On your marks… get set… breathe Lesson 2 (continued) - In the Zone

getinthezone.org.uk

On your marks… get set… breathe Lesson 2 (continued) - In the Zone

On your marks… get set… breatheLesson 2 (continued)CExperimentTeacher SheetWhat is the relationship between peak flow and height?Student notes for this experiment are on pages 28–29.AimPeak flow is a measure of the maximum velocity of air that a person can generatethrough a forced exhalation. In this experiment students will measure their heightand their own peak flow and determine if there is a relationship between the two.Students can then go on to explore a hypothesis of their own choice to find out ifthere are any relationships between peak flow and types of sport, e.g. swimming.EquipmentFrom the kit box• 2 peak flow meters• disposable mouthpieces• tape measuresFrom your schooloptional:• stadiometerSafety• Students should have a break between each peak flow test.• Identify any students with asthma: they may not wish to participate or may wish touse their inhaler before they take part in the peak-flow measurement.• Identify any student with heart/lung problems; they should be allowed to decline totake part in the peak-flow measurement.• Ensure disposable mouthpieces are not shared, although they may be re-used byindividual students.• Students attempting to outdo each other in peak flow rates may become faint orsuffer headaches; discourage such competition.• Ensure students carry out the activities in a suitable place, clear of any obstruction.Running the experiment1 Students will use a stadiometer or tape measure to measure their standingand sitting heights. A stadiometer is a medical device for measuring height.The sliding horizontal headpiece will allow students to measure heightmore accurately. To do this they will need access to a wall. When studentsmeasure their height, they should do this without shoes and with a ruleror other flat object to level the top of their head. They should take a deepbreath in, breathe out, relax and stand tall without going on tiptoes. Youcould ask three students to measure a fourth student’s height withouttaking the precautions above to illustrate the variation in readings they willobtain. Refer to the diagram on the Student sheet. Students will not needto repeat this if they have already done it for Experiment C.2 Students will then measure their peak flow using the peak flow meter(please refer to the 'How to use the equipment in the box' section on page7 of this guide). Each student must use their own disposable mouthpiecewww.getinthezone.org.ukAges11–1426


CExperimentTeacher Sheetwhen using the peak flow meter. Students must throw their mouthpieceaway at the end of the experiment.3 When students are taking their peak flow readings the following importantinstructions must be followed:• The pointer on the peak flow meter should be set to the end of the meter (belowthe 60 mark) before students blow into it.• Students must stand up.• Students should hold the peak flow meter so that their fingers are clear of thescale and slot.• They should hold the meter horizontally when blowing into it.4 See the Student sheet on pages 28–29 for the protocol for obtainingevidence.5 Students take three readings and work out their average peak flow.6 Students can then write their results on the whiteboard or a record sheet.Expected resultsPeak flow in this age group will be mainly dependent upon height. The peak flow oftaller students is likely to be greater than those of other students. Peak flow is alsolikely to be higher in those who take part in regular exercise. Students with asthmaare likely to have a lower peak flow and may be used to measuring their peak flow.In adults peak flow varies with height, age and sex.Live Data ZoneYour students can enter their peak flow and heights from this experiment, togetherwith data from Experiment D, into the ‘Live Data Zone’ section of the In the Zonewebsite (www.getinthezone.org.uk). See Teacher notes on page 35 for 11–14Lesson 3.www.getinthezone.org.ukAges11–1427

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