonitions of

New York’s Destruction (Yale University Press).

Building the Nation: Americans Write About Their Architecture, Their Cities,

and Their Landscape, 1789 to the Present (University of Pennsylvania

Press), co-edited with Steven Conn.

Giving Preservation a History: Essays on the History of Historic

Preservation in the United States (Routledge Press), co-edited with

Randall Mason.

Articles in Academic Journals

“Alexander Hamilton: The Man Who Made Modern America,” review essay in

Journal of American History (June 2005).

“The Unnatural History of Natural Disaster,” review essay in Journal of Planning

History (November 2003).

“The Future of the Past: New York History after 9/11,” inaugural issue of the

new New-York Journal of American History (May 2003).

Articles in Books

“The Heights and Depths of Urbanism : Fifth Avenue and the Creative

Destruction of Manhattan," in Roberta Moudry, ed, The American

Skyscraper : Cultural Histories (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,

2005).

“The City's End: Past and Present Narratives of New York's Destruction,” in

Lawrence Vale and Thomas Campanella, eds., The Resilient City: Trauma,

Recovery, Remembrance (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004).

64


2009

2008

2007

2006

2006

2006

2006

2005

2005

2005

2005

2004

2004

2003

2003

2003

2003

2003

2003

SERVICE

2006-present

2007-present

2003-present

2003-present

2001-2003

1999 -

2000-2001

REGISTRATION

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AWARDS

2008

2003

2001

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

Articles in Magazines and Newspapers

“The Houston Pavilions: Towards a Mixed Use Downtown?” Cite, Spring 2009.

“Designing for God: The Reemergence of Tradition at the new Co-Cathedral of

the Sacred Heart in Houston,” Cite, Spring 2008.

“The Urban Ear: Sounds of the City,” New York Times (July 22, 2007)

“Sprawled Out,” Architecture (October 2006). Public Realm columnist for

Architecture in 2006.

“Shifting the Memorial Paradigm,” Architecture (August 2006)

“The Preservation Act at 40,” Architecture (June 2006)

“Crashing to Earth, Again and Again,” on the 75 th Anniversary of the Empire

State Building, New York Times (April 23, 2006)

“Welcome Back, King Kong,” Op-Ed in the Boston Globe (December 17, 2005).

Reprinted in the Philadelphia Inquirer and International Herald-Tribune.

“The Kindness of Strangers: Rebuilding New Orleans,” Architecture (December

2005)

"Germany’s Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe," Architecture (June

2005).

“Careful Urban Renewal Twenty-Five Years Later: How the International

Building Exhibition Berlin Has Stood the Test of Time,” Metropolis (March

2005).

“New Architecture in Berlin,” Architecture (September 2004).

“The Otis Elevator: The ‘Hoisting Apparatus’ That Changed America,” Hartford

Courant (February 22, 2004).

“Education By Design: New Architecture at the Five Colleges,” Architecture

(October, 2003).

“Boxed In: The Galante Architecture Studio’s Falmouth, MA Recreation Center,”

Architecture (July, 2003).

"Minuteman Athletics Logo Makeover Reveals Skewed Priorities at UMass,"

with Eve Weinbaum, Worcester Telegram and Gazette (July 29, 2003).

“River of Innovation: Returning to the Tradition of Contemporary Architecture on

the Charles River,” Architecture Boston (Summer, 2003).

“Takin’ It To the Streets: The Geography of Public Protest,” Architecture Boston

(Spring, 2003).

“Trent Lott and the Color Line,” Valley Advocate (January 2, 2003).

Massachusetts Society of Professors (faculty union at UMass), President

Urban History, North American Editorial Board

Society of American City and Regional Planning Historians, Board of

Directors

Urban History Association, Board of Directors

Radical History Review Editorial Collective Member

Referee: American Studies, The Public Historian & Journal of American

History

Board of Advisers, The Gotham Center, NY

Fulbright Fellowship

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship

Spiro Kostof Award, Society of Architectural Historians

65


STEPHEN SCHREIBER Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

1984

1979

1977

Design studios

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2005–present

2005–2006

2000–2004

2000–2005

1997–2000

1989–2000

1987–1989

1984–1986

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

1990–present

1986–1987

1985–1986

1984–1985

1982–1983

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

2008

2006

2005

2002

SERVICE

1999–present

1997–present

2005–2006

2000–2004

2006

1996–2000

2003–2006

2006–present

REGISTRATION

1985

1991

2001

1991

Master in Architecture Harvard University

Bachelor of Arts Dartmouth College

Foreign study program University of Salamanca. Spain

Director and Professor

University of Massachusetts Amherst Architecture+Design Program

Visiting Associate Professor, UMass Amherst

Dean and Director, University of South Florida School of Architecture

Associate Professor, University of South Florida School of Architecture

Associate Professor and Director

Architecture Program, University of New Mexico

Faculty positions, University of New Mexico

Visiting Professor, University of Miami

Instructor, Boston Architectural Center

Stephen Schreiber, Architect

Daniel/Mulliken Associates, North Easton, MA

Notter, Finegold, Alexander, Boston, MA

Moshe Safdie and Associates, Boston, MA

Moore, Grover, Harper, Centerbrook, CT

Selected Publications

“Education of Architects”, International Encyclopedia of Education, Elsivier

“Minor Setbacks”, in Professional Practice 10—2 nd Ed., Wiley.

“Mitigating the Effects of Hurricanes on Residences in Florida”, in AIA Report

on University Research, American Institute of Architects.

“Fountain of Youth”, in BA Architect, vol. 6, ,AIA Tampa Bay,

National Architectural Accrediting Board Visiting Teams (chair—7 visits,

member -4 visits)

National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB): national

committees

Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA): President

American Institute of Architects (AIA):

Florida Board Member

Boston Society of Architects Board Member

New Mexico Board of Examiners for Architects

Florida Board of Architecture and Interior Design

Massachusetts Architect Registration Board

Architect:

Massachusetts

New Mexico (expired)

Florida

NCARB

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

66


AWARDS

2004

2004

2003

2001

2000

American Institute of Architects (AIA)

Exemplary university research, national AIA (with others)

Elected to College of Fellows, AIA

American Institute of Architects (Tampa Bay), Award of Excellence

Clearwater Roundabout Design Competition, Honorable mention

Landscape Architecture, "Excellence in Communication" (with others)

67


BLAKE WILLIAMS Lecturer

TEACHING

EDUCATION

1990–1992 University of Pennsylvania

Master of Architecture with Advanced Standing

Thesis: “Canonical Grafts: An Experimental Music Center for Seattle”

1983–1987 University of Washington

Bachelor of Arts in Architecture

1982–1983 Manhattan School of Music

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2008–2009

Spring 2007

Fall 2006–

present

1999–2000

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

1995–present

2006–present

2003–2005

2001–2003

1998–2000,

2005–2006

1987–1998

1991–1992

1989–1991

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

Fall 2008

May 2005

2004

2004

SERVICE

REGISTRATION

Architecture+Design, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Lecturer in Architecture.

Hampshire College, Humanities and Cultural Studies

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Architecture. Architecture Studies Program,

affiliated with Five Colleges, Inc.

Mt Holyoke College, Department of Art and Art History

Visiting Assistant Professor of Architecture. Architecture Studies Program,

affiliated with Five Colleges, Inc.

University of Michigan, Taubman College of Architecture And Urban Planning

Lecturer Graduate Design Studio Courses: Arcades and Canopies (Fall 1999)

Detroit Design Studio (Winter 2000) with David Miller, FAIA

BW.AR–(self)

Dietz and Company Architects, Springfield, MA

Hamilton Anderson Associates, Detroit

Weinstein A|U, Seattle

A3C, Ann Arbor

Hoshide Williams Architects, Seattle

Mithun, Seattle

Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen, Seattle

ACSA Northeast Chapter Publication, “Cypress Shelter”

Seattle Homes and Lifestyles, “Alhadeff Condominium”, responsibility at

Weinstein A|U: designer and project architect

Jill Herbers, editor, “Prefab Modern”, New York: Harper Design International,

Colin House

University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture, Detroit Design

Charette: West Riverfront

Washington, Michigan, Massachusetts

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AIA, American Institute of Architects

NCARB, National Council of Architectural Registration Boards

ACSA, Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture

CDT, Construction Specifications Institute

68


AWARDS

1991

Schneidman AIA Award, University of Pennsylvania

1991

Dales Traveling Fellowship, University of Pennsylvania, Travel in Japan: Tokyo,

Kobe & Takayama. Studied Japanese architecture with master carpenters and

contemporary Japanese architects

1991

Newberry Grant, University of Pennsylvania

1987

Distinguished Project Award, “An Architect’s Office” University of Washington

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

69


ERIKA ZEKOS Lecturer

TEACHING Design studios

EDUCATION

1994

1993

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2009

2004–present

2005

1999-04

1999-04

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

1998-present

1997-98

1995-97

1995

1993-94

SERVICE

2004-present

ongoing

2007

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, School of Architecture, Troy, NY

Bachelor of Architecture

Bachelor of Building Sciences

UMass Architecture+Design Program

Program Coordinator, western Mass, Learning By Design in Massachusetts,

Studio Instructor, Mount Holyoke College, Art Department

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Architecture, School of Architecture, Art and

Historic Preservation, Roger Williams University,

Studio Instructor, Department of Continuing Education, Young Artists Program,

Pre-College, Summer Studies, Rhode Island School of Design

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Boston Architectural Center

Principal, studiozed, design, Amherst, MA,

Bruner/Cott & Associates, Cambridge, MA,

Rothman Partners Architects, Boston, MA,

Kallmann, McKinnell and Wood Architects, Boston, MA,

Architecture Plus, Troy, NY

Board Member, Western Massachusetts American Institute of Architects,

Guest Critic, Smith College, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Hampshire

College, Roger Williams University, ongoing

Guest Judge, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Art Senior

REGISTRATION and PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AWARDS

1999

2000

2000

1997

1995

1995

1994

1993

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

Performance Award, Build Massachusetts w/ Bruner/Cott, for Dean College

Residence Hall

Special Design Citation, Boston Society of Architects/Healthcare Assembly w/

Rothman Partners Architects, for MGH Cox Cancer Center

Honor Award, Boston Society of Architects/Healthcare Assembly W/ Rothman ,

for MEEI Cosmetics Plastics Surgery Center

Exhibitor: Ideas Afloat - David’s Island Competition,

Alpha Rho Chi Medal, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,

American Institute of Architects Excellence Award, Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.

Peck Prize: Best Thesis Award, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Second Prize: Crypta Balbi International Student Competition

70


Public Art since 2002

Greetings From MY City,” postcards project, various cities, ongoing

Greetings From MY Boston

Greetings From MY Holyoke, ongoing

“Look Up,” site-specific temporary installation, Easthampton, MA,

Windows Project of the Easthampton Cultural Council

“Sea the City,” site-specific temporary installation, Boston, MA,

part of the Boston Arts Festival, Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs

“Making Time Visible,” site-specific temporary installation, City Hall Plaza, Boston,

MA, sponsored by the Boston Cultural Agenda Fund and the Boston Foundation

for Architecture

Design Work since 2002

Bennet – Gray residence (new home), Sunderland, MA

Sweeting residence (renovation/addition), Amherst, MA

Wunderarts Gallery (renovation), Amherst, MA,

Graham Brown – Dellert residence (renovation/ addition), Deerfield, MA,

Dolan Residence (renovation / addition), Missoula, MT,

Haynes/Watts residence (renovation/ addition/master plan), Milton, MA

Long Dimensions Workshop (new construction), Hopedale, MA,

Moses residence (new three family home), Jamaica Plain, MA,

Mastandrea residence (renovation/ addition), Milton, MA

Moses residence (renovation), Jamaica Plain, MA,

Brownell residence (addition/renovation), Belmont, MA

71


TIMOTHY ROHAN Associate Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

History of Architecture and the Built Environment

Introduction to the History of Art/Renaissance to the Present

Nineteenth-Century Architecture

Twentieth-Century Architecture

Graduate Seminar: Themes in Postwar Architecture

May 2001

PhD, Department of the History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University

• Field of Concentration: history and theory of modern architecture,

particularly post-WW II architecture and urbanism.

• Master's Thesis: "Dressing New Delhi: Lutyens’s Viceroy’s House,"

Spring 1997.

• Dissertation: “Architecture in the Age of Alienation: Paul Rudolph’s

Postwar Academic Buildings,” completed May 2001.

1991

BA, Yale University

Majors: History of Art and English, Graduated cum laude, with distinction in

art history

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2001–present

2000–2001

1998–2001

1996–1997

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

1991–1992

1993–1995

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

Forthcoming

2011

2008

2007

2003

2005

SERVICE

Associate Professor, Art History Program, Department of Art

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Tenure awarded Spring 2008.

Visiting Lecturer, Art Department, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York

Lecturer, The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY

Teaching Fellow, Department of Fine Arts/Harvard Core, Harvard University

The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY

Assistant, Department of Public Information.

Department Secretary, Architecture and Design. Assistant for the

exhibition “Frank Lloyd Wright: Architect”, (Fall 1994 to Spring 1995) curated

by Terence Riley with Peter Reed in the Department of Architecture and

Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

Book Project

Working title: Enriching Modernism: Paul Rudolph, Buildings and

Projects,1945-1997. Yale University Press.

Catalog

Model City: Buildings and Projects for Yale and New Haven by Paul

Rudolph, Yale School of Architecture, Nov. 3, 2008 – Feb. 6, 2009. Curated

exhibition featuring thirteen projects by Rudolph. Wrote essay and compiled

checklist of over one hundred works.

Articles in journals

“Challenging the Curtain Wall: Paul Rudolph’s Blue Cross and Blue Shield

Building”, The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, vol. 66, no.

1, March 2007, p. 84-109 (refereed).

“From Microcosm to Macrocosm: The Surface of Buckminster Fuller’s

United States Pavilion for Expo ’67,” Architectural Design,

Book Review

Charles Waldheim. Hilberseimer/Mies van der Rohe: Lafayette Park Detroit

(New York: Prestel and Harvard Design School, 2004).

72


2004–2007

2004–2007

2005

REGISTRATION

Director of Undergraduate Studies (Art History).

Faculty advisor to the Art History Club

Art History Program: Search Committee for Modernist Art Historian

Not applicable

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AWARDS

Society of Architectural Historians (SAH)

College Art Association (CAA)

DOCOMOMO, USA chapter (Documentation and Conservation of Buildings,

Sites and Neighborhoods of the Modern Movement)

Teaching Awards

2006–2007 Winner, Lilly Teaching Fellowship, U. Mass., Amherst (Fall 2006–Spring

2007)

2006

Winner, College of Humanities and Fine Arts Teaching Award (CHFA)

2001-2003 Nominated three times by students for the Distinguished Teaching Award,

UMass

Grants and Awards

The Society of Architectural Historians’ Scott Opler Fellowship for New

Scholars awarded for the article, “Challenging the Curtain Wall: Paul

Rudoph’s Blue Cross and Blue Shield Building,” JSAH, vol. 66, no. 1, March

2007, p. 84-109.

2007–2008 Kluge Research Fellowship. The Library of Congress, Washington D.C. (8

months- Summer 2007 and Summer/Fall 2008).

2006

Faculty Research Grant, UMass

2004

Research fellowship. Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal (Spring

2004).

2003

Research Grant. Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

2008–2009

2006

2009

2005

Exhibitions

Curator for “’Model City’: Buildings and Projects for Yale and New Haven by

Paul Rudolph”, the Yale School of Architecture, November 3, 2008 to

February 6, 2009. The exhibition examines thirteen projects by Rudolph for

the city and the university with images from the Rudolph Archive at the

Library of Congress. It will coincide with the rededication of the restored Art

and Architecture Building by Paul Rudolph. For catalog see publications.

Wall text on Paul Rudolph for “Beyond the Harvard Box”, curated by Michael

Meredith, Harvard Graduate School of Design, October 5- November 15,

2006.

Symposia, Panels, Responses

Organizer of the symposium, “Reassessing Rudolph: Architecture and

Reputation”, Jan 23-24, 2009. Yale School of Architecture. In conjunction

with the exhibition “Model City”, see above. This symposium will bring

together a group of international historians, critics and architects to

reconsider Rudolph’s architecture and the discipline’s assessment of him.

Collection of essays by the participants edited by Rohan under discussion

with Yale University Press.

Organized and chaired the panel: “Other Ethics and Aesthetics: the

International Scope of Brutalism,” Society of Architectural Historians Annual

Meeting, Vancouver, British Columbia. April 7, 2005.

73


MARGARET BIRNEY VICKERY Lecturer

TEACHING

EDUCATION

1993

1993

1990

1985

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2009

1994-95

1987-9

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2008-present

1992-3

1987

1986

Introduction to Architecture

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

2007

1999

199

SERVICE

2005

2007

AWARDS and REVIEWS

1992

1990

1989

2000

2001

Stanford University, Stanford CA, Ph.D. program in Art History 1986 to June

1993. M.A. Art History, 1988. Ph.D. Architectural History

Attingham Summer School, intensive course on the preservation of English

country houses..

Victorian Society Summer School, London

Oberlin College, Oberlin Ohio, B.A. Art History

Lecturer, Art History Program

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Lecturer, in architectural history, University of Bristol, adult

education program.

Teaching Assistant, architectural history courses, Stanford University.

Guest Curator, University Gallery, Fine Arts Center, University of

Massachusetts, “Greening the Valley: Sustainable Architecture in the Pioneer

Valley” opens, February 2010,.

Secretary, Victorian Society Summer School, London. (1992-93).

Curatorial Intern, Stanford University Art Museum, Prints and

Drawings Collection, Summer.

Curatorial Assistant, DeCordova Museum, Lincoln MA.

Smith College : The Campus Guide ,Princeton Architectural Press, 2007

Buildings for Bluestockings: The Architecture and Social History of Women's

Colleges in Late Victorian England, University of Delaware Press, 1999.

“Lady Margaret Hall and Somerville College, Oxford: Their Architectural and

Social Context.” Victorian Society Annual

Solid Waste Committee, Amherst

Amherst Ballet Board of Directors

Pevsner Memorial Award, for the paper, “Lady Margaret Hall and

Somerville College, Oxford: Their Architectural and Social Context.”

Victorian Society Annual

Samuel Kress Travel Grant, for travel to England for dissertation

research in 1991.

Mellon Foundation Pre-Dissertation Grant, from the Center for

European Studies, Stanford University.

William Whyte reviewed Buildings for Bluestockings, in the English

Historical Review, September 2000, pp. 1011-1012.

Elizabeth Edwards Harris reviewed Buildings for Bluestockings, in the

Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, vol. 60, #4, Dec. 2001

74


PEGGI CLOUSTON Assistant Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

Tectonics 2/Mechanics of Building Materials for Construction

Design of Wood Structures

Design and Construction of a Timber Bridge

1996–2001 Ph.D. Department of Wood Science, Faculty of Forestry, University of

British Columbia. Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Thesis: Computational Modeling of Strand-based Wood Composites

1993–1996 M.A.Sc. Department of Wood Science, Faculty of Forestry, University of

British Columbia. Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Thesis: The Tsai-Wu Strength Theory for Douglas-fir Laminated Veneer

1985–1989 B.A.Sc. Department of Civil Engineering, University of British Columbia.

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

09/2005–present Faculty, Architecture+Design Program, University of Massachusetts,

Amherst, MA

09/2003–present Adjunct Faculty. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

09/2001–present Assistant Professor. Department of Natural Resources Conservation,

Building Materials and Wood Technology Program, University of

Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA

05/1988 –

Timber Engineering Research Assistant, Department of Civil Engineering,

02/1989

University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

1989–1994 Trus Joist Macmillan, Structural Engineer, Vancouver, B.C.,

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

Submitted

In preparation

In preparation

In preparation

In press

In press

2008

2008

2007

2007

Refereed Publications:

Peters, J.; Damery, D.; Clouston, P.: “A Geography of Eastern Log Building

Based on Tree Species Use”. Journal of Forestry.

Oberholzer, M.; Clouston, P.; Benson, T. “Increasing the Quality and

Aesthetical

Value of Undervalued Wood Species in North America by Creating Glued

Laminated Timbers”. ASTM Journal of Testing and Evaluation.

Clouston, P.; Michalski, J. “An Experimental Comparison of Wood-Concrete

Composite Connectors”. ASTM Journal of Testing and Evaluation.

Michalski, J.; Clouston, P. “New England Mill Renovation using Wood-Concrete

Composites: A Case Study”. ASCE Journal of Architectural Engineering.

ARWADE, S; CLOUSTON, P.; WINANS, R. “Measurement and stochastic

computational modeling of the elastic properties of parallel strand lumber.”

Journal of Engineering Mechanics.

ARWADE, S; WINANS, R.; CLOUSTON, P. “Variability of the strength of

Parallel

Strand Lumber” Journal of Engineering Mechanics.

CLOUSTON, P.; SCHREYER, A. “Design and Use of Wood-Concrete

Composites”. ASCE Practice Periodical on Structural Design and Construction,

13(4), pp. 167-175.

KANE, B; CLOUSTON, P. “Tree Pulling Tests of Large Shade Trees in the

Genus Acer”. Journal of Arboriculture and Urban Forestry, 34(2), 2008, pp. 101-

109.

CLOUSTON, P. “Characterization and Strength Modeling of Parallel Strand

Lumber”. Journal Holzforschung, Vol. 61, pp. 394-399.

75


2006

2006

2005

2004

2003

Sept. 2009

July 2009

2008

2006

2006

2004

SERVICE

REGISTRATION

DAMERY, D; CLOUSTON, P.; FISETTE, P. “Wood science education in a

changing world: A case study of the UMASS-Amherst building materials & wood

technology program, 1965-2005”. Forest Products Journal. 57(5) pp. 19-24.

PETERS, J.; DAMERY, D; CLOUSTON, P. “A Decade of Innovation in

Particleboard and Composite Materials: a Content analysis of Washington

State University’s International Particleboard/Composite Materials

Symposium Proceedings.” Journal of Forest Products Business Research.

CLOUSTON, P.; SCHREYER, A. “Wood Concrete Composites: A Structurally

Efficient Material Option.” Civil Engineering Practice. Boston Society of Civil

Engineers (BSCE) Section / American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

Spring/Summer

CLOUSTON, P.; BATHON, L.; SCHREYER, A. Shear and Bending

Performance of a Novel Wood-Concrete Composite System. ASCE Journal

of Structural Engineering. 131(9), pp.1404-1412.

CLOUSTON, P.; CIVJAN, S; BATHON, L. “Experimental Behavior of a

Continuous Metal Connector for a Wood-Concrete Composite System.”

Forest Products Journal. 54(6) pp. 76-84.

BURNETT, D. T.; CLOUSTON, P.; DAMERY, D.; FISETTE, P. “Structural Properties

of Pegged Timber Connections as Affected by End Distance.” Forest

Products Journal. 53(2) pp. 50-57

Conference Papers and Presentations:

Arwade S.; Winans R.; Clouston, P. “Modeling strength variability in Parallel

Strand Lumber.” International Conference on Structural Safety and Reliability,

Osaka, Japan.

Arwade S.; Winans R.; Clouston, P. “Measurement and modeling of spatially

varying strength in Parallel Strand Lumber.” 10th U.S. National Congress for

Computational Mechanics, Columbus, Ohio.

CLOUSTON, P. “Pedagogic Strategies for Wood Engineering in an

Interdisciplinary Setting”. 2008 Structures Congress, Vancouver BC Canada

CLOUSTON, P. “Characterization and Strength Modeling of Parallel Strand

Lumber”, World Congress on Computational Mechanics, Los Angeles, CA

CLOUSTON, P. ; LIU, S. “Prediction of Influence of MacroVoid Distribution

on Parallel Wood Strand Composites.” World Conference of Timber

Engineering, Portland, Oregon

CLOUSTON, P. “Numerical Simulation of Mechanical Behavior of Parallel

Strand Lumber.” World Conference of Timber Engineering, Lahti, Finland

Membership Chair and Section Correspondent, Forest Products Society,

Northeast Section

Representative NE Region, National Planning Committee of the National

Association of Professional Forestry Schools and Colleges

P. Eng. (Assoc. of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of British

Columbia)

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AWARDS

Boston Society of Civil Engineers

Associate Member, American Society of Civil Engineers

Member, Canadian Society for Civil Engineering

Forest Products Society

Member, Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of British

Columbia

76


Research Leadership in Action Award, University of Massachusetts - $17,000

Lilly Fellowship, Center for Teaching, University of Massachusetts

College of Food and Natural Resources Instructional Development - $1000

Weyerhaeuser Fellowship in Wood Design - $30,000

VanDusen Graduate Fellowship in Forestry - $3,000

Forintek Canada Corporation Fellowship in Wood Science and Wood

Products - $30,000

ENCON Endowment / National Scholarship - $5,000

Weyerhaeuser Fellowship in Wood Design - $15,000

MAS - Agricultural Experimental Station, University of Massachusetts,

McIntire-Stennis Grant, 5 year duration - $ 75,000

77


DAVID T. DAMERY Associate Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

Business of Building

Building Materials and Forest Products Marketing

The Built Environment

1997–2006 University of Massachusetts Amherst

PhD. Department of Resource Economics

Dissertation: “Factors Influencing Forest Management Planning by Private

Forest Landowners”

1986–1988 Carnegie Mellon University

MS Industrial Administration (MBA) Graduated With Distinction

1976–1980 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology

BS Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

1996–Present University of Massachusetts Amherst

Assoc. Professor, Director, Building Materials and Wood Technology

1994 - 1996 Greenfield Community College Greenfield, MA

Adjunct Faculty, Business Department

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

1989–1993 Rugg Manufacturing Company Greenfield, MA

Vice President, Division Manager Responsible for profit/loss of

manufacturing and architectural millwork divisions in a $12 Million family

business.

1988–1989 Data General Corporation Westboro, MA

Manufacturing Management

1981–1986 Earl and Wright, Consulting Engineers San Francisco, CA

Naval Architect

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

2008

2007

2007

2007

2006

Refereed

Damery, David T. and Jeff Benjamin. “The Northeast Forest Bio-products

Puzzle” Forest Prod.J. 57(11): 14-15.

Damery, David T. and Susan Campbell. From Trees to Flooring: Value-Added

Processing from a Non-Industrial Private Forest Improvement Harvest. Wood

Structure and Properties ’06, Arbora Publishers, Zvolen, Slovakia pp. 439-444.

Damery, David T. “Landowner-Driven Sustainable Forest Management and

Value-Added Processing A Case Study in Massachusetts, USA” Journal of

Sustainable Forestry 24 (2/3): 229-243.

Damery, David T., Peggi Clouston and Paul R. Fisette. “Wood science

education in a changing world: A case study of the UMASS-Amherst building

materials and wood technology program, 1965-2005” Forest Prod. J. 57(5):19-

24.

Peters, James S., David T. Damery, and Peggi Clouston. “A Decade of

Innovation in Particleboard and Composite Materials: a content analysis of

Washington State University’s International Particleboard/Composite

Materials Symposium Proceedings” Journal of Forest Products Business

Research 3(1), viewed at: http://www.forestprod.org/jfpbr/jfpbr-a9.asp

viewed on February 2, 2006.

78


2004

2003

J. Peters, D. Damery, and Clouston, P. “Residential timber framing as a

“value–added” approach to private non-industrial forest ownership”,

Proceedings 8 th World Conference on Timber Engineering, June 14-17,

2004, Lahti, Finland, pp. 167-170

Burnett, David T., Peggi Clouston, David T. Damery, Paul Fisette.

“Structural properties of pegged timber connections as affected by end

distance”. Forest Products Journal 53(2) 50-57

Reviewed

2008

Catanzaro, Paul, David T. Damery, Anthony D'Amato and Kristina Ferrare.

"Economic Viability of Ownerships in the Deerfield River Watershed", UMass

Extension, Amherst, MA, 31p.

2007

Timmons, David, David Damery, Geoff Allen, and Lisa Petraglia. Energy from

Forest Biomass: Potential Economic Impacts in Massachusetts. Mass. Division

of Energy Resources, Boston, MA. 36p.

2007

Damery, David T. and Jeff Benjamin. “The Northeast Forest Bio-products

Puzzle”, Forest Prod. J. 57(11): 14-15

2006

Damery, David T. “Aquaculture Marketing Handbook: Book Review”, Fisheries,

31 (10): 516

2006

Damery, David T. “Engineered Wood Products: Building the Future” Forest

Products Journal. 56(7/8): 14-15

2006

Damery, David T. “Housing Within Reach: Innovations in Affordable Housing”

Forest Products Journal. 56(6): 9-10

2006

Damery, David T., Curt Bellemer, and Gordon Boyce. Massachusetts Directory

of Sawmills and Dry Kilns, 2006. Dept. of Conservation and Recreation, Boston,

MA. 52 p

2005

Damery, David T. and Brian C.P. Kane. “Urban Wood Waste: Maximizing

Log Value for the Sawmill Market”. Arborist News, 14(3): 44-46

2004

Damery, David. “Northeast Section Discussed Opportunities in Wood

Thermoplastic Composites”, Forest Products Journal, 54(7/8): 4-5

2004

Damery, David. “ Why OSB Prices Went Over the Top”, Journal of Light

Construction, 22(4): 19,24

SERVICE and PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

2006-09

2006-07

AWARDS

2006-07

2004-05, 05-06

2003-04

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

International Forest Products Society, Board of Directors

Forest Products Society , Northeast Section, Chair, Secretary

Northeastern Retail Lumber Association - Northeast Young Lumber

Executives Liaison

Massachusetts Woodlands Coop - Treasurer, Board of Directors

Greenfield Savings Bank, Trustee

Forest Products Society - Excellent Student Chapter Performance (Faculty

Advisor)

Forest Products Society–Outstanding Student Section (Faculty Advisor)

Forest Products Society–Excellent Section Performance, Northeast

Jeffrey Blanchard, P.I., David T. Damery (Co-PI), Paul Catanzaro (Co-PI,

Sustainable use of woody biomass as a renewable alternative to gasoline,

Mass. Agricultural Exp. Station, 2009-2011, $150,000

Paul Catanzaro, P.I., David T. Damery co-investigator, Economic Viability of

Land Ownership in the Deerfield Watershed of western Massachusetts, New

England Forestry Foundation, 2007, $44,000

David T. Damery, P.I. Finding and Removing Barriers to sustainable harvest

and primary processing of Massachusetts native woods, MA Dept. of

Agricultural Resources, 2007, $36,634

79


PAUL FISETTE Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

Energy Efficient Housing (Building Physics I)

Principles of Light-Frame Structure Technology (Tectonics I)

Architectural Blueprint Reading and Estimating

1986

MS, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

Wood Science and Technology

1984

BS, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

(Wood Science and Technology (cum laude)

1971

AS, Johnson and Wales University

Business Administration (cum laude)

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2007–present

1988–2007

2006–present

2006–present

2000–2006

2004–2006

1997–2000

1988–1997

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Professor and Department Head, Department of Natural Resources

Conservation

Director of the Building Materials & Wood Technology Program

Professor, Building Materials and Wood Technology

Professor, Architecture & Design

Associate Professor, Building Materials & Wood Technology

Associate Professor, Architecture & Design

Assistant Professor, Building Materials & Wood Technology

Lecturer, Building Materials & Wood Technology

University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA

1986–1988 Custom Builder Magazine, Senior Editor.

1973–1986 Building Contractor

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

2008

2007

2007

2006

2006

2005

2005

2005

2005

2004

2003

2003

2003

Articles

Fisette, Paul. "Reroofing and Residing to Save Energy." NAHI Journal, 22-26.

Damery, David T., Peggi Clouston, and Paul Fisette. “Wood science education

in a changing world: A case study of the UMASS-Amherst building materials &

wood technology program, 1965-2005.” Forest Products Journal, 19-24.

National Research Council of The National Academies. Green Schools:

Attributes for Health and Learning. National Academy Press. Washington, D.C.

180pp. (co-authored with 12 other panel members).

"Test Your Building-Code IQ." Fine Homebuilding

National Research Council. Review and Assessment of the Health and

Productivity Benefits of Green Schools. - National Academy Press.

“Celulose Gets in the Groove." Smart HomeOwner

"Leaky Housewraps" National Association of Home Inspectors Forum

"Callback Cures." LBM Journal

"Evaluating OSB for Coastal Roofs." Coastal Contractor

"Insulating on the Outside." Smart HomeOwner

National Research Council. Promoting Innovation: 2002 Assessment of the

PATH. National Academy Press.

Fisette, Paul and David Damery. “Getting Contractors Discounts.” Journal of

Light Construction,

Burnett, David T., Peggi Clouston, David T. Damery, and Paul Fisette.

“Structural Properties of Pegged Timber Connections as Affected by End

Distance.” Forest Products Journal.

80


2006

2005

SERVICE

2007–2008

2005–2006

2003–2006

2002–2008

2002–2005

2001–2006

2000–2004

2000–2003

1992–present

1990–present

REGISTRATION

Book Chapters

Fisette, Paul. Contributing Editor for Journal of Light Construction book JLC’s

Construction Tips & Techniques. Hanley Wood, 348pp.

Fisette, Paul. "Preventing Ice Dams." in the book Roofing, Flashing &

Waterproofing, The Taunton Press, 51-57.

National Academy of Sciences, Center on Economics, Governance, and

International Studies (CEGIS) of the National Research Council - Committee to

Evaluate the Research Plan of the Department of Housing and Urban

Development.

National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council Committee to

conduct a Review and Assessment of the Health and Productivity Benefits

of Green Schools.

Underwriters Laboratories, UL Standards Technical Panel for Fabricated

Scaffold Planks and Stages, STP 1322 pursued as National Standard

National Academy of Sciences, Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed

Environment (BICE), addressing questions of technology, science, and

public policy applied to the relationship between the constructed & natural

environments & interaction with human activities

Appointed by the National Academies to a National Research Council

Committee to Review and Assess the Partnership for Advancing

Technology in Housing (PATH).

Editorial Board, Smart HomeOwner Magazine

Board of Directors, Lumber and Building Material Dealers Foundation

National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council - Committee to

provide Oversight and assessment of the Department of Housing and Urban

Development’s Partnership for Advancing Technology in Housing in the USA.

National Research Initiative Competitive Grants Program. Peer reviewer.

Journal of Light Construction Contributing Editor

Massachusetts State Construction Supervisor's License

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Real Estate Brokers License

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

1994–present

1993–present

1993–present

1993–present

1983–present

AWARDS

Northeast Retail Lumber Association.

Member of National Institute of Building Sciences.

University Coordinator for relations with Habitat for Humanity

Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA)

Forest Products Research Society

2002

Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Service, Department of Natural

Resources Conservation

1999–2000 Certificate of Achievement for Outstanding Outreach Contributions, College

of Food and Natural Resources

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

Performance of building systems

Energy-efficient construction

Sustainable development and resource efficiency

Influence of moisture on wood and buildings

81


SIMI HOQUE Assistant Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

2006

2003

1997

1996

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

Permaculture and Sustainable Living (faculty sponsor, Living Routes)

Building Energy and Environmental Systems

Building Energy Performance Analysis

Faded Green–Green Homes Energy Audits

Ph.D. in Architecture Design Theories and Methods

Master of Architecture (first professional degree)

University of California, Berkeley Dept. of Architecture

Master of Science in Computer Aided Engineering

Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Civil Engineering

Bachelor of Arts in Design Engineering

Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering

2008–present Assistant Professor, Green Building Program

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

2006–2008 Lecturer, Department of Architecture

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2005–2008 Mechanical Engineer

Norian-Siani Engineering, Waltham, MA

2004–present Principal

Simile Engineering and Architectural Design

2005

Intern Architect

Neshamkin French Architects, Charlestown, MA

2005

Intern Architect

Ruhl Walker Architects, Boston, MA

2000

Design Architect

Endresware Architects and Engineers, Berkeley, CA

1997–1999 Mechanical Engineer

ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2008

2007

Publications

“Creativity and Rule-based Design”

Journal of Learning Design (refereed journal, in preparation)

“The Spaces of Gesture”

The Gesture Journal (refereed journal, in preparation)

“New Zero Energy Buildings in New England”

The American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air Conditioning

Engineers Journal (refereed journal, in preparation)

“Case Studies in Flood Adaptation in Bangladesh”

International Journal of Climate Change Impacts and Responses

(refereed journal, accepted for publication)

“The NESEA Zero Energy Award Winner”

Northeast Sun (accepted for publication)

“LEED certifiable vs. LEED certified”

in www.greenerbuildings.com

“Transculturation and Translation”

in Conversations about the Design Process, MIT

82


2009

2009

2007

2007

2006

2006

SERVICE

2009

2008

2008

2008–present

2008–present

REGISTRATION

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

2008–present

2008–present

2008–present

2007

2007–present

1999

AWARDS

2008

2008

2008

2008

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

Conference papers

Energy and Sustainability Conference, Bologna Italy

“Tools for Sustainable Development: A comparison of building performance

simulation tools”

25th Annual ACSA Beginning Design Student, Baton Rouge, LA

“Borrowers, Bricoleurs and Builders of Architectural Education”

ConnectED Architectural Education, Sydney Australia

“Computational Methods in Architectural Design”

Architecture and Phenomenology, Haifa, Israel

“Phenomenology and pedagogy”

Global Forum III: Architectural Education, Istanbul, Turkey

“Learning by Seeing” : An analysis of the Veneto Experience

CSAAR 06: Architectural Design Education, Rabat, Morocco

“Playing with Rules” : An analysis of digital design studio

Associate Editor

International Journal of Climate Change Impacts and Responses

Executive Board, NESEA (Northeast Sustainable Energy Association)

Zero Energy Challenge

Ad-hoc Reviewer

NSF Career Grant Proposals

Program Director

YouthBuild Building Energy Training Program, Holyoke MA

Holdsworth 2.0 Building Enhancement Committee member

Associate member, ASHRAE

Member, Association of Energy Engineers

Member, Northeast Sustainable Energy Association

LEED Accredited Professional

Engineers without Borders, Member

Engineer-in-training License

The Healey Endowment Grant ($15,000)

Ever Green Research

The Graham Foundation (semi-finalist)

Floodspace documentary

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Alumni Class Fund ($30,000)

Floodspace design studio in Bangladesh for undergraduate students

The Echoing Green Foundation for social entrepreneurs (semi-finalists)

Floodspace Research and Design Collaborative

Wicks-Lim Residence, Sustainable Design Analysis, Amherst, MA

Washington Beech Condominiums, Systems Design, Roslindale, MA

Cocobol Yoga Resort, Playa Venao, Panama

The Panama House, Eco Venao, Panama (2300 sf)

Maher’s House, Pennsylvania (2000 sf)

Amma’s House, Pennsylvania (2400 sf)

83


LUDMILLA PAVLOVA-GILLHAM Lecturer

TEACHING

EDUCATION

Project Management for Design and Construction

1986

Master of Architecture, Columbia University

1984

Columbia University, Summer Program in France

1982

Bachelor of Architecture and Program in European Cultural Studies, Princeton

University

1981

Fall Semester, Syracuse University School of Architecture in Florence, Italy

1980

Summer Design Program, Columbia University

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

1985–1986 Teacher’s Assistant, Columbia University, A4410 Design Attitudes in European

and American Urbanism, 1750-1930; Professor Richard Plunz

1984–1986 Research Assistant, Columbia University, Professor Richard Plunz,

contributions to A History of Housing in New York City, Columbia University

Press, 1990

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2005–present Senior Facilities Planner, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

2002–2005 Facilities Planner, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

1998–2002 Project Manager, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

1996–1998 Architect, John M.Y. Lee/Michael Timchula, Architects, New York, NY

1995–1996 Senior Associate, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, Trade Finance, New

York, NY

1992–1995 Executive Secretary, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, New York, NY

1990–1992 Executive Secretary, Dai Ichi Kangyo Bank, Ltd., New York, NY

1989–1990 Junior Architect, Mitchell Kurtz, Architect, P.C., New York, NY

1986–1989 Junior Architect, Timchula Creative Limited, In., New York, NY

1983–1984 Student Employee, Columbia University School of International and Political

Affairs

1982–1983 Junior Architect, Potomac Group, Washington, DC

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

Fall 2007

March 2008

August 2007

April 2005

March 2005

April 2004

SERVICE

2007–present

2005–present

2001–2007

REGISTRATION

Professional and Public Lectures and Panels

Amherst Downtown Redesign Project”: Mark Lindhult and Kathleen Lugosch

joint LARP and Architecture studio project; panel member discussion and

presentation on sustainable design principles and opportunities in town

planning, design and form-based code development

“Green Living”

SPIRALS Student Organization, UMass Amherst

Annual Meeting and Conference, Covenant of the Goddess

“Sustainability and LEED Overview”

LARP Studio: Jack Ahern, presentation with Bruce Thomas and Cynthia

Arbour

Architecture Studio: Ray Kinoshita

LARP 614: William Cone, presentation with Bruce Thomas

Town of Amherst Planning Board

Town of Amherst Energy Conservation Committee

Town of Amherst Design Review Board

84


Registered Architect, New York, License #028439

LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Accredited

Professional

Massachusetts Public Purchasing Official, certification pending (Design and

Construction program successfully completed January 2008)

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

1999–present

2002–present

2007–present

2006–present

AWARDS

Society of College and University Planners, Convener for the Annual

Conference in 2000 and 2007, reviewer for Annual Conferences from 2003 -

Present

Member, US Green Building Council, Convener at the Green Build Annual

Conference in 2006, Program Reviewer for the Annual Conference in 2007

and 2008

Member, USGBC Massachusetts Membership Forum (formerly USGBC

Affiliate) and member of Regional Subcommittee

North East Sustainable Energy Association

1986 William Kinney Fellows Memorial Traveling Fellowship

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

Managed Projects

As Senior Facilities Planner for University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Project manager and architect of building feasibility studies for complex, multimillion-dollar

projects, including research and academic facilities, financial

analyses and forecasts, development of alternatives, and recommendation of

solutions. Responsible for development of facilities planning design

standards to ensure efficient and high-quality planning projects; development

of facility programs, goals and objectives, technical requirements and cost

estimates; management of campus planning studies including land use

planning, capital project analysis and forecasts, landscape improvements,

pedestrian and vehicular circulation and transportation and infrastructure

systems. Responsible for: i) coordination of capital projects planning

activities utilizing both in-house staff and outside consultants, ii) development

of facility programs, goals and objectives, technical requirements, and cost

estimates; iii) leasing of off-campus real estate for the University, including

user program development, development of RFP’s, analysis of potential sites,

and lease administration and iv) coordination/collaboration with state and

federal offices which are impacted by or regulate the work of F&CP. As the

division’s Sustainable Design Coordinator, is responsible for the division’s

professional development training on green building and participates in

sustainability charettes on large projects. Major projects include:

SW Residential Complex Feasibility Study – existing utility and concourse

conditions analysis, master plan and conceptual design study for a 4 acre

area housing 5,000 students

Police Building Study – a feasibility study for a 30,000 gsf new police building,

including multiple alternatives for construction delivery, siting, program and

budget.

Off-Campus Leased Space – programming, planning, fiber optic utility

development and procurement of off-campus leased space for University

Outreach and Extension, University Without Walls, and Office of Information

Technologies, totaling 15,800sf

Physical Plant Building Energy Efficiency Project – full building energy audit,

design and implementation of energy saving measures, as well as

development of tools for tracking building energy performance metrics and

maintaining an on-going monitoring program

85


ALEXANDER C. SCHREYER Lecturer

TEACHING

EDUCATION

2003–present

1999–2003

1993–1998

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2006–present

2003–2006

2003–present

1999

1996–1997

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2003

1998

1997

1994

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

In press

Tectonics 3

Construction Materials & Methods

Properties of Wood

Introduction to CAD for Construction and Architecture

Advanced Topics in CAD

Student, Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Forestry and Wood Technology,

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Topic: CAD-software integrated optimization of digitally created parametric

building models

Master of Applied Sciences (M.A.Sc.), Wood Science, University of British

Columbia

Thesis: Monotonic and Cyclic Behavior of Slender Dowel-Type Fasteners

in Wood-Steel-Wood Connections

Diplom-Ingenieur, FH (Dipl.-Ing. FH), Undergraduate Degree in Civil

Engineering University of Applied Sciences (Fachhochschule)

Wiesbaden, Germany Thesis: Determination of the Capacities of a New

Composite Timber-Steel Connector System

Lecturer (graduate teaching faculty level)

Adjunct Faculty, Department of Natural Resources Conservation, Building

Materials and Wood Technology Program, University of Massachusetts,

Amherst, MA

Instructor and Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Natural

Resources Conservation, Building Materials and Wood Technology

Program, UMass

Teaching Assistantships–University of British-Columbia:

Mechanics of Wood Products

Teaching Assistantships–University of Applied Sciences Wiesbaden,

Germany.

Lecturer

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA

Research Assistant

University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Engineering Assistant

Ingenieurbüro Wasser und Landschaft, Wiesbaden, Germany

(engineering firm)

Architectural Assistant INFRA Gesellschaft für Umweltplanung mbH,

Mainz, Germany (architecture firm)

Clouston, P., Schreyer, A. “Design and Use of Wood-Concrete Composites”.

American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Practice Periodical on Structural

Design and Construction.

86


2006

2005

2004

SERVICE

2005–present

2007–present

2008–2009

2005

2003, 2006–

present

REGISTRATION

Not registered

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AWARDS

Clouston, P., Schreyer, A. Wood-Concrete Composites: A Structurally

Efficient Material Option. Paper, Boston Society of Civil Engineers

(BSCE), Civil Engineering Practice

Clouston, P., Bathon, L.A., Schreyer, A. Shear and Bending Performance of

a novel Wood Concrete Composite System. Paper, American Society of

Civil Engineers (ASCE), Journal of Structural Engineering, 131 (9), pp.

1404-1412

Schreyer, A., Lam, F., Prion, H.G.L. Comparison of Slender Dowel-Type

Fasteners for Slotted-in Steel Plate Connections under Monotonic and

Cyclic Loading. Paper, Proceedings, World Conference on Timber

Engineering 2004, Lahti, Finland

Served as faculty member for a new interdisciplinary NAAB-accredited

Architecture+Design program (specifically as member of curriculum, website,

admissions and digital fabrication committees)

Served as chair of NRC computer committee (2007-present), as member of

BMATWT faculty search committee (2008) and as member on UMass Facilities

Management committee (2008).

Designed and supervised implementation of new CMS-based Natural

Resources Conservation department website (2008) and Building Materials and

Wood technology website (2009)

See http://nrc.umass.edu / and http://bct.nrc.umass.edu / for website

Designed and supervised implementation of new Architecture+Design program

website

See http://www.umass.edu/architecture/ for website

Maintained Building Materials and Wood Technology program website as

webmaster

See http://www.umass.edu/bmatwt/ for website

Member, American Society of Civil Engineers

Member, Forest Products Society

Member, National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS)

Member, Bund Deutscher Baumeister, Architekten und Ingenieure (BDB),

Germany

Member, Verein Deutscher Ingenieure (VDI), Germany

Weyerhaeuser Fellowship in Wood Design - $15,000

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

Long-term exterior testing of a wood-concrete slab. University of

Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA (ongoing since 09/2005)

Preliminary Structural Evaluation and Presentation of Refurbishment

Options for the Usher Mill in Erving, MA. For Donahue Institute, University

of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA (08/2003)

Strength Testing of Small I-Joists for Stressed-Skin Panels. For

Bensonwood Homes, Walpole, NH, USA (06/2003)

Strength Testing of Lag-Screw End-Grain Connection for Space-Truss

made from Peeler Cores. For StructureCraft Builders, Vancouver, BC,

Canada (06/2003)

87


SANJAY ARWADE Assistant Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

Perspectives on the Evolution of Structures

Structural Analysis

Advanced Solid Mechanics

Finite Element Analysis

2002

Ph.D., Civil & Environmental Engineering

Cornell University

Dissertation: Stochastic Characterization and Simulation of Material

Microstructures with Application to Aluminum.

1999

M.S., Civil & Environmental Engineering

Cornell University

Major Field: Structural Engineering. Minor Field: Structural Mechanics

Thesis: Probabilistic Models for Aluminum Microstructure and Intergranular

Fracture Analysis.

1996

B.S.E., Civil Engineering & Operations Research, summa cum laude

Princeton University

Thesis: Analysis of the E ect of Di erential Support Motion on a Typical

Reinforced Concrete Highway Bridge

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2006–present Assistant Professor

Civil & Environmental Engineering University of Massachusetts, Amherst

2006–2008 Visiting Assistant Professor

Civil Engineering Johns Hopkins University

2002–2006 Assistant Professor

Civil Engineering Johns Hopkins University

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2008–present

2007

2006–2008

2004

1996

1997

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

Submitted

Submitted

Submitted

Accepted

Flodesign Inc.

Daedalus Cycles

STX Lacrosse

Engineering Society of Baltimore

Intern Engineer, Robert Silman Associates, New York City

EIT, New York State

Journal articles:

Arwade, S. R., Winans, R., & Clouston, P. L. “Variability of the strength of

Parallel Strand Lumber.” Journal of Engineering Mechanics.

Arwade, S. R., & Schafer, B. W. “Cell wall sti ness, geometric uncertainty, and

the elastic properties of cellular networks.” Modeling and Simulation in Materials

Science and Engineering.

Arwade, S. R., Moradi, M., & Louhghalam, A. “Variance decomposition and

global sensitivity for structural systems.” Engineering Structures.

Arwade, S. R., Winans, R., & Clouston, P. L. “Spatial variation of parallel strand

lumber elastic modulus,” Journal of Engineering Mechanics.

88


2008

2009

Accepted

2008

2007

2007

2006

2005

2005

2004

2003

2003

SERVICE

2002–2006

2003–present

2003–present

2003–present

REGISTRATION

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AWARDS

2008–2009

2002

1997, 1998

1996

1996

1996

1996

Dorgan, K. M., Arwade, S. R., & Jumars, P. A. “Worms as wedges: E ects of

sediment mechanics on burrowing behavior.” Journal of Marine Research

66:219-254

Arwade, S. R. & Popat, M. “Statistics of simulated intergranular cracks.”

Probabilistic Engineering Mechanics. 24:117-127

Louhghalam, A, & Arwade, S. R. “Prediction of incipient damage sites in

composites using classifiers.” International Journal of Damage Mechanics

Tan, L. & Arwade, S. R. “Response classification of simple polycrystalline

microstructures.” Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering.

197:1397-1409

Dorgan, K. M., Arwade, S. R., & Jumars, P. A. “Burrowing in marine muds by

crack propagation: kinematics and forces.” Journal of Experimental Biology.

210(23):4198-4212

Liu, H., Arwade, S. R., & Igusa, T. “Random composites classification and

damage estimation using Bayesian classifiers.” ASCE Journal of Engineering

Mechanics. 133(2):129-140

Arwade, S. R., Ariston, L., & Lydigsen, T. “Structural behavior of the Bollman

truss bridge at Savage, Maryland.” Association for Preservation Technology Bul

letin. 37(1):27-36

Ferrante, F., Arwade, S. R., & Graham-Brady, L. “A non-stationary translation

field model for composite microstructure.” Probabilistic Engineering Mechanics.

20(3):215-228

Arwade, S. R. “Translation vectors with non-identically distributed components.”

Probabilistic Engineering Mechanics. 20(2):158-167

Arwade, S. R., & Grigoriu, M “Characterization and modelling of random

polycrystalline microstructrues with application to intergranular fracture.” ASCE

Journal of Engineering Mechanics. 130(9):997-1006

Arwade, S. R. & Grigoriu, M. “The ODF of kinematically determined planar

polycrystals subject to random deformation.” Probabilistic Engineering

Mechanics. 18(4):289-299

Grigoriu, M, Ditlevsen, O. & Arwade, S. R. “A Monte Carlo simulation model for

stationary non-Gaussian processes.” Probabilistic Engineering Mechanics.

18(1): 87-95

Committee membership:

ASCE Dynamics

ASCE Probabilistic Methods

IASSAR Computational Mechanics

IASSAR Material Modeling

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

Lilly Teaching Fellow, University of Massachusetts

New Century Scholar, selected for NSF workshop participation

John E. Perry Teaching Assistant Prize. Cornell University

ACI (NJ Section) award for outstanding research in concrete structures

Phi Beta Kappa

Sigma Xi

Tau Beta Pi

89


SCOTT A. CIVJAN, P.E. Associate Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

Tectonics III

Structural Steel Design

Advanced Topics in Steel Design

Seismic Design of Structures

1998

Ph.D. Civil and Environmental Engineering (Structural), The University of

Texas at Austin

1995

M.S.C.E Civil and Environmental Engineering (Structural), The University of

Texas at Austin

1989

B.S.C.E, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Washington University, St.

Louis

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2005-Present

2005-Present

2004-Present

1998-2004

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

1993-1998

1989-1993

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

SERVICE

REGISTRATION

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AWARDS

Adjunct Faculty–Architecture and Design

Structural Engineering/Mechanics Group Coordinator - CEE Dept.

Associate Professor–CEE Dept.

Assistant Professor - CEE Dept.

Graduate Research Assistant, University of Texas, Austin

Civil Engineer (Level 03) , Black and Veatch Architects and

Engineers, Overland Park, KS.

Structural Engineering with an emphasis on experimental research, though

analytical research and field monitoring/implementation is also pursued.

Specific areas of interests include design and behavior of steel structures,

seismic design of structures, composite structures, and structural

applications of new materials.

Over 30 Journal/Conference Proceeding Publications

Associate Editor–Journal of Structural Engineering - ASCE

Associate Member - Partners in Education Committee–AISC

BSCE Structures Committee

Associate Member, Paper Awards Committee - ACI

Chair - Construction Award Paper Committee - ACI

Associate Member Composite and Hybrid Structures - ACI

Corresponding Member - BSSC Technical Subcommittee TS11–

Composite Structures

Paper and Grant Reviewer for several Journals and Federal Agencies

Prof. Engineer Texas (#81440) and Massachusetts (#42419)

American Society of Civil Engineers

American Institute of Steel Construction

Earthquake Engineering Research Institute

National Steel Bridge Alliance

Structural Engineering Institute

American Concrete Institute

90


2006

Student nominated COE Commencement Speaker

2006

ASCE Student Chapter Teacher of the Year

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

Evaluation of Terrazzo Cracking in Elevated Walkways

Performance of Historic Steel Connections/Components

Reduced Beam Section Moment Connection Behavior

Tuned Strut for Support of Large Excavations

Integral Abutment Bridge Behavior (Field Data and Modeling)

Implementation of New Corrosion Inhibiting Concrete Admixture

91


KAREN KOEHLER Associate Professor

TEACHING

EDUCATION

1986

June 1993

1987–1988

1981–1984

1973–1976

May 1976

1980

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2003–present

1998–2003

1998–2001

1990–1997

1988–1990

1983–1984

1978–1981

Architectural Theory

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK

In progress

In preparation

for 2010

2008

Princeton University, Department of Art and Archaeology.

MFA 1986

PhD, June 1993.

Dissertation: "Great Utopias and Small Worlds: Architectural Visions and

Political Realities in the Prints of the Weimar Bauhaus, 1919-1925."

Harvard University, Fine Arts, Exchange Scholar.

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Art History Program.

MA, with Distinction, June 1984.

Masters' Paper: "Kazimir Malevich, Russian Formalism, and the Return to

Figurative Painting."

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Program in English Literature.

BA, with Distinction, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi; May 1976

Library and Information Science, MLS, 1980

Hampshire College, Amherst MA; Associate Professor of Art and Architectural

History

Co-coordinator, Five College Architectural Studies

Five College Associate and Visiting Associate Professor, Amherst MA

Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith Colleges and the University

of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Yale University, New Haven, CT; History of Art and the School of Architecture;

Lecturer

Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, Art and Art History, Assistant

Professor, 1993-97; Instructor, 1990-93

Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA, Department of Art, Instructor

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, University Gallery, Curatorial Assistant

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, University Library, Research

Assistant/Associate

Books and Exhibition Catalogues

Gropius in Exile and the Fear of Reception.

The Bauhaus (Phaidon Press, "Art & Ideas" series; contract signed.

Bauhaus Modern; (sole author) exhibition catalogue (Northampton, MA: SCMA).

92


Forthcoming

2011

Forthcoming

2009

March 2009

2004

January 2003

October 2008

March 2008

2005

2003

SERVICE

REGISTRATION

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

AWARDS

August 2005

2004

2003–2009

2002–2003

2000–2001

1997–1998

1986

1988

1984–1988

RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

Articles, Essays, Reviews

“Retelling Objects” in The Mad Square: Modernity in German Art 1910-1938 (Art

Gallery of New South Wales and National Gallery of Victoria, Australia)

exhibition catalogue essay

“The Bauhaus Manifesto Postwar to Postwar: From the Street to the Wall to the

Radio to the Memoir” in Bauhaus Construct, edited by Jeffrey Saletnik and

Robin Schuldenfrei, (NY: Routledge).

[Review] Jill Pearlman, Inventing American Modernism (Charlottesville:

University of Virginia Press, 2007) and Meredith Clausen, The Pan Am Building

and the Shattering of the Modernist Dream (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2005)

for Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians (JSAH)

"Angels of History Carrying Bricks: Gropius House and Historical Montage," in

The Anatomy of Exile, ed. by Peter Rose, (Amherst: University of

Massachusetts Press).

"Which Bauhaus?" (Review of Anja Baumhoff, The Gendered World of the

Bauhaus and Margret Kentgens-Craig, The Bauhaus and American: First

Contacts) Centropa, 3:1

Selected Papers and Lectures

“Bauhaus Modes and Modernities” Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton

“The Bauhaus Manifesto Postwar to Postwar: From the Street to the Wall to the

Radio to the Memoir” “Bauhaus Palimpsest” Leventritt Symposium Harvard

University Art Museums Cambridge

Respondent, “Surviving to Rebuilding, 1914-1945,” Northeast Conference British

Studies Association, University of Massachusetts

"Translation and Perception: Gropius, Photography, Building," College Art

Association, New York

Whiting Foundation, Summer Faculty Fellowship

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, Summer Stipend

Hampshire College, Faculty Development Grant [NEH, Mellon and MacArthur

Foundations]

Graham Foundation, Principal Investigator, “Five College Architectural Studies

Project”

Fellowship, Louise and Edmund Kahn Institute, Smith College, Northampton,

Massachusetts

The Graham Foundation, Chicago, Illinois, "Bauhaus Historiography"

Princeton University, Hencken Fellowship

Lee Dissertation Grant

University Fellowship

93


4.5 VISITING TEAM REPORT FROM THE PREVIOUS VISIT

Supplemental information to the APR must include a complete copy of the previous

VTR.

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Department of Art, Architecture, and Art History

Visiting Team Report

Master of Architecture

Track One: (undergraduate credit hours plus 87 graduate credit hours)

Track Two: (undergraduate credit hours plus 57 graduate credit hours)

The National Architectural Accrediting Board

28 February 2007

The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), established in 1940, is the sole agency authorized

to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture. Because most state registration boards in

the United States require any applicant for licensure to have graduated from an NAAB-accredited

program, obtaining such a degree is an essential aspect of preparing for the professional practice of

architecture.

94


Section

I. Summary of Team Findings

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Team Comments

Progress Since the Previous Site Visit

Conditions Well Met

Conditions Not Met

Causes of Concern

Table of Contents

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

II. Compliance with the Conditions for Accreditation 10

III. Appendices

A. Program Information

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

History and Description of the Institution

Institutional Mission

Program History

Program Mission

Program Self Assessment

B. The Visiting Team 35

C. The Visit Agenda 37

IV. Report Signatures 41

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4

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9

9

29

29

29

29

30

31

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95


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University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

96


I.

1.

Summary of Team Findings

Team Comments: Executive Summary

From the point of view of the visiting team, the UMass architecture program has students and

faculty who are working hard to create a successful professional degree program. As is to be

expected in a new program, the visiting team identified a number of areas where improvement will

be necessary. The decision for initial accreditation will be made in July 2007 by the directors of

the National Architectural Accrediting Board.

Due to the fact that this is a new program, the number of students enrolled is relatively small. At

the time of the visit, two students had already graduated and a group of about ten students were

in their last semester.

Three Great Strengths

A. UMass will have the first public architecture program in New England.

This will significantly improve accessibility to architectural education and give the University

of Massachusetts a significant competitive edge in recruiting students. The institutional

support of the flagship land grant university is an ideal context for an architecture program,

thus, great potential exists. This fills a long-standing vacuum in the professional and

academic community.

B. The architecture faculty at UMass is talented, committed, and collegial.

Given the high teaching loads and demands of a new program, the faculty is productively

engaged in a range of creative work. The faculty is dedicated to working with students, and

students in return are appreciative. The program has successfully recruited new faculty and

a program director. The level of collegiality and mutual respect seems very high, and serves

as an important role model for the students. It is impressive to see how the faculty has

balanced teaching, creative activity, and service.

C. Interdisciplinary collaboration is genuinely valued within the university and within the

architecture program.

The architecture program, students, and faculty participate in a full spectrum of

interdisciplinary interconnections: courses, programs, events, activities, research grants,

among others were regularly cited as examples of interdisciplinary collaboration. Faculty

from many disciplines on the campus contribute to the mission of the architecture program:

engineering, studio art, building science, landscape architecture, art history. Appreciation for

interdisciplinary activity is a part of the culture of UMass, not just lip service.

Other strengths:

Students are articulate and thoughtful.

The students represent an economic and geographic diversity. The team is confident that

future recruiting efforts will increase diversity.

The leadership, at all levels, is committed to the architecture program.

The provost, the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts, and the director of the

architecture program see the potential for the architecture program and are committed to

helping the program thrive within the competing priorities of the campus. Ideally, the new

department chair for art, architecture, and art history will continue to assist the fledging

program.

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

1

97


2

The regional profession has long supported development of a professional

architecture program at UMass.

These efforts include the sponsorship of program activities, involvement in course activities,

financial commitment, and participation in department activities. The new advisory council is

well positioned to assist the program.

The five college consortium offers many opportunities for a unique collaboration of

public and private university entities.

It should be noted that enrollment in architectural studies at the private colleges has recently

increased significantly

Faculty and students have established a strong sense of community within the

program.

Overall, the technical courses enrich the design experience of the architecture

students.

Major Concerns

A. Short term and long term plans for the program are ambiguous.

After repeated requests, a written strategic plan was provided on the third day of the visit.

The visiting team felt frustrated as it tried to understand the true goals of this program, its

future plans and priorities. It was difficult to receive a clear answer about plans for future

growth. The written strategic plan seemed vague and not related to discussions.

Comprehensive planning is needed to project faculty, financial, and facility needs.

B. The curriculum structure, and particularly the design studio structure, is ambiguous.

While individual design studio assignments are intriguing and student work is good, the

underlying consistency, or predictability, in the exposure to various architectural issues is not

apparent. The student's experience in the design studio sequence could be a rather random

collection of projects, rather than a coordinated learning experience.

In December 2006, the faculty made important progress in trying to identify key, recurring

design issues and related skills, within the sequence of the studio courses. Nevertheless,

this is not yet implemented in the course descriptions as provided and in the course work that

the team reviewed.

As a new program, it is to be expected that curriculum would be developing and "in

transition." The 2006 faculty study is a good step in providing a coherent curriculum that

would be predictable from year to year, no matter which individual faculty member is actually

assigned to a given course.

C. The architecture program suffers from a lack of visibility and autonomy.

While all administrators met by the visiting team were supportive of the architecture program,

the team is concerned that the architecture program is "administratively buried" below a

provost, dean, and department chair. It is unclear how much autonomy the program director

actually has in controlling budget, in seeking university funds, and in hiring.

As the program grows, the current administrative structure is neither comparable to the

administrative structure of other professional programs on the campus, nor to other

architecture programs at large flagship research universities.

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

98


Other concerns

The advising system is not sustainable.

The current advising system is too dependent on the program director, and is not sustainable as

the program grows. (The program director's efforts are very much appreciated by students.)

Space needs exist. Planning for expansion should occur.

Plans for the projected expansion of the architecture program into vacated art department space

should be underway. (This vacated space is adjacent to the architecture studios and is available

because of the relocation of the studio arts program into a new building scheduled for completion

in 2008.)

In comparison to typical design programs at research universities, shortcomings in facilities

include;

dedicated design studio presentation areas or classroom spaces for project presentations

satellite reference library space for current periodicals and reserve readings

shop for use by architecture students

social space to promote program collegiality.

in its current location, the program has no physical identity on campus.

Digital resources are inadequate.

Many students use off-campus sources for basic digital services (especially large format printing),

which could be interpreted as a form of social inequity. The computer lab in the building has very

limited hours.

In comparison to other architecture programs, digital needs for the architecture program include:

computer lab available 24/7

up-to-date hardware (although students reported up-to-date software)

output facilities, such as printers, scanners, plotters, etc.

cutting edge digital fabrication technology, such as CNC mills, laser cutters and 3D printers

In the design studios, students of varying skill levels are combined in the same course:

the differentiation in expectations and evaluations for beginning and advanced students in

the same course are unclear.

As the program grows, it may no longer be necessary to "blend" students of different skill levels in

one course.

The Business of Building class does not focus on architecture's needs.

While the Business of Building course is a valuable interdisciplinary course, it lacks the requisite

specificity to meet specific accreditation criteria for a professional program in architecture

Recommendations

The visiting team is confident that UMass can address concerns listed above, as well as

shortcomings identified in the team's review of specific conditions of accreditation.

Additional recommendations include:

Although the 4+2 and the three year graduate degree program overlap in many areas, there

is clearly a 4+2 degree path which should be recognized in the next accreditation process

with a separate NAAB matrix.

The program should take advantage of the Amherst 250 university initiative to recruit 250 new

faculty in five years. The architecture program could benefit with a clear outline of future

faculty needs and "cluster hires" across discipline lines to reinforce the interdisciplinary nature

of the program. Faculty start-up funds can enhance the program's mission.

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

3

99


The architecture program should address the confusion and ambiguity about the current and

future role of interior design.

Some streamlining of technology courses might be possible, and more emphasis on non-

residential construction would be helpful for students.

2. Progress Since the Previous Site Visit

4

Condition 4, Social Equity

The program must provide all faculty, students, and staff—irrespective of race, ethnicity, creed,

national origin, gender, age, physical ability, or sexual orientation—with equitable access to a

caring and supportive educational environment in which to learn, teach, and work.

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

Previous Team Report: Policies are in place to ensure that faculty, students, and staff will have

equitable access to the program. The team encourages the program to develop specific

mechanisms to ensure a diverse student body. (The condition is ―not yet met� as there are not yet

any students in the professional M. Arch.)

This criterion is now met: see comments in Section II: Compliance with the Conditions for

Accreditation.

Condition 6, Human Resources

The program must demonstrate that it provides adequate human resources for a professional

degree program in architecture, including a sufficient faculty complement, an administrative head

with enough time for effective administration, administrative and technical support staff, and

faculty support staff.

Previous Team Report: The program benefits from a talented, collegial, enthusiastic faculty at

UMass and at the other nearby colleges (Five College consortium). The team is concerned about

the absence of dedicated support staff for the program, the lack of official recognition of program

administration, and the small number of core full time faculty who are assigned to the professional

program. The extraordinary, multidisciplinary program will require a significant amount of faculty

and staff time for coordination, shared governance, advising, travel, etc. While the team

recognizes the limits of resources at UMass, the team urges upper administration to allocate a

critical mass of faculty and administration to appropriately launch the Master of Architecture

program.

Teaching loads are high, partly because of the way studio credit hours are counted. All current

and proposed architecture studios are valued at 3 credits (similar to art studios) rather than 6

credits (typical of architecture studios at peer institutions and in the UMass landscape

architecture program). With an appropriate adjustment in credit hours, architecture faculty loads

(and productivity) will be reflected more accurately.

Progress has been made in this area:

A new director and staff support have been hired.

Undergraduate studio courses have had an increase in credit hours from 3 to 4.

10

0


Condition 8, Physical Resources

The program must provide physical resources that are appropriate for a professional degree

program in architecture, including design studio space for the exclusive use of each full-time

student; lecture and seminar spaces that accommodate both didactic and interactive learning:

office space for the exclusive use of each full-time faculty member; and related instructional

support space.

Previous Team Report: The program provides studio space for current students; office space

for full time faculty; and access to other instructional spaces. There is a significant need for a

state of the art lecture hall in close proximity to the architecture/art studios. With the expected

construction of the new visual arts building (occupancy is anticipated for 2007), architecture will

be allocated more space in the fine arts center. Currently, though, the architecture program has

no physical identity on campus—there is no ―architecture office�, for example.

Even though the new studio arts building will liberate space in the fine arts building to be

used by the architecture program, the team was concerned about inadequate facilities

and the lack of clear planning regarding facilities. See comments in Section II:

Compliance with the Conditions for Accreditation.

Condition 10, Financial Resources

Programs must have access to institutional support and financial resources comparable to those

made available to the other relevant professional programs within the institution.

Previous Team Report: Expenditures per student are similar in the home department (Art and

Art History) to other comparable programs at UMass. It is difficult to calculate the expenditures

per student in Architecture/Design because the program does not have a separate budget.

Though strained, the program appears to have had sufficient institutional support and

resources to start the program. See comments in Section II: Compliance with the

Conditions for Accreditation.

Criterion 13.9, Non-Western Traditions

Understanding of parallel and divergent canons and traditions of architecture and urban design in

the non-Western world

Previous Team Report: The team met several faculty members with expertise and interests in

this area. The team expects that necessary minor adjustments can be made to address this

issue.

This is no longer a concern.

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

10

1

5


6

Criterion 13.14, Accessibility

Ability to design both site and building to accommodate individuals with varying physical abilities

Previous Team Report: While the team did not find evidence in the team room, this will be a

focus of studios not yet implemented.

This is no longer a concern.

Criterion 13.16, Program Preparation

Ability to prepare a comprehensive program for an architectural project, including assessment of

client and user needs, a critical review of appropriate precedents, an inventory of space and

equipment requirements, an analysis of site conditions, a review of the relevant laws and

standards and assessment of their implication for the project, and a definition of site selection and

design assessment criteria

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

Previous Team Report: While the team did not find evidence in the team room, this will be a

focus of studios not yet implemented. The team did find evidence of ―understanding�, but not

―ability�.

This remains a concern: see comments in Section II: Compliance with the Conditions for

Accreditation.

Criterion 13.17, Site Conditions

Ability to respond to natural and built site characteristics in the development of a program and the

design of a project

Previous Team Report: While the team did not find evidence in the team room, this will be a

focus of studios not yet implemented.

This remains a concern: see comments in Section II: Compliance with the Conditions for

Accreditation.

Criterion 13.18, Structural Systems

Understanding of principles of structural behavior in withstanding gravity and lateral forces and

the evolution, range, and appropriate application of contemporary structural systems

Previous Team Report: The team met several faculty members with expertise and interests in

this area. The team expects that necessary minor adjustments can be made to address this

issue. Evidence in the area of light frame structures was in the team room.

This is no longer a concern.

Criterion 13.20, Life Safety

Understanding of the basic principles of life-safety systems with an emphasis on egress

10

2


Previous Team Report: While the team did not find evidence in the team room, this will be a

focus of studios not yet implemented.

This is no longer a concern.

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

10

3

7


Criterion 13.23, Building Systems Integration

Ability to assess, select, and conceptually integrate structural systems, building envelope

systems, environmental systems, life-safety systems, and building service systems into building

design.

Previous Team Report: While the team did not find evidence in the team room, this will be a

focus of studios not yet implemented.

This is no longer a concern.

Criterion 13.25, Construction Cost Control

Understanding of the fundamentals of building cost, life-cycle cost, and construction estimating

Previous Team Report: The team met several faculty members with expertise and interests in

this area. The team expects that necessary minor adjustments can be made to address this

issue.

This remains a concern: see comments in Section II: Compliance with the Conditions for

Accreditation.

Criterion 13.26, Technical Documentation

Ability to make technically precise drawings and write outline specifications for a proposed design

Previous Team Report: The team did not find evidence of outline specs (a new criterion)

This remains a concern: see comments in Section II: Compliance with the Conditions for

Accreditation.

Criterion 13.28, Comprehensive Design

Ability to produce a comprehensive architectural project based on a building program and site

that includes development of programmed spaces demonstrating an understanding of structural

and environmental systems, building envelope systems, life-safety provisions, wall sections and

building assemblies and the principles of sustainability

Previous Team Report: While the team did not find evidence in the team room, this will be a

focus of studios not yet implemented.

3. Conditions Well Met

8

1.1

1.3

1.4

13.1

13.7

13.9

This is no longer a concern.

Architectural Education and the Academic Context

Architectural Education and Registration

Architectural Education and the Profession

Speaking and Writing Skills

Collaborative Skills

Non-Western Traditions

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

10

4


13.18 Structural Systems

4. Conditions Not Met

2

8

13.8

13.10

13.11

13.15

13.16

13.17

13.25

13.26

Program Self-Assessment Procedures

Physical Resources

Western Traditions

National and Regional Traditions

Use of Precedents

Sustainable Design

Program Preparation

Site Conditions

Construction Cost Control

Technical Documentation

13.29 Architect's Administrative Roles

13.30 Architectural Practice

13.32 Leadership

13.33 Legal Responsibilities

5. Causes of Concern

See executive summary

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

10

5

9


II.

1.

10

Compliance with the Conditions for Accreditation

Program Response to the NAAB Perspectives

Schools must respond to the interests of the collateral organizations that make up the NAAB as

set forth by this edition of the NAAB Conditions for Accreditation. Each school is expected to

address these interests consistent with its scholastic identity and mission.

1.1 Architecture Education and the Academic Context

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

The accredited degree program must demonstrate that it benefits from and contributes to

its institution. In the APR, the accredited degree program may explain its academic and

professional standards for faculty and students; its interaction with other programs in the

institution; the contribution of the students, faculty, and administrators to the governance

and the intellectual and social lives of the institution; and the contribution of the institution

to the accredited degree program in terms of intellectual resources and personnel.

Met

[ X ]

WELL MET

UMass will have the first publicly funded architecture program in New England, thus

making architectural education more accessible.

In a commendable way, the architecture program is an active collaborator with other

disciplines on the campus, in courses and in research: landscape architecture, building

science, engineering, and studio art. Faculty from these disciplines are regularly invited

for reviews and the spirit of cooperation was consistently apparent.

The five college consortium increases the sense of intellectual exchange with nearby

colleges of Smith, Mount Holyoke, Hampshire, and Amherst.

1.2 Architecture Education and Students

The accredited degree program must demonstrate that it provides support and

encouragement for students to assume leadership roles in school and later in the

profession and that it provides an environment that embraces cultural differences. Given

the program's mission, the APR may explain how students participate in setting their

individual and collective learning agendas; how they are encouraged to cooperate with,

assist, share decision making with, and respect students who may be different from

themselves; their access to the information needed to shape their future; their exposure

to the national and international context of practice and the work of the allied design

disciplines; and how students' diversity, distinctiveness, self-worth, and dignity are

nurtured.

Met

[ X ]

The UMass architecture program succeeds in creating a nurturing learning environment

for the students. Students are enthusiastic and committed to this program, and are

articulate and effusive in expressing this. Students appreciate the intimate nature of the

current program and cite this as a strong point of their academic experience. Another

strong point cited by students is the interdisciplinary nature of the program which allows

students to tailor the program based on their individual learning agendas. However, this

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

10

6


was also seen as a potential program weakness because students received inconsistent

counsel pertaining to which classes they need to take, in what sequence, in order to

satisfy program requisites.

The faculty of the program is very supportive of students pursuing leadership roles both

inside and outside the school. The recent establishment of the Student Architecture

Society (SAS) within the UMass Amherst architecture program is a demonstration by the

students of their sincere interest in creating a unified voice amongst themselves. The SAS

is still in an embryonic phase, and needs to better define its goals and aspirations. The

mission and vision of this organization is vague and in need of clarification/ focus. The

founding of the SAS helps to give the architecture students an identity in the university

student population. Once fully established, the students hope to initiate a communal

chapter of the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) with students from the

five college consortium.

The students found the faculty responsive to their concerns about workloads and course

content. Students found the program flexible enough to allow them to participate in extra-

curricular activities and employment without conflicting with their course workloads.

Vertical studios and collaborative studios with students from other programs give the

architecture students exposure to working on diverse teams. However, in the case of

vertical studios, it was unclear how students at different levels were adequately evaluated

based on the amount and level of work they produced.

The program is touted as being very diverse, but based on the students with whom the

visiting team interacted, this was not evident. The demographics of the student population

demonstrated economic diversity, but fell short in the area of the ethnic diversity that was

evident in the general university student population.

1.3 Architecture Education and Registration

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

The accredited degree program must demonstrate that it provides students with a sound

preparation for the transition to internship and licensure. The school may choose to

explain in the APR the accredited degree program's relationship with the state

registration boards, the exposure of students to internship requirements including

knowledge of the national Intern Development Program (IDP) and continuing education

beyond graduation, the students' understanding of their responsibility for professional

conduct, and the proportion of graduates who have sought and achieved licensure since

the previous visit.

WELL MET

Within the coursework, the visiting team found evidence that students are receiving

preparatory information on the career path connecting education with licensure. The

appointment of a faculty member to the Massachusetts Architecture Registration Board

provides a strong link between the program and professional regulation, assuring good

communication on current regulatory standards. This link recently provided a program

that introduced students to IDP standards and procedures. The visiting team also viewed

coursework that introduced students to the elements of the Architectural Registration

Examination, creating an awareness of the NCARB testing standard.

Students benefit from exposure to practicing professionals in the classroom, through

faculty members with private practice and membership in professional organizations.

Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ ]

11

10

7


12

Internship opportunities in community and regional firms, while limited, do provide

exposure to professional practice. The visiting team found strong support for the UMass

Amherst program among local firms and professional organizations.

1.4 Architecture Education and the Profession

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

The accredited degree program must demonstrate how it prepares students to practice

and assume new roles and responsibilities in a context of increasing cultural diversity,

changing client and regulatory demands, and an expanding knowledge base. Given the

program's particular mission, the APR may include an explanation of how the accredited

degree program is engaged with the professional community in the life of the school; how

students gain an awareness of the need to advance their knowledge of architecture

through a lifetime of practice and research; how they develop an appreciation of the

diverse and collaborative roles assumed by architects in practice; how they develop an

understanding of and respect for the roles and responsibilities of the associated

disciplines; how they learn to reconcile the conflicts between architects' obligations to

their clients and the public and the demands of the creative enterprise; and how students

acquire the ethics for upholding the integrity of the profession.

Met

[ X ]

WELL MET

The visiting team was encouraged to find that a significant relationship between the

program and the professional community of western Massachusetts is clearly developing.

The local AIA chapter was an important advocate for this program's foundation, and local

professionals are regular design jury critics. Most of the faculty members are licensed

architects and the majority are members of the American Institute of Architects. Faculty

participation in the local and state professional organizations and the program director's

position on the state regulatory board further enhances the evolving positive relationship

between the UMass Amherst Program and the professional community.

This open communication and shared sense of purpose enhances the student's academic

experience, fosters opportunity for student internships, and encourages a dialogue on

career development opportunities between students and professionals.

There is ample evidence that the UMass Amherst architecture program provides students

with an adequate understanding of their future roles and opportunities in the profession.

1.5 Architecture Education and Society

The program must demonstrate that it equips students with an informed understanding of

social and environmental problems and develops their capacity to address these

problems with sound architecture and urban design decisions. In the APR, the

accredited degree program may cover such issues as how students gain an

understanding of architecture as a social art, including the complex processes carried out

by the multiple stakeholders who shape built environments; the emphasis given to

generating the knowledge that can mitigate social and environmental problems; how

students gain an understanding of the ethical implications of decisions involving the built

environment; and how a climate of civic engagement is nurtured, including a commitment

to professional and public services.

Met

[X]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

10

8


In the required student coursework, seminars, and design studios, the visiting team found

several meaningful efforts to inform UMass Amherst students of the social and

environmental issues in modern architectural practice.

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

The student understanding of the complex social and environmental context in which

today's architect must function is gained largely through exploration of the immediate

setting of the campus in western Massachusetts. The visiting team felt that student

appreciation of social and environmental problems would be further enhanced by

exposure to a broader range of physical and urban contexts of modern life and practice.

The visiting team felt there were ample opportunities for students to be exposed to and

participate in community service that could strengthen the program.

2. Program Self-Assessment Procedures

The accredited degree program must show how it is making progress in achieving the NAAB

Perspectives and how it assesses the extent to which it is fulfilling its mission. The assessment

procedures must include solicitation of the faculty's, students', and graduates' views on the

program's curriculum and learning. Individual course evaluations are not sufficient to provide

insight into the program's focus and pedagogy.

Met

[ ]

During the 2004 visit, the program was encouraged to develop "a concise document with

measurable strategies, objectives, and goals." This has not happened.

Faculty members regularly discuss their goals, and after repeated requests, a written strategic

plan was provided on the third day of the visit. The visiting team felt frustrated as it tried to

understand the true goals, future plans, and priorities of this program. It was difficult to receive a

clear answer about the plan for future growth. The written strategic plan seemed vague and not

related to discussions.

See executive summary.

3. Public Information

To ensure an understanding of the accredited professional degree by the public, all schools

offering an accredited degree program or any candidacy program must include in their catalogs

and promotional media the exact language found in the NAAB Conditions for Accreditation,

Appendix A. To ensure an understanding of the body of knowledge and skills that constitute a

professional education in architecture, the school must inform faculty and incoming students of

how to access the NAAB Conditions for Accreditation.

The program's website and printed materials have the required NAAB language. Additionally, the

FAQ section of the website addresses these issues.

As a member of the five college consortium, the UMass architecture program would be better

served by more clarity regarding professional programs and accreditation on the five college web

site.

Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ ]

13

10

9


4.

Social Equity

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

The accredited degree program must provide faculty, students, and staff—irrespective of race,

ethnicity, creed, national origin, gender, age, physical ability, or sexual orientation—with an

educational environment in which each person is equitably able to learn, teach, and work. The

school must have a clear policy on diversity that is communicated to current and prospective

faculty, students, and staff and that is reflected in the distribution of the program's human,

physical, and financial resources. Faculty, staff, and students must also have equitable

opportunities to participate in program governance.

Met

[ X ]

UMass Amherst's "Blueprint for Diversity" outlines the university's strategies relative to diversity at

all levels. The program itself does not appear to have a written policy regarding recruitment of a

diverse student body. The student body is generally reflective of the diversity of the overall

student body at UMass, but is not diverse, except for gender.

Faculty and staff meet on a regular basis to discuss program issues, however it is not clear that

students, other than teaching assistants, are actively involved in the process.

The program is touted as being very diverse, but based on the students with whom the visiting

team interacted, this was not evident. The demographics of the student population demonstrated

economic diversity, but fell short in the area of the ethnic diversity that was evident by the general

university student population.

5. Studio Culture

14

The school is expected to demonstrate a positive and respectful learning environment through the

encouragement of the fundamental values of optimism, respect, sharing, engagement, and

innovation between and among the members of its faculty, student body, administration, and

staff. The school should encourage students and faculty to appreciate these values as guiding

principles of professional conduct throughout their careers.

The impression of the visiting team was that faculty and students have established a strong sense

of community within the program. The program is relatively small and faculty seems to value the

personal scale. Both students and faculty expressed a strong sense of respect for each other.

Faculty seemed willing to accommodate student schedules and was responsive to student

concerns.

The provided "studio guidelines" relate more to studio logistics than to more cultural issues. The

policy, which addresses attendance, the condition of the studio spaces, the collection of student

work, and grading, appears to have been written by the faculty, as more of a top-down type of

document.

The guidelines do not address work load for the faculty or the students. Nevertheless, students

reported that faculty members were responsive to students' concerns about workload. Overall,

students seemed to feel that the workload was challenging but not excessive.

Workload expectations for students at different levels within the same studio were not clear.

Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

11

0


6.

Human Resources

The accredited degree program must demonstrate that it provides adequate human resources for

a professional degree program in architecture, including a sufficient faculty complement, an

administrative head with enough time for effective administration, and adequate administrative,

technical, and faculty support staff. Student enrollment in and scheduling of design studios must

ensure adequate time for an effective tutorial exchange between the teacher and the student. The

total teaching load should allow faculty members adequate time to pursue research, scholarship,

and practice to enhance their professional development.

The program has provided adequate faculty to commence. The program director was an

important new hire. The current search for a digital studio instructor is significant. Faculty

members seem productive outside of the classroom.

As the program grows, the human resources should expand: plans for expansion are unclear.

7. Human Resource Development

Schools must have a clear policy outlining both individual and collective opportunities for faculty

and student growth inside and outside the program.

The program does provide support and opportunities for student and faculty development. Clear

written policies could be helpful, especially in advising.

The current advising system is too dependent on the program director, and is not sustainable as

the program grows. (The program director's efforts are very much appreciated by students.)

8. Physical Resources

The accredited degree program must provide the physical resources appropriate for a

professional degree program in architecture, including design studio space for the exclusive use

of each student in a studio class; lecture and seminar space to accommodate both didactic and

interactive learning; office space for the exclusive use of each full-time faculty member; and

related instructional support space. The facilities must also be in compliance with the Americans

with Disabilities Act (ADA) and applicable building codes.

See comments in the executive summary

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

Met

[ x ]

Met

[ x ]

The program is currently housed on the bridge level of the fine arts building. This highly distinctive

building, completed in 1975, provides shared studio space for the undergraduate foundation

studio courses, studio space for the program in architecture (including individual desks for each

M. Arch. student), office space for the program's administrative staff, the director, and the full time

faculty. Classroom and other instructional space are shared with other departments and colleges

of the university.

Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[X]

15

11

1


There is currently no shop for use by architecture students, no social space to promote program

collegiality, and no area suitable for project reviews. A computer lab, shared with other academic

programs within the department, is located adjacent to the architecture studio space. Access to

the lab is limited.

In its current location, the program has no physical identity on campus, and no signage to direct

visitors and students to the program.

A new studio arts building for the university is under construction and expected to be complete in

early 2008. When this construction is finished, additional space adjacent to the current

architecture studios will become available, most likely by fall 2008.

The program has been lead to believe they will receive this freed-up space, created by the move

of studio arts to a new building. Plans for the projected expansion of the architecture program

into this space should be underway.

Funds for a renovation are not currently budgeted. Both the current and new facilities for the

program on the fourth floor bridge of the existing fine arts building are in need of upgrade,

including increased electrical power distribution, electronic communications networking,

mechanical system rehabilitation, and other renovations to address building code and access

issues.

Computer Lab:

As mentioned above, the program has access to a conveniently located computer lab that

provides a worthwhile resource for the program. Access to the lab is limited because classes are

conducted in the lab and the lab closes at 9:00 p.m.

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

Unfortunately the hardware is inadequate for many of the programs regularly used by the

architecture program. The program recently gained access to a color 11"X17" printer. Students

can only print large format documents at the facilities of the landscape architecture department.

Many students report relying of commercial printing houses for the bulk of their reproduction

needs.

In addition to a lack of adequate output devices for student use, there is no program of regular

replacement of faculty computers.

9. Information Resources

16

Readily accessible library and visual resource collections are essential for architectural study,

teaching, and research. Library collections must include at least 5,000 different cataloged titles,

with an appropriate mix of Library of Congress NA, Dewey 720-29, and other related call

numbers to serve the needs of individual programs. There must be adequate visual resources as

well. Access to other architectural collections may supplement, but not substitute for, adequate

resources at the home institution. In addition to developing and managing collections,

architectural librarians and visual resources professionals should provide information services

that promote the research skills and critical thinking necessary for professional practice and

lifelong learning.

Met

[X]

The program is supported by the university's central library. The UMass Amherst Du Bois library

collection has over 28,000 volumes classified in the NA and NK categories directly pertaining to

Not Met

[ ]

11

2


University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

architecture. The program's faculty and students have complete access to the five college library

system, as well as other regional, national and international interlibrary loan programs.

The library is located near the space occupied by the program. This close proximity facilitates

use by the students in architecture. Further the library is open twenty-four hours a day for student

use.

The slide library is currently housed in the history of art department. The university is in the

process of centralizing all visual resources and has recently undertaken an extensive program to

digitize the art history slide collections, as well as material that supports architectural education.

10. Financial Resources

An accredited degree program must have access to sufficient institutional support and financial

resources to meet its needs and be comparable in scope to those available to meet the needs of

other professional programs within the institution.

Though strained, the program appears to have had sufficient institutional support and resources

to start the program.

The architecture program and the department of art, architecture and art history have used their

limited funds effectively and leveraged outside resources well. The architecture program has

been creative in seeking grants and gifts from regional sources. Interdisciplinary grants have

helped the architecture program. The current search for a faculty member with digital expertise

could be an opportunity for faculty start-up funds to support expanded digital facilities.

As the program grows, the financial resources should expand. The program would greatly benefit

from a more autonomous budget, which may be related to its administrative structure.

11. Administrative Structure

The accredited degree program must be, or be part of, an institution accredited by one of the

following regional institutional accrediting agencies for higher education: the Southern Association

of Colleges and Schools (SACS); the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools

(MSACS); the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC); the North Central

Association of Colleges and Schools (NCACS); the Northwest Commission on Colleges and

Universities (NWCCU); and the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). The

accredited degree program must have a measure of autonomy that is both comparable to that

afforded other professional degree programs in the institution and sufficient to ensure

conformance with the conditions for accreditation.

The University of Massachusetts is a fully accredited institution. (NEASC)

The team is concerned that the architecture program is "administratively buried." The program

director reports to a department chair, who reports to the dean of the College of Humanities and

Fine Arts, who reports to the provost. With this many layers of administrative structure, the

Met

[ X ]

Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

17

11

3


material provided to the visiting team was unclear regarding how much autonomy the program

director actually has in controlling budget, in seeking university funds, and in hiring.

All administrators that the visiting team met were supportive of the architecture program.

As the program grows, the current administrative structure is neither comparable to the

administrative structure of other professional programs on the campus, nor to other architecture

programs at large flagship research universities.

12. Professional Degrees and Curriculum

The NAAB accredits the following professional degree programs: the Bachelor of Architecture

(B. Arch.), the Master of Architecture (M. Arch.), and the Doctor of Architecture (D. Arch.). The

curricular requirements for awarding these degrees must include professional studies, general

studies, and electives. Schools offering the degrees B. Arch., M. Arch., and/or D. Arch. are

strongly encouraged to use these degree titles exclusively with NAAB-accredited professional

degree programs.

The UMass program provided a NAAB criteria matrix for a three year M. Arch. program. By

definition, students entering such a program (with little or no previous background in architecture)

have a broad background of electives with other than architectural content.

The UMass program did not provide an NAAB criteria matrix for its 4+2 path, and the visiting

team would encourage that the 4+2 M. Arch. track be considered separately in future

accreditation visits. The majority of courses that met NAAB criteria were included in both the

three year and 4+2 M. Arch. track. In general, it seemed that the 4+2 track includes more

courses in design and architectural history.

The amount of electives "with other than architectural content" in the four year B. F. A. appears

relatively limited.

13. Student Performance Criteria

18

The accredited degree program must ensure that each graduate possesses the knowledge and

skills defined by the criteria set out below. The knowledge and skills are the minimum for meeting

the demands of an internship leading to registration for practice.

13.1 Speaking and Writing Skills

Ability to read, write, listen, and speak effectively

WELL MET

All of the student work from ARC 630 included writing that was articulate, thoughtful and

well written.

At the student meeting, students were consistently articulate in expressing their thoughts.

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ ]

Met Not Met

[ X ] [ ]

11

4


13.2

Critical Thinking Skills

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

Ability to raise clear and precise questions, use abstract ideas to interpret information,

consider diverse points of view, reach well-reasoned conclusions, and test them against

relevant criteria and standards

Met

[ X ]

Assignments from Arch 643 promote critical thinking in addressing interpretations of

buildings from the past and in local buildings.

In Arch 630, students take basic concepts and apply them to different cultures.

The degree projects require in-depth research and analysis that promote critical thinking.

13.3 Graphic Skills

Ability to use appropriate representational media, including freehand drawing and

computer technology, to convey essential formal elements at each stage of the

programming and design process

More freehand drawing would enrich the student design skills.

The foundation program and undergrad sequence is very good in this area.

13.4 Research Skills

Ability to gather, assess, record, and apply relevant information in architectural

coursework

The degree projects (Arch 699) require in-depth research and analysis that provide an

underlying rationale for the final design project.

While the student course notebooks contained extensive information collected from a

variety of sources, the synthesis of this information could be expanded.

13.5 Formal Ordering Skills

Met

[ X ]

Met

[ X ]

Understanding of the fundamentals of visual perception and the principles and systems of

order that inform two- and three-dimensional design, architectural composition, and urban

design

Met

[ X ]

The development of formal ordering systems was well developed in the undergraduate

studio series for the 4+2 degree path.

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

19

11

5


20

The development of basic skills seemed to be inconsistent in the three year graduate

degree path and was considered marginally met. The team was also concerned about the

lack of a consistent approach to communicating principles of urban design within the

curriculum.

13.6 Fundamental Skills

University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Visiting Team Report

24-28 February 2007

Ability to use basic architectural principles in the design of buildings, interior spaces, and

sites

Met

[ X ]

Because of its historical founding as an interior design degree, the program is successful

in instilling architectural principles for interior spaces.

The team felt that fundamental skills in addressing site issues would benefit from a more

consistent approach in the required studio courses.

The development of basic architectural principles was well developed in the

undergraduate studio series for the 4+2 degree path. The development of these

principles seemed to be inconsistent in the three year graduate degree path.

13.7 Collaborative Skills

Ability to recognize the varied talent found in interdisciplinary design project teams in

professional practice and work in collaboration with other students as members of a

design team

WELL MET

An appreciation for interdisciplinary collaboration seems to be an important part of the

UMass institutional culture, both within the university and regional colleges. Students and

faculty alike were committed to collaboration in coursework and in research efforts.

This is a strength of the program.

13.8 Western Traditions

Understanding of the Western architectural canons and traditions in architecture,

landscape and urban design, as well as the climatic, technological, socioeconomic, and

other cultural factors that have shaped and sustained them

In the four year B. F. A., ArtHist 191 covers this material well, but not all students

accepted into the M. Arch. program have taken this course.

In the M. Arch. program, evaluation of the graduate admissions requirement for an

introduction to architectural history is inconsistently handled in the admissions process.

Met

[ X ]

Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ x ]

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The team was concerned that this requirement was not included in the graduate advising

checklist for individual students. Absent this kind of survey course, the material in ArtHist

643 is too limited to meet this criterion.

13.9 Non-Western Traditions

Understanding of parallel and divergent canons and traditions of architecture and urban

design in the non-Western world

WELL MET

In the assignments given in Arch 630, students thoughtfully investigate theoretical

concepts related to non-western cultures.

13.10 National and Regional Traditions

Understanding of national traditions and the local regional heritage in architecture,

landscape design and urban design, including the vernacular tradition

National traditions are treated well within the history courses. However, there is

insufficient evidence that regional heritage and the vernacular is being consistently

addressed for all students in the program. A more consistent approach to an

understanding of the vernacular of New England is a missed opportunity.

13.11 Use of Precedents

Ability to incorporate relevant precedents into architecture and urban design projects

While Arch 670 requires the study of precedents, there is insufficient evidence that all

students in the program have consistently been required to demonstrate the ability to

incorporate relevant precedents into their design work.

13.12 Human Behavior

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Met

[ X ]

Met

[ ]

Met

[ ]

Understanding of the theories and methods of inquiry that seek to clarify the relationship

between human behavior and the physical environment

Met

[ X ]

This criterion is consistently addressed in Arch 670.

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ ]

21

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22

13.13 Human Diversity

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Understanding of the diverse needs, values, behavioral norms, physical ability, and social

and spatial patterns that characterize different cultures and individuals and the implication

of this diversity for the societal roles and responsibilities of architects

Met

[ X ]

Both Arch 670 and 630 address these issues.

13.14 Accessibility

Ability to design both site and building to accommodate individuals with varying physical

abilities

Met

[ X ]

This is considered marginally met. While students include elevators in multi-story

buildings, efforts to provide accessibility in site design are not consistently evident. The

visiting team believes that students would benefit from a more holistic view of accessibility

13.15 Sustainable Design

Understanding of the principles of sustainability in making architecture and urban design

decisions that conserve natural and built resources, including culturally important

buildings and sites, and in the creation of healthful buildings and communities

Met

[ ]

The faculty seems to be sensitive to environmental issues. However, a consistent

presentation of the principles of sustainability is not present. After a review of the

materials referenced in the APR, the team was unconvinced that all students graduating

from the program consistently gained an understanding of sustainability.

13.16 Program Preparation

Ability to prepare a comprehensive program for an architectural project, including

assessment of client and user needs, a critical review of appropriate precedents, an

inventory of space and equipment requirements, an analysis of site conditions, a review

of the relevant laws and standards and assessment of their implication for the project,

and a definition of site selection and design assessment criteria

Met

[ ]

Arch 670 challenges students to research and prepare a program for the degree project,

as well as to research relevant codes. However the team could not find sufficient

evidence that students produced a program satisfying the requirements as listed in this

criterion.

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ x ]

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13.17 Site Conditions

Ability to respond to natural and built site characteristics in the development of a program

and the design of a project

While there are indications that site issues are being considered in studio work, the

visiting team felt that the studio projects fell short of demonstrating basic site design and

analysis skills. Furthermore, this issue is not present at a predictable location in the

studio sequence and it is unclear if all students will be exposed to these issues.

13.18 Structural Systems

Understanding of principles of structural behavior in withstanding gravity and lateral

forces and the evolution, range, and appropriate application of contemporary structural

systems

WELL MET

This criterion is met in Tectonics II and III. In addition, work in Tectonics III is integrated

with design studio projects in a meaningful way.

13.19 Environmental Systems

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Met

[ ]

Met

[ X ]

Understanding of the basic principles and appropriate application and performance of

environmental systems, including acoustical, lighting, and climate modification systems,

and energy use, integrated with the building envelope

Met

[ X ]

Evidence of this criterion is found in Building Physics I, II and III, as well as in Integration

700.

13.20 Life-Safety

Understanding of the basic principles of life-safety systems with an emphasis on egress

In G 3-5, student work demonstrated an ability level to provide for life safety by providing

two exits to grade in projects reviewed by the visiting team

13.21 Building Envelope Systems

Understanding of the basic principles and appropriate application and performance of

building envelope materials and assemblies

Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

23

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24

This content is being communicated in the building physics classes and some studio class

projects. The visiting team felt that this was an area that could be strengthened across a

number of classes.

13.22 Building Service Systems

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Met

[ X ]

Understanding of the basic principles and appropriate application and performance of

plumbing, electrical, vertical transportation, communication, security, and fire protection

systems

Met

[ X ]

G5 and Arch 700, hold the students accountable for this information.

13.23 Building Systems Integration

Ability to assess, select, and conceptually integrate structural systems, building envelope

systems, environmental systems, life-safety systems, and building service systems into

building design

Met

[ X ]

Arch 700, hold the students accountable for the conceptual integration of this information.

13.24 Building Materials and Assemblies

Understanding of the basic principles and appropriate application and performance of

construction materials, products, components, and assemblies, including their

environmental impact and reuse

Tectonics II and III, as well as Arch 700, require students to demonstrate an

understanding of these basic principles.

13.25 Construction Cost Control

Understanding of the fundamentals of building cost, life-cycle cost, and construction

estimating

While the Business of Building course includes aspects of construction cost control in the

syllabus, the team feels that there was insufficient evidence existed to demonstrate that

students acquire an understanding of this material.

Met

[ X ]

Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ X ]

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13.26 Technical Documentation

Ability to make technically precise drawings and write outline specifications for a

proposed design

The work from Arch 700 revealed numerous technically precise drawings. However, the

visiting team did not find evidence that students were required to write an outline

specification in required course material.

13.27 Client Role in Architecture

Understanding of the responsibility of the architect to elicit, understand, and resolve the

needs of the client, owner, and user

In Arch 670, the requirement for field surveys help students to understand needs and

input from users and clients.

13.28 Comprehensive Design

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Met

[ ]

Met

[ X ]

Ability to produce a comprehensive architectural project based on a building program and

site that includes development of programmed spaces demonstrating an understanding

of structural and environmental systems, building envelope systems, life-safety

provisions, wall sections and building assemblies, and the principles of sustainability

Met

[ X ]

In the combination of the G5 Studio and Arch 700, students develop projects in a way that

demonstrates a proficiency in understanding the requirements for comprehensive design.

However, the team feltthat the development of wall sections could receive more attention.

13.29 Architect's Administrative Roles

Understanding of obtaining commissions and negotiating contracts, managing personnel

and selecting consultants, recommending project delivery methods, and forms of service

contracts

Met

[ ]

While the Business of Building course is a valuable interdisciplinary course, it lacks the

requisite specificity to meet the needs of an accredited program in architecture. Further,

work in G4 did not address these issues. Therefore this criterion is not met.

13.30 Architectural Practice

Understanding of the basic principles and legal aspects of practice organization, financial

management, business planning, time and project management, risk mitigation, and

Not Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ x ]

25

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mediation and arbitration as well as an understanding of trends that affect practice, such

as globalization, outsourcing, project delivery, expanding practice settings, diversity, and

others

Met

[ ]

While the Business of Building course is a valuable interdisciplinary course, it lacks the

requisite specificity to meet the needs of an accredited program in architecture. Further,

work in G4 did not address these issues. Therefore this criterion is not met.

13.31 Professional Development

Understanding of the role of internship in obtaining licensure and registration and the

mutual rights and responsibilities of interns and employers

Evidence of this criterion was found in the Business of Building course. In the team's

discussion with students, it was apparent that students had broad knowledge of

internship issues.

13.32 Leadership

Met

[ X ]

Understanding of the need for architects to provide leadership in the building design and

construction process and on issues of growth, development, and aesthetics in their

communities

Met

[ ]

While the Business of Building course is a valuable interdisciplinary course, it lacks the

requisite focus on the architect's specific leadership roles. Further, the work in the

graduate design studios does not consistently address these issues. Therefore this

criterion is not met.

13.33 Legal Responsibilities

Understanding of the architect's responsibility as determined by registration law, building

codes and regulations, professional service contracts, zoning and subdivision

ordinances, environmental regulation, historic preservation laws, and accessibility laws

While the Business of Building course is a valuable interdisciplinary course, it lacks the

requisite specificity to meet the needs of an accredited program in architecture. Further,

work in the graduate design studios does not consistently address all of these issues.

Specifically, the team found no evidence that professional service contracts were

understood by students. Therefore this criterion is not met.

Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ x ]

Not Met

[ ]

Not Met

[ X ]

Not Met

[ X ]

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13.34 Ethics and Professional Judgment

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Understanding of the ethical issues involved in the formation of professional judgment in

architectural design and practice

Met

[ X ]

The Business of Building course addressed ethics and professional judgment in a

convincing fashion.

Not Met

[ ]

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III. Appendices

Appendix A:

1.

Program Information

History and Description of the Institution

The following text is taken from the 2007 University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Architecture Program Report.

One of today's leading centers of public higher education in the Northeast, the University

of Massachusetts Amherst was established in 1863 under the original Land Grant Act. In

recent decades it has achieved a growing reputation for excellence in an increasing

number of disciplines, for the breadth of its academic offerings, and for the expansion of

its historic roles in education, research, and outreach. A large number of faculty,

especially in the physical sciences and engineering, actively engage in sponsored

activities. Research expenditures in the past year totaled more than $100 million. An

increase in applications has made enrollment more selective.

Within its 10 schools and colleges the University offers bachelor's degrees in 90 areas,

masters degrees in 68, and the doctorate in 49. Ninety-four percent of the approximately

1,063 full-time faculty hold the highest degree in their fields. There are approximately

24,000 students, made up of nearly 18,000 undergraduates and 6,000 graduates,

including part-time. The University prides itself on the diversity of its student body, and is

committed to the principles of affirmative action, civility, equal opportunity, and the free

exchange of ideas.

Located in the historic Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, the 1,450-acre

campus provides a rich cultural environment in a rural setting. The University is one of

the founding members of the Five College cooperative program, offering reciprocal

student access among the University, and Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and

Smith colleges.

The University of Massachusetts Amherst is the flagship campus of the

Commonwealth's university system. There are three other undergraduate campuses, at

Boston, Dartmouth and Lowell. The University's Worcester Medical School includes the

medical school and associated teaching hospital.

Activities at the five University campuses are complemented by outreach education,

research, and service programs at sites throughout the Commonwealth, ranging from

the Southeastern Massachusetts Agricultural Center in East Wareham to the Berkshire

Medical Center in Pittsfield and the Small Business Development Center in Springfield.

From "UMass Overview', 2002

2. Institutional Mission

The following text is taken from the 2007 University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Architecture Program Report.

As the system's flagship campus, Amherst draws students from throughout the

Commonwealth, the nation and the world, providing a broad undergraduate curriculum

with nearly 100 majors and approximately 50 doctoral programs. It will continue as a

Carnegie Research I university and maintain its presence in Division I intercollegiate

sports; it will continue its efforts to achieve a median ranking among the American

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Association of Research Libraries and obtain membership in the Association of

American Universities.

Access: Providing undergraduate education for all qualified students (meeting their

full financial need) in a broad range of areas found in leading public Research I

universities, as well as in graduate programs leading to doctoral or other appropriate

terminal degrees in most of these fields.

Excellence: Maintaining a range of academic offerings comparable in quality to

those offered at AAU universities; maintaining national leadership in such areas as

creative writing, computer science, engineering, polymer science, linguistics,

astronomy, sport studies, and hotel management and striving for national leadership

in other academic areas.

Innovation: Creating new knowledge with a broad program of distinctive research;

and disseminating this knowledge through publications, public presentation and

professional conferences.

Economic Development and Global Competitiveness: Supporting the economic

development of the Commonwealth by providing assistance to small business and

industry; encouraging technology transfer, undertaking research in areas of

economic importance; and providing the language instruction and other tools

necessary for participation in the global economy.

Public Service: Providing public service by meeting formal land-grant

responsibilities; serving agriculture, offering assistance to regional cities and towns;

and engaging in research and outreach in such areas as public health,

environmental safety, transportation, public finance and education.

Quality of Life: Developing the human and cultural quality of life for the region

through a comprehensive arts program; assisting the public social agencies to

provide improved services to the citizens of the Commonwealth; and promoting the

multicultural awareness and tolerance of diversity essential to a pluralistic,

transnational society.

3. Program History

From Amherst Campus Vision Statement (2002)

The following text is taken from the 2007 University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Architecture Program Report.

Architecture+Design is one of three programs in the Department of Art, Architecture, and

Art History (part of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts.) The Architecture+Design

program is responsible for an undergraduate pre-professional degree (BFA-

Architecture), a graduate professional degree (Master of Architecture), and a graduate

post-professional degree (Master of Science).

The Architecture+ Design Program has evolved from a strong interior design area. In

1972, UMass founded one of the first professional interior design programs in the United

States, under the leadership of Professor Arnold Friedmann. The fledgling program

developed a rigorous interior design curriculum based on the principles of the Bauhaus.

After being accredited in 1976 the interior design program merged Art Department in the

College of Humanities and Fine Arts in the belief that design should be based on a

foundation of visual arts. In 1987 the Faculty Senate and Trustees authorized the design

program to offer a concentration in Architectural Studies.

In the mid 1990's, the design program underwent a substantial re-organization, with the

hiring of several new full time faculty—all registered architects. With the support of Dean

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Le Edwards and Chair Ron Michaud, the program began developing a professional

program in architecture. In 2002, UMass was granted NAAB candidacy status for a

proposed 4+2 Master of Architecture programs, and a 3 year Master of Architecture. (In

the same year, the program gave up FIDER accreditation of the BFA Design program).

In 2004, the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education approved the Master of

Architecture as a UMass degree program. It is New England's first and only public

professional architecture degree. Various faculty members have served in the informal

role of area coordinator (or program director) as part of other assignments. Kathleen

Lugosch served as area coordinator/ program director from 1995 to 2001 and 2002 to

2005, and Ray Kinoshita Mann served as area coordinator from 2001-2002. The NAAB

granted candidacy in 2002.

In 2005, the Art Department was reorganized into three distinct programs. Also in 2005,

UMass created a new senior position of Director, and conducted a national search.

Stephen Schreiber, who served as a interim director since 2005, accepted the position

as Director of the Architecture+Design program in 2006.

UMass Amherst already has several strong programs in fields closely associated with

architecture. The Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning, for

instance, offers eight degree programs, ranging from an undergraduate program in

Environmental Design to a dual Master's degree in Landscape Architecture (MLA) and

Regional Planning (MRP). The Building Materials and Wood Technology program has

strong emphasis on innovative construction technology in the building industry. The

Department of Engineering offers a professional practice graduate degree geared

towards professions like architectural engineering. It is also the base for the building

science based Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The Art History

program offers the only publicly funded M.A. in New England, and the History

Department has established a historic preservation concentration in their Public History

program. UMass is also home to an innovative interdisciplinary Environmental Sciences

program.

UMass is part of the Five Colleges -the country's oldest and most effective consortium

of colleges. The group includes Smith, Amherst, Mt. Holyoke, and Hampshire Colleges,

in addition to the university. The four colleges have initiated architectural programs

within the context of liberal arts education. The program in studio architecture at Smith

College is the longest-running program in architecture for women in the country. The

Five Colleges have developed a unique interdisciplinary Architectural Studies program

that capitalizes on each college's unique approach to liberal and professional education.

Because the UMass Master of Architecture program is the only state-funded

professional architecture program in New England, the regional student program

enables students throughout New England to participate in the both the undergraduate

pre-professional program and the graduate professional program for a little over in-state

tuition rates.

4. Program Mission

The following text is taken from the 2007 University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Architecture Program Report.

UMass Architecture+Design provides an accessible, intellectually rigorous design

education that firmly grounds students in the art and science of the built environment

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The interdisciplinary, collaborative program embraces spirited, socially progressive, and

environmentally responsive design. As New England's first and only public architecture

program, the faculty and students use the region as a laboratory for integrated teaching,

research, and outreach.

5. Program Self Assessment

The following text is taken from the 2007 University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Architecture Program Report.

PROGRAM STRENGTHS

Some strengths of the Architecture+Design Program are outlined as follows:

Curriculum

The Architecture+Design Program offers the first and only professional architecture

degree in New England. The curricula- graduate and undergraduate- offer students a

comprehensive education in architectural design built on collaboration of professional

and educational disciplines spanning three colleges. The Five College Architectural

Studies program adds richness to the program.

The new Master of Architecture capitalizes on the expertise of numerous established

programs, including interior design, studio art, landscape architecture, building materials,

history and engineering. This represents a new model in architectural education, one

that has been talked about by a number of programs, but no program has had the

opportunity to implement it in the way this program has begun.

The home department facilitates interdisciplinary activities for students and faculty

through its three programs: Architecture+Design, Studio Art, and Art History.

The Foundations program, a significant and special element of the department, has

been strengthened by the participation of the architecture program. The major in

architectural studies provides a strong foundation for students to pursue a number of

academic and professional options. The programs undergraduate courses expose non-

majors to the issues of architecture and design.

Faculty

The faculty is committed to providing students an intelligent and challenging

teaching/learning experience, and is invested in advancing the discipline and profession

of architecture through teaching and their creative, scholarly, and professional work. The

program strives to promote interdisciplinary teaching and research.

Students/Alums

The student body is diverse, motivated and capable of meeting the challenges and

demands inherent in a studio based architectural education. Despite its youth and small

size the program has a distinguished history of excellence in architecture and interior

design. Since 1999 three graduate students have been among the finalists and winners

of the prestigious Skidmore Owings and Merrill Foundation Traveling Fellowship in the

newly created Interior Architecture category. The interior design program was very highly

ranked by Design/ntelligence in 2000. An alumnus won both the AIA Young Architects

award and the Rome Prize in architecture in 2006. Several alumni/ae hold prominent

positions in academia and the profession.

Place

The program located in the center of gravity of New England. The area imparts a sense

of place and inspiration to students and faculty. Western Massachusetts offers a great

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laboratory for studying the challenges of design professionals today: there are rural

planning boards confronting sprawl, urban areas trying to revitalize, and a resonant

historical setting that brings its own challenges. The region is at the forefront of socially

progressive and environmentally responsive design. The program is based in the

extraordinary Fine Arts Center, a significant project designed by Kevin Roche

PROGRAM CHALLENGES

The Program faces a number of important challenges, including:

Curricula

Curricular revisions have been slowed by a lengthy university approval process. Class

scheduling and coordination, across three UMass colleges, is difficult. Clear metrics

need to be put in place to assure the goals and objectives are being accomplished, and

if not, strategic adjustments can then be made from an informed position. Because this

is an experimental program, it is critical that it be documented so that the success can

be celebrated and shared; or in the case of failures, change can be implemented so the

recovery can take place. The program will develop electives and interdisciplinary

research focused on sustainable practices intended to address the challenge of

designing and planning buildings and communities.

Faculty

In order for the program to grow significantly, there will be a need to add core faculty to

the architecture program to give it the critical mass to govern and oversee the day-to-

day curricular and departmental welfare. There is also a need for technical support staff

to help integrate media technologies into the instructional agenda of the department and

college. Predictable faculty support for professional development will help increase

productivity in research and creative work.

Students

The program is developing a comprehensive recruitment strategy for graduate and

undergraduate students that include an early admissions program for high school

graduates of exceptional merit. There is a need for an increased number of

scholarships, assistantships and work opportunities for graduate students as well as

additional financial assistance for undergraduate students. The program needs to

integrate digital technology -including building information modeling-more fully into the

studio sequence and other courses. There is an opportunity to increase the number of

articulation agreements between the Architecture+Design Program, and strategic feeder

programs.

Resources

Support for a proposed Center for Engaged Design is a high priority. Resources need to

be committed for renovation of the Fine Arts Center (fourth floor) immediately after the

relocation of Studio Art functions. It is important that the program develop resources to

highlight the accomplishments of the students, faculty, and staff.

ADDRESSING CHALLENGES

The faculty of the Architecture+Design Program uses several instruments for

documenting program strengths and challenges as well as developing ways for

addressing the challenges. These instruments primarily include faculty retreats and

special focus meetings conducted since the previous accreditation visit, the VTR from

the last accreditation visit, and standing and ad hoc committees.

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Appendix B: The Visiting Team

Team Chair, Representing the ACSA

Marleen K. Davis, FAIA

University of Tennessee, Knoxville

College of Architecture and Design

Knoxville, TN 37996-2400

(865) 974-5265

(865) 974-0656 fax

mkdavis@utk.edu

Representing the AIA

Michael Stanton, FAIA

Michael Stanton Architecture

444 De Haro Street

Suite #202

San Francisco, CA 94107-2351

(415) 865-9600

(415) 865-9608 fax

mstanton@stantonarchitecture.com

Representing the AIAS

Kristal Peters

1700 Shepard Street, NW

Washington, DC 20011

(202) 250-9318

kristalpeters@hotmail.com

Representing the NCARB

James R. Lev, AIA

Hagney Architects

4615 E. State Street

Suite 206

Rockford, IL 61108

(815) 397-3330

(815) 397-0243 fax

jrlevaia@aol.com

Observer

Erica Gees, AIA

Kuhn Riddle Architects

28 Amity Street, Suite 2B

Amherst, Massachusetts 01002

(413) 259-1630

(413) 259-1621 fax

egees@kuhnriddle.com

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Observer

Kerry Dietz, AIA

Dietz & Company Architects, Inc.

17 Hampden Street

Springfield, MA 01103

(413) 733-6798

(413) 732-4385

kerryd@dietzarch.com

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Appendix C: The Visit Agenda

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IV. Report Signatures

Respectfully submitted,

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Program Response to the Final Draft Visiting Team Report

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4.6 ANNUAL REPORTS

Supplemental information to the APR must include the following documentation:

• Copies of all Annual Reports submitted to the NAAB since the previous site visit


2008

PART I - ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT SECTION A. INSTITUTIONAL

CHARACTERISTICS

This section captures aggregated information about the home institution for each architecture

program. Wherever possible, this information should be the same as that reported by the

institution to IPEDS in its most recent Institutional Characteristics, Completion and 12month

Enrollment report.

(for inclusion on the NAAB website)

Institution Name: University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Academic Unit Name: Architecture + Design Program

Address 1: 457 Fine Arts Center

Address 2: 151 Presidents Drive, OFC1

City: Amherst

State: MA

Zip: 01003

Architecture Program Tel. No: 413.577.1575

Architecture Program School Fax No: 413.545.3929

Architecture Program School URL: www.umass.edu/architecture

Email address for general inquiries: architecture@art.umass.edu

ACSA Region: Northeast

In order to modify your organization information please visit the ACSA Guide site.

Public

Explain:

Doctoral/Research Universities - Extensive

New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC)

Explain:

5. Who has direct administrative responsibility for the architecture program?

Name Stephen Schreiber

Title Director, Professor

Office Tel. No 413-577-1575

Fax No 413.545.3929Email Address schreiber@art.umass.edu

6. To whom should inquiries regarding this questionnaire to be addressed?

Name Stephen Schreiber

Title Director, Professor

Office Tel. No 413-577-1575Fax No 413.545.3929Email Address schreiber@art.umass.edu

7. Who is the administrator responsible for verifying data (and completing IPEDS reports) at

your institution?

Name Marilyn Hecht BlausteinTitle Director, Institutional Research

Office Tel. No 413 545 0941Fax No 413-545-3010

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Email Address blaustein@oirp.umass.edu

(Aggregated for the Institution; this information should be the same as that reported to

IPEDS for the last fiscal year) Total undergraduate enrollment:20114Total graduate

enrollment:575925th percentile ACT score for undergraduates

enrolling on the last fiscal year2275th percentile ACT score for undergraduates

enrolling on the last fiscal year2725th percentile SAT score for undergraduates

enrolling on the last fiscal year113075th percentile SAT score for undergraduates

enrolling on the last fiscal year1240 Average GRE score for graduates enrolling

in the last fiscal year

(not including specialized programs like law,

medicine, business or other programs for

which a specialized entrance examination

is required):1825

Male Female

Total 10090 10024

American Indian/Alaska Native 25 41

Asian or Pacific Islander 820 706

Black, Non-Hispanic 441 502

Hispanic 349 377

White, Non-Hispanic 7429 7296

Other 120 116

Declined to or Did Not Supply 906 986

Male Female

Total 2823 2936

American Indian/Alaska Native 5 12

Asian or Pacific Islander 108 96

Black, Non-Hispanic 97 135

Hispanic 80 114

White, Non-Hispanic 1402 1630

Other 728 540

Declined to or Did Not Supply 403 409

SECTION B. NAAB-ACCREDITED ARCHITECTURE PROGRAMS

This section captures information about the specific NAAB-accredited degree programs

offered by the institution, unless otherwise noted in the instructions.

B. Arch. M. Arch. X D. Arch.

Discipline Degree Guide Display

Architecture M. Arch Master of Architecture

Architecture M. Arch Master of Architecture

92


Interior Design/Interior

Architecture

Architecture

Other

B.F.A. Architectural

Design

Master of Science in

Design

BFA Design

No If yes, a report is required in PART II – Narrative Report that outlines the plans and

planning for the new program. No If yes, a report is required in PART II – Narrative Report

that outlines the plans and planning for the new program. 2 Semesters or Trimester

Please Explain:

The program(s) in this section are dependent on your selection in Section B, Question 1.

B. Arch.:

M. Arch.: 140

D. Arch.:

The program(s) in this section are dependent on your selection in Section B, Question 1.

a. Indicate the total number of credit hours taken at your institution to earn each NAAB

accredited degree offered by your institution.

B. Arch.:

M. Arch. Pre-Professional: 57

M. Arch. Non Pre-Professional: 87

D. Arch.:

b. By degree, how many of those credit hours are assigned to general education?

B. Arch.:

M. Arch. Pre-Professional: 0

M. Arch. Non Pre-Professional: 0

D. Arch.:

c. By degree, what is the average number of credits each full time student completes per

academic term?

B. Arch.:

M. Arch. Pre-Professional: 57

M. Arch. Non Pre-Professional: 87

D. Arch.:

No

Location 1:

Location 2:

Location 3:

SECTION C. TUITION, FEES AND FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS IN

NAAB-ACCREDITED PROGRAMS

B Arch.

If this section is not applicable, please enter all zero's (0).

Full-Time

Annual Tuition Annual Fees Per Hour/Term/Year

In-State 0 0 Per Credit Hour

Out-of-State 0 0 Per Credit Hour

Part-Time

93


In-State 0 0 Per Credit Hour

Out-of-State 0 0 Per Credit Hour

a. Does the institution offer discounted or differential tuition for a NAAB-accredited degree

program?

If yes, please explain No

Explain:

b. Is a summer session required for any portion of your accredited degree program(s)?No If

yes, what is the additional tuition and fees for the summer program?

(If no fill this section with 0s)

Full-Time

Summer Tuition Summer Fees Per Hour/Term/Year

In-State 0 0 Per Credit Hour

Out-of-State 0 0 Per Credit Hour

Part-Time

In-State 0 0 Per Credit Hour

Out-of-State 0 0 Per Credit Hour

Does the institution offer discounted or differential tuition for summer courses for a NAABaccredited

degree program?

If yes, please explain No

Explain:

What is the average per student expenditure for students enrolled in NAAB accredited degree

programs? This is the total amount of goods and services, per student, used to produce the

educational services provided by the NAAB-accredited program.

The program(s) in this section are dependent on your selection in Section B, Question 1.

M. Arch. Student Exp 5400

What was the total amount of financial aid (Grants, loans, assistantships, scholarships,

fellowships, tuition waivers, tuition discounts, veteran’s benefits, employer aid [tuition

reimbursement] and other monies [other than from relatives/friends] provided to students to

meet expenses. This includes Title IV subsidized and unsubsidized loans provided directly to

student) provided by the institution to students enrolled in each program(s) leading to a

NAAB accredited degree during the last fiscal year?

The program(s) in this section are dependent on your selection in Section B, Question 1.

Financial Aid provided to graduate students in NAAB-accredited programs: Total Graduate

Financial Aid for last fiscal year781504Average Graduate Financial Aid per student19061

What was the total number of graduate-level students employed on a part-time basis for the

primary purpose of assisting in classroom or laboratory instruction or in the conduct of

94


esearch during the last fiscal year within the NAAB-accredited programs offered by your

institution? Please include: graduate assistant, teaching assistant, teaching associate, teaching

fellow or research assistant in your calculation.

12 SECTION D. STUDENT CHARACTERITICS FOR NAAB-ACCREDITED DEGREE

PROGRAMS

(If your institution offers more than one program, please provide the information for each

program separately)

Indicate the number of individuals who fulfilled the institution’s requirements to be

considered for admission (including payment or waiving of the application fee, if any) and

who had been notified of one of the following actions during the last fiscal year: admission,

nonadmission, placement on a waiting list, or application withdrawn by applicant or

institution. Information about ethnicity must be based on self-identification information

provided by the applicant.

Please fill out these tables completely, entering 0 for blanks. Please use whole, positive

integers and do not include '$' or ','" A person can only be counted in one group.

B. Arch.

Total

American Indian/Alaska Native

Asian or Pacific Islander

Black, Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

White, Non-Hispanic

Other

Declined to or Did Not Supply

M. Arch.

Male Female

Male Female

Total 30 41

American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Asian or Pacific Islander 8 18

Black, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Hispanic 2 4

White, Non-Hispanic 20 19

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Indicate the total number of individuals who were notified of admission or placement on a

waiting list for the last fiscal year. Information about ethnicity must be based on selfidentification

information provided by the admitted applicants.

95


Please fill out these tables completely, entering 0 for blanks. Please use whole, positive

integers and do not include '$' or ','" A person can only be counted in one group.

B. Arch.

Total

American Indian/Alaska Native

Asian or Pacific Islander

Black, Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

White, Non-Hispanic

Other

Declined to or Did Not Supply

M. Arch.

Male Female

Male Female

Total 24 31

American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Asian or Pacific Islander 6 14

Black, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Hispanic 2 2

White, Non-Hispanic 16 15

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Please fill out these tables completely, entering 0 for blanks. Please use whole, positive

integers and do not include '$' or ','" A person can only be counted in one group.

Indicate the number of individuals who enrolled during the last fiscal year. Exclude

readmitted students who were counted as enrolled in a prior year). Information about

ethnicity must be based on self-identification information provided by the individual.

B. Arch. Full-Time

Total

American Indian/Alaska Native

Male Female

Part-Time

Male Female

96


Asian or Pacific Islander

Black, Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

White, Non-Hispanic

Other

Declined to or Did Not Supply

M. Arch. Full-Time

Male Female

Total 8 12

American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Asian or Pacific Islander 0 3

Black, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Hispanic 1 0

White, Non-Hispanic 7 9

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Part-Time

Male Female

Please fill out these tables completely, entering 0 for blanks. Please use whole, positive

integers and do not include '$' or ','" A person can only be counted in one group.

B. Arch. Full-Time

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Part-Time

Male Female

97


Total

American Indian/Alaska Native

Asian or Pacific Islander

Black, Non-Hispanic

Hispanic

White, Non-Hispanic

Other

Declined to or Did Not Supply

M. Arch. Full-Time

Male Female

Male Female

Total 23 18

American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Asian or Pacific Islander 7 5

Black, Non-Hispanic 1 1

Hispanic 4 3

White, Non-Hispanic 11 9

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Part-Time

Male Female

a. Total number of credits in professional architectural studies taken by full time students for

the last fiscal year: 1116b. Total number of credits in professional architectural studies taken

by part-time students in the last fiscal year: 0 SECTION E. DEGREES AWARDED

(The information requested in this section should be provided by the unit within the

institution responsible for submitting the annual Completion Report to the National Center

for Education Statistics and IPEDS.)

B. Arch. M. Arch. D. Arch.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

98


Male Female

Total 0 0

American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Asian or Pacific Islander 0 0

Black, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Hispanic 0 0

White, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Male Female

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

6

0

2

0

1

3

0

0

Male Female

SECTION F. RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS AND LEARNING IN NAAB-

ACCREDITED PROGRAMS (all forms of media) Catalogued Titles on Main campus:

29209 Catalogued Titles on Other locations: 0 (all forms of media) Library of Congress NA

or Dewey 720-729 Catalogued Titles on Main campus: 23110 Library of Congress NA or

Dewey 720-729 Catalogued Titles on Other locations: 0 Permanent Workstations on Main

Campus: 89 Permanent Workstations at Other locations: 0

Resource Type Available?

Shop Yes

Computer Facilities (Lab) Yes

Computer Output Facilities (Plotters, Specialized plotting) Yes

Digital Fabrication Facilities No

Wireless Network Yes

Image Collection (Slide Library) Yes

Photo Studio/Darkroom No

Lecture Series Yes

Gallery/Exhibits Yes

Other No

If Other Resources, Please describe:

SECTION G. HUMAN RESOURCE SUMMARY (Architecture Program)

Faculty are defined as follows: Persons identified by the institution as such and typically

those whose initial assignments are made for the purpose of conducting instruction, research

or public service as a principal activity (or activities). They may hold academic rank titles of

professor, associate professor, assistant professor, instructor, lecturer or the equivalent of any

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

99


of those academic ranks. Faculty may also include the chancellor/president, provost, vice

provosts, deans, directors or the equivalent, as well as associate deans, assistant deans and

executive officers of academic departments (chairpersons, heads or the equivalent) if their

principal activity is instruction combined with research and/or public service. The

designation as "faculty" is separate from the activities to which they may be currently

assigned. For example, a newly appointed president of an institution may also be appointed

as a faculty member. Graduate, instruction, and research assistants are not included in this

category.

Those members of the instructional/research staff who are employed full time and whose

major assignment is instruction, including those with release time for research. Includes fulltime

faculty for whom it is not possible to differentiate between reaching, research, and

public service because each of these functions is an integral component of his/her regular

assignment:

Please fill out these tables completely, entering 0 for blanks. Please use whole, positive

integers and do not include '$' or ','" A person can only be counted in one group.

Professor

Tenured

Male Female

Total 1 2

American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Asian or Pacific Islander 0 0

Black, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Hispanic 0 0

White, Non-Hispanic 1 2

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Associate Professor

Tenured

Male Female

Total 2 1

American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Tenure-Track Non-Tenure-Track

Male Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Male Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Tenure-Track Non-Tenure-Track

Male Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Male Female

0

0

10

0


Asian or Pacific Islander 0 1

Black, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Hispanic 1 0

White, Non-Hispanic 1 0

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Assistant Professor

Tenured

Male Female

Total 0 0

American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Asian or Pacific Islander 0 0

Black, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Hispanic 0 0

White, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Instructor

Tenured

Male Female

Total 0 0

American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Asian or Pacific Islander 0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Tenure-Track Non-Tenure-Track

Male Female

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Male Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Tenure-Track Non-Tenure-Track

Male Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Male Female

0

0

0

10

1


Black, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Hispanic 0 0

White, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Total credit hours taught by full time faculty: 9

Please fill out these tables completely, entering 0 for blanks. Please use whole, positive

integers and do not include '$' or ','" A person can only be counted in one group.

Professor

Tenured

Male Female

Total 0 0

American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Asian or Pacific Islander 0 0

Black, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Hispanic 0 0

White, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Associate Professor

Tenured

Male Female

Total 2 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Tenure-Track Non-Tenure-Track

Male Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Male Female

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

Tenure-Track Non-Tenure-Track

Male Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Male Female

0

10

2


American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Asian or Pacific Islander 0 0

Black, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Hispanic 0 0

White, Non-Hispanic 2 1

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Assistant Professor

Tenured

Male Female

Total 0 0

American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Asian or Pacific Islander 0 0

Black, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Hispanic 0 0

White, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Instructor

Tenured

Male Female

Total 0 0

American Indian/Alaska Native 0 0

Asian or Pacific Islander 0 0

Black, Non-Hispanic 0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

Tenure-Track Non-Tenure-Track

Male Female

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Male Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Tenure-Track Non-Tenure-Track

Male Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Male Female

1

0

0

0

10

3


Hispanic 0 0

White, Non-Hispanic 0 0

Other 0 0

Declined to or Did Not Supply 0 0

Total credit hours taught by part-time faculty: 3

Non-tenure track faculty service in a temporary or auxiliary capacity to teach specific courses

on a course-by-course basis. Includes both faculty who are hired to teach an academic

degree-credit course and those hired to teach a remedial, developmental or ESL course;

whether the later three categories earn college credit is immaterial. Excludes regular parttime

faculty, graduate assistants, full-time professional staff who may teach individual

courses (such as the dean or academic advisor) and appointees who teach non-credit courses

exclusively).

Please fill out these tables completely, entering 0 for blanks. Please use whole, positive

integers and do not include '$' or ','" A person can only be counted in one group.

Professor

Male Female

Total 0 0

American

Indian/Alaska

Native

Asian or Pacific

Islander

Black, Non-

Hispanic

0 0

0 0

0 0

Hispanic 0 0

White, Non-

Hispanic

0 0

Other 0 0

Declined to or

Did Not Supply

0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Assoc. Prof. Assist. Prof. Instructor

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

10

4


Male Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Male Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Male Female

Please fill out these tables completely, entering 0 for blanks. Please use whole, positive

integers and do not include '$' or ','" A person can only be counted in one group.

Full

Time

Male

Female

Part

Time

Male

Female

2

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

Adjunct

Male

D. Arch. 0 0 0 0 0 0

M. Arch. 1 3 0 0 2 3

B. Arch. 0 0 0 0 0 0

Ph.D. in architecture 1 0 0 1 0 0

Ph.D. in other discipline 0 0 0 0 0 0

Post-professional master's in

architecture

1 0 0 0 0 0

Other degrees 0 0 4 1 0 0

Registered in U.S. Jurisdiction 2 3 0 0 0 0

Please fill out these tables completely, entering 0 for blanks. Please use whole, positive

integers and do not include '$' or ','" A person can only be counted in one group.

Number Minimum Avg. Max. Univ. Avg.

3

0

1

0

0

2

0

0

Female

10

5


Professor 3 96662 101729 110826 112900

Assoc. Prof. 3 79886 80833 81555 87700

Assist. Prof. 1 55240 55241 55242 66800

Instructor 0 1 2 3 56100

• The NAAB responses to the Annual Reports.

NAAB RESPONSE TO UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS-AMHERST

2008 ANNUAL REPORT

Rec’d Date: November 18, 2008

Year of Next Visit: 2010

Section One:

Checklist of required elements

Part I Statistical Report √Included

Part II Narrative Report √Included

Section Two:

Assessment of Narrative Report

DEFICIENCIES

Condition 2: Program Self-Assessment Procedures

Although the faculty and student leaders have developed a strategic plan, no evidence has been

presented to support that this condition has been met. Continue to report, and include the outcomes

of strategic planning in future annual reports and the next APR.

Condition 8: Physical Resources

With respect to physical resources, progress has been made but further evidence is needed; given

that there is new space available for the Architecture + Design program in the new Studio Art

Building, please provide updated floor plans and stated plans for future renovations. The program is

to be commended for now having its own computer lab, but again please provide floor plans along

with requirements for the laptop computers. The program states that signage has been approved, but

has it been installed?

Criterion 13.8: Western Traditions

Should the statement, “Initial advising has been “approved” be “improved?” Regardless, no evidence

(syllabus, curriculum changes) has been presented to support that this criterion has been met.

Continue to report, and include the outcomes of your advising and the introductory course.

Criterion 13.10: National and Regional Traditions

No evidence (syllabus, curriculum changes) has been presented to support that this criterion has

been met. Continue to report, and include the outcomes of the Graduate Design III studio.

Criterion 13.11: Use of Precedents

Although you state that all graduate studios are addressing this deficiency, no supporting evidence

has been presented (syllabus, curriculum changes, etc.). Continue reporting with evidence.

Criterion 13.15: Sustainable Design

No evidence (syllabus, curriculum changes) has been presented to support that this criterion has

been met. Continue to report, and include the outcomes of the Graduate Design III studio.

Criterion 13.16: Program Preparation

No evidence (syllabus, curriculum changes) has been presented to support that this criterion has

been met. Continue to report, and include the outcomes of Arch-Des 670 Research Forum.

Criterion 13.17: Site Conditions

No evidence (syllabus, curriculum changes) has been presented to support that this criterion has

been met. Continue to report, and include the outcomes of the Graduate Design III studio.

Criterion 13.25: Construction Cost Control

No evidence (syllabus, curriculum changes) has been presented to support that this criterion has

been met. Continue to report, and include the outcomes of Arch-Des 700 Integration.

Criterion 13.26: Technical Documentation

10

6


No evidence (syllabus, curriculum changes) has been presented to support that this criterion has

been met. Continue to report, and include the outcomes of Arch-Des 700 Integration.

Criterion 13.29: Architect’s Administrative Roles

No evidence (syllabus, curriculum changes) has been presented to support that this criterion has

been met. Continue to report, and include the outcomes of Arch-Des 660 Business of Building.

Criterion 13.30: Architectural Practice

No evidence (syllabus, curriculum changes) has been presented to support that this criterion has

been met. Continue to report, and include the outcomes of Arch-Des 660 Business of Building.

Criterion 13.32: Leadership

No evidence (syllabus, curriculum changes) has been presented to support that this criterion has

been met. Continue to report, and include the outcomes of Arch-Des 660 Business of Building.

Criterion 13.33: Legal Responsibilities

No evidence (syllabus, curriculum changes) has been presented to support that this criterion has

been met. Continue to report, and include the outcomes of Arch-Des 660 Business of Building.

CAUSES OF CONCERN

As identified in the executive summary of the VTR

A. Short term and long term plans for the program are ambiguous

B. The curriculum structure and particularly the design studio structure is ambiguous.

C. The architecture program suffers from a lack of visibility and autonomy.

Other concerns

The advising system is not sustainable.

Space needs exist. Planning for expansion should occur.

Digital resources are inadequate.

In the design studio, students of varying skill levels are combined in the same course: the

differentiation in expectations and evaluations for beginning and advanced students in the

same course are unclear.

The Business of Building class does not focus on architecture’s needs.

Part II – The narrative did not specifically address the causes of concern as identified in the VTR.

Future Annual Reports must respond to the causes of concerns as well as the specific criterion and

conditions. The next NAAB Team will want to see how the program has addressed these causes of

concerns in the next APR.

CHANGES TO THE ACCREDITED PROGRAM

No changes to the accredited program reported

10

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