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Dan, Mike, Shawn and Brandon Ferman with 4 - Miller Publishing ...

Dan, Mike, Shawn and Brandon Ferman with 4/4FAS Hard Maple.Lumber stored under T-sheds.Rick Frye, dry kiln superintendent, standing infront of a new dry kiln.MERIDIEN HARDWOODS OF PA., INC.(814) 563-4614 FAX: (814) 563-4624Email: meridien@penn.comYard Address: Old Pittsfield Rd., Pittsfield, PA 16340“Everything You’ll Ever Need From The Forest”Dan Ferman(814) 563-4614Michael Songer(814) 486-1711Brandon Ferman(814) 563-4614Mike Ferman(814) 563-4614New England and Quebec Representative: Rob AllardOffice: 802-387-4609 Cell: 802-380-4694 E-mail: rallard@hughes.net• 18 Acre Concentration Yard •• Double End Trimmer...Trim Line (40 Sorts) •• Straight Line Ripping and S2S Facilities •• We Offer Export Preparations, Container Loading, Mixed Species & Thicknesses •• Wholesalers of Northern, Appalachian and Southern Hardwoods •• 800,000’ Dry Storage •• Dry Kiln Capacity 250,000’ •BUILD YOUR OWN LOADAll KD lumber pick-a-pack tallied.


American ChestnutsRoasting On An Open Fire.Help usmake thisa realityonce more.It once stood as one of themost important trees in ourEastern forest. Averaging fivefeet in diameter and up to100 feet tall, the Americanchestnut supplied wood forvirtually everything –finefurniture, shingles, railroadties, even pulp and plywood.Its nuts were a valuable cashcrop, providing food and mast– even serving as inspirationfor a beloved Christmas song.Sadly, this American wonderalmost disappeared due to aninvasive blight that devastatednearly 4 billion trees. But thereis new hope.The American Chestnut Foundationhas been working for 25years to breed a blight-resistanttree and reintroduce it to ourforests again. And we’re almostthere. To discover how youcan helprestore thisgreat tree toour forests,please visitwww.acf.orgThis ad was created and donated by Banks Hardwoods, Inc. Please join us in supporting The American Chestnut Foundation.CHRISTMAS/2008 1


Season’s Greetingsfrom your friendsat O’Shea Lumber.Two Locations to Serve YouMain 11425 Office Susquehanna and Yard Trail11425 Glen Rock, Susquehanna PA USA 17327 Trail1.717.235.1992 phoneGlen 1.717.235.0200 Rock, PA USAfax173271.717.235.1992 Satellite Yardphone1.717.235.0200 113 North Funk Road faxWooster, OH USA 44691www.oshealumber.com1.330.263.1100 phoneE-mail: 1.330.263.1101 anton@oshea.com faxwww.oshealumber.com | anton@oshea.com1.800.638.0296Your needs are our highest priority.INTRODUCINGwood.made better.HEAT-CRAFTED LUMBERIncreased Dimensional StabilityDecay ResistantUniform ColorationThermal modification is a clean and efficienttechnology that adds value and utility to wood,promoting responsible forestry practices.Available species (including FSC-certified):White Ash • Yellow Birch • Red OakSoft Maple • Eucalyptus GrandisKINGSTON, NH • TROY,VA • MANASSAS,VAFSC SUPPLIER SW-COC-022phone 603.642.3665 • fax: 603.642.8670www.northlandforest.comC o n t e n t sFeatures:Canterbury Wood Floors Focuses On Custom Orders ............................282009 Hardwood Purchasing Plans .............................................................302009 Forecasts .............................................................................................32Oakcrest Opens Tennessee Facility...........................................................34Moore Forest Makes The Grade In Hardwoods ........................................36Forest Preservation Tops HMA Regional Agenda.....................................38Hardwood Federation Fly-In’s A Run-Away Success ...............................40Truth About Trees Travels To San Francisco ............................................42Baillie’s Herskind Addresses Annual NHLA Meeting ...............................43WCMA Meets For Fall Conference, Plant Tour..........................................44Kretz Lumber Marvels At Ancient Logs .....................................................46Departments:News Developments ....................................................................................14Washington Report ......................................................................................18NHLA News ...................................................................................................20HMA & Solid Hardwood Promotion ............................................................22AHEC Update ................................................................................................24Hardwood Calendar .....................................................................................26Trade Talk......................................................................................................78Obituaries......................................................................................................85Buyer’s Guide Index ....................................................................................882 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


Christmas, 2008 Vol. 82, No. 12The Cover“Our Quality Is Built-In”We have generations of experience. We at Wolf River Lumberwould love to have a long-term relationship with you.Wolf River Lumber has invested in the future of theHardwood lumber business. Not only in the 5th, 6th and 7thgenerations of the Ort family, but in our facilities that are upto-datewith modern cutting edge technology to better serveour customers and the industry.In this regard, the owners, management team and employeesof Wolf River Lumber are pleased to announce they haveachieved Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Chain of Custodyand Controlled Wood Certification (SGS-COC-005371)through SGS Qualifor Programme. Wolf River Lumber joinstwo other Ort owned companies already FSC Certified, AacerFlooring (SW-COC-001339, October 18, 2004) and NorthernComponent Solutions (SW-COC-002488, July 12, 2007). TheCentral Wisconsin location is convenient to other hardwoodrelatedbusinesses owned by the Ort family, including 85,000acres of pristine, responsibly managed, hardwood timberland,three sawmills producing 35 million board feet of lumber andan industry leading hardwood flooring mill and dimension company. Logs and lumber from this region arebest known for their bright color and uniform tight grain.Today, in the world economy, the customer must get what they need. If they need white, four-sided HardMaple or four-sided Red Cherry for cabinet doors, it does them no good to buy 50% more of an item thatmust be sorted and stored. We can sort 100 sorts at a time within 1/10” width, 1/2” length, thusincreasing yield and decreasing space requirements. This gives the customer the width, length,color, one to four sides they require. By doing this it reduces wasted space and inventory cost andincreased yields. We believe that a deal must be profitable to all parties. Repeat business helps usto continually work on reducing cost.Have a Merry and Blessed Christmas,- Wolf River Lumber, Inc. and The Ort FamilyFounded in 1927 by:O.L. MILLER1894-1963The National Hardwood Magazine is the product of a company and its affiliates thathave been in the publishing business for 81 years.Other publications edited for specialized markets and distributed worldwide include:Forest Products Export Directory • Hardwood Purchasing Handbook • Dimension &Wood Components Buyer’s Guide • Import/Export Wood Purchasing News • ClassifiedExchange • Imported Wood Purchasing Guide • Green Book’s Hardwood MarketingDirectory • Green Book’s Softwood Marketing Directory • The Softwood ForestProducts BuyerPaul J. Miller, Sr.....................................................................................................PublisherPaul J. Miller, Jr. ....................................................................................................PresidentCentral States EditorTerry Miller................................................................................Vice President – Sales Mgr.Northeast EditorWayne Miller ..................................................................................................Vice PresidentCanada & West Coast EditorGary Miller......................................................................................................Vice PresidentSoutheast EditorBarbara King................................................................................................Travel ManagerVirginia Sorensen ........................................................................................Finance OfficerSue Putnam .................................................................................................................EditorDavid Owens...............................................................................................Associate EditorJohn Gray, Jr ......................................................................................................Art DirectorWalter Lee...........................................................................................Associate Art DirectorTammy Daugherty................................................................................Production ManagerCharlene Jumper.....................................................................Green Book …Market SalesLisa Carpenter......................................................................................Circulation ManagerLexi Hardin...............................................................................Subscription & List ServicesMichelle Miller ......................................................................................Classified ExchangeMiller Publishing Corp.ADVERTISING OFFICES:1235 Sycamore View, Memphis, TN 38134901-372-8280 FAX 901-373-6180Reach us via the Internet at: www.nationalhardwoodmag.come-mail addresses: ADVERTISING: tammy@millerpublishing.comEDITORIAL: editor@millerpublishing.comSUBSCRIPTIONS: circ@millerpublishing.comEDITORIAL CORRESPONDENTS:Chicago, Los Angeles, High Point, Grand Rapids, Portland, TorontoControlled circulation postage paid at Memphis, TN(USPS #917-760)The NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE (ISSN 0194-0910) is published monthly,except for two issues in December, for $55.00 per year and $65.00 (U.S. dollars) peryear for Canada by National Hardwood Magazine, Inc., 1235 Sycamore View,Memphis, TN 38134. Periodicals Postage paid at Memphis, TN. POSTMASTER:Send address changes to National Hardwood Magazine, P.O. Box 34908, Memphis,TN 38184. Publications mail agreement No. 40739074. Return undeliverableCanadian addresses to: P.O. Box 503, RPO W. Beaver Cre., Rich-Hill, ON L4B 4R6.DOWNES & READERHARDWOOD CO., INC.Wholesale Distributorsof Hardwood,Softwood Lumber,Mahogany and PlywoodIRON S ICKDirect ExportersAsh, Basswood,Beech, Birch, Cherry,Cypress, Hickory,Hard Maple,Soft Maple,Poplar,Walnut,Red Oak,White Oak,Aromatic Cedar,Sugar Pine,SYP® ®Providing the following services:4,000,000 BF Kiln Dried Inventory,Planing Mill, Straight Line Ripping,Gang Ripping, Mixed ContainerShipments, and Rail SidingDOWNES & READERHARDWOOD CO., INC.Headquarters:P.O. Box 456 - Evans DriveStoughton, MA USA 02072Phone: 781-341-4092Fax: 781-344-7110Inside U.S.A.: 800-788-5568North Carolina Office:William von der GoltzSteve ArnettTel: 336-323-7502Fax: 336-323-2848The most durable and cost effectivekiln stick on the marketDistribution YardP.O. Box 634Commercial Blvd.Blakeslee, PA USA 18610Phone: 570-646-6724Fax: 570-646-6628Web Site: www.downesandreader.comCHRISTMAS/2008 3


Season’s GreetingsfromGreenTree Forest Products, Inc.andValley View Hardwoods, Inc.• We currently operate three band sawmills intwo locations and produce a combined total of22,000,000 board feet of AppalachianHardwood Lumber annually.• We produce Red Oak, White Oak, Poplar, HardMaple, Soft Maple, Ash, Basswood and Hickoryin thicknesses of 4/4 - 10/4 and lengths 6 - 16feet. We offer 5 length separation, dipping andend sealing. ALL LUMBER IS SOLD GREEN.• Our pallet division builds approximately 15tractor-trailer loads per week of custom pallets,skids and crating materials in both hardwoodsand KD softwoods.• We can furnish heat treated pallets and/orheat treated lumber for the export market.GreenTree Forest Products, Inc.746 Muses Mill RoadWallingford, KY 41093Phone (606) 876-5551Fax (606) 876-2508SALES: James D. WellsEmail: james@greentreeforest.comValley View Hardwoods, Inc.2041 Flemingsburg Rd.Morehead, KY 40351Phone (606) 784-5247Fax (606) 783-1846SALES: David WellsEmail: david@greentreeforest.comOur web site is www.greentreeforest.com4 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


Pudge ShatzerPh: 800.627.4826Fax: 972.228.5987e-mail: p.shatzer@sitco.comDonna BlissPh: 866.543.0570Fax: 866.418.4183e-mail: d.bliss@sitco.comBob WilliamsPh: 800.267.4826Fax: 620.663.1611e-mail: b.williams@sitco.comJess FulcherPh: 877.977.4826Fax: 214.987.4486e-mail: j.fulcher@sitco.comSteve McKeeverPh: 800.627.4826Fax: 972.228.5987e-mail: s.mckeever@sitco.comTom HibdonPh: 901.592.7454Fax: 972.228.5987e-mail: t.hibdon@sitco.comJon PappasPh: 800.627.4826Fax: 972.228.5987e-mail: j.pappas@sitco.comMarc BaranyPh: 504.208.1562Fax: 972.228.5987e-mail: m.barany@sitcosa.comNational HardwoodLumber AssociationInternational WoodProducts Association75 Species6 Continents1 LocationSITCO LUMBER COMPANYOffice: 2050 Kestrel Ave.DeSoto, TX 75115Toll-free: 800.627.4826Phone: 972.225.4283 Fax: 972.228.5987E-Mail: sales@sitco.comWebsite: www.sitco.comImported and Domestic HardwoodsHardwoods from A to ZAfrican Mahogany, Almond, Afrormosia,Genuine Mahogany, Andiroba, Aniegre,Avodire, Bubinga, Bloodwood, Canarywood,Cocobolo, Coyote, Cumaru, European Beech,Goncalo Alves, Granadillo, Ipe, Iroko, Jatoba,Jelutong, Koa, Lacewood, Laurel Negro, Luan,Mansonia, Makore, Meranti, Merbau, Mesquite,Morado (Bolivian Rosewood), NicaraguanRedwood, Okoume, Padouk, Peruvian Walnut,Purpleheart, Raintree, Royal Cedar, SantosMahogany, Sapele, Shedua, Sipo, SpanishCedar, Teak, Virola, Wenge, Yellowheart,Zebrawood;Alder, Aromatic Cedar, Basswood, Birch,Beech, Cherry, Cypress, Cottonwood,Hackberry, Hickory, Soft Maple, Red Oak, HardMaple, Pecan, Pine, Sycamore, Walnut, WhiteOak, WillowOVER 50 years of quality service, 2,000,000 bdft. instock. From our warehouse to yours, in truckloads orunits delivered on time.SITCO’s own quality inspectors are at the source, inthe port and at the distribution center in Dallas toensure that the quality and grade of the lumber youreceive from SITCO are exactly what you want. Westand behind every shipment, be it full truckloads ora single unit!Warehouse: Dallas, Texas USACHRISTMAS/2008 5


HAPPYHOLIDAYSMarketing - EditorialPaul Miller Sr.Wayne MillerPaul Miller Jr. Gary Miller Terry MillerProduction - PersonnelVirginia SorensenJoAnne Avanzi Barbara Newsom Michelle MillerEve JonesEditorial - Graphics - ArtBest WishesFor TheNew Year!Sue PutnamDavid OwensJohn Gray Jr.Magazine - Newspapers - DirectoriesWalter LeeCharlene JumperTammy DaughertyMichelle PattersonRachael StokesCirculation - ClassifiedOur sincere thanks forenabling us to serve youfor 82 years!Lisa CarpenterLexi HardinAshley YoungSheila ReuterResearch - Tele-MarketingCarolyn HigginbothamMichelle KellerPeggy YoungPublications edited for specialized markets and distributed worldwide include: National Hardwood Magazine • Hardwood Purchasing Handbook • Green Book’sHardwood Marketing Directory • Green Book’s Softwood Marketing Directory • The Softwood Forest Products Buyer • Import/Export Wood Purchasing NewsClassified Exchange • Imported Wood Purchasing Guide • Forest Products Export Directory • Dimension & Wood Components Buyer’s Guide6 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


CHRISTMAS/2008 7


BUYERStake anotherLOOKRegion:All RegionsForest Products Stock ExchangeSpecies:ALDER Search Advanced SearchCheck out the new enhancements to our websiteforestproductsstockexc.comRepresenting Manufacturers & Processors who supply over500,000,000’of Hardwoods8 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


Holmes & Co., Inc.Phone: 800-222-5376 ext. 240 FAX: (260) 244-5694WalnutHard MapleWhite OakRed OakSoft MapleAshButternutBasswoodCherrySeason’s GreetingsP.O. Box 370 • Columbia City, Indiana 46725fromMista Feist and Ray ThompsonSales: Mista Feist and Ray ThompsonWe specialize in heavy stock 4/4 through 16/4Band MillAutomatic StackerDry KilnsSurfacerPredryerAnnual Production9,000,000 ft.Avg. AD Inventory2,000,000 ft.Avg. KD Inventory3,000,000 ft.We specialize and manufactureNorthern Appalachian kiln driedhardwoods such as Red Oak, White Oak,Cherry, Ash, Hard and Soft Maple.570-836-1133Fax: 570-836-8982Email: fox@deerparklumberinc.com1301 SR 6ETunkhannock, PA 18657www.deerparklumberinc.comCHRISTMAS/2008 9


Merry Christmas fromPhone 501-742-3371Fax 501-742-3423E-mail: sdmoore@centurytel.netOffering:Kiln Drying, S2SRail (U.P.), Truck,or Container ShipmentsOur ARKANSAS Sawmill producesRed Oak • White Oak • Sap Gum • Poplar • Hackberry • Elm • Ash • Soft Maple • Cypress“Precision Manufactured Hardwood Lumber”Sales: Steve Moore, Jerry MooreLocation:Mail:401 N.W. Third St. P.O. Box 98Kensett, Arkansas 72082 Searcy, Arkansas 72145Quality First-Service Always!Wholesale Distirbutors and Exporters ofSOUTHERN, APPALACHIAN& NORTHERN HARDWOODSAIR OR KILN DRIEDRAIL and/or TRUCK SHIPMENT1,000,000 FT. KILN DRIED INVENTORYBox 12385 New Bern, NC 28561Tel. (252) 638-5717 Fax: (252) 638-4860E-Mail: jejoneslumber@embarqmail.comJ.E. JONES JR., MIKE JONESLEXINGTON, N.C. OFFICE AND YARDJim Leonard, Johnny Myers & Joe Perry(336) 472-2666 Fax: (336) 472-860510 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


Season’s GreetingsINDIANA DIMENSION, INC.A SISTER COMPANY OF COLE HARDWOOD, INC.SPECIALIZING IN RED OAK, CHERRY, WHITE HARDMAPLE, SOFT MAPLE, ASH, ALDER AND WALNUTHardwood:Panels • Furniture and CabinetComponents • Cabinet Doors • DimensionMouldings • S4SSALES: Jeremy RentschlerP.O. Box 568 U.S. 24 WestLogansport, IN 46947Telephone: (574) 739-2319Fax: (574) 739-2818www.indianadimension.comfromForest Products, Inc.25,000,000 BF of Quality Bandsawn Pennsylvania Hardwoods1,000,000 BF Kiln CapacityExport Packaging & Container LoadingSPECIALIZING IN HARD MAPLE, CHERRY, SOFT MAPLE, RED OAK, ASH“We welcome your inquiries and look forward to serving your needs.”Contact:Mike Tarbell, Sales ManagerRus Gustin(814) 697-7185FAX (814) 697-7190We sell both green and kiln dried lumber.Mailing Address1716 Honeoye RoadShinglehousePA 16748E-mail: ramsales@frontiernet.netCHRISTMAS/2008 11


BEE FOREST LLCS1130 STATE HWY 25NELSON, WI 54756715 673-4127715 673-4137 FAXFACILITIES include:• 4 kilns - 2 set up for white woods• Container or flatbed loading• Newman planer S2S• 2 sawmills with circular headsaws followed by band resawsSPECIES include good color Northern hardwoods including red oak,basswood, cherry, hickory, hard and soft maple, white oakand aspenSPECIALIZING in random length/widthSales: Bob Bee 715 673-4127 office or 715 225-4954 cellRead each month’s featurestories or download the latestissue online@www.nationalhardwoodmag.com12 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


Season’sGreetingsR.A. MILLER HARDWOOD COMPANY, INC.35 Industrial DriveNORTH TONAWANDA, NEW YORK 14120Phone 1-800-833-4693 FAX: 716-694-0966Website: www.ramillerhardwood.comNew York State’s FinestWhite Hard Maple • Sap Soft MapleCherry • Northern Red OakFlooring (Hardwood & Heart Pine),Dimension, TimbersCYPRESS1” DIMENSION2” DIMENSIONFINISHSIDINGFENCINGPANEL PECKYTIMBERSCharlie WilsonHARDWOODSFURNITUREMILLWORKINDUSTRIALMOULDINGTerry WilsonCindy WilsonHARDWOODS,CYPRESS,YELLOW PINEPhillip BrownSemi-DimensionEleanor WilsonBobby JorgensenWilson Lumber Company, Inc.Memphis, Tennessee T38182-0526 PHONE: (901) 274-6887 FAX: F(901) 274-68501279 N. McLean, P.O. PBox 820526Web Site: WWW.CYPRESSUSA.COME-mail: wlumber@cypressusa.comDISTRIBUTION YARDRippingPlaningMoulderResawSeason’sGreetingsfrom:TANNER LUMBER COMPANYP.O. BOX 1637, ELKINS, WEST VIRGINIA 26241Phone: 304-636-1088 Fax: 304-636-4738Expert Salesmen - 2 Lumber Yards - Fast ShipmentsQuality Appalachian Hardwood Lumberhardwoods: grade lumber, green & kiln dried ★ blocking ★ timbers ★ landscape materialsCHRISTMAS/2008 13


NewsDevelopmentsWPC FAIR OFFERS WOOD SOLUTIONSThe Wood Products Council, a collection of seven trade associationsthat represent the wood products industry, recently hosted a“Wood Solutions Fair” at the Minneapolis Convention Center.The event featured booths from dozens of industry vendors andpresentations “for individuals considering or using wood in nonresidentialstructures.” The event followed the council’s launch lastspring of the “WoodWorks” North Central program, which promoteswood to nonresidential users in Minnesota, Illinois andWisconsin.WoodWorks provides wood-related education and training toarchitects, engineers and contractors in such categories as codeissues, fire protection, wind and seismic design, durability andgreen building.According to data from McGraw-Hill Cos., wood accounts foronly 11.5 percent of the wall frame construction materials in nonresidentialU.S. building four stories or less. However, wood industryofficials argue that most of those buildings could have beenbuilt under existing codes for far cheaper using wood.Over the past four years, the price of steel products has doubled,while concrete products are up 35 percent, according to the Bureauof Labor Statistics. By comparison, wood products such as lumberand plywood have dropped in price approximately 6 percent.U.S. HARDWOOD INDUSTRY PROMOTES LEGAL,SUSTAINABLE BENEFITSIn response to the increasing global demand for verified legal andsustainable forest products, the American Hardwood industryrecently released the findings of its independent study,“Assessment of Lawful Harvesting and Sustainability of U.S.Hardwood Exports.”The study commissioned by the American Hardwood ExportCouncil and undertaken by a team of international experts, led bySeneca Creek Associates, confirms that U.S. Hardwoods derivefrom legal and well-managed forests. The research concludes thatthere is a very low risk that U.S. Hardwoods derive from illegalsources; there is high confidence that Hardwoods procured fromthe U.S. are low risk in all categories of the Forest StewardshipCouncil (FSC) controlled wood standard; and national and stateforest programs in the U.S. are responsive in promoting and ensuringsustainable forest practices.The groundbreaking study is the first of its kind to look at legalityon a national basis and will prove a valuable tool for complianceto a range of sustainable procurement policies, including FSC-controlledwood. This should greatly facilitate the supply of FSClabeledproducts containing American Hardwoods using FSC’s percentageand volume credit systems. The study also provides aseries of recommendations for the American Hardwood industry,designed to enhance the level of transparency and environmentalcredentials of its products.Already the AHEC board has responded to these recommendationsby preparing a Responsible Procurement Policy for Exporters(RPP). This policy may be voluntarily adopted by AHEC memberswishing to communicate their commitment to specific environmentalobjectives and to progressively increasing the proportion ofAmerican Hardwoods that can be tracked to forest of origin.14 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


News about North American industrialHardwood consumers and overseasupdates, including mergers, plant expansions,association activities and personnelCOPELAND FURNITURE ACHIEVES SFC SILVER STATUSCopeland Furniture, headquartered in Bradford, Vt., recentlyreceived Silver Exemplary Membership Status from theSustainable Furniture Council (SFC). The natural Hardwood furnituremanufacturer is already Forest Stewardship Council-certified,one of only a handful of American furniture manufacturers to do so.“Copeland Furniture’s continued commitment to sustainabilityserves to strengthen the sustainability movement and the furnituremarketplace,” said Susan Inglis, SFC executive director. “I amexcited to welcome Copeland Furniture as our newest SilverExemplary Member, and am particularly impressed by Copeland’scommitment to use FSC-certified North American wood and otherresponsibly sourced materials for the health of consumers, communitiesand the environment.”Copeland Furniture actually exceeds SFC Silver status requirements,using between 15 and 25 percent FSC-certified or equivalentwood; between 1 and 25 percent non-wood products madefrom recycled or bio-based materials; has completed a CarbonFootprint Report that includes detailed analysis of its operation’senergy output; and is showing a positive impact on supply chainimprovements as a result of sustainability efforts.Copeland Furniture recently launched a new FSC-certified bedroomcollection called Newport that is constructed of FSC-certifiedsolid Maple and combines minimalist style with functionality.THOMASVILLE FURNITURE ADDING NEW JOBSThomasville Furniture Industries, based in Thomasville, N.C.,recently announced plans to add approximately 100 jobs to its PlantC in the next several months as part of a plan to better utilize itsproduction facilities.Some of the workers have already been hired to assemble diningchairs for six or seven dining groups, while others will producebeds and tables for a few inline collections.Plant C was largely idled in mid-2007 when its operations wereconsolidated into the company’s Lenoir, N.C., case goods plant.Thomasville Furniture President Ed Teplitz said the plant wouldgrow from 15 workers in late September to at least 100 over thenext several months.Thomasville is also planning to add 100 jobs at its Lenoir facilityby the close of the year. Teplitz said the added production capacitywould help reduce lead times, compared with shipping goodsfrom Asia.“We are pleased to be able to bring this work back here and createthese jobs,” he said. “We think it will lead to better service levelsto our customers.”STATTON FURNITURE CLOSES SHOPStatton Furniture Manufacturing Co., located in Hagerstown,Md., recently closed after 82 years in business. The domestic producerof high-end solid Cherry 18 th and 19 th century case goodsdecided to liquidate its assets so it wouldn’t have to file for bankruptcyprotection.“I think people are really scared to buy right now and orders justPlease turn the pageCHRISTMAS/2008 15


WashingtonReportAreport from the nation’s capital on governmental actionsaffecting the forest products industry.CONGRESS IMPLEMENTS ILLEGALLOGGING BANU.S. government agencies recently heldthe first public meeting to discuss theircommitment to implement and enforcechanges to the Lacey Act, which prohibittrade in products that contain illegallylogged wood.Representatives from the Department ofAgriculture, Department of HomelandSecurity, Department of Interior andDepartment of Justice outlined plans for aphased-in approach for the requirementto declare the origin and species of theplant material contained in a widevariety of products.The agencies announced that theenforcement of the declaration requirementwould begin on April 1, 2009, for plants,timber and solid wood products, to coincidewith the availability of a Web-based declarationsystem. Other products of concern,such as furniture and paper, will be phasedin subsequently over a two-year timeframe.The Lacey Act amendments were aresponse to the global problem of illegal logging,which costs developing countries anestimated $15 billion a year in lost revenue,contributes to the 20 percent ofannual total greenhouse gas emissionscaused by deforestation, and supportsorganized crime around the world.“We are very encouraged thatPlease turn to page 7018 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


NHLA NewsThe Year Ahead Is Full Of Potholesby MARK BARFORD, CAEExecutive DirectorNational Hardwood Lumber Assoc.Memphis, Tenn.Very few NHLA members are looking to 2009 as a quickturnaround from some of the Titanic challenges they facedin 2008. We know, the road ahead is full of potholes. Fartoo many companies did not survive the year 2008, anddespite that reduction in production the markets barelynoticed.The deepest pothole is the state of the general economy.Since Hardwoods are not a prime necessity, they fall out offavor when families worry more about food and shelter.We know instinctively things will improve, but the questionis “when?” Only the most ardent optimist thinks theturnaround will happen during 2009.Our second big pothole is competition. I am not referringto imports or the mill down the street, I am talking aboutsubstitutes. As the world hears the mistaken message,that somehow plastics and bamboo are better environmentalproducts, consumers look away from wood. Theseare markets that once lost, may never come back.The third big issue facing the industry is the increasedinterest in certified wood products. This is an issue thathas been evolving for years and has gained more interestlately due to increased environmental awareness. As anindustry, we cannot afford to be shut out of markets forany reason, especially ones like this where wood is clearlythe best environmental choice.The long term potential of the Hardwood industry is limitlessas we look to the world’s needs and demands in thefuture. The industry collectively needs to fill the potholeson the road in order to reach the super highway. NHLA iscommitted to leading the repair efforts to fix these potholesand serving our members for another 110 years.•20 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


HMA & Solid HardwoodPromotionHMA’s American Hardwood Promotion ProgramYour Contributions Make It HappenMost of us learn through the simple process of repetition.Seeing and hearing information repeatedly, we learn andremember, then draw upon that information when theneed arises.In our on-going efforts to educate consumers and buildingprofessionals about the many benefits of choosing andusing American Hardwoods and American Hardwoodproducts, HMA’s American Hardwood Promotion Programfollows a similar approach. Through a wide variety ofmedia vehicles, we broadcast our consistent, no-nonsenseHardwood message - American Hardwoods are beautiful,durable, green, sustainable, naturally renewing and moreby GIL THURMExecutive Vice PresidentHardwood Manufacturers AssociationPittsburgh, Pa.abundant today than 50 years ago. It’s a message indeed worth repeating and a promotional program that works.That positive media exposure is made possible through the continued financial support of our HMA membership, their“special” contributions and the contributions of non-member companies and organizations devoted to Hardwood promotion.Your financial support makes it all happen.Chances are pretty great that when an educated consumer chooses Oak flooring instead of bamboo or Maple cabinetsover Mahogany, it’s because of information and knowledge gained via one of the media messages made possible by you.Thank you for your continued support.HMA Member Extra Contributions (For the period October 1, 2007 to September 30, 2008)$15,000 and upNorthwest Hardwoods/WeyerhaeuserBaillie Lumber Co.$2,000 to $8,000T & S Hardwoods, Inc.Weaber, Inc.Anderson-Tully Co.Bill Hanks Lumber Co.Kitchens Brothers Manufacturing Co.Rutland Lumber Co.Cersosimo Lumber Co., Inc.Cummings Lumber Co.Northland Forest ProductsRam Forest ProductsHolt & Bugbee Co.Fred Netterville Lumber Co.Season’s Greetings from the HMAThe holiday season brings sweet memories of times past,And bright hopes for all that is yet to be.Wishing you and yoursAll the joys of the season.$1,000 to $1,900East Perry Lumber Co.Turn Bull Lumber Co.Wolf River Lumber Co.Curtner Lumber Co.Up to $900Hanafee Brothers Sawmill Co.BWP Hardwoods, Inc.Pike Lumber Company, Inc.Jerry G. Williams & Sons, Inc.Mueller Brothers TimberNon-member Contributions$1,000 to $5,000Penn-York Lumbermen’s ClubSouthwestern HardwoodManufacturers ClubHardwood Market ReportLake States Lumber AssociationWoodus K. Humphrey & Co.Employees of Weaber, Inc.National Hardwood MagazineSwaner Hardwood Co.Up to $900Reel LumberSII Dry KilnsW. M. Cramer Lumber CompanyCotton-Hanlon, Inc.Champlain HardwoodsFrank E. Wilson Lumber Co.•22 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


Brighten up your Christmas andNew Year by buying QualityAppalachian Hardwoods fromKepley-Frank HardwoodCompany, Inc.HAPPY HOLIDAYS fromEXPERIENCE QUALITY DEPENDABLE975 Conrad Hill Mine Rd.Lexington, NC 27292Phone 336-746-5419Fax 336-746-6177Web: www.kepleyfrank.comInformation about our sawmill, planer mill and lumber inventory is below:1.) Our three sawmills cut 15 million board feet a year of fine AppalachianHardwood lumber in 4/4 through 8/4 thicknesses in mostly Red Oak,White Oak and Poplar as well as Ash and Maple. Our crosstie mill manufacturesabout 100,000 board feet per week of crosstie and tie sides inspecies such as Hickory, Sycamore, Beech, Gum and Elm. In additionto the lumber we cut from our sawmill we also process another 12to 15 million board feet of lumber per year through our Hardwoodconcentration yard business. We purchase and process all domesticspecies in all grades.2.) Our modern planer mill runs two shifts to ensure on time shipments ofour lumber to customers. We deliver kiln dried or air dried lumber andoffer export preparation and on site container loading.3.) We offer 600,000 board feet of fan shed inventory at all times, to provideefficient service to our customers. Kepley-Frank maintains an air driedinventory of 5,000,000 plus board feet of all species, to ensure back upinventory for our customers.The green-roofed building in the forefront houses thegreen chain while the sawmill operation is located in theadjacent building.*Through Jimmy Kepley acquiring Lexington Home Brands’ plant #2 inLexington, N.C., and naming the operation Linwood Furniture, Inc., hiscompany offers kiln dried lumber from Linwood’s eight dry kilns witha total dry kiln capacity of 600,000 board feet per charge. The furnitureplant is also offering the service of contract furniture manufacturingand the manufacturing of wood components for other furnituremanufacturers and other woodworking companies.This is a view of Kepley-Frank Hardwood’s circle sawscutting a large Appalachian log into lumber. The firmhas three sawmills running at the company’s headquarters.


AHEC UpdateAHEC Introduces Responsible Procurement Policy (RPP) For Exports To JapanThe AHEC Board of Directors has approved the implementationof an AHEC voluntary “ResponsibleProcurement Policy for Exporters” (RPP), which is specificallydesigned to address the Japanese requirements forgreen wood product procurement under the “Basic Policyon Green Purchasing.”For the past 18 months, AHEC staff – along with substantialsupport from the U.S. embassy in Japan andAHEC Past Chairman Peter King – have been workingwith the Japanese government and the Japanese LumberImporters’ Association to devise a mechanism for non-certifiedU.S. Hardwoods to be admitted under the policy.The attached document has been reviewed by both organizationswho have tentatively agreed to accept this policy –in conjunction with the AHEC-funded Risk AssessmentStudy – as adequate for meeting Japanese demands forlegally-sourced wood products. The final logistical detailsare being ironed out, but it appears likely that this documentwould not need to accompany every shipment toJapan, but rather each AHEC member who chooses to participatewould provide a copy for their Japanese customersto keep on file.By way of background, the Basic Policy on GreenPurchasing refers to a document formulated by theJapanese Forestry Agency which provides more detailedguidance on the verification of legality and the sustainabilityof wood and wood products. In contrast to someEuropean government procurement policies, the JapaneseGuideline is relatively short and lacking in detail.“Legality” in the context of wood products is defined brieflyas “harvested in a legal manner consistent with proceduresin the forest laws.”The Japanese Guideline does not seek to establish anoperational definition of sustainable forest management.It is important to note, therefore, that this RPP pertains toJapanese requirements for legality only, and makes noclaims related to sustainability.The Japanese Guideline allows three different mechabyMICHAEL SNOWExecutive DirectorAmerican Hardwood Export CouncilWashington, D.C.nisms by which suppliers may verifylegality:1. Forest certification and chain ofcustody systems;2. Codes of conduct of wood industry associations; and3. Self-established procedures of individual companies.The AHEC RPP is designed to use option 2 above to meetthe Japanese requirements. In practice therefore, theJapanese government has been highly flexible with regardto the forms of evidence it is willing to accept. By recognizingcodes of conduct and other private sector initiatives,a great deal of responsibility has been passed on to the privatesector.Over the coming months, AHEC plans to work in consultationwith governments and wood importing and manufacturingfederations around the globe in an effort toexpand the use of this policy in other countries andregions.The American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) is theleading international trade association for the U.S.Hardwood industry, representing the committed exportersamong U.S. Hardwood companies and all major U.S.Hardwood product trade associations. AHEC’s membercompanies service the growing global demand for U.S.Hardwood and represent the full range of Hardwood products.AHEC maintains offices in Japan, Europe,Southeast Asia, China, Korea and Mexico, in addition toits Washington, D.C. headquarters, to serve the needs ofthe global community. For additional information pleasecontact AHEC by phone at 202/463-2720, by fax at202/463-2787 or consult our web site at www.ahec.org.•24 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


2 CharactersproduceR/Q White Oak &Plain-Sawn WalnutCharacterLumberto makeCharacterGreg & Dave GrafFlooring.White Oak & WalnutPO Box 458679 Johnson LaneSouth Shore, KY 41175Phone: 606-932-3117Fax: 606-932-3156E-mail: info@grafbro.comWebsite: www.grafbro.comGraf Brothers produces CharacterRift & Quartered White Oak andPlain-Sawn Walnut in widthsranging from 7” to 15” and wider.Call for special pricing.


H a r d w o o d C a l e n d a rDECEMBERSouthwest Club, Windsor Court Hotel, NewOrleans, La. Contact: 601-765-8892. Dec. 6-8(annual banquet and meeting dates: Dec. 7 and 8)West Side Hardwood Club Annual ChristmasLuncheon, Eden Park Racquet Club, PineBluff, Ark. Contact: 501-851-3580. Dec. 18.JANUARY Y 2009Appalachian Lumbermen’s Club, meeting, TheHoliday Inn Select, Hickory, N.C. Contact:828-397-7481. Jan. 13.Lake States Lumber Assoc., Winter Meeting,Hotel Mead, Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. Contact:888-213-2397. Jan. 15-16.International Builder’s Show, Las VegasConvention Center, Las Vegas, Nev. Contact:202-266-8200. Jan. 20-23.Canadian Kitchen Cabinet Association,National Forum, Phoenix, Ariz. Contact:info@ckca.ca. Jan. 28-Feb. 1.FEBRUARYIndiana Hardwood Lumbermen’s Assoc.,Convention & Expo, Downtown IndianapolisHyatt Regency Hotel, Indianapolis, Ind.Contact: 800-640-4452. Feb. 4-5.Canadian Lumbermen’s Annual Convention,Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Ont.Contact: 613-233-6205. Feb. 18-19.Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers Inc.,Annual Meeting, Ponte Vedra Inn & Club,Ponte Vedra, Fla. Contact: 336-885-8315. Feb.25-Mar. 1.MARCHHardwood Manufacturers Assoc., NationalConference and Expo, The Westin Charlotte,Charlotte, N.C. Contact: 704-375-2600. Mar.17-19.APRILLumbermen’s Association of Texas, AnnualConvention, Galveston Island, Galveston,Texas. Contact: 512-472-1194. Apr. 2-4.National Wood Flooring Assoc., Convention,Long Beach, Calif. Contact: convetion@nwfa.org. Apr. 28-May 1.•WORMY CHESTNUT • TROPICALS • QTR & RIFT • CYPRESS • ELMWest CoastSales626-445-8556Headquarters, Concentration Yard & Kilns in Hickory, N.C.Phone (828) 397-7481 FAX: (828) 397-3763www.cramerlumber.comHardwoods, Cypress, White PineMERRYCHRISTMAS!Orlando, FLWarehouse407-323-3740“LIMBO”The Lumber RuleAtlanta, GAWarehouse770-479-9663HAPPYNEW YEAR!SawmillKilnsMarlinton, WVYardKilnsMillwood, KYHICKORY • HARD & SOFT MAPLE • POPLAR • RED & WHITE OAK • WALNUT • ASHWHITE PINE • BASSWOOD • BEECH • BIRCH • CEDAR • CHERRY26 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


House Resolution NeedsHardwood Industry SupportU.S. Reps. Brad Ellsworth (D-Ind.) andGeoff Davis (R-Ky.) are currently tryingto draw up support for House Resolution1477, which was introduced prior to therecent adjournment by Congress. Theresolution is geared toward givingUnited States Hardwoods full considerationin any environmentally preferablebuilding programs. Currently, most U.S.Hardwoods do not qualify under most“green” building programs because thereliance is on certified wood, which isnearly an impossible requirement forsmaller, private woodland owners. Theresolution as follows was referred to theCommittee on Agriculture:Recognizing the importance and sustainabilityof the United States hardwoodsindustry and urging that UnitedStates hardwoods and the productsderived from United States hardwoodsbe given full consideration in any programdirected at constructing environmentallypreferable commercial, public,or private buildings.Whereas hardwood trees grown in theUnited States are an abundant, sustainable,and legal resource, as documentedannually by the Forest Inventory andAnalysis Program of the United StatesForest Service;Whereas, despite development pressureand cropland needs, Department ofAgriculture data shows that the inventoryof United States hardwood hasmore than doubled over the past 50years;Whereas the Department ofAgriculture reports that annual UnitedStates hardwood growth exceeds hardwoodremovals by a significant marginof 1.9 to 1, and net annual growth hasexceeded removals continuously since1952;Whereas the World Bank ranks theUnited States in the top 10 percent of allcountries for government effectiveness,regulatory quality, and rule of law withrespect to hardwood resources;Whereas United States hardwoodshave been awarded the highest conservationcrop rating available under theDepartment of AgricultureEnvironmental Benefits Index;Whereas United States hardwoods arenet absorbers of carbon and are widelyrecognized to be critical to reducing theUnited States carbon footprint;Whereas United States hardwoods area valuable raw material which, whenutilized properly, provide an incentivefor landowners to maintain their land ina forested condition rather than clearingthe land for development or other alternativeland use;Whereas United States hardwoods area renewable resource and bio-basedmaterial;Whereas United States hardwoods arerecyclable, and hardwoods used in constructioncan often be restored andreused in later construction;Whereas United States hardwoods aregrown primarily in those States locatedalong or east of the Mississippi Riverand in the Pacific Northwest, but, with apresence in every State, the hardwoodPlease turn to page 77CHRISTMAS/2008 27


Canter bFloors FKey employees at Canterbury Wood Floors, headquarteredin Mocksville, N.C., include Simon Briggs, owner;Jerry Little, operations manager; and Beth Burton,NWFA certified sales counselor.Custo mMocksville, N.C.—Since opening its doors in 2007, Canterbury WoodFloors, headquartered here, has attracted customersthroughout the United States and internationallywith its unique line of custom flooring andrelated products.Owned and operated by Simon Briggs, the companycommonly known as Canterbury Flooring manufacturesdomestic and imported species ofHardwood flooring and other forest products thatinclude mouldings, S4S blanks, paneling andHardwood lumber. Over 50 domestic and exoticspecies are utilized in Canterbury’s forest products.Most of the flooring made by Canterbury is consideredto be very high-end, Briggs said. “Our flooringis manufactured in many wide widths and longlengths,” he said. “Even in our domestics, we offermore unique products such as rift and quartersawnWhite Oak, wide Black Walnut and AmericanCherry. While we make the standard 1-foot to 7-foot lengths in our flooring, our most popular productlines are our long plank, which is 2-foot to 12-foot random length, and our estate plank, which is4-foot to 12-foot random length.”Briggs said that Canterbury Flooring typicallymanufactures its flooring products in 3/4-inch solidthick and 5/8-inch thick engineered, but will makeother thicknesses upon request. “We’ve manufacturedproducts as thin as 1/4-inch, and flooring asthick as an inch for sports flooring applications,” hesaid.Canterbury Flooring epitomizes what a customflooring mill should be, and will meet any customers’request as long as it is technically possible.“Our experienced employees help customers definethe style they want, and work with them to achievethat style while staying within budget,” he said.Canterbury’s customers are primarily Hardwoodflooring distributors whose clients are high-endhomebuilders, designers and architects. “Even inthis slow economy, we’re focused on getting adequaterepresentation of our products,” Briggs said.“We want to make sure that everybody that potentiallywould be interested in our products hasaccess to them, and has a way to communicate withus as to what they’re looking for.”Briggs said that his sales staff often receives a callfrom a customer for an order that they’ve neverdone before. “Part of the custom nature of the businessmeans that it’s our customers telling us what❝ Part of the custom nature of the business means thatit’s our customers telling us what they want, not us forcingsomething on the market so to speak. It gives us a levelof flexibility that customers really seem to respond to,and our salespeople are overjoyed to fulfill their requests.We’re not just throwing the same product on ourmanufacturing line day after day. Every job is alittle bit different than the last one.❞– Simon Briggs, owner, Canterbury Wood Floors28 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


ury WoodFocuses On2m OrdersBY GARY MILLERthey want, not us forcing something on the market soto speak,” he said. “It gives us a level of flexibility thatcustomers really seem to respond to, and our salespeopleare overjoyed to fulfill their requests. We’re notjust throwing the same product on our manufacturingline day after day. Every job is a little bit differentthan the last one. I think that challenges our staff andbreaks up some of the monotony in doing their jobs.”Canterbury Flooring has approximately 18 full-timeemployees on staff, and uses a local temp agency whenmore help is needed. “We hire probably 70 percent ofour manufacturing staff that came through this oneemployment agency. Most of the workers obtainedthrough the agency demonstrated their commitmentand were brought on permanently,” Briggs said.“North Carolina is blessed to have a really strongworkforce that is well educated and very skilled inwood products manufacturing.”Briggs said that a number of other workers werebrought on staff following area closings of other manufacturingoperations. “Both of our moulder operatorscame out of the furniture industry, and have over 25-plus years of woodworking experience,” he said. “Theycame on board, and brought a knowledge and level ofquality that is not usually typical of the flooring industry.”34Please turn to page 6202. Canterbury Flooring manufactures domestic and imported species ofHardwood flooring and other forest products.03. Some of the equipment Canterbury Flooring has at its operation includestwo moulders, a rip saw, a Cameron automation scanning system and twoplaners.04. Pictured is Canterbury Wood Floors’ moulder infeed system.05. This is a demonstration of the company’s end match infeed machinery.5CHRISTMAS/2008 29


?The year 2008 will be rememberedas a watershed moment in the historyof the lumber industry. The closingof lumber companies across thecountry was not an uncommon sightin 2008. Those whose doors remainopen for business in 2009 have survivedthrough frugal planning, cautiouspurchasing, and offering newproducts and services.As the housing market continueson one of its worst declines since theonset of the GreatDepression, lumberindustry insidershope – somewhatanxiously – thatbetter days areahead. Those wespoke to offeredsimilar strategies toto use while navigatingwhat liesahead in the next$12 months – keepinventories lean,take very good careof the customers you have, anddiversify the product offerings asmuch as possible.* * * * * *John Griswold of ConestogaWood Specialties Corp. inMountain View,Ark. is optimisticfor 2009. “I thinkwe’ll see a turnaround,but notuntil the secondquarter. The firstquarter will probablybe slow but Iexpect an uptickby the second,”2009HARDWOODPurchasing Planscome in. We’re also looking into specialtywidths and sorts,” he saidwhen asked about adjustmentsmade due to the current market.Hard Maple and Cherry were thecompany’s best sellers in 2008.* * * * * *Brad Huerter of Koch & Co. Inc.in Seneca, Kan., said that sales ofhis company’s Hardwood cabinetshave been down this year, but heexpects the industry is headed for aEditor’s Note: The followingis an exclusive reportabout the purchasingplans of many of thelargest Hardwood lumberbuyers in North America.turnaround as early as this spring.“The direction of sales has definitelydecreased in the past year due tothe economic decline,” he said. “But,I believe the industry will pick backup in the spring and return to whereit was in 2007.”Koch$& Co. Inc. manufacturesHardwood cabinets in such speciesas Red Oak, Beech, Alder, Cherry,Hickory, Poplar and Maple (FAS,No. 1 Common). Huerter said RedOak and Beech were the best sellersof 2008.“We were down a little as waseveryone due to the economic downturn,but our Red Oak and Beechcabinets still sold well,” he said.Huerter said Koch & Co. has survivedthe current market conditionsby maintaining a smaller inventoryand keeping close watch on prices inthe market.Griswold said.The company manufactures kitchenand bath cabinet doors and purchases40 million board feet annually of4/4 and 5/4, kiln-dried and green inthe following species: Birch, Walnut,Alder, Maple, Cherry, Red and* * * * * *White Oak and Hickory.As for sales, Griswold said they In Bangor, Wis., at Couleewere down about 25 percent from Region Hardwoods, Kathylast year. “We’re cutting inventory Solberg is confident about thePlease turn to page 58and basically buying orders as they direction of sales and the wood prod-30 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINEucts industry ingeneral. “Wepicked up aftereverybodydropped off thisyear but we leveledout and areexpecting a pickup after elections,but it willbe a slow pickup,” said Solberg of the firm’s activity.“Our salesstayed the samefrom last year, withRed Oak and HardMaple in Select andBetter being our topsellers. We are buyinga lot more gradespecific, instead ofbuying No. 3 andBetter, we’re onlybuying 2A, and not?* * * * * *3 and Better.”The firm handleslumber (4/4 to 8/4,KD and green, all grades, rough andS2S, gang ripped and straight lineripped), as well as dimension andedge-glued panels. As for 2009,Solberg stated, “We expect a pickup, albeit a slow one, but with theelection, next year will be a betteryear overall.”Sue PutnamBarry Freiburger said GeorgeGuenzler & Sons Inc. inKitchener,Ont., has notexperienced anysignificantdecrease in business,and is lookingforward to aprofitable 2009.“Our concentrationon diversifyingour marketsserved, and expanding our customerbase has allowed us to maintain oursales volume,” he said. “Many in theindustry are struggling with newhome sales at historic lows, and this


– The Premium BrandThis Holiday Season,Treat Yourself to Simply the BestITL Corporationdba Industrial Timber & Lumberwww.itlcorp.com23925 Commerce Park Road Beachwood, OH 44122 USAPhone: (216) 831-3140 FAX: (216) 831-4734Toll Free: (800) 829-WOOD (9663)E-mail: sales@itlcorp.comThe FSC logo identifies products which contain wood from responsibly managed forests independently certified in accordance with the rules ofthe Forest Stewardship Council A.C. FSC Trademark ©1996 Forest Stewardship Council A.C. SW-COC-000293 © 2006 Industrial Timber & Lumber


2009FORECASTSJohn BeardBeard HardwoodsGreensboro, N.C.I once had an employee that whenyou would ask him, “How are youdoing?”, he would always respond,“Come on Friday!” Well, I think if youasked anyone in our industry the question,“How are you doing?”, theresponse would have to be, “Come on2009!” At the time of this writing it’s a week after thefinancial collapse of September, 2008 and there is moredoom and gloom than I can ever remember in my professionallumber life. I believe that our industry is in themiddle of a huge contraction cycle that may continue wellinto 2009. The question on many people’s minds is whowill be left standing when we find our way through thiscrisis.I think that lumbermen by nature are eternal optimists.So, knowing this I will be optimistic and say that 2009will be better than 2008. During this crisis we have allhad to make very difficult decisions and sacrifices.Because of this we have become better and more efficientoperators. While many of us are in the “controlling thebleeding mode”, 2009 we’ll see the “bleeding stop” andwe’ll see a return to profitability.I am starting to see some of our customers feeling betterabout business. It’s the first time in many years that someof my domestic furniture and moulding manufacturersare increasing production. The huge freight increases in2008 are now driving some furniture production back tothe United States which is very encouraging. It’s obviousthat we’re starting to realize that our society needs to createvalue and manufacture something here. With energycosting more, almost daily, “Outsourcing” is a word that israrely mentioned anymore.The majority of problems that we will face in 2009 willstem from the economic crises that we’ve faced for thepast year. With our close ties to the housing industry andtougher bank regulations, banks are increasingly gettingmore difficult to work with. Lack of available credit willhave a big impact on how lumber companies are able toconduct business. This coincides with production issuesthat we are experiencing in this area this fall. Many millsare unable to finance log and timber purchases, thus creatingsome major supply concerns in a specie that we’renot used to having supply problems in: Poplar! Willdemand finally outpace supply and create some opportunity…Ithink, hope, so….?I can honestly say that I’ve never been bored in thisbusiness! If you like to be challenged this is a great businessto get into. We are looking forward to the challengesthat we face in 2009. Merry Christmas and a Happy andProsperous New Year!Victor BarringerCoastal Lumber CompanyCharlottesville, Va.We do not expect much improvementin 2009, or most of 2010 for that matter.If a variety of the following scenariosoccur, the situation could changesignificantly:1) Standing timber and log decks stayat the same levels. 2) The Lacey Act (atpresstime was due to go into law November 18) has theeffect we hope it will. 3) The Russians follow through ontheir proposed log tax January 1, 2009. 4) The banks continueto implement strict lending standards on our industry.5) We get an up-tick in demand. 6) Situation with ourloggers does not change. We see real potential for a seriouslumber shortage along the Northern Appalachianregion, and it could be 2004 all over again or somethingsimilar.We have ongoing concerns about jobs going to the gasand coal industry as they hire our millwrights, lumberinspectors and loggers along the Appalachian region. Astheir industry expands and ours contracts, it will be difficultto lure those employees back. Along the Appalachianregion we will all have to live with lower log inventories.Our customers seem to be slow as well.I believe in spite of the housing recession, we could all bedoing better right now – if we had been promoting the useof solid American Hardwoods as an industry instead ofleaving it up to a few associations to try to carry the ball.The complete absence of product marketing and positioningby our industry is unprecedented in a business thatPlease turn to page 5232 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


What's on yourwish list?The quality of our lumber willput our name at the top.Established in 1886, Taylor Lumber Incorporated is aleading manufacturer of rift & quarter sawnlumber. Our quality manufactured lumber isproduced from the highest grade Appalachianforest logs, known for their clarity and excellentgrain. Rift & quarter sawn lumber isoffered in the following species: Ash,Cherry, Hard Maple, Red Oak, Walnut,White Oak. Plain sawn lumber is also available. Alllumber is precision-end trimmed,export graded and packaged.At Taylor Lumber, we are committed to providing ourcustomers with consistent quality and efficient service.From our state of the art processing centers to thetalented sales staff of Taylor, we guarantee that ourlumber will satisfy each customer.800.296.6223www.taylorlumberinc.com


OakcrestOpens Tennessee FacilityOakcrest’s new concentration yard in Newport, Tenn.,will give the company access to quality Appalachian Hardwoods.Buena Vista, Ga.— Founded nearly 20 years ago by Wesley Weaver, OakcrestLumber Inc., headquartered here, recently added a new Appalachian Hardwood concentration yardon the outskirts of Newport, Tenn. The long-time desire to operate a facility in the Appalachianregion is finally underway.Rick Cook, general manager forthe Tennessee facility, said thatpresently the new yard has approximately1.5 million board feet ofupper grade Red and White Oak ininventory. Other managementincludes Paul Baker, assistant manager,and Brad Bradley, purchasingmanager for both the Georgia andTennessee operations.The new yard in Tennessee consistsof 160,000 board feet of kilncapacity constructed by SII DryKilns of Lexington, N.C. A newwood-fired boiler system has beeninstalled to provide steam to thenew kilns. A total of six to 10 drykilns are planned in the future.Currently, the 35-acre facilityhouses lumber handling equipmentincluding a grading chain and stackingline designed by FroedgeMachine & Supply Co. Inc. ofTompkinsville, Ky. Also a new25,000-square-foot building hasbeen erected for grading and storageof kiln-dried lumber.Oakcrest currently purchasesgreen No. 2 Common and Better Redand White Oak, Poplar and Ash aswell as multiple truckloads of kilndriedeach month. The flooringgrade lumber is used in the company’sflooring facility, and the uppergrades are sold in both the domesticand export markets.Owned and operated by WesleyWeaver and his two sons, Russelland Roland, Oakcrest Lumber Inc.began manufacturing Hardwoodflooring in December 2004, during aslump in the flooring industry.Today, the company produces roughly55,000 square feet per day of 2-1/4and 3-1/4 strip flooring, 4-inch and5-inch plank flooring and some prefinishedproducts in Red and WhiteOak and Hickory.The company’s state-of-the-artflooring facility in Georgia is housedBY GARY MILLERin a 75,000-square-foot building,which was constructed in early2004. Finished flooring is placed in ahumidity-controlled warehouse,which is attached to the productionfacility.Oakcrest Lumber Inc. manufacturesapproximately 17 millionboard feet of Hardwood lumber andproduces approximately 14 millionsquare feet of Hardwood flooringannually. The Georgia facility hasan average Hardwood lumber inventoryof 5 million board feet and has600,000 board feet of kiln capacity.The operation also houses a planeroperation, which includes aNewman planer, straight-line ripcapability and width sorting. Theoperation preps lumber for eitherdomestic or export shipments.Roughly 40 percent of the firm’sband mill production is absorbed byOakcrest Hardwood Flooring, a divi-Please turn to page 6434 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


Russell Weaver, Kevin and Bobby Cloer and Roland Weaver all work to help makeOakcrest Lumber Inc. and Oakcrest Flooring the great success that both these companiesare today.Pictured is the stacker and maintenance building at the company’sTennessee facility.Oakcrest Flooring recently installed this new wood-fired boilerto provide steam for its new kilns.Rick Cook is the general manager of Oakcrest Lumber Inc.’s new Hardwood lumber concentration yardin Newport, Tenn., while Paul Baker is the assistant general manager. The two new SII Dry Kilnsinstalled at this yard are in the background.Cameron Elliott is the lumberyard manager and Jim DeBaise is the sawmillmanager at Oakcrest Lumber Inc.’s Buena Vista, Ga., band mill operation.The Tennessee yard consists of 160,000 board feet of kiln capacity constructed bySII Dry Kilns of Lexington, N.C. The kilns above, which are located in BuenaVista, Ga. were also made by SII Dry Kilns.This is a view of the kiln-dried storage, lumber grading and lumber receivingfacility in Newport, Tenn.CHRISTMAS/2008 35


Moore Forest Makes TheGrade In HardwoodsBY WAYNE MILLER❝ We sell strictlyon grade, andwe’re verycareful to makethat grade right.We do a good jobof edging ourlumber and alllumber is doubleend trimmed atthe sawmill. Weoffer kiln drying,S2S and rail,truck andcontainershipments. Weput up greatlooking packs oflumber for ourcustomers. ❞Kensett, Ark.—For more than 30 years, MooreForest Products Inc., headquarteredhere, has provided precision manufacturedHardwood lumber, switch tiesand other forest products to customerslocated throughout the United States.Jerry Moore has a long history in theforest products industry that includespulpwooding and logging with hisfather in east Texas. Jerry also workedfor International Paper Co. (IP) formany years before getting his ownpulpwood dealership at Judsonia, Ark.,with IP in 1966. This led to a relationshipwith a man named Fred Beamanwhom Jerry sold Hardwood logs to thathe procured with pulpwood he bought.Moore Forest Products Inc. was establishedin November 1976 when JerryMoore bought Fred Beaman LumberCo. from Fred Beaman (it was a smalltie mill).Jerry’s son, Steve Moore, who todayserves as president, joined the companyupon graduating from theUniversity of Arkansas in Monticello.Steve said, “When I graduated fromthe University of Arkansas in May1977, I came to work here the nextday.”Steve, who has a bachelor’s degreein forestry, is actually a third generationworking in the forest productsindustry as his grandfather owned apulpwood business in east Texas.Moore Forest Products Inc., which islocated on 28 acres just east of Searcy,Ark., manufactures 8 million boardfeet of 4/4 grade lumber, 4x6 cants andswitch ties in Red and White Oak, SapGum, Poplar, Hackberry, Elm, Ash,Soft Maple and cypress.Steve said the company procures itslogs from within a 130-mile radius ofKensett. A majority of the timber ispurchased as tracts that Moore ForestProducts pays contractors to log. Theremainder is bought as “gatelogs”according to their grade from otherloggers.“In 1977, when I came to work here,a long haul to obtain logs was 30–– Steve Moore, president,Moore Forest Products Inc.Key employees at Moore Forest Products include TerryDees, vice president and general manager; Steve Moore,president; and Mitch Moore, Steve’s son, sales and officecontroller.Moore Forest Products operates three Spears dry kilns,which have a total capacity of 210,000 board feet.36 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


miles,” he said. “Today, we have to goout 130 miles because of the dwindlingsupply of timber.”In addition to availability, Steve saidthe biggest challenge in the marketplacetoday is buying logs at a reasonableprice. “Log prices have not followedthe lumber market, at least notin the South,” he said. “There’s alwayssome company that’s holding pricesup. If you try to lower prices, you won’tget any logs at all. We’re paying toomuch for ourlogs and notgettingenough forour lumber.”When logsfirst arrivein Kensett,they areunloaded byone of two950 Caterpillarfrontendloadersto the logscaler, which scales and grades thelogs. Moore Forest Products utilizes aHMC debarker, Corley carriage with ascanner and a six-foot McDonoughheadrig with “six-foot wheels and a 7-foot opening.”“Six-foot wheels and a 7-foot openingmeans the wheels are further apart,and it requires a longer saw to completethe job,” Steve said. “The longeryour saw is, the longer it’s going tolast.”The Corley carriage cuts the logsinto lumber and large cants. The cantsare then sent to the computerizedCorley linebar resaw. There is a sixfootKockums band at the linebar,which cuts grade lumber, ties andcants.Steve said he has a lot of Corleyequipment in his operation becauseit’s a “superior product and offersgreat service.”Moore Forest Products operatesthree Spearsdry kilns,which have atotal capacityof 210,000board feet.However, onlyone is currentlyoperating,“becausethere is not alarge enoughprice spreadbetweengreen andkiln-dried lumber to pay the extra costof kiln drying,” Steve said. “Runningone kiln costs about the same as threekilns cost three years ago. This iswhen we look back and say we wish wehad put in a waste-fired boiler yearsago.”Steve said the success of MooreForest Products Inc. has been based onthe hard work of its employees and theThis is an aerial view of Moore Forest Products Inc.’s headquarters in Kensett,Ark.Please turn to page 66The company uses a unique chip pile loading system tostore its wood waste.This is a picture of some Oak lumber air drying in the yard.CHRISTMAS/2008 37


Forest Preservation TopsHMARegional AgendaBY TERRY MILLERManchester, N.H.– Members of the Hardwood Manufacturers Association (HMA) convenedat The Highlander Inn & Conference Center, located here, to hear tips about conserving forestsduring the organization’s Northeast Regional Meeting.Jane Difley, president/forester for the Society for the Preservation of New Hampshire Forests,addressed the group about “Conserving the Forest Reserve.” Difley discussed ways that NewHampshire’s oldest and largest land trust works with landowners, foresters and loggers to protect theworking forests that generate the wood resource that supports the forest economy.Attendees also toured several facilities, including Abenaki Timber Corp., Northland Forest ProductsInc., Holt & Bugbee Co., New England Wood Pellet, HHP Inc. and the Society for the Protection of NewHampshire Forests.The HMA also hosted a dinner and reception during the two-day meeting.The Hardwood Manufacturers Association is the only national trade organization with membership limitedto Hardwood sawmills and lumber concentration yards located in the United States.HMA is a member-driven association, providing member companies with peer networks, state-of-theartinformation, 21 st Century management tools and American Hardwood promotion campaigns.The HMA offices are located in Pittsburgh, Pa. For more information, call 412-829-0770.•1238 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


435601. Dave Marshall, American Hardwood Industries Inc., Cromwell, Conn.;Dave Paige and Dan Harrison, Cersosimo Lumber Co. Inc.,Brattleboro, Vt.; and Jeff Hanks, Bill Hanks Lumber Co. Inc.,Danbury, N.C.02. Jeff Manges, Cole Hardwood Inc., Logansport, Ind.; Rick Smrcka,Wolf River Lumber Inc., New London, Wis.; Angie Capper, PikeLumber Co. Inc., Akron, Ind.; and Bob Miller, Frank Miller LumberCo. Inc., Union City, Ind.03. Phil Mann, Cersosimo Lumber Co. Inc., Brattleboro, Vt.; LuannLafreniere, New England Wood Pellet LLC, Acton, Mass.; Eric Porter,Abenaki Timber Corp., Kingston, N.H.; Michael Cersosimo, CersosimoLumber Co. Inc.; and Tony Messina, Frank Miller Lumber Co. Inc.,Union City, Ind.04. Charlie Niebling, New England Wood Pellet LLC, Jaffrey, N.H; LukeBrogger, Quality Hardwoods Ltd., Sunfield, Mich.; and StephenLumbra, Lumbra Hardwoods Inc., Milo, Maine705. Mark Williams, Jerry G. Williams & Sons Inc., Smithfield, N.C.; JeffHanks, Bill Hanks Lumber Co. Inc., Danbury, N.C.; and Scott Shaffer,Bingaman & Son Lumber Inc., Kreamer, Pa.06. Dennis Carrier, Kennebec Lumber Co., Solon, Maine; Natalie Crane,HHP Inc., Henniker, N.H.; and Fred Doane, Northland ForestProducts Inc., Kingston, N.H.07. Richard Carrier, HHP Inc., Henniker, N.H.; Deb Hawkinson,Hardwood Federation, Washington, D.C.; Norman Langlois, PHLIndustries Inc., St. Ephrem-de-Beauce, Que.; and Jimmy Jones, J.E.Jones Lumber Co., New Bern, N.C.08. Michael Cersosimo, Cersosimo Lumber Co. Inc., Brattleboro, Vt.; LeeStitzinger, BWP Hardwoods Inc., Brookville, Pa.; Scott Ferland,Cersosimo Lumber Co. Inc., Brattleboro, Vt.; Drew Helmus, PWHardwood LLC, Brookville, Pa.; and Terry Miller, National HardwoodMagazine, Memphis, Tenn.Additional photos on page 488CHRISTMAS/2008 39


Hardwood Federation Fly -Washington, D.C.– Representatives of the Hardwood industry recently participated in the HardwoodFederation’s 5 th Annual Fly-In on Capitol Hill. Fifteen states were represented by the 30 industry delegates who listened toCongressional leaders address issues pertaining to forest products. They were also afforded an opportunity to meet with theselegislators personally.Hardwood Federation (HF) members met with more than 20 Congressional leaders to exchange information about such topicsas illegal logging legislation, truck weight limts, green building standards and alternative energy and carbon credits.Receptions for both Republican and Democrat candidates were hosted by the Hardwood Federation’s Political ActionCommittee (HFPAC). HFPAC has raised $210,000 and actively supports several candidates seeking federal office.•2134540 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


-In’s A Run-Away SuccessPHOTOS BY SCOTT HENRICHSEN76981001. Terry Brennan, Baillie Lumber Co., Hamburg, N.Y.; and Ben Forester, RexLumber Co., Windsor, Conn.02. Brian Hawkinson, guest; Dave Bramlage, Cole Hardwood Inc., Logansport,Ind.; Deb Hawkinson, Hardwood Federation, Washington, D.C.; Ray Moistner,Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen’s Assoc., Indianapolis, Ind.; and John Brown,Pike Lumber Co. Inc., Akron, Ind.03. Tim Leyden, Frank Miller Lumber Co. Inc., Union City, Ind.; Ted Rossi,American Hardwood Industries Inc., Cromwell, Conn.; Grace Terpstra,Hardwood Federation, Washington, D.C.; Criswell Davis, Frank MillerLumber Co. Inc.; and Gil Thurm, Hardwood Manufacturers Assoc.,Pittsburgh, Pa.04. Jim Howard, Atlanta Hardwood Corp., Mableton, Ga.; Dave Redmond, HighlandHardwood Sales Inc., Augusta, Ga.; and Mark Vollinger, W.M. Cramer Lumber Co., Hickory, N.C.05. Don Finkell, Anderson Hardwood Floors, Clinton, S.C.; and John Clark, Kitchens Bros. Manufacturing Co. Inc., Hazlehurst, Miss.06. Gil Thurm, Hardwood Manufacturers Assoc., Pittsburgh, Pa.; Jack Shannon, J.T. Shannon Lumber Co. Inc., Memphis, Tenn.; and VictorBarringer, Coastal Lumber Co., Charlottesville, Va.07. Roy Cummings, Cummings Lumber Co. Inc., Troy, Pa.; and Tom Inman, Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers Inc. (AHMI), High Point, N.C.08. Kip Howlett, Hardwood Plywood & Veneer Assoc., Reston, Va.; and Brad Thompson, Columbia Forest Products Inc., Greensboro, N.C.09. Jameson French, Northland Forest Products Inc., Kingston, N.H.; and Sen. John Sununu, (R-N.H.)10. Tom Inman, AHMI, High Point, N.C.; and Donna Reckart, Allegheny Wood Products, Petersburg, W.Va.CHRISTMAS/2008 41


Truth About Trees TravelsTo San FranciscoBY TERRY MILLERSan Francisco, Calif.– Truth About Trees, a presentation of the HardwoodForest Foundation (HFF) and recently sponsored by MacBeath Hardwood Co. and SweeneyHardwoods, was warmly received by 50 students attending Leonard R. Flynn ElementarySchool, located here.The program was presented in conjunction with the National Hardwood Lumber Association’sAnnual Convention & Exhibit Showcase. The program teaches children that harvesting treesis not always harmful to the environment and explores items that are partially comprised oftree products. The students also toured the milling facility at MacBeath Hardwood Co.The HFF Annual Silent Auction was also held during the NHLA convention. The HFF raisedover $12,000 with this auction at the 2007 convention.Additionally, the HFF Annual Golf Tournament took place at the Presidio Golf Course & ClubHouse. It was presented by North Pacific.Winners of the tournament were: first place, Joe and Matt Lang, Rick Degen, Al Whitson Jr.;second place, Lynne Barker, Roy Reif, Chip Dickinson, Jeff Kelly; third place, Russell Kelly,Douglas Martin, Brian Walsh and Dennis Reid.HFF offices are located in Memphis, Tenn. For more information, call 901-507-0312.•Norm Murray, of U•C Coatings Corp., Buffalo. N.Y., and Jay Clark, of North Pacific, Portland, Ore. address children from Leonard R. FlynnElementary School during the Hardwood Forest Foundation’s Truth About Trees presentation at the NHLA Convention in San Francisco.42 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


Baillie’s Herskind Addresses Annual NHLA MeetingPHOTOS BY WAYNE MILLERSan Francisco, Calif.– During the annual National HardwoodLumber Assoc. convention held here recently, members of the Fellowship ofChristian Lumbermen (FCL) gathered in observance of their annual meeting.Guest speaker this year was Mark Herskind, Baillie Lumber Co., who gavea testimony of faith and discussed how he personally puts “faith into action.”Harry Jacobs, from The Jacobs Team, opened the meeting with prayer andWayde Day, FCL board of directors member, welcomed attendees and presentedan overview of the FCL.A business meeting was part of the agenda as well. Meeting sponsors wereAWMV Industrial Products, Freedom Forest Products, Hardwood MarketReport, Quality Hardwoods and Sitco Lumber.FCL is headquartered in Central Point, Ore. For more information, contactChris Martinson at 920-850-9406 or visit the organization’s website atwww.christianlumbermen.com.•George and Gary Swaner, Swaner Hardwood Co., Burbank, Calif.; George Crawford, SomersetWood Products, Somerset, Ky.; and Terry Stockdale, BWP Hardwoods, Brookville, Pa.David Hopper, Hardwoods Inc. of Alabama, Alabaster, Ala.; Steve Jones,Ron Jones Hardwood Sales Inc., Union City, Pa.; and Vince Catarella,Baillie Lumber Co., Hamburg, N.Y.CHRISTMAS/2008 43


WCMA Meets For FallConference, Plant TourWaterloo, Iowa– A total of 183 WCMA members,technology partners, and plant tour hosts participated in the recentWood Component Manufacturers Association’s (WCMA) 2008 FallConference & Plant Tour Event, held here. This year’s event offered aunique opportunity for roundtable discussions, contact tables with technologypartners, and tours of leading manufacturing facilities.The WCMA’s Fall Conference kicked off with WCMA members andtechnology partners participating in several roundtable discussions toshare ideas and experiences on important topics to component manufacturers.These topics included: lean manufacturing, chain of custodycertification, new technologies and innovations, and moulding and tooling.During its membership meeting, WCMA members elected PaulEastman of Kane Hardwood, Kane, Pa., and Tim McIntyre of Thos.Moser Cabinetmakers, Auburn, Maine, to serve on the WCMA board ofdirectors. Barry Freiburger of George Guenzler & Sons Inc., Kitchener,Please turn to page 67WCMA members elected Paul Eastman of Kane Hardwood, Kane,Pa., and Tim McIntyre of Thos. Moser Cabinetmakers, Auburn,Maine, to serve 3-year terms on the WCMA board of directors.Season’s Greetings from:Manufacturer of Fine Appalachian Bandsawn HardwoodsShed Dried, USNR Kiln Dried & GreenClinton GoodmanLumber SalesRed OakAshHard MapleWhite OakPoplarCherryFAITHFUL SERVICE & QUALITY THROUGH THE YEARS8574 STATE ROUTE 131HICKORY, KENTUCKY 42051TEL: 270-658-3193clintongoodman@goodmanlumber.comcaseygoodman@goodmanlumber.comCasey GoodmanLumber Sales44 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


Barry Freiburger of George Guenzler & Sons, Kitchener, Ont., is honored for hisservice on the WCMA board of directors by WCMA President Chris Watson ofConestoga Wood Specialties Corp., East Earl, Pa.WCMA members observe the laminating system for cabinet doors and parts usedby Bertch Cabinet Mfg. Co. during a recent tour of that facility in Waterloo, Iowa.Plant Tour attendees observe lumber sorting operation at Kendrick ForestProducts in Edgewood, Iowa.Rhonda Kendrick of Kendrick Forest Products shows the firm’s cabinet operationto WCMA members.C HALLENG E USDON’T GIVE US YOUR BUSINESS...LET US SHOW YOUHOW WE’LL EARN ITMIXED LOADS bothdomestic and imported species.DELIVERY we’re committed todelivering product when and whereyou need it.IMPORTS most popular Africanand South American species.CUSTOM GRADES for avariety of applications. We willwork with you to improve youryield.SERVICE years of experience,the right technologies and the rightresources to help you succeed.AMERICAN LUMBER COMPANY / PHONE: 814.438.7888 / 888.438.7888 / FAX: 814.438.3086 / E-MAIL: INQUIRY@ALUMBER.COM / WWW.ALUMBER.COMCHRISTMAS/2008 45


Kretz LumberMarvels At Ancient LogsAntigo, Wis.– Two semi-loads ofancient logs have been pulled from a one-time bogin Wisconsin’s Crocker Hills, and Kretz LumberCompany, based here, which prides itself on usingeverything but the shadow of the trees it processes,isn’t letting them go to waste.Before a large invited crowd at its recent ForestryField Day, the sawmill processed several of theancient specimens into usable—and very durable—lumber.“At least we don’t have to worry about hitting anail in one of these,” Kretz forester Dennis Finchersaid as the portable sawmill, operated by MattKorbisch, cut through the ancient wood.The activity took place at the mill’s 11th annualfield day, designed for members of the Kretz ForestFamily, along with vendors and guests, to browsedisplays and demonstrations and review the latestissues in forest and environmental management.Spectators crowded close once each cut was complete,examining the excellent quality and conditionof the timber. Sections of the logs were fashionedinto ornaments available for purchase, eachwith a certificate of age and authenticity.There was more at the field day as well, includingdemonstrations on log grading and scaling, landmapping, tiki carving and bowl turning, horses andharnesses, surveying and global positioning systems,forest foods, and wildlife painting.Attendees also had the opportunity to tour themoulding, sawmill and dimension plants and takeguided walks through the Ray Kretz IndustrialForest.Guest speakers were Evan McDonald ofKeweenaw Land Trust and Joe Hovel of Partnersin Forestry, who discussed the effects of forestPlease turn to page 69Season’s Greetings fromDJM Hardwoods & VeneerCyBlair Lumber LLCDJM Hardwoods and Veneer is owned and operated by David J. McCunn. David has over 25 years of experience in the lumberindustry. DJM has 4 separate locations for purchasing veneer and saw logs such as: Cherry, Red & White Oak, Hard &Soft Maple, Walnut and Poplar for export or domestic use.DJM Hardwoods and Veneer has built a solid reputation for high quality veneer logs and finely manufactured lumber.Outstanding service and satisfaction keeps our customers coming back for more!P.O. Box 26McArthur, Ohio 45651McArthur, OH: (740) 596-8411Oak Hill, OH: (740) 682-9232Gallipolis Ferry, WV:(304) 675-5159Milton, WV: (304) 743-8441Website: www.djmhardwoods.comE-mail: info@djmhardwoods.com46 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


The crowd gathers close to look at the 1,600-yearoldlogs as they are milled at Kretz LumberCompany’s Forestry Field Day.Kretz Lumber Company Head Forester Al Koeppel presentsa senior logger award to Harold and EdithJohnson of Clintonville. Johnson is still logging—andworking with Kretz—after decades in the business.we combine thebest PEOPLEwith the bestRESOURCESour valuesAt Baillie, one of our values isto pursue excellence tenaciously.One way we dothat is by providing ourcustomers with highquality lumber andgreat service at aand createfair price. By pursuingexcellence everyLUMBERday, we provide realvalue for our customers.SOLUTIONSTHAT WORKPictured left to right:Jeff Meyer, Don Meyer, Jim Dillsit’s not just a product...it’s a solutionBaillie Lumber Co. / P.O. Box 6 / Hamburg, NY 14075 / 800-950-2850 / Fax 716-649-2811 / www.baillie.comCHRISTMAS/2008 47


HMA PHOTOS - Continued from page 39Adam Calvert, Dwight Lewis Lumber Co., Hillsgrove, Pa.; Lise Lennonand Bruce Horner, Abenaki Timber Corp., Kingston, N.H.; and MarcLewis, Dwight Lewis Lumber Co.Phil and Roger Pierce, Holt & Bugbee Co., Tewksbury, Mass.; and SteveFrench, Abenaki Timber Corp., Kingston, N.H.Russ D’Elia, HHP Inc., Henniker, N.H.; Bill Collins, Holt & Bugbee Co.,Tewksbury, Mass.; Jim Howard, Atlanta Hardwood Corp., Mableton, Ga.;Jane Difley, guest speaker, Society for the Protection of New HampshireForests, Concord, N.H.; and Parker Boles, Hermitage HardwoodLumber Sales Inc., Cookeville, Tenn.Skipper Beal, Beal Lumber Co. Inc., Little Mountain, S.C.; JaredFowler, Emporium Hardwoods, Emporium, Pa.; Linda Jovanovich,HMA, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Dave Marshall, American Hardwood IndustriesInc., Cromwell, Conn.; and Keith Snider, Graham Lumber Co. LLC,Linden, Tenn.2914 Professional ParkwaySuite AAugusta, GA 30907(706) 724-22531-800-241-3370FAX: 1-800-673-3720Charles “Lindy” Markland, Vice-chairman; Bob Moore, Chairman ofthe Board/CEO; and Dave Redmond, President/COOFor Quality Appalachian, Northern and/or Southern Hardwood lumber,contact Highland Hardwood Sales, Inc.Our people make the difference.When you’re seeking a reliable, consistent source for awide range of species and thicknesses of Hardwood lumberfor the domestic and/or export market, count on the peopleat Highland as your partners.Our people have the right combination of information,technology and market knowledge you need. We’re flexible,respond quickly and give you the personal service andattention you deserve.The relationship we have built with our present customersand suppliers has helped our first 20 years of being in businesstruly enjoyable and rewarding. We are confidently lookingforward to our next 20 years.Hugh PickettSalesRobbie ParrottSalesBrad MerrySalesMike FlemingSales48 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


HMA PHOTOS - ContinuedJameson French, Northland Forest Products, Kingston, N.H.; TerryBrennan, president, HMA, Baillie Lumber Co., Hamburg, N.Y.; and JimWoodberry, PW Hardwood LLC, Brookville, Pa.Hugh Hawley, McDonough Manufacturing Co., Eau Claire, Wis.; PemJenkins, Turn Bull Lumber Co., Elizabethtown, N.C.; and Phil Pierce,Holt & Bugbee Co., Tewksbury, Mass.Dan Mathews, SII Dry Kilns, Lexington, N.C.; Deb Hawkinson, Tina Radigan, Abenaki Timber Corp., Kingston, N.H.; Terry Miller,Hardwood Federation, Washington, D.C.; Scott Cummings, Cummings National Hardwood Magazine, Memphis, Tenn.; and Nikki BeuschelLumber Co. Inc., Troy, Pa.; Tina Radigan, Abenaki Timber Corp., and Lise Lennon, Abenaki Timber Corp.Kingston, N.H.; and Gil Thurm, Hardwood Manufacturers Assoc.,Pittsburgh, Pa.Additional photos on next pageAn eye for profitability.NEW!Stacker• Designed to stack random widthand random length material• Integrated “floor level” incline• Even-ended, even-sided stacking• Left- and right-handmachines available• Compact user friendlycontrols are mountedto the stackerRipmaster• Fenceless ripping for superior yields• For fixed or moveable blade rip saws• Detailed, accurate production reports• Improved speed, yield and throughput• Stores history for simulation and vendorcomparisonNEW!Talon Cutoff Saw• Greater speed and accuracy forincreased yield and throughput• State-of-the-art control system• Superior optimization• Intuitive touch screen interface• Accurate and custom reporting• Compact, space-efficient andreliable, all controls are mountedto the sawSharp Thinking.422 Dutch Valley Drive, NE • Sugarcreek, OH 44681 • Phone: 330.852.1300 • 877.744.9447 • www.eaglemachines.comCHRISTMAS/2008 49


HMA PHOTOS - ContinuedCraig Myers, Pennsylvania Lumbermens Mutual Insurance Co.,Philadelphia, Pa.; Steve Jones, Ron Jones Hardwood Sales Inc., UnionCity, Pa.; Greg Devine, Abenaki Timber Corp., Kingston, N.H.; andSheila Michaud, Pennsylvania Lumbermens Mutual Insurance Co.Gil Thurm, HMA, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Parker Boles, Hermitage HardwoodLumber Sales Inc., Cookeville, Tenn.; Eric Porter, Abenaki TimberCorp., Kingston, N.H.; and Tim Kuhns, Kuhns Brothers Lumber Co. Inc.,Lewisburg, Pa.Peter McCarty, McDonough ManufacturingCo., Eau Claire, Wis.; Luke Brogger, QualityHardwoods Inc., Sunfield, Mich.; and RobKittle, McDonough Manufacturing Co.Dave Paige, Cersosimo Lumber Co.,Brattleboro, Vt.; Larry Thompson, T & SHardwoods Inc., Milledgeville, Ga.; andJordan McIlvain, Alan McIlvain Co., MarcusHook, Pa.Weld and Gordon McIlvain, Alan McIlvainCo., Marcus Hook, Pa.; and Matt Begley,Begley Lumber Co. Inc., London, Ky.50 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


HMA PHOTOS - ContinuedSkipper Beal, Beal Lumber Co. Inc., Little Mountain, S.C.; GordonMcIlvain, Alan McIlvain Co., Marcus Hook, Pa.; Dave Marshall,American Hardwood Industries Inc., Cromwell, Conn.; and AndyGodzinski, Rex Lumber Co., Acton, Mass.Tim Kuhns, Kuhns Bros. Lumber Co. Inc., Lewisburg, Pa.; TomArmentano, Sirianni Hardwoods Inc., Painted Post, N.Y.; and RodWeaver, Dick Kordez and Mark Bittner, Kuhns Bros. Lumber Co. Inc.Bob Pope, USNR, Woodland, Wash.; RonMonnoyer, PW Hardwood LLC, Brookville,Pa.; and Peter Miles, Northland ForestProducts Inc., Kingston, N.H.Jim Howard, Atlanta Hardwood Corp.,Mableton, Ga.; and Marc Kendrew andDennis Carrier, Kennebec Lumber Co.,Solon, MaineMatt Begley, Begley Lumber Co. Inc.,London, Ky.; Dave Doucette, Rex LumberCo., Englishtown, N.J.; and John Patterson,Begley Lumber Co. Inc. CONTACT: JOHN OR MARCUS HAWKINSON,TONY GEIGER CHRISTMAS/2008 51


All of us atLiberty Lumber CompanyJoin in Wishingyou and yoursa joyous holiday season!FORECASTS - Continued from page 32sells a product, particularly one that is out of favor. Everyhousewife, architect and designer in the world should bescrambling to use American Hardwoods in our culturethat reveres “designer brands” and feels compelled to buy“green” even when they both cost more than the averageproduct.We do not engage in illegal logging, our product is a sustainableresource from inception and it takes only sunlightand rain to grow and prosper. Yet we have allowedother industries to win over many of our consumer markets,and environmental organizations to paint us as thebad guys. We have been outmaneuvered and out marketedso now the consumer believes that OSB, bamboo andmany other products are better suited environmentally.We have squandered our primary advantage as the originaland ultimate “green” product.I am looking at the September issue of an industry publication(between September-November), and I can counttwelve industry gatherings. Not a single one has a promotionof solid American Hardwoods on their agenda,although one plans to update members on “what’s new”with promotion. If you annualize this over the year, itcomes to 48 such meetings in a given year. They probablyaverage two days per meeting so that comes close to 100days of meetings per year with hardly any discussion overthe promotion of what we produce as an industry. It isalmost as if we are not in the business of selling a product.This money and time could have gone to the promotion of“Solid American Hardwoods,” a campaign in which allships rise with the tide!As I have said before, the story of our industry’s inability/unwillingnessto adapt to the changing desires of themarket place will be a textbook topic in America’s businessschools one day. In the midst of a fundamental shift in consumerbuying preferences (buy green) and disappearingmarkets (overseas and substitutes), we have been sittingon the sidelines at meeting after meeting promoting ourselvesto each other or competing with each other. Theindustry exceptions to this are AHEC and the HardwoodFederation, whose missions are focused, all business andend-result driven. From our perspective the party is over.Where do we go from here? The status quo is not servingany of us well anymore.On Behalf of Coastal Lumber Company – MerryChristmas and may your New Year be prosperous!Wendell M. CramerW.M. Cramer Lumber CompanyHickory, N.C.Liberty Lumber Co. Inc.“Supplying Distributors Nationwide”Liberty Lumber Co.9979 Old Liberty Rd.P.O. Box 535Liberty, NC 27298Phone: 336-622-4901 Fax: 336-622-3686Contact: Jim Skiver, Tom Wright or Donnie TurnerThe biggest problem the Hardwoodlumber industry is facing today is nodemand! The pipeline is full and movingextremely slow. In trying to put itinto some perspective on a scale of 1 to10, the current usage is about 2 andproduction is about 1-1/2! While contendingwith no demand, the prices are the next big challenge.The most troubling predicament is no optimism in sightfor 2009. The ongoing decline in lumber sales will in allprobability continue through the first quarter of 2010 –maybe longer.Most of our customers are experiencing the slow businessas we are, and doing their best to cope with the downfallin sales. High fuel cost continues to be an upset forbottom line margins and absorbing those costs.We do not plan on expanding any of our facilities. Our52 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


FORECASTS - Continuedcompany is holding steady and enduring the storm as successfulas possible, which I see lasting at least 6 months to2 years.Let us give some foresight to better economical days, beprepared for all upcoming challenges, and continue to serviceour customers’ needs to the best of our abilities.Hopefully, we will see a turn around in the near future!Tommy MaxwellMaxwell Hardwood Flooring Inc.Monticello, Ark.We expect the business forecast for2009 to be about the same as 2008.However we hope to see a slight upturnby mid-year. The biggest problems wecan forecast would be a continued slowmarket and a lagging economy duringthe early part of the year. Hopefullythis will improve by early summer 2009.Bud GriffithGriffith Lumber Co. Inc.Woolwine, Va.We are all cautiously optimistic hereat Griffith Lumber. Timber availabilityis difficult along with fuel costs.Lumber prices are too low while timberand manufacturing prices are too high.One positive aspect is that we are startingto see Poplar lumber prices come upa little.On the timber side of business a lot of loggers are retiringand younger men aren’t coming into the business fastenough to replace those who are retiring. You see a lot ofyounger guys pursuing other careers rather than harvestingtimber. Equipment and insurance are expensive andit’s hard to buy timber.We hope for an uptick in business around the spring of2009. Of course, a big factor in whether the lumber businessgets better has to do with the housing market gettingstronger. From the people I’ve talked to, we are hoping theeconomy begins to turn around for the better in the spring.We are afraid it will not improve until 2010. Many of us inthe lumber business have gone through a tough year andwe’ll probably have to go through one more.The stacking stick business has been slow. The closing ofso many furniture manufacturing companies has adverselyaffected stick sales. The housing industry affects thesouthern yellow pine mills and those folks make up about60 percent of our stick sales. Lumber inventories are lowall across the United States and when that occurs, southernyellow pine sawmillers don’t need a lot of sticks. If wecould keep supply and demand in the lumber industry inbalance and people don’t over produce again, things willbalance out and prices of lumber and sticks will stay at alevel where everyone can make a profit. Our business willpick up when housing and the grade lumber market picksup. We are patiently waiting for that to happen.In the meantime, here at Griffith Lumber Co., we arekeeping overtime down and we’re making managementdecisions to help keep our company healthy even in thisslow economy. We are in the process of installing a moulderat our stick plant to make an improved profile stackingstick and for other value added lumber products. AlsoPlease turn the pageCHRISTMAS/2008 53


THE RENEWABLERESOURCEAtreeisGod’screationeverywhereon earth - includingBrooklyn.It’s said man oncelived in trees. When heclimbed down, life neveragain was to be quite sosimple...yet only then did thetree get truly appreciated. Forhere was food and fuel and shelter.Then a weapon, a tool, a wheel - andtransportation. And now it’s floors, doors,veneers, piers, baskets, caskets...rubber forgaskets. It’s a handle for brooms, shovels, rakes...syrup on pancakes. It’s paper and paints...tars, spars, boxes and boxcars...storage bins andbowling pins. It’s toothpicks and matchsticks...evenplastics...material for distillation, lamination, insulation,windows for ventilation, and a thousand and one otherwe-can’t-do-withouts. Yet few people look at a tree in the sameway. To the small boy it’s a favorite and strategic place...where you build a treehouse, spot a woodpecker,cut slingshots and fishpoles, hang old tires andclimb for fun. To the naturalist it’s probing a fascinating world of buds,blossoms, bark, needles, cones and leaves...spectacles of color...and some 1,035 domestic species. (Yet to a baseball player it’s as simple as astick of second-growth ash, sized and shaped to “feel like a million.”) To the artistit’s inspiration...alone on a windswept hill, timberline patchwork on a mountainside,thick and verdant in a valley. To the homeowner it’s beauty and shade and propertyvalue...also digging, planting, pruning, edging, feeding and a lot of other weekend work.To the hobbyist and craftsman it’s a new bookcase, picnic table, paneled den, plywoodshelves...a chance to become downright “immortal.” To the timberman it’s a bustling bigbusiness, measured by cords and board feet. But most of all, a tree remains whatit was in the firstplace...man’sever-lasting friend.For we’d sure be“stumped” for amighty lot ofthings in a worldwithout trees!There is no substitute for FineAppalachian HardwoodsThe Fifth Generation Family OwnedBusiness with Customer Satisfactionas our primary concernNEFF LUMBER MILLS, INC.P.O. Box 457 Broadway, VA 22815540-896-7031 Fax: 540-896-7034E-mail: neflum@aol.comMarijo WoodSales ManagerFORECASTS - Continuedwe are installing two dry kilns with a combined capacityof 140,000 board foot per charge that will be furnishedsteam by a wood fired boiler. The kilns and boiler shouldbe operating in early 2009.I want to take this opportunity to wish everyone in thelumber industry a Merry Christmas and a Happy NewYear.Philip A. BibeauWood Products ManufacturersAssociationWestminster, Mass.Our forecast for 2009 is that businesswill continue to be a struggle, but therewill be business for those that are willingto work for it. We also feel thatthere will be new opportunities forcompanies to recapture business thathad once been sent overseas. We are hearing from moreand more companies that are currently having productsmanufactured in Asia, but are now seeking to have themmade in North America. The reason for this change canbe attributed to three specific factors; the first being thedrop in the dollar, the second being increased oceanfreight rates and the constant re-scheduling of containers,and the third and most important factor is the severe dropin quality of imported products.This is a perfect opportunity for manufacturers to focuson the things they can control, quality and prompt deliveries.There will always be people interested in offeringan extremely low price, but successful businesses arestarting to realize that they must become integral partnerswith their suppliers if they are going to survive andprosper. The companies that are able to say “yes, we cando that” and then find a way to do it, on time and aspromised, will see their business expand in 2009.Our members are forecasting a year that shows between2-6 percent growth. The majority of this will be derivedfrom providing new or additional product to existing customers,with a small percentage attributed to new business.The majority of the new business will come fromproviding products or services to companies that have hadtheir current suppliers change focus or exit the industry.The balance of the new growth will come from manufacturersthat have thought “out of the box” and created newvalue added items. All members have stated emphaticallythat they have increased their sales and marketing effortsand are working harder than ever for the orders they areable to write.As an association, the biggest challenge we face in 2009is getting members to take advantage of all the programsand services made available to them. With businessbeing as challenging as it is, companies are often so busyjuggling multiple tasks that they forget to reach out andutilize the benefits that are available to them. To addressthis need, the WPMA will continue to strengthen our“member reach” program to constantly focus on the needsof our members. The feedback from the “member reach”program was instrumental in the association offering adiscounted accounts receivable insurance programthrough our partnership with Euler Hermes. It also ledto the expansion of our cash back business insurance safetygroup program with our partner Indiana LumbermensMutual Insurance (ILM). Participants in the programwill be able to receive up to 10 percent of their annual premiumsif the safety group has a good year. Being a memberdriven association, we are constantly looking for ways54 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


FORECASTS - Continuedto reinvent ourselves to be able to offer programs and servicesthat help solve member problems and improve thebottom line.In 2009 the wood industry will continue to see changeand evolution. Companies that are producing productsfor the consumer market will continue to see fewer dollarsavailable for discretionary income. Those that do havefunds to spend will be looking for the best value for theirdollar and an item that will possibly serve more than onefunction. The upcoming year will be one in which successfulbusinesses take a long hard look at what they produceand who they sell to. Companies that have beenproducing commodity type items will see business muchharder to come by. It has been said over and over thatpeople should focus on producing niche products thatmight not be available in large quantities, but repeatoften. In order to do this, companies must continue tofocus on lean manufacturing and extremely fast turnaround times. They must take the “yes we can attitude.”Those that do, will be around in 2010, those that do notwill be featured in an auction flyer.Tom InmanAppalachian HardwoodManufacturers Inc.High Point, N.C.The most reliable way to forecast thefuture is to try to understand the present.An attempt to heed John Naisbitt’sadvice and understand 2008 is adaunting task. The housing crisis, thecredit failures, the stock market collapse, and the U.S.government bailout all have had a profound impact on allbusiness in 2008.The Hardwood lumber industry was hurt by these alongwith energy costs and declining markets. AmericanHardwood lumber production dropped substantially in2008 and the second half of the year found most sawmillsat below normal levels for logs, higher inventories ofgrade Hardwood lumber and order files with few orders.With that understanding, 2009 will be off to a slow start.Many economists are predicting that it will be the thirdquarter before any noticeable uptick in business.That’s a safe bet. It will take months for the credit marketsto settle and probably the remainder of 2009 forhomebuyers to make a dent in the backlog of availablehousing.Residential housing has become a major customer forAmerican Hardwoods. Flooring, cabinet, millwork andfurniture production all track with housing and mosthave plenty of inventory to move first.Many lumber producers in the Appalachian region aredealing with fewer loggers, finding less timber for sale ata reasonable price and rising costs to manufacture products.Those conditions will continue through 2009 alongwith a tight credit market. Cash will be king as financingchoices disappear.On the positive side, Appalachian producers and distributorswill find new customers for Appalachian HardwoodVerified Sustainable (AHVS) lumber. A slight increase indemand for certified wood will continue in 2009 and bemet with little supply. These customers have found AHVSa reasonable alternative to certified Hardwood and placedorders.I believe that will continue as secondary manufacturersPlease turn the pageScott Greene is the owner of North State Hardwoods, Inc. and is incharge of lumber sales.For our customers and others in need offine Appalachian Hardwood lumber we:• saw 20,000,000 board feet a year of fineHardwoods. We deal in wholesale lumber aswell.• have 425,000 board feet per charge of dry kilncapacity and maintain approximately 1,000,000board feet in Hardwood inventory.• specialize in very white sap 1 Face Poplar in 4/4through 8/4 thicknesses. We also saw WhiteOak, Hickory, Red Oak, Cherry, Walnut and SoftMaple, manufactured primarily in 4/4 thicknesses.• also sell export grade veneer logs and sawlogs.• have a band resaw, ring debarker and a NewmanS382 planer that helps in processing our lumber.• have three company owned trucks to deliver yourlumber orders to you promptly.Call us when we can be of service!CONTACT INFORMATION:1461 Speedway RoadNorth Wilkesboro, NC 28659Tel: (336) 838-1117Cell: (336) 452-1614FAX: (336) 838-2117E-mail: scott@northstatehardwoods.comSALES: Scott GreeneCHRISTMAS/2008 55


Imagine what youcan make withwood this good.Whether you turn it intoflooring, molding, fine furniture,trim, superb cabinetry--or whetheryou broker it to those who do--ourattention to detail guarantees youhardwood of unusuallyhigh standards.Manufacturing quality hardwoodsfor three generations.• Specializing in walnut,red oak, white oak, soft maple• Offering northern andappalachian hardwoods• Domestic / export• Bandmill• Surfacing• Automated stacker• Straight line ripping• 620,000 bd. ft. capacity dry kiln• 4,000,000 bd. ft. AD inventory• 3,000,000 bd. ft. KD inventoryMISSOURI-PACIFICLUMBER COMPANY694 DD Highway • Fayette, Missouri 65248-9635Phone 800-279-7997 Fax 660-248-2508www.mopaclumber.comFORECASTS - Continuedlearn of the resource available in the 12 states of theAppalachian region and the sustainable growth toremoval ratio. AHMI will educate and promote this toconsumers and reach out to other Hardwood producersand distributors in and around the Appalachian region.Dave B. RedmondHighland Hardwood Sales Inc.Augusta, Ga.As I sit at my desk putting mythoughts into words, I think it isimportant to note the date: October 8,2008. All of us are just waiting forsome positive signs or good news.It is difficult at best during thesetimes to work on a business forecast fornext week or month, much less next year! We are certainlyin uncharted waters, as an industry, nation andindeed world. The stock market has declined drasticallyfrom its high, banks are closing or scrambling for lifelines,loans have gone from ridiculously easy to obtain toextremely difficult to obtain. The government is trying toimprove the situation, so far to no apparent avail. Thehousing market is continuing to decline in volume of newstarts, sales of exiting homes, and in equity value.Sawmills are closing, many are running reduced hours,log inventories are extremely low. The domestic consumersof our Hardwood lumber are concerned about supplyissues, however are unwilling or unable to do anythingabout it. Uncertainly and concern rule. We are anindustry trying to “tread water” not quite sure where we’llend up when we reach land. These are indeed dark daysfor us all.However, these old sayings, “it’s always darkest beforethe dawn”, and “the true temper of a man (or industry) isdetermined by the heat of the fire”, are applicable. Everyday owners and managers of companies are asking thequestions over and over again: Am I overlooking something,how can we further cut cost, what can our marketingdepartment do to increase sales (and hopefully generatea profit)? We have been, and continue to face challengesour fathers and grandfathers would never havedreamed of. The market dynamics are ever changing,prompting the question, “where do we go next?”The Hardwood industry is primarily comprised of familyowned businesses. They work hard and are individuallytempered. Resourceful, resilient, innovative and stubborn.The long-term supply (or sawmill) side, in my opinionis weakened but not defeated. When demand is strongenough, and prices are improving, we can expect supply toreact positively. The North American temperateHardwood resource is sought after, even coveted by muchof the world. Our resource sustainability and transportationinfrastructure enable us to react positively andrapidly. We are dependable suppliers to the world. Ourindustry associations are continually striving to efficientlydeal with promotion, government regulations, certification,education, order and structure. There is indeedstrength in numbers with a unified voice.I am firmly convinced, there will be a market for ourproduct, both at home and abroad. Energy cost may eventuallyimpact where consumer products are manufactured,not just the cheap cost of labor and lack of governmentaland environmental regulations. We didn’t get tothis point overnight, and we will not see our way outovernight. I feel our country is many months away from asignificant economic recovery. (Doesn’t there seem to be56 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


FORECASTS - Continuedmore houses on the market everyday?) There is no need to even discussthe stock market, we are allacutely aware of the situation.Let each of us keep our focus sharpand determination to succeedstrong!Each of us at Highland HardwoodSales, Inc. wish everyone a MerryChristmas and Happy New Year.We do have much to be thankful for!Bob BarnesBarnes Brothers HardwoodFlooringHamburg, Ark.time high but are still higher thanthey have been in the past. The highprice of oil, driven by consumption offoreign products, has led to explorationfor natural resources ondomestic soil. This, along with newgas pipelines stretching across thecountry, has lead to an increase indemand for laminated mats andtimber mats. The vitalization of theconstruction mat market has driventhe demand for grade constructionmaterials to a higher level. Thisopportunity can be realized if lowgrade logs can be bought at anattractive price and sawmills areable to limit the production of 4/4grade lumber that is being cut.Grade lumber continues to be anissue for all mills. Consumers aredealing with fixed incomes due tothe economical downturn. Untilimprovements in the economyoccur, consumers will probably postponepurchasing new furniture orremodeling homes for the most part.Demand for higher grade lumberused in furniture, moulding, andPlease turn to page 73This past year has presented itsfair share of challenges to theHardwood industry. From challengingmarket conditions to unpredictableand unfavorable weatherconditions, preparation and utilizationhave been imperative in anattempt to weather these less thanideal circumstances.With that said, we are currentlyadding additional dry kilns to ourflooring manufacturing facilities inHamburg, Arkansas. We believethat this will help to reduce excessivefreight costs that may continueto rise in the near future. With thestruggling housing market, graspingconsumer market trends andutilizing lumber to fit those nichesare beneficial in both flooring salesand production. In sawmill production,we are attempting to utilize theprogressive construction materialspectrum of the Hardwood industryby shifting production to constructionlumber, such as board road, mattimbers, ties, etc.We would like to be optimisticabout 2009, but as this is written,there is uncertainty in the economy,such as the glut on the housing marketthat was created by lendinginstitutions. The credit crisis wasintensified due to poor money lendingdecisions for mortgages, makingit possible for people with poor creditto borrow money for mortgagesthey could not pay back. This hasimpacted the cabinet, flooring, andfurniture industry directly becausethe excess mortgages have to be consumedbefore new construction isable to resume, thus creating a fluctuationin the number of existinghouses and a decline in new housingconstruction starts. Predictions for aturnaround in the market vaguelypoint to 2010 or later. This makesthe rest of the year and all of nextyear look bleak for our industry.Oil prices are just down from an allCHRISTMAS/2008 57


HARDWOOD PURCHASING -Continued from page 30has affected portions of our business.But, we have been fortunate togrow other market areas to ensurestable revenues.”George Guenzler & Sons Inc. manufacturesshow wood furniture components,chair frames, stair componentsand upholstery lounge seatingin No. 1 Common Hard and SoftMaple, Cherry, Red Oak, White Ash,Walnut and European Beech.Freiburger said the company hasseen growth this year in health carefurniture and office furniture seatingand components particularly inSoft Maple, Hard Maple, Cherry andEuropean Beech.“For 2009, I think we will be in formuch of the same,” Freiburger said.“We will be budgeting for smallgrowth. I think we will have to waituntil 2010 for any true expansion insales growth.”* * * * * *Alder accounted for up to 90 percentof sales for MountainMillworks in Steamboat Springs,MANUFACTURER OF QUALITY BAND SAWNNORTHERN APPALACHIAN HARDWOODSRED OAK WHITE OAK CHERRY SOFT MAPLEPOPLAR WHITE ASH HARD MAPLE WALNUT500,000 B.F. Dry Kiln Capacity 2 Million B.F. Dry StorageContainer LoadingMixed TL’sS2S, Ripped to Width, Cut-Length & Finger-JointLumber Measured & Inspected after Kiln Drying2240 Shermans Valley Road, Elliottsburg, PA 17024Phone: 717-582-4122 Fax: 717-582-74382240 Shermans Toll Valley Free: Road, 1-800-253-0263 Elliottsburg, PA 17024E-mail: Phone 717-582-4122 sales@tuscarorahardwoods.comFax 717-582-7438Website: tuscarorahardwoods.comColo., this year. “It’s still prettystrong in most resort areas aroundthe country,” Scott Glynn noted.“Obviously with the dollar beingweak, we’re seeing people buy secondhomes for vacations. There isstill a lot out there for homeowners.We don’t foresee a slowdown in ourmarket. People who are interested ina $5 million home are scaling it backto 3, and that’s still very good.”The firm manufactures architecturalmillwork and stair parts and purchases225,000 board feet annuallyof Alder, Maple, Oak, Mahogany,Hickory and pine. As for adjusting tothe current market, they are spendingmore time shopping vendors toensure they’re getting a qualityproduct at the best value. Lookingahead at 2009, Glynn added, “I thinkthe second home and primary homeresidential market here is going tobe strong.”* * * * * *At Mason’s Mill & Lumber Co.,in Houston,Texas, EricBoer said hiscompany has hada fairly solid year,and is on par tosurpass revenuelevels in 2007.“We’ve hadappreciablegrowth over2007,” he said. “Iwould like to seeEric Boermore, but I am not complaining.We’re holding our own compared towhat a lot of people are doing.”Mason’s Mill & Lumber Co. manufactureshigh-end customer architecturalmillwork for residential andcommercial applications, and theysell Hardwood lumber and plywoodin Alder, Red and White Oak, Hardand Soft Maple, Cherry, Walnut,Poplar and imports such asBrazilian Cherry, African Mahoganyand Spanish Cedar. Species-wise,Boer said Alder is at the front of thepack. “We’re moving a lot of Alder,and our Mahogany business is prettysteady,” he said.Boer said he hopes to continue toattract high-end residential andcommercial customers in 2009. “Ithink we’ll continue this same patternnext year,” he said. “I knowthere will be some remodeling andrebuilding due to the hurricanesthat swept through this area.”* * * * * *“Historically over the years everyelection helps the economy start toroll back,” said Jim Garth of58 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


HARDWOOD PURCHASING -ContinuedDecorativeFlooring Inc. inPort St. Joe,Fla. “The depletionof the housinginventory willeventually startan increase innew housingstarts and consumerconfidencewill come back.”Sales for theJim Garthfirm have been off up to 42 percentfrom previous years, and the companyis adjusting by cutting inventoryback and reducing LTL’s. “Before wewould do LTL’s with no problem, butnow we try to wait on a full truckload,” Garth mentioned. “When weship we’re much more likely to becritical about the cost and shippingnow.”Decorative Flooring manufactureswood floor inlays, such as medallionsand borders, in Maple, White Oak,Walnut, Holly, Ash, Wenge, Jatobaand Bubinga. The company purchasesmore than 200,000 board feet oflumber annually.WinterhouseFurniture Inc.in Dublin, Pa.,has cut back onthe amount ofstock it carriesthis year as thehousing marketweakened. JohnBuckman saidsales are downapproximately 20 John Buckmanpercent, butPennsylvania has avoided some ofthe bigger problems seen inCalifornia and Florida.“Right now, there are still newhomes being built,” he said. “I’ve gota positive attitude that there will bea turnaround, not in the beginningof the year, but sometime next yearwe’ll start to get a break. You’ve gotto stay optimistic.”Winterhouse Furniture Inc. specializesin woodworking for the customkitchen market, and sells amajority of its kitchen cabinets inPlease turn the page* * * * * *Frank Demott of Best MouldingInc. in Albuquerque, N.M., saidbusiness has been steady for hiscompany, and he believes 2009 willbe a better year.“We offer mouldings in a variety ofspecies such as Red and White Oak,Poplar and Maple, so we’re wellversed,” he said. “Our Maple andOak mouldings are our most popularsellers going mostly into homes andsome to the big box stores.”Demott said sales are down approximately20 percent for the year, buthe believes business will improve in2009. “I don’t think the housing marketwill get any worse,” he said.“But, I think there will be an attitudechange. People are ready for animprovement.”* * * * * *Maple has been leading the way insales for Kendor Wood Inc. inMayfield, Ky. Jeff Holt said thatsales were down 20 percent from lastyear. However, in recent weeks thecompany has seen an upswing. Aswith most, the company is watchinginventory closer and keeping lowerlevels than in 2007.Kendor Wood purchases 850,000board feet annually of Hard Maple,Red and White Oak, Cherry, Poplar,Birch, Alder, Walnut, Ash and somepine for cabinet manufacturing.* * * * * *CHRISTMAS/2008 59


HARDWOOD PURCHASING -ContinuedCherry (paint grade). “Everybody’sdoing a little Cherry and paintgrade accent pieces,” Buckman said.“It’s what’s in right now.”Buckman said there is a lot ofuncertainty in the economy rightnow, but expects some kind of turnaroundwithin the next year. “Thetwo big issues are the bailout andthe presidential election,” he said. “Ijust hope that we’ll get behind theone that’s elected, and we will allJ V Awork together for what’s best forthis country.”* * * * * *According to Richard UngerbuehlerSr., of Federal MillworkCorp. in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., theMidwest is not feeling a downturn.In fact it’s quite the contrary. “Aftera recent trip to the AWI, Chicagoand Heart of America chapters,there doesn’t seem to be a slow downin either one of those areas,” henoted. “But in the Sunbelt states,J.V. AVERITTLUMBER CO.MANUFACTURERS OFBANDSAWN APPALACHIANHARDWOODS5,000,000’ ANNUAL PRODUCTIONRED & WHITE OAK, ASH,POPLARDry Kilns and Planer MillBand Mill • Band ResawP.O. Box 221 • Erin, Tenn. 37061Phone: 931/289-3810 Fax: 931/289-3800Email: jvaverittlbr@peoplestel.netContact: Phil Averittsuch as Florida, it’s a little tougher.”He further related that sales forFederal Millwork were down 35 percentfrom previous years. To cope,the company is being cautious withinventory and purchases. “Rightnow it’s about being inventory cautious,you buy what you need andavoid marginal purchases that maybe futuristic in their scope,” headded.The firm manufactures architecturalmillwork and purchases morethan 300,000 board feet of Poplar,Cherry, Oak, Mahogany, Teak,Alder, Ash and Birch annually.* * * * * *“The year started off really slow,but by early August, everything waspicking up quite a bit,” saidDemetre Koutros of BuffaloCreek Millwork Inc. inWaxahachie, Texas.Koutros said that sales were downabout 20 percentduring the firsthalf of the year,but could equal2007 figureswhen all is saidand done. Henoted that hiscompany haskept a tighter,shorter inventorythis year, and isexpecting 2009 to“definitely be better.”Demetre Koutros“Hopefully, we’ll have a little stabilityafter the year is done,” he said.“We’ve had the presidential electionand some hurricanes in this part ofthe world. A lot of our industry willbe getting back to somewhat normal.After the last hurricane, therewill have to be a lot of rebuilding. Itwas a tragic thing, but out of bad,sometimes comes good.”Buffalo Creek Millwork Inc. manufacturesHardwood mouldings, millwork,flooring components, cabinetand stair parts in a variety ofspecies including Red Oak, Maple,Poplar, Hickory, Cherry and Alder.Koutros said Red Oak bending railswere his most popular product in2008.* * * * * *Located in Salisbury, N.C.,Goodman Millwork Inc. manufacturescustom millwork and purchases300,000 board feet annually of allNorth American Hardwoods. BenGoodman commented that saleswere off, but only by 10 percent thisyear.“We tend to lag behind the housingmarket and when we see the trends60 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


HARDWOOD PURCHASING -Continuedgoing down we can count on it six oreight months later for us. We’ve gota lot of promising jobs coming up theend of this year and on into next,” hesaid.A popular issue, the price of fuelhas however, caused them to tightenup on deliveries. “If we can, we holdoff until we have multiple deliveriesin the same area,” he stated. Goinginto 2009, Goodman is positive for aproductive year. “Taking advantageof the downtime, we’re installingnew equipment and upgrading thefacility so we’ll be ready when themarket turns,” he said.* * * * * *Kevin Putnam of WasatchCabinet & Furniture Co. in WestJordan, Utah, commented thatresidential business in his area wasdown 25 percent from last year. Amanufacturer of commercial andresidential cabinetry comprised ofMaple and Red and White Oak,sales have gone from 50 percent residentialand 50 percent commercialto about 80/20, he said.When asked about plans for 2009,Putnam replied, “We are hoping fora turnaround in the residential market,but putting more of a focus incommercial because it’s holdingsteady in our area. Realtors here areforecasting a turn by the secondquarter.”* * * * * *White Oak is setting the pace forMoore Lumber Sales inMcMinnville, Tenn. The companypurchases over100,000 boardfeet of all speciesincluding Redand White Oak,Cherry, Walnutand Poplar forboards, panelingand flooring.Clint MooreClint Moorenoted that hispurchases havechanged accordingto the current market. “We werestacking green lumber on the yardbut we are buying kiln-dried for certainapplications,” he mentioned.Keeping with the popular just-intimeinventory, Moore noted thatthey are maintaining a minimalinventory and buying as the ordersdictate. Sales for the company weredown 60 percent from 2007, butMoore expects to see a turnaroundin the New Year.* * * * * *Keith Swaner of SwanerHardwood Co. in Burbank, Calif.said that Poplar, Red Oak andMaple are his top selling species thisyear. The firm’s orders are up 20percent from last year and Swanerexpects the New Year to bring moreof the same. He attributes the company’ssuccess to having a goodinventory.“We have anabundance ofinventory on hand.We are stayingbusy because ourcompetitors arekeeping lowinventories and,therefore, callingus for orders theynormally wouldPlease turn the pageKieth SwanerCHRISTMAS/2008 61


HARDWOOD PURCHASING -Continuedhave filled themselves,” he said.Swaner Hardwood Co. manufacturesHardwood plywood and purchases7 million board feet annuallyof Ash, Birch, Maple, Oak, Walnut,Sycamore, Poplar, Alder andMahogany.* * * * * *“Sales have been about the samefor 2008 as 2007,” said BrettHarmon fromMid-AmericaHardwoods Inc.in Sarcoxie, Mo.With Hard Mapleprimarily beingtheir best seller,he noted that RedOak was makinga comeback.“There’s beensomewhat of a Brett Harmonpush for it thelast few months, people who wereimporting Red Oak from China arenow getting it closer to home due torising fuel costs,” he said. “With atough economy like we currentlyhave, Red Oak is a cost efficientproduct.”Harmon also commented that thecompany was keeping a slightlylower inventory and being lean withpurchasing due to the current market.As for the New Year, he doesn’tlook for an uptick until the end of2009. “I don’t see an early turnaround,but by the end of ’09 theremight be a slight turnaround,” hesaid.Mid-America Hardwoods manufacturesmouldings, cabinet parts, stairtreads and risers, dimension parts,unfinished and prefinished flooring,and pre-hung interior doors. Thefirm purchases approximately 20million board feet annually of Redand White Oak, Hickory, Walnut,Cherry, Ash and Maple.* * * * * *Randy Collins of Dixie Plywoodin Savannah, Ga., noted that thecompany was profitable in 2008,which he attributes to diversification.“We also do industrial applicationsrather than solely residential,so it puts us at an advantage,” hesaid of the company’s current profitmargins.Keeping inventory balanced withdemand, and with product availability,the company is ordering on an“as needed” basis. “Certainly ourinventory is relative to demand butsince mail order files have been slim,we don’t risk carrying the largeinventory when product is so readilyavailable,” Collins said. However, hedid note that earlier in the year,before the housing market decline,there was a noticeable shortage ofHardwood plywood.The company purchases 106,000board feet annually of Maple, Redand White Oak, Walnut, Cherry,Mahogany, Teak, cypress, ponderosapine, and radiata pine. Lookingahead into 2009, Collins stated thathe expects it to be even with 2008depending on the outcome of theelections and the financial state ofthe country at present.•CANTERBURY -Continued from page 29In addition to Briggs, who alsohelps oversee finances and vendorselection, key employees includeJerry Little, operations manager;Beth Burton and Reid Easton, floor-62 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


CANTERBURY - Continueding and millwork sales; and JimHeflin, an independent sales representativebased in Peoria, Ill., whohandles sales throughout theMidwest for Canterbury.Counting all domestic and importedspecies of Hardwood and softwoodlumber, Canterbury Flooringpurchases approximately 150 truckloadsof lumber annually. The thicknessof lumber they purchase is 4/4,usually surfaced to 15/16ths andbought kiln-dried. Most lumber ispurchased in width sorts or rippedblanks.Although he delegates many dayto-dayresponsibilities, Briggs alsooften helps out in the manufacturingplant. “I let the guys that knowwhat they’re doing operate themachines, but sometimes I’ll standby the manufacturing line and helpload the line with lumber, or helpgrade the product we’re making,”Briggs said. “I want feedback frommy employees when there are anyconcerns, or if they have any suggestionsabout how to maximize efficiencyin our plant. It’s good for meto have that hands-on experienceand familiarity with what our workersare seeing every day which inturn helps me make some informeddecisions about what we should orshould not be doing in our manufacturingprocesses in our plant.”Briggs said his operation runs four10-hour shifts per week, which hashelped reduce costs and increaseproductivity. “On a 10-hour shift,you get more peak production time,”he said. “Plus, if a piece of equipmentbreaks and you’ve got toschedule overtime, we can do thaton Friday instead of having guysstay until very late or give up theirSaturday or Sunday.”In 2005, Briggs and his fatherbegan their company in a small2,000-square-foot warehouse inWinston-Salem, N.C., which wholesaledlumber and made specialtyflooring on a contract basis withsmaller flooring mills. “My fatherand I saw a demand for made-toordercustom flooring, and we formallyopened the doors ofCanterbury Flooring in early 2007,”Briggs said.Today, Canterbury Flooring operatesout of a 32,000-square-footfacility, but has actually purchasedenough adjoining land so they candouble in size if and when theymake the decision to do so.Some of the equipment CanterburyFlooring has at its operationincludes two moulders, a rip saw, aCameron automation scanning systemand two planers.“Basically, wood flows very smoothlythrough our plant from start tofinish,” Little said. “There’s veryminimal human interaction with it.By doing that, we’re probably producingin a day what other flooringcompanies would produce usingtwice the labor.”Briggs said his company partneredwith Eagle Machinery & Supply Inc.based in Sugarcreek, Ohio, to obtainmost of their modern, state-of-theartmaterial handling equipment.He mentioned Eagle is a companyhe will continue to do business with.“A lot of equipment manufacturerswill just build exactly what youPlease turn the pageCHRISTMAS/2008 63


CANTERBURY - Continuedorder, deliver it and then walk awayfrom it,” he said. “Eagle has given usthe support after selling us theirequipment that we really needed.”Briggs said Canterbury Flooring’slocation in Mocksville, N.C., is anadvantage because many woodworkingequipment manufacturers havetheir plants in North Carolina, solooking at and obtaining the rightpiece of machinery is not difficult.Canterbury Flooring is a memberof the National Wood Flooring Assoc.(NWFA), World Floor CoveringAssoc., National Assoc. of HomeBuilders and the NationalHardwood Lumber Assoc. The companyalso attends and exhibits atthe flooring show held in Las Vegas,Nev., called Surfaces.In closing, Little said CanterburyFlooring’s philosophy is to give customerswhat they want, at the rightprice and in a reasonable amount oftime. “We try to deliver a customproduct with a much shorter leadtime by maintaining flexibility, goodscheduling and automation,” hesaid. “Someone said that our limitationis our customer’s imagination,and that’s pretty accurate.”For more information, contactCanterbury Flooring at 800-940-9504, visit their Web site atwww.canterburyflooring.com, or e-mail them at contact@canterburyflooring.com.•OAKCREST - Continued from page 34sion of Oakcrest Lumber Inc.Kevin Cloer, vice president of salesand marketing, noted that the companyhas its own trucks to deliverHardwood lumber and/or flooringproducts within about a 300-mileradius of the Georgia facility.Contract carriers are used for locationsof further distances. All ofOakcrest’s flooring products arewrapped in plastic at time of shipmentto ensure proper moisture contenton delivery.“We have developed a real strongcustomer base with Hardwood flooringdistributors and Hardwood lumbercustomers all over the countrywho have remained loyal to us inthese very difficult market conditions,”Cloer said. “We are known inthe industry for our consistency inmanufacturing quality lumber andflooring products, and maintain astrong commitment to dedicatedcustomer service.”Kevin said the hands-on involvementby the Weaver family hasstrongly contributed to Oakcrest’ssuccess. “They have been very effectivein showing us how being personallyinvolved in all aspects of theoperation is vital,” he said. “Wesley,Russell and Roland carry out thehands-on approach in our operationsevery day.”Wesley Weaver is president ofOakcrest Lumber Inc. He handlesall purchasing of manufacturingequipment for both the Georgia and64 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


OAKCREST - ContinuedTennessee operations, as well asdoing the detail planning of all constructionprojects and assisting inday-to-day operations. RolandWeaver serves as executive officer tooversee the financial aspect of thebusiness as well as assisting in dayto-dayoperations. Russell overseesthe operational side of the flooringfacility in Georgia, along with theconcentration yards in both Georgiaand Tennessee.Oakcrest Lumber Inc. is a memberof the National Wood Flooring Assoc.and the National Hardwood LumberAssoc., both of which have helpedincrease the company’s client base.Kevin Cloer is joined in the salesdepartment by his brother, BobbyCloer, who also handles flooringsales and inventory control for boththe Georgia and Tennessee operations.Bobby comes to Oakcrest withover 20 years of experience in theHardwood lumber and flooringindustry with experience in lumberinspection, kiln drying operationsmanagement, and sales ofHardwood flooring products. Bothbrothers travel throughout thecountry offering professional customerservice to Hardwood lumbercustomers and Hardwood flooringdistributors.In addition to the managementstaff previously mentioned, keyemployees at the operation includeJim Debaise, general manager ofoperations; Cameron Elliott, assistantmanager of operations;Dewayne Fulk, Dave McGhee andJamie Bailey, flooring plant managers;Johnny Thomas, electricalmaintenance; and Casey Register,industrial maintenance.The Weaver family considers everyemployee key to the success of theoperations. These employees arecredited in providing the companythe ability to offer quality productsand services. The Weaver familyalso noted that the first credit ofsuccess is given to God.In closing, Kevin stated, “OurHardwood lumber and flooring productsare known for quality, and weintend to do everything possible tokeep that reputation. A high standardfor quality and customer servicehave helped us greatly in keepingour products moving in this difficultmarket. Prices are at an alltime low, and the ability to make aprofit is very difficult to say theleast. Hard work and commitmentfrom all the staff and employees ofOakcrest have kept the companyviable.”For more information, contactOakcrest Lumber Co. Inc. at 229-639-9328, fax 229-649-9585 or e-mail kcloeroakcrest@windstream.net or bcloeroakcrest@windstream.net.•Wishing You aGlowing Holiday Season800.476.5393 • 404.792.2290 800.248.4393 • 704.875.65875596 Riverview Road • Mableton, GA 30126 11701 McCord Road • Huntersville, NC 28078www.hardwoodweb.comCHRISTMAS/2008 65


MOORE FOREST -Continued from page 37loyalty of its repeat customers.“We sell strictly on grade, and we’revery careful to make that graderight,” he said. “We do a good job ofedging our lumber and all lumber isdouble end trimmed at the sawmill.We offer kiln drying, S2S and rail,truck and container shipments. Weput up great looking packs of lumberMoore Forest Products utilizesthis Corley linebarresaw as well as otherCorley equipment.Salamanca Lumber Co., Inc. is situatedin the most northern part of the NorthAppalachian region. This geographicallocation ensures Salamanca Lumber Co.a steady supply of fine-texture, slowgrown,high quality Hardwoods.The modern drying facilities, automatedstripmill, trim- and packaging linestogether with over 30 years experience inthe export market make SalamancaLumber Co. the ideal partner to serveyour North American Hardwood needsin ‘random width’, ‘sorted-to-width’ or‘ripped-to-width’ lumber.for our customers.”Steve added that the company iswell positioned for future growthand success. “We’ve got a good locationhere in Kensett,” he said. “We’refarther west than most of the otherHardwood sawmills in Arkansas, sowe’ve been able to sell a lot of lumberinto Texas. We’re located justtwo miles from a major freeway(U.S. 67/167), and we’re on theUnion Pacific railroad line.”Moore Forest Products Inc. sellsits lumber green and kiln-dried tobrokers and end users throughoutthe United States. Over the years,the firm has also sold its products todistribution yards, including a customerin Mexico who requested No.1 Common Red Oak. Red and WhiteOak are the predominant speciessold as Hardwood lumber, andWhite Oak makes up approximately28 percent of Oak lumber sales.Koppers Inc., an integrated producerof carbon compounds andtreated wood products, located inPittsburgh, Pa., is one of the largestcustomers of Moore Forest Products’Salamanca Lumber Co., Inc. PO Box 416, Salamanca, New York State 14779, USA.Phone: (1) 716-945-4810 Fax: (1) 716-945-1531 Attn: Mr. Barry Yuhas.Salamanca Lumber Email: Co., Inc. barryyuhas@salamancalumber.comPO Box 416, Salamanca, New York State 14779, USA.Phone: (1) 716-945-4810 Fax: (1) 716-945-1531 Attn: Mr. Barry Yuhas.E il b h @ l l bJeff Williams has been a lumber grader at MooreForest Products for many years.66 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


MOORE FOREST -Continuedswitch ties. However, the companymarkets its switch ties on the openmarket. “We will sell our switch tiesto anybody who wants to buy them,”Steve said. “We just have a verygood working relationship withKoppers. Their representative thatcovers this area actually lives inSearcy, Ark., where we live, and weknow him personally.”Steve said his firm ships most ofits products by truck, but averagesone railcar load per month. Thefacility has a good customer upnorth that receives railcar shipments.Moore Forest Products Inc. hasapproximately 42 workers on staff.In addition to Jerry Moore, who issemi-retired but still comes in everyday, and Steve Moore, who handlesHardwood lumber sales and purchasing,key employees includeMitch Moore, Steve’s son, sales andoffice controller; Terry Dees, vicepresident and general manager; andTom Berry III, timber and log procurement.Steve said, “Our employeesare key to our success. Somewere here when I came to workhere.”The company is a member of theNational Hardwood Lumber Assoc.(NHLA) and the SoutheasternLumber Manufacturers Assoc. Inc.Jerry Moore is a former member ofthe NHLA board of directors.For more information, contactMoore Forest Products Inc. at 501-742-3371, fax 501-742-3423 or e-mail sdmoore@centurytel.net.•WCMA - Continued from page 44Ont., and Jay Dee Hanna of SpartaWoodworks, Sparta, Tenn., were recognizedfor their contribution to theboard of directors for the past threeyears.Remaining WCMA board membersare: President Chris Watson ofConestoga Wood Specialties, EastEarl, Pa.; Vice President KeithAtherholt of Lewis LumberProducts, Picture Rocks, Pa.; PastPresident Ed Solberg of CouleeRegion Enterprises, Bangor, Wis.;Steve Sabatini of BradfordDimension Specialties, Bradford,Pa.; Keith Malmstadt of Great LakeWoods, Holland, Mich.; Mike Brotenof Four Seasons Wood Products,Frederic, Wis.; and Richard Pyle ofNorthland Forest Products, Inc.,Shakopee, Minn.WCMA Members and TechnologyPartners toured the productionfacilities of seven leading manufacturingoperations in the Waterloo,Iowa, area. Collectively, these companiesproduce solid and engineeredwood components, cabinetry, mouldings,interior and exterior doors, andlumber. Attendees also toured thePlease turn the pageCHRISTMAS/2008 67


WCMA - Continuedtractor assembly plant for JohnDeere in Waterloo. The plant toursallowed attendees to see new manufacturingtechniques, exchangeideas, and see how diffrerent productsare produced.Plants that were toured included:Bertch Cabinet Mfg., which wasfounded in 1977, and is a manufacturerof quality wood and laminatedkitchen and bath cabinets, as wellas interior passage doors, mirroredproducts, and cultured marble tops.Also, Kendrick Forest Products,which is a second-generation, family-ownedlogging, sawmill, dry kiln,rough mill, and cabinet operationoperates in a team environment toproduce wood products for domesticand foreign markets. They own timberlandsand produce 9.3 millionDuring the Holiday Season,our thoughts turn gratefullyto those who havemade our progress possible.to you and your familiesNorthland Corporation800-873-1441fax 502-222-5355Web: www.northlandcorp.com E-mail: tgirardi@northlandcorp.comP.O. Box 265, 2600 Highway 146 East, LaGrange, KY 40031board feet of Hardwood lumberannually. Their rough mill producescabinet components for their cabinetdivision and other outside companies.Woodharbor Doors & Cabinetry,which was founded in 1993 byCurtis, Dennis and Jon Lewerkewith a new vision of the Woodharborhome. The “whole home concept” is acomplete line of interior millworksthat complement and match eachother, giving the consumer consistencyin design, quality and finishthroughout the home. WoodharborDoors & Cabinetry has two state-ofthe-artfacilities. The Mason Citylocation produces their lines of cabinetry.The Northwood location manufacturesinterior doors and cabinetcomponents.BTS Lumber produces lumber anddimension blanks. At their SandSprings location, they produce flooringand moulding blanks with planing,straight-line ripping, and sandingcapabilities. Their newestacquisition is a Weinig / RaimannValue-Rip System with a ProfiRipOptimization System that helpsrough mills predict yields andimprove quality control. BruggemanLumber, Inc. also hosted a tour oftheir sawmill operation.Also included in the tour was JohnDeere’s Tractor Cab AssemblyOperation in Waterloo, where completeassembly is implemented ofRow-Crop and Four Wheel Drivetractors from start to finish. Since1918, Waterloo has been the home tothe John Deere WaterlooOperations, which includes six manufacturinglocations, encompassing2,774 acres of land and 8 millionsquare feet of manufacturing floorspace. John Deere has shipped morethan 2.3 million Waterloo-built tractorsto every state in the UnitedStates and over 160 countries worldwide.The WCMA’s 2009 Fall Conference& Plant Tour Event will be held inthe Eastern Wisconsin area on Sept.68 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


WCMA - Continued20–22. The WCMA began theirPlant Tour program in the 1930sand it is now the Association’s mostpopular event. WCMA members discovernew manufacturing techniques,exchange ideas and learnabout alternative methods for settingup their manufacturingprocesses. “Participants in theseplant tours always learn somethingnew and everyone comes away withat least one good idea that can beimplemented in their own plants,”says Steve Lawser, ExecutiveDirector of the Wood ComponentManufacturers Association. “Thiswas my 25 th plant tour event andthey are all unique and beneficial toeveryone who attends.”The WCMA represents over 150manufacturers of wood componentproducts located in the UnitedStates and Canada. These componentsare produced fromHardwoods, softwoods and engineeredwood materials. For moreinformation, contact the WCMA,741 Butlers Gate, Suite 100,Marietta, GA 30068. Tel: (770) 565-6660. Fax: 770-565-6663. Or visitthe WCMA’s website at www.woodcomponents.org.•KRETZ - Continued from page 46fragmentation and development.Head Forester Al Koeppel presentedHarold and Edith Johnson ofClintonville with a senior loggeraward, acknowledging Johnson’slong association with the companyas a forest family member. Heremains an active logger.The ancient logs, only a small portionof which were milled, were amix of Red Oak and Yellow Birch,white pine and eastern hemlock, socalled“foundation species” thatwere common in the woods of northernWisconsin at the time of Christ.They were discovered by landownerPaul Monk, who dredged a smallsediment preserved the wood andbark. “Looking at them, you wouldnever think they were as old as theyare,” Fincher said.Monk’s uncle, Eric Horn, workedin a forest products lab in Madisonaffiliated with the University ofWisconsin, and he took a sample ofthe wood for carbon-dating.How old is the wood? Sixteen cenbogon his Crocker Hills propertynortheast of Antigo to create alake.It’s pristine now, but it took realviolence to send the trees toppling.Monk figured that a lake predatedthe bogs, and a tremendous tornadorocked the area around 400 A.D.and sent the trees tumbling.Once underwater, the lack of oxygenand later, the heavy coating ofWHEELAND LUMBER CO.,• Clear Strips• Solid Dimensions• Band Headrig and Band Resaw Mill• 500,000 BF of Dry Kilns - 1,500,000 of Dry Storage• Grading to Overseas StandardsPhone: (570) 324-6042 • Fax (570) 324-2127Contact: Ray Wheeland, Sales • E-mail: ray@wheelandlumber.comDerek Wheeland, Sales • E-mail: derek@wheelandlumber.comBill Baker, Sales • E-mail: bill@wheelandlumber.comDamen Wheeland, Log Sales: E-mail: damen@wheelandlumber.comWebsite: www.wheelandlumber.comINC. • FORESTRY PARTNERSHIPS • WHEELANDLUMBERCO.,INC • FORESTRY PARTNERSHIPS •Please turn the pageCHRISTMAS/2008 69


KRETZ -Continuedturies old. In human terms, 1,600years represents 80 generations,but in geological terms, it is just ablink of an eye.The trees grew tall in the forestslowly, unlike today. Fincherexplained that the tightly spacedrings indicated very slow growth,meaning the area was probablyheavily wooded with little underbrush.In comparison, Kretz forestersmanage woodlands today for rapidgrowth and regeneration, withplenty of light reaching the forestfloor to encourage young trees toreplace those harvested every 15years or so.•G.F. Hardwoods, Inc.“A Company You Can Depend On”9880 Clay County Hwy.Moss, TN 38575-6332Contact: 1-800-844-3944Jimmy Carr - Bobby CollinsFAX 1-931-258-3517Quality AppalachianHardwood LumberSpeciesServicesFacilities• Red Oak• Poplar• Hard Maple• White Oak• Ash• Cherry• Own Trucks• Cut 4/4through 8/4• Grade AfterKiln Drying• ComputerTally• 5 LengthSeparations• 600,000 B.F.Kiln Capacity• 500,000 B.F.PredryerCapacity• YatesAmericanPlanerWASHINGTON REPORT -Continued from page 18importers, retailers and manufacturershave joined us in supporting practicalsteps to stop the importation ofstolen wood,” said Alexander vonBismarck, executive director of theEnvironmental Investigation Agency(EIA). “This commitment by the U.S.government represents a historicbreakthrough for internationalefforts to control deforestation andprotect the global environment.”SECURE RURAL SCHOOLS ACTADDED TO BAILOUT BILLEfforts to pass the Reauthorizationof the Secure Rural Schools andCommunity Self-Determination Actfinally succeeded as the four-yearreauthorization was attached to the$700 billion bailout package aimed atrescuing the financial markets. Inaddition to the county paymentsreauthorization, the packageincludes Section 45 renewable energyproduction tax credits, a patch for theAlternative Minimum Tax (AMT),and research and development taxcredits.The four-year reauthorization isidentical to the plan authored bySens. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), LarryCraig (D-Idaho), Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.) and Max Baucus (D-Mont.).The proposal implements a formulachange for receipt distribution basedless on the value of past timber harvestsand more on the acreage of federalforestland in each state. It alsoincludes a ramp down in paymentsbefore ending in 2012 and two yearsof full funding for the Payment-in-Lieu of Taxes (PILT) program.Under the legislation, the programwill disappear in 2012 with countiesonce again sharing timber receiptsgenerated by the Forest Service andBureau of Land Management (BLM).E-mail: gfhardwoods@info-ed.com • Website: www.gfhardwoods.comCONTINUING RESOLUTIONINCLUDES FIRE-RELATED FUNDINGA $600 billion ContinuingResolution (CR) to fund the federalgovernment through March 2009also includes $910 million in additionalfire-related funding for theForest Service and BLM. Leadership70 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


WASHINGTON REPORT -Continuedin the House and Senate opted for aCR rather than the individual FY09Appropriations Bills due to disputeswith the White House over domesticspending levels and offshoredrilling.The CR will fund the ForestService and BLM at FY08 levelsthrough March, when regularappropriations bills will need to beconsidered with a newAdministration and Congress inplace.The $910 million will provideimportant funding to both agenciesfollowing a year that include agency“borrowing” to cover expensesbeyond regular appropriations. TheForest Service will receive $775 million,while the BLM will receive$135 million. The funds for theForest Service include $300 millionto be transferred back into accountsthat were raided to fund this summer’sexpenses, $100 million torepay past fire suppression transfersfrom the Knutson-Vandenburg(K-V) Fund, $100 million in suppressionfunding, $175 million forhazardous fuels reduction efforts onnon-federal and federal lands, $75million for rehabilitation andrestoration of federal lands, and $25million for fire personnel retentionin high cost areas.Bureau of Customs and BorderProtection are named in the suit.Corey Brinkema, president ofForest Stewardship Council-US,said the organization joined the lawsuitbecause, “FSC-US and our partnerswork tirelessly to develop andpromote the highest standards forforest management, as well as providethe public the opportunity toreward responsible forestry throughchoosing FSC-labeled products. TheWEMAYBELEDDOWNMANYPATHSadministration’s action is a hugesetback that, if left unchecked, couldsignificantly lower the bar for whatis represented as sustainableforestry.”The suit alleges that money earmarkedto the two timber industrydominatedorganizations, the U.S.Endowment for Forestry andCommunities Inc. and the AmericanForest Foundation, should havegone into the U.S. Treasury.Please turn the pageCONSERVATION GROUPS FILELAWSUIT FOR TIMBERALLOCATIONSForest Stewardship Council-US,Conservation Northwest and theCenter for Biological Diversityrecently filed a lawsuit accusing theBush administration of diverting$350 million from the public treasuryto forestry foundations “dominatedby the timber industry.”The suit says that the administrationviolated federal appropriationslaw when it steered $350 millionfrom Canadian lawsuit settlementfunds to the foundations. The U.S.Trade Representative, theDepartment of Commerce and theSWEENEY HARDWOODS ANDTHE R.E. SWEENEYFAMILY OF COMPANIESDISTRIBUTION OF QUALITYFOREST PRODUCTS THROUGHOUTMANY AREAS OF TEXAS, CENTRALOKLAHOMA AND NORTHERNLOUISIANAFT. WORTH, TEXAS 800.580.2352CHRISTMAS/2008 71


WASHINGTON REPORT -ContinuedNAR CALLS FOR 4-POINTHOUSING STIMULUS PLANThe National Assoc. of Realtors(NAR), recently offered a four-pointlegislative plan to reinvigorate thehousing market, calling on Congressto act during a lame-duck session.NAR believes the plan will give aboost to the economy and help tocalm jittery potential homebuyers.The plan features such consumerdrivenprovisions as eliminating therepayment of the first-time homebuyertax credit and expanding it toall homebuyers, making highermortgage loan limits permanent,pushing banks to extend credit toMain Street, and prohibiting banksfrom entering into real estate.“Housing has always lifted theeconomy out of downturns, and it isimperative to get the housing mar-HARD HEADEDWhen it comes to providing the lumber market with a quality choice, wehave to admit we are hard-headed. We won’t settle for inferior products,and we’re downright stubborn when it comes to delivering the best, mostresponsive service out there! Our equipment is first class, our facility humswith a no-nonsense team of experienced lumbermen, and we are buildinga reputation that is second to none. Now if this all sounds a little hard toswallow, give us a call and you’ll see we mean business.ket moving forward as quickly aspossible,” said NAR PresidentRichard F. Gaylord. “It is vital to theeconomy that Congress take specificactions to boost the confidence ofpotential homebuyers in the housingmarket and make it easier forqualified buyers to get safe andaffordable mortgage loans. We areasking Congress to act right away.”NAR’s plan includes: removing therequirement in the current law thatfirst-time homebuyers repay the$7,500 tax credit, and expand thetax credit to all buyers of a primaryresidence; revising the FHA, FannieMae and Freddie Mac 2008 stimulusloan limit increases to make thempermanent; urging the governmentto use a portion of the allotted $700billion that was provided to purchasemortgage-back securities frombanks to provide price stabilizationfor housing; and making permanentthe prohibition against banks enteringreal estate brokerage and management.HOUSING GROUPS PRAISEEMERGENCY STABILIZATION ACTHardly Run-Of-The-MillHermitage Hardwood Lumber Sales, Inc.P.O. Box 698Cookeville, Tennessee USA 38503931-526-6832 • Fax: 931-526-4769www.hermitagehardwood.comPROCESSORS OF NORTH AMERICAN HARDWOODSSteve GundersonDomestic Sales(one stubborn guy)The National Assoc. of HomeBuilders (NAHB), NAR and theAmerican Forest & Paper Assoc.(AF&PA) all recently voiced theirapproval on the passing of theEmergency Economic StabilizationAct of 2008. The act requires financialinstitutions to work withlenders and mortgage servicers tofind ways to avoid foreclosure. Italso creates a Troubled Asset ReliefProgram to purchase and guaranteethe troubled assets from financialinstitutions that hold mortgages ormortgage-backed securities.NAR President Richard F. Gaylordsaid, “This far-reaching and meaningfullegislation goes a long way inhelping restore confidence in thenation’s financial system. The legislationnot only helps make homemortgages more available, whichhelps stabilize home sales andprices, but also helps families whoare trying to secure a car loan orborrow money to send their childrento college.”72 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


WASHINGTON REPORT -ContinuedDonna Harmon, AF&PA presidentand chief executive officer, said,“America’s forest products companies,as well as their customers, arecapital-intensive businesses thatneed access to functioning capitalmarkets and a healthy banking systemin order to create jobs and promoteeconomic growth. Additionally,tight credit is a significant barrierto reviving housing demand, whichis a major market for forest products.”NAHB Chairman Sandy Dunnadded, “This legislation wasabsolutely essential to prevent a collapsein our financial system thatwould have inflicted devastatingdamage to our nation’s economy.”•FORECASTS - Continued from page 57cabinets is still somewhat inconsistent,thus creating a surplus of highgrade lumber. Until new constructionbegins, the demand for theseproducts will continue to gounchanged.With the upcoming presidentialelection, political change in economicalpolicies and practices isinevitable. Getting adjusted to anew administration, whether it isRepublican or Democrat, will takeat least a year. Until some of themiddle income mortgages are consumed,new home construction willlag for the most part, directly affectingthe market for strip flooring.Upper income housing, which utilizesmore plank and specialty products,should continue with an economicrebound.Due to these circumstances, we areable to examine what we can do inorder to captivate the opportunitiesthat are present. We have takennecessary steps in order to bettersituate ourselves for the marketchange and are looking forward tomore favorable situations in thenear future.Alfred MayoParton Lumber CompanyRutherfordton, N.C.If the housing market does pick up,it will not affectthe lumber businessuntil afterthe market getsgoing again – latespring 2009.Some people wehave spoken withare still very pessimisticabout anearly surge in the market.The major issue we foresee in 2009is getting logs. Too many loggers aregetting out of the business. Also,landowners seem to be holding offon selling timber until the marketgoes back up.We have always and will continueto service our accounts with JITshipments, which seem to be moreprominent lately.Please turn the pageCHRISTMAS/2008 73


FORECASTS - ContinuedJim SkiverLiberty Lumber CompanyLiberty, N.C.SERVING THE WORLDFOR OVER 75 YEARSSpecializing in 4/4 Hardwood LumberCummings Lumber Co. Inc.P.O. Box 6, Troy, Pa 16947Phone: 570-297-4771Fax: 570-297-2766Web: www.clc1.comRoy Cummings Jr. - Presidentroy@clc1.comLarry Cordner - Saleslarry@clc1.comWhen Quality CountsKITCHENSBROTHERS MANUFACTURINGLUMBER - DIMENSIONFLOORING - MOULDINGS990,000’ Dry Kiln Capacity1,900,000’ Predryer CapacitySAWMILLS AT:Utica - Hazlehurst, Mississippiand Monroe, LouisianaChip Cummings - Saleschip@clc1.comSales Office:John Clark - Sales ManagerE-mail: jlc1102@aol.comPaul Ostlund - Sales RepresentativeE-mail: paulkbmc@aol.comP.O. Box 111 Hazlehurst, Miss. 39083Tel: 601-894-2021 Fax: 601-894-1069Web sites: www.kitchensbrothers.comwww.cherrybark.netWe look forward to continue servicingour customer base as the lumber industrygets harder to understand. Withsupply lines slow and the order filethin, it presents daily challenges tounderstand how to move product.Thanks to a healthy export market, wehave been able to keep moving product with some certaintyfor tomorrow and the month ahead, and that is about asfar ahead as your can look. Hopefully as the markets getfeet again after the election, our markets will liven aswell.Our customers are also trying to work through thesetimes of uncertainty. Each one has a different story of howthis order dried up or got smaller. Our job is to try andhelp tie good producers together with users that we hearabout in our daily conversations about “I can’t get moulding,flooring, frames”, and the like. Most think it will be along time before we see business back to some kind of normalcy!This year has definitely been difficult in the Hardwoodindustry. We have endured increases in all facets of manufacturingcosts, as our product price has searched theabyss for the bottom. I think we are in for more of thesame with lean manufacturig being the only tool of survival.Our government has done everything possible tomake sure businesses in this country have no chance. Weare the most regulated, taxed, permitted, scrutinized producersin the world. Certification schemes abound and wewill have to look to this as a tool to help us function in thisGreen society. Fuel is such a large part of our individualoperations from the loggers in the woods to the sawmilland dry kiln and truckers and steamship lines that carrythe containers, it will be a long time before we learn tooperate with this variable.We look forward to the challenges coming with the ideathat as it gets harder, coalitions with other producers thatunderstand lean manufacturing and doing the job rightthe first time will make our products desirable world wide.New emerging markets are going to present themselves,with the certified forest products we have to offer, thingsshould improve as long as we can source lumber, sayingthat, the production shortages should work towards thedemand sometime in early 2009.We have built more storage buildings this year toimprove our reaction time to “just in time” shipments aswell as handle more species. This has been a great help toour sales force and our customer base. With the changingmarket conditions, we are the warehouse to most of ourcustomers. As time goes by I think we will see more of ourfriends and competitors decide to close doors that havebeen open for decades and more. This natural attritionhas to take place so our industry can find the bottom andwork our way back up.Our hopes for the coming year are to continue tostrengthen our relationships and have the products thatare needed too help them profit in their organizations. Weshould be “Certified” late this year, both FSC and SFI. Ihope this is a direction that will pay off in the buildingindustry as the market comes back!Thanks to all who work with us in these trying marketsas we all look forward to better times!74 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


FORECASTS - ContinuedDavid WellsValley View HardwoodsMorehead, Ky.On a scale of 1 to 10, on how strongour business is, we’re probably arounda 5. My understanding from NHLAforecasts is that production is off about40 percent and still the phone is notringing a lot with people wanting tobuy lumber. Of course, that’s a concernto me. But one advantage we have is that we have builtgood, solid relationships with our grade lumber and palletcustomers over the years and some of them have been inbusiness since the 1970’s like we have. When I call mycustomers mentioning that I need to move some truckloadsof lumber and/or pallets, they are willing to takesome of the loads.We’re fortunate in that our company has a niche in thepallet market because we manufacture custom pallets. Inother words, for our pallets we cut every board and nailthem up into custom designed pallets for our clients.About all pallet companies mass produce pallets and mostare not willing to custom design them for various companies.We took advantage of the slow down in the economy byreorganizing our sawmill division at our Morehead, Ky.,location in February. We put in an additional 100 feet ofgreen chain, so the lumber falls right out onto the gradingstation where it’s graded, packed, marked and banded allin one operation. This eliminated us handling the lumberin our mill about two times and enabled us to becomemore efficient. Also, by adding this equipment we can producemore lumber with less people as well.Fuel has been a tremendous cost at 40%. But we arethankful that freight rates are coming down now, and it’shelping some. The price of lumber is down and just abouteverything we purchase is going up in price. So it reallymakes it difficult for lumber producers now. There havebeen times when we’ve cut Poplar lumber and lost moneyon it. But it’s better to lose a little money than it is to shutdown your mill or lay your crew off.However, recently we’ve seen the price of Poplar lumberrise, which helps.There have been a lot of loggers that have quit and somehave gone to work in public or government jobs.As for when it will pick back up, my opinion is that witha surplus of housing and these bad mortgages, it’s going totake at least until 2011 before business conditions will getbetter. But it is a good time to modernize our mill becauseprices are down on buying equipment now.As I said, I think it’s going to take a couple of years forbusiness conditions to get better. The outcome of the electionwill be a major factor. I personally don’t feel we needtax increases. If anything, we need lower taxes to promotebusiness, which will get this economy picked back up,again.We have a slow economy here in the United States but,presently, so does the rest of the world. I believe the peopleover in Europe and Asia, and a lot of other countries, arewaiting to see what we’re going to do. If we don’t get oureconomy straightened out, they aren’t going to get theirsstraightened out either. We are still leaders of the worldand others are depending on us to set the pace.We’re looking forward to better business conditions in thefuture. I want to take this opportunity to wish everyone inthe industry a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.Please turn the page58228 County Road 43, P.O. Box 1168Middlebury, Indiana 46540Phone: (574) 825-2129 FAX: (574) 825-7519HARDWOOD LUMBER SALES:Rick Hetler - rick@indianawood.comCharlie Steiner - csteiner@indianawood.comBill Tusing - bill@indianawood.comVENEER LOG SALES: Dean HowardMANUFACTURERS OF FINE QUALITY INDIANA &MICHIGAN GREEN & KILN DRIED HARDWOODS- 200,000’ kiln capacity - surfacing- 625,000’ pre-dryer capacity - straight line ripping- inspection after kiln drying - mixed truckloads- container loading - export preparation- 1,000,000’ kiln dried inventoryred oak, white oak, cherry, white ash,poplar, hard maple, soft maple,hickory, walnutRutland LumberCompany, Inc.4/4 Bandsawn White & Red Oak and PoplarSpecialtiesCrane/Dragline Mats up to 8’x12”x36’BoardroadExport Prep.FacilitiesDry Kiln, Planing Mill, 7’ Band Mill, 7’ Band ResawTotal Annual Prod. - 19,000,000 BFAvg. AD Inventory - 2,000,000 BFAvg. KD Inventory - 300,000 BFP. O. Box 2349 Collins, MS 39428Tel. (601) 765-8892 (800) 426-3319 FAX (601) 765-4352Sales - Lee Bass Email: lee@rutlandlumber.comJoe Vaughn Email: jvaughn@rutlandlumber.comCHRISTMAS/2008 75


FORECASTS - ContinuedMarijo WoodNeff Lumber MillsBroadway, Va.Established 1798J. Gibson M c Ilvain CompanyMain OfficeP.O. Box 222, 10701 Philadelphia RoadWhite Marsh, Maryland 21162410-335-9600 • 800-638-9100FAX 410-335-3574email info@mcilvain.comhttp://www.mcilvain.com/Prompt Shipment by our own fleet of trucks/containers as required nationwide.Complete Moulding & Millwork FacilitiesImported & Domestic SpeciesDomestic SpeciesAlder, Birch, Cherry, Hard Maple, Poplar, Red Oak, Soft Maple, Walnut, White OakAfrican SpeciesAfrican Mahogany, Afrormosia, Aniegre, Bubinga, Makore, Padouk, Sapele, Utile/Sipo, WengeSouth American SpeciesCambara Decking, Cumaru Decking, Genuine Mahogany, Ipe Decking, Jatoba, MassarandubaDecking, Peruvian Walnut, Purpleheart, Santos Mahogany, Spanish Cedar, Tigerwood DeckingEuropean SpeciesEuropean Steamed Beech, Russian BirchNew England Office:P.O. Box 294, 127 Rock AvenueDanielson, Connecticut 06239860-774-4930 • 800-231-7061FAX 860-774-4790Asian SpeciesEbony, Keruing, Philippine Mahogany, TeakPlywoodAfrican Mahogany, Cherry, Maple, Marine Grade, Red Oak, Sapele6 million BF hardwoods in stock.Please call for inquiries at either of our locations.Linwood Truitt, who is in charge of sales at Beasley, is standing by hiscompany’s sign that proudly displays their logo.Beasley Forest Products, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of 200,000board feet of kiln capacity and a 7 foot band mill head-rig and carriage.For you, we at Beasley Forest Products, Inc.:• manufacture approximately 94 million board feet a year of Southern Hardwoodand Cypress lumber products.• saw and kiln-dry: Red Oak, White Oak, Poplar, Ash and Cypress in 4/4 thickness.• have 520,000 board feet of dry kiln capacity.• offer container loading for Export.• manufacture pallet components (cut-stock) for the pallet industry.• saw crossties and pallet cants.• saw Cypress framing timbers.• manufacture Cypress to various patterns.• offer prompt delivery with company trucks and local trucking companies.• anti-stain treat, end-coat and paint all kiln-dried lumber.Beasley Forest Products, Inc.P.O. Box 788 • Hazlehurst, Georgia 31539Phone: (912) 375-5174 ext 107 • FAX: (912) 375-9541E-mail: bfp9541@bellsouth.netWeb Address: www.beasleyforestproducts.comSALES: Linwood TruittCell: (912) 253-9000We think business conditions will getbetter in 2010, however the reality isnobody really knows when the economywill get better. We are hoping for aturn-around the middle of 2009.Currently in the Appalachian regionthere is a shortage of Poplar lumber, soprices of this species of lumber have risen, and that’s goodfor our overall business.At Neff, we have our own sawmill that cuts mostly gradelumber but we also manufacture pallets and surveystakes. We have plenty of logs and our Red Oak and WhiteOak strips are selling well. There has been a slow down inthe lumber industry in the U.S. for the last two to threeyears but we’ve increased our lumber exports, so today it’sabout 75 percent of our business, with the other 25 percentof our sales being in the domestic market. Containershipping is relatively adequate depending on the countrya company wants to ship to. For example, if we’re shippinglumber to Malaysia, it might be three or four weeksbefore we can get a container, and if we’re shipping toItaly it may only be a week or two.As for certification, presently, we’re not really affected.People abroad know that our lumber is manufacturedfrom logs that come from forest lands that are sustainable.Our agent in Denmark, for example, said that heknows that lumber exported from the United Statescomes from sawmillers, or other export lumber suppliers,who, ‘down the line’ are using good forestry practices.When we saw a downward trend in the economy occurringin 2005, we added a dry kiln specifically for heattreatingour pallets. That has helped us expand our marketsfor our pallets both internationally and domestically.We’d like to take this opportunity to wish everyone inthe Hardwood industry a Merry Christmas and HappyNew Year.Jim TannerTanner Lumber Co.Elkins, W.Va.With so much of our business beingrelated to the housing industry, I do notbelieve we will see a major upswing inthe Hardwood lumber business untilnew housing starts begin to rebound.The real issue, in my opinion, is can anoptimistic lumber supplier surviveuntil this happens.In these economic conditions, sawmillers are trying todecide whether to continue operating during this downmarket, or whether to shut down their operations andwait it out. Most of our sawmill suppliers are people whohave been in business for a long time, and have the financialreserves to stop producing lumber if they so choose.They are not talking about selling their mills, but are consideringtaking a stop, wait and see position. If things donot improve within a reasonable amount of time, they willthen decide if they want to liquidate their operations.One of my biggest concerns is that I do not believe anybodyin the lumber business is making a profit and no oneis excited about hanging on for a year or two until thebusiness becomes profitable again. If too many sawmills76 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


FORECASTS - Continueddisappear from the supply stream, it will become difficultto meet today’s demands not to mention the demand whenthe housing market does rebound.Additionally, the cost of timber has not dropped in pricein relation to lumber, which is adding to the squeeze. Weare located in the midst of the world’s best timber supplyand I see the pressure the mills are experiencing. Wemust see a rebound in lumber prices before the yards andmills will be able to get back to where they can survive.Also fuel costs are affecting everything we do in the lumberyardbusiness. Every raw material we use, other thanlumber, has increased in price, which is making it difficultfor us. Everyone is experiencing the same problems:increased costs, lower gross profit margins. For example,the price of steel has risen considerably causing anincrease in the cost of everything we have to purchase forthe continuation of our operations while the profit marginon everything we sell is dropping.I hope we will see some improvement in the 1st quarterof 2009. I do not, however, think we will see much, if any,improvement for another six to nine months. We will haveto wait and see what effects the government bail out programswill have had on the economy and Wall Street. Weare in uncharted waters as far as the Federal Reserveloaning huge amounts of money to banks and Wall Streetfirms – the outcome is uncertain at best. Until the problemswith Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae are resolved, weare not going to see housing starts improve much. Nor doI foresee a major recovery until the surplus of foreclosedhouses are out of the marketplace. I am starting to seesome evidence of that happening now but how long andhow fast it takes is anybody’s guess. I hope that it willtake no more than a year for the market to move the foreclosurehouses and new home starts will come back at areasonable pace.I want to take this opportunity to wish everyone in thelumber industry a Merry Christmas and a Happy NewYear, especially our friends, customers and suppliers wehave here at Tanner Lumber Company.•HARDWOOD RESOLUTION - Continued from page 27industry is one of the major sources of economic activity and sustenancein many rural communities;Whereas United States hardwoods are grown by thousands ofsmall family landowners who may harvest trees only once ortwice in a generation; andWhereas United States hardwoods and the products derivedfrom United States hardwoods are prized throughout the worldas a superior and long-lasting building material: Now, therefore,be itResolved, That the House of Representatives —(1) recognizes that United States hardwoods are an abundant,sustainable, and legal resource under the United States rule oflaw; and(2) urges that United States hardwoods and products derivedfrom United States hardwoods should be given full considerationin any program directed at constructing environmentally preferablecommercial, public, or private buildings.Hardwood company representatives can contact their U.S. congressmenand ask them to sign on as a co-sponsor. Please call theCapitol switchboard at 202-224-3121 and ask to speak to yourcongressman, or visit www.congress.org to find contact information.•Season’s Greetings“Quality Hardwood Lumber and Flooring”P.O. Box 458, Hwy. 41 South Buena Vista, GA 31803Tel: (229) 649-9328 FAX: (229) 649-9585Quality Bandsawn HardwoodsProduce 17 million ft. annually • 500,000’ kiln capacityNewman 282 planer • Straight line rip capabilityExport prep and shipping • Width sorting availableSpecies: Red Oak, White Oak, Ash, PoplarLumber Sales: Roland Weaver 229-649-9328Kevin Cloer 229-649-9328Brad Bradley 706-754-8221ANNOUNCINGthe opening of our newTennessee location - offeringAppalachian Hardwoods“Quality Hardwood Flooring”75,000 SF Manufacturing facility Producing 2 1 /4, 3 1 /4, 4, & 5” FlooringContactKevin Cloer - E-mail: kcloeroakcrest@windstream.netBobby Cloer - bcloeroakcrest@windstream.net“For unto you is born this day in the city of David, a Saviorwhich is Christ the Lord.” Luke 2:11WARNING!Once you’ve tried a load of our Appalachian HardwoodLumber we know you’ll be pleased with the quality andcount on us as one of your reliable suppliers.Manufacturers of QualityAppalachian Hardwood LumberWilson Hardwoods Inc.Route 89 North, Titusville, PA 16354Doug WilsonPhone: 814-827-7934Toll Free: 877-766-6967FAX: 814-827-7934E-Mail: wilsonhardwoods@verizon.netServices:kiln driedmixed truckloadsexport prep &container loadingsurfacingdouble end trimstraight line rippingSALES:Brian HughesPhone: 218-751-3038FAX: 218-751-3039Cell: 218-766-6967E-Mail: bhughes@paulbunyan.netSpecies:CherryHard MapleRed OakWhite OakSoft MapleWalnutHickoryand othersFor our customers, and others in need we:• manufacture and market quality, Appalachian Hardwoods.• cut approximately 6,000,000 board feet of quality bandsawnAppalachian Hardwood lumber per year (green or kiln dried), and weproduce pallet lumber and cants as well. Our lumber is in 4/4 through8/4 thicknesses.• sell export quality veneer and sawlogs.Green lumber inquiries always welcome.CHRISTMAS/2008 77


T R A D ET A L KW. Springfield, NHP.O. Box 96 • Route 4AWest Springfield, NH 03284603-763-4525 • FAX: 603-763-4701Web Site: www.ghevarts.comE-mail: ghevarts@tds.netContact: George H. Evarts • Greg WinnieLebanon, NHWashington, D.C.—According to a recent study by the U.S.International Trade Commission (ITC), U.S. wood flooringand Hardwood plywood industries have faced increasingcompetition from imports in recent years, particularly fromChina, which has become its most significant competitor.The study, “Wood Flooring and Hardwood Plywood:Competitive Conditions Affecting the U.S. Industries,” wasrequested by the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance, andlooked at U.S. production, consumption and trade of woodflooring and Hardwood plywood between 2002 and 2007.According to the study, U.S. wood flooring consumptiongrew rapidly over the period studied, driven by strongdemand from residential construction and remodeling andrising consumer preference for wood flooring relative toother types of flooring. Increased demand for Hardwood plywoodin some end uses, such as cabinetry and fixtures, waspartially offset by weak demand in others (e.g., furniture).With the housing slowdown, which began in 2006, consumptionof both products declined in 2007.U.S. imports increased faster than U.S. production as shiftingpreferences for prefinished flooring, exotic species andengineered wood flooring benefited imports more thandomestic production.Combined global trade of wood flooring and Hardwoodplywood increased by 80 percent with the United States andthe top foreign suppliers (Brazil, Canada, China, Indonesia,Malaysia and Russia) accounting for more than three-fourthsof global exports.Illegal logging contributed to increased production andconsumption of these products. Major exporters have implementedmeasures designed to conserve and/or retain forestresources for their domestic producers, and major markets(e.g., the United States, the European Union and Japan), haveeither implemented or are developing policies to address illegallogging.“Wood Flooring and Hardwood Plywood: CompetitiveConditions Affecting the U.S. Industries” will be available onthe ITC’s Web site at hotdocs.usitc.gov/-pubs/332/pub4032.pdf. A CD-ROM of the report may berequested by e-mailing pubrequest@usitc.gov, calling 202-205-2000, or contacting the Office of the Secretary, U.S.International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW,Washington, D.C., 20436. Requests may also be faxed to 202-205-2104.•Mauckport, Ind.—Norstam Veneers Inc., a Hardwood lumberand veneer manufacturer, located here, recentlyannounced plans to rebuild and expand its operations followinga fire earlier this year. The company also expects toadd up to 24 new associates by 2011 and invest more than $12million to reconstruct its 106,000-square-foot production and78 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


An update covering thelatest news aboutHardwood Suppliers.distribution facility.“Norstam Veneers is a homegrown Indiana company thatcontinues to invest in our state and create jobs for hardworkingHoosiers,” said Indiana Lt. Gov. Becky Skillman. “We’rehappy to help them contribute to Indiana’s continuing economicgrowth.”Norstam Veneers Inc. is a manufacturer of custom veneersand lumber for the furniture and custom millwork markets.Founded in 1979, Norstam specializes in supplyingHardwood products to customers worldwide. The firm willlikely begin hiring additional production associates, salesand management personnel to coincide with the opening ofthe new facility in the first quarter of 2009.The Indiana Economic Development Corp. offered up to$100,000 in infrastructure assistance funds and up to $12,500in training grants. Harrison County will provide $900,000 toextend the water line to the site at the request of the HarrisonCounty Economic Development Corp.•Richmond, B.C..— Progressive Solutions Inc., headquarteredin Richmond, B.C., announced record sales in NorthAmerica in a recent fiscal quarter, with over 1,000 new usersof bisTrack, lumberTrack and Microsoft Dynamics GP (GreatPlains).“We have the pleasure of working with an outstandinggroup of new bisTrack and lumberTrack believers,” said LenWilliams, president of Progressive Solutions. “Our customersare the new generation of pioneers, forging beyondoutdated software packages to invest in today’s advancedtechnology so they can continue to increase market share,efficiency and profitability.”Progressive Solutions’ bisTrack and lumberTrack softwaresolutions feature a powerful Microsoft-based platform thatharnesses an environment with familiar user interface, easydata access, business intelligence and analytic tools, and limitlessintegration possibilities. An added advantage, comprehensiveindustry-specific functionality and reporting canhelp companies best identify and profit from unique opportunitiesin today’s competitive wood products and buildingmaterials supply chain markets.•Chesterfield, Mo.—The National Wood Flooring Assoc.(NWFA), headquartered here, recently opened registrationfor its 24th annual Wood Flooring Expo and EducationConference, scheduled for April 28-May 1, 2009, in LongBeach, Calif. The event is one of the largest conventions anywherededicated exclusively to wood flooring.This year’s show in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., attracted moreAn aerial view of Robert S. Coleman Lumber Co., Inc.’s band milloperation with dry kilns.For fine AppalachianHardwood Lumber andPallet Stock, contact aspecialist...Robert S. ColemanLumber CompanyTo better serve our customers, we have a bandmilland dry kilns at our operation, so for yourHardwood Lumber needs (green or kiln dried) contactRobert S. Coleman, Jr. or Jamie ColemanThis is a view of our McDonough headrig that does a great job inmanufacturing quality Hardwood lumber for our operation.Robert S. ColemanLumber Co., Inc.7019 Everona RoadCulpeper, VA 22701Office: (540) 854-4628FAX: (540) 854-5096E-mail: jamie@colemanlumber.comPlease turn the pageCHRISTMAS/2008 79


The MANN & PARKER Lumber CompanyNew Freedom, PASouthern Manufacturers of 20,000,000 bd. ft.of Bandsawn Red Oak and White Oak, Poplar and AshCoby Crager, OperationsManager of Al-Tom ForestProducts, Inc.Lumber forboardroad andcrane mat timbersWe care about producing the best lumber wepossibly can for you, the customer!Please call or fax any inquiries to:Al-Tom Forest Products, Inc.Waynesboro, MSPhone: 601-735-2734FAX: 601-735-2809Ricky Smith, Operations Manager of KelwoodProducts, Inc., and Tommy Kelley standing infront of logs being watered down to keep themfresh for customers.you’ll be glad you did!Kelwood Products, Inc.Enterprise, MSPhone: 601-659-7027FAX: 601-659-3595Email: rkp@kelleycompanies.comWe can offer you Kiln Dried or Green lumber!TRADE TALK - Continuedthan 3,400 attendees from all over the world. The 2009 eventwill feature more than 500 exhibit booths showcasing theindustry’s latest products, machinery, tools and services.General sessions will include “Getting Your Business ToWork For You,” “How To Capitalize On A Reviving Market”and “Advertising and Marketing.”The entire education conference, which includes theWelcome Reception, Awards Party, Networking Lunches,General Sessions and all education sessions, will cost $350for registrations received by March 27. For more information,visit www.nwfa.org.•Ottawa, Ont.—The Forest Products Association of Canada,based here, along with PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)recently published a free buyer’s guide for sustainableCanadian forest products.The appropriately named “A Buyer’s Guide to Canada’sSustainable Forest Products” covers topics such as: climatechange, traceability, certification, legality and social desirability,and provides information to consider when penningprocurement policies. The guide recommends buyers lookbeyond the traditional price, quality, service and availability,and evaluate the full cycle of forest projects, from productionthrough usage and disposal.“Beyond the immediate and obvious consequences of theirpurchases, consumers, retailers, investors and communitiesare taking an increased interest in how their buying decisionswill affect the environment for future generations,” saidBruce McIntyre, co-author of the guide. “We want to helpmake those choices by providing them with solid informationon Canada’s environmental credentials when it comes toforest products.”•Ponte Vedra, Fla.—Appalachian Hardwood ManufacturersInc. (AHMI), headquartered in High Point, N.C., is currentlymaking plans for its 2009 Annual Meeting set for Feb. 25through March 1, 2009, at the PonteVedra Inn & Club.The theme for next year’s event is “WillEconomic Recovery Come In 2009?” andis based on the ever changing forecastfrom economists and other financialleaders. The agenda includes presentationsfrom credit insurance specialists,an economist and industry experts.“Economic issues will continue to be atTom Inmanthe forefront in early 2009, and we wantto prepare AHMI members with strategiesto succeed,” said Tom Inman, AHMI president. “Thereare so many variables that are constantly changing. We willlook at a few key areas and offer insight for meeting attendees.”There will be an extra emphasis on the receptions andsocial times this coming year along with golf, tennis andsporting clays. For more information, contact AHMI at 336-885-8315 or send an e-mail to info@appalachianwood.org.•Oakland, Calif.—According to a recent study, bioenergyproduction reduces greenhouse gas levels by enhancing forestcarbon sequestration. The study was prepared for theGreen Power Institute’s Renewable Energy Program of thePacific Institute, based here, using the latest research by Dr.80 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


TRADE TALK - ContinuedGregory Morris.“Biomass electricity, produced from the controlled combustionof untreated cellulosic wastes lowers net greenhouse gasemissions below a zero greenhouse gas emissions level,” saidRobert E. Cleaves IV, chairman of USA Biomass in Portland,Maine. “This is because the usual disposal options for woodand agriculture wastes emit large quantities of methane gasand CO2 through decomposition, forest fires and landfilling.”The Green Power Institute is the renewable energy programof the Pacific Institute. Under the direction of Dr.Gregory Morris, the Institute performs research and providesadvocacy on behalf of renewable energy systems andthe contribution they make to reduce the environmentalimpacts of society’s energy systems.•West Lafayette, Ind.—Dan Cassens, professor of forestryand natural resources at Purdue University, based here,recently helped create a “Lumber from Hardwoods” CDaimed at helping woodworkers and sawmills of all sizes. Thedisc features 35 Hardwood species used for lumber, includingdetailed photographs that can be enlarged for printing.Cassens, who owns and manages Hardwood forestlandwith his Woodmizer sawmill, used more than 30 years ofresearch-based, hands-on practical field experience to compilethe information for “Lumber from Hardwoods.”Information provided to help determine species selectionincludes decay resistance, mechanical properties, the productionprocess, purchasing and selling Hardwood lumber,shrinkage of lumber, steam bending, understanding lumber,and wood machining properties.The Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen’s Assoc. andWoodmizer Products Inc. sponsored the CD. The wood panelspictured were sponsored by Cassens Trees, ColeHardwood Inc., Crone Lumber Co. Inc., Dubois WoodProducts, Forest Products Mfg., Indiana HardwoodSpecialist, Koetter Woodworking Inc. and Landmark WoodProducts Inc. The panels are on permanent display inPfendler Hall on Purdue’s West Lafayette campus.“Lumber from Hardwoods” can be ordered for $25 fromthe Purdue Extension Education Store atwww.ces.purdue.edu/new or by calling 1-888-398-4636.In related news, Purdue University recently began planninga 100-year study to develop better forest managementmethods. The study will also measure how those practicesaffect resident plant and animal species. Researchers willconduct their work in nine 200-acre research areas within theMorgan-Monroe and Yellowwood State Forests in Indiana.•New York, N.Y.—According to a report byPricewaterhouseCoopers, based here, the Canadian forestindustry lost more than $1.2 billion in 2008, including $700million by companies in the east and $500 million in the westincluding British Columbia. Final figures had yet to be postedas of press time.Craig Campbell, a co-author of the report, said BritishColumbia’s interior lumber industry took such a hit becauseapproximately 80 percent of its output goes into the U.S.housing market. Since annual housing starts are down considerablyfrom their peak several years ago, losses could beexpected.Please turn the pageLUMBER CO., Inc.Manufacturers ofBand Sawn Hardwoods100,000’ Dry Kiln CapacityDry Storage FacilitiesDavid, Josh, Buddy andTerry Roberson, standing infront of 12/4 FAS Poplar.Henning, Tennessee 38041731/738-5021 FAX: 731/738-5027Email: reelfootlumberco@bellsouth.netRandy, Terry, David & Odie L. (Buddy) RobersonSales: Josh RobersonE-mail: josh_reelfootlbr@bellsouth.netLumber For ALifetime.Phone: 319-986-5524Toll Free: 877-SAWLOGSFax: 319-986-5710Email: sally@bateyltd.comSales: Sally JohnsonSpecializing inWalnut, Soft Maple,White Oak and Red OakCHRISTMAS/2008 81


Contact usfor fineHardwoods3530 Jonathan Creek RoadWaynesville, North Carolina 28785 U.S.A.Tel: (828) 926-1621Fax: (828) 926-3383E-Mail: mail@oaksunlimited.comWebsite: www.oaksunlimited.comContact: Joe Pryor, Mark Tayloror our other salesmenWhite Oak • Red OakYellow Poplar • CherryA view of some of our lumber air drying in our shed.Meeder’s Lumber Co. ANDMeeder’s Dimension& Lumber Products Co.• Custom Kiln Drying• Glued Panels• Turning Squares• Northern Hardwoods & Pine• Primary Species Hard Maple & Basswood• Dimension Plant• SawmillFamily Owned and Operated Since 1947Happy Holidays!7810 S. M-88 Hwy.Mancelona, Michigan 49659Phone (231) 587-9761 or 587-8611FAX (231) 587-8333Mitch MeederTRADE TALK - ContinuedHowever, Campbell said, “Usually we bounce off the bottomrelatively quickly. Down cycles last six to 12 months.This time, and I’ve been saying this for a year, there is no endin sight.”British Columbia lumber prices have fallen to their lowestpoint since 1991 at under $190 U.S. per 1,000 boards. “That’sputting most producers under water,” Campbell said. “If yougo back to 2004, we were in the high $300s, $400. We were themost profitable region in the world.”•Marion, N.C.—Blue Ridge Wood Products, headquarteredhere, recently retained the Easton, Md.-based EquityPartners Inc. to obtain sources of additional equity or to sellits sawmill.Founded in 2002, Blue Ridge operates a state-of-the-art,32,000-square-foot mill on 40 acres in Marion, about 30 mileseast of Asheville, N.C. The company manufactures and distributeslumber and associated wood products and is capableof producing 30 million board feet annually.Jeff Benfield, Blue Ridge president, said, “Due to thedecline in the economy, and housing market specifically, wewere forced to file Chapter 11 protection in July 2008.However, despite the current suspension of operations, customerscall daily to inquire as to when they will be able toresume business with us.”Management hopes that the ultimate buyer will want toresume operations, in order to serve the customer base andbring jobs back to the area. When the mill was operating, itemployed about 50 people, working one shift. With properfunding, the company plans to increase that number to over70 in order to run a second shift. “Our crew is drawing temporarylayoff and are on standby to come back to workquickly,” Benfield said.•Washington, D.C.—The United States Department ofAgriculture, headquartered here, recently began offeringincentive payments to producers with Conservation ReserveProgram acres as a means to encourage enhanced wetlandand bottomland Hardwood conservation.“Bottomland Hardwoods, flood plain wetlands, and nonfloodplain wetlands as well as our deck nesting habitat practicewill be eligible for these new incentive payments, whichwill total $204 million over 10 years,” said John Johnson,USDA Farm Service Agency deputy administrator.The incentive payments include 40 percent of the cost ofestablishing the practice, a signing incentive of $100 an acre,and an enhance soil rental rate of 20 percent over the normalsoil rental rate.•St. Paul, Minn.—The University of Minnesota ExtensionService, based here, recently began a project to collect andsend seed from Ash trees grown in the wild to a seed storagefacility in Colorado. The project, a proactive response to thepresence of the Emerald Ash Borer, is being led by AndrewDavid, a University of Minnesota forest genetics researcher,and Mike Reichenbach, a forestry educator with theUniversity of Minnesota Extension.Minnesota is host to White, Green and Black Ash trees.While White Ash grows along the Mississippi River in southeastMinnesota, Black and Green Ash are found throughoutmuch of the state. Black and Green Ash represent 51 percentof the lowland Hardwood cover type in Minnesota. BlackAsh is also very important in native cultures as a source of82 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


TRADE TALK - Continuedwood for Ash baskets. Both Black and Green Ash are used toproduce pallets, saw and veneer logs.The Emerald Ash Borer was most likely transported to theUnited States in 2002 on wood packaging from Asia to theDetroit, Mich., and Windsor, Ont., areas. Within the UnitedStates, the insect is most often transported on firewood. TheEmerald Ash Borer has been responsible for the death of over20 million Ash trees throughout Illinois, Indiana, Maryland,Michigan, Missouri, Ontario, Ohio, Pennsylvania andWisconsin.•Camptonville, Calif.—Possum Tree Farm, based here,recently became the newest member of the WesternHardwood Assoc. (WHA). Phil Simmons is the owner ofPossum Tree Farm, a sawmill and private timber tracts.The Western Hardwood Assoc. was founded in 1955 tobring Western U.S. Hardwoods to a position of prominencein the manufacturing of fine furniture and cabinets.Membership consists of sawmills, manufacturers, re-manufacturers,wholesalers, landowners, timber owners and serviceorganizations. The organization’s mission is, “To promoteand market Western Hardwoods while educatingstakeholders on sustainable and environmentally responsibleresource management.”For more information, contact Possum Tree Farm at 530-289-3336 or e-mail mmccoun@deschutespine.com.•Washington, D.C.—Sandy Dunn, chairman of the NationalAssociation of Home Builders (NAHB), located here, suggestedrecently that state and local governments will have toconsider innovative ideas to help put the housing marketback on track.“Necessity is indeed the mother of invention during afinancial crisis,” she said. “While the federal government hasstepped forward with a series of emergency actions to stabilizeand restore confidence in the financial markets, it’s nowtime for the same sort of innovative thinking at the local andstate levels where public officials are grappling with budgetshortfalls that are putting a squeeze on spending for everythingfrom schools to public safety and other essential services.”Dunn said such creative thinking could include foregoingimpact fees on new development, allowing higher densityzoning to build more affordable housing or streamlining theentire development review process. She added that it is alsoimportant for cities and counties to extend existing zoningapprovals while builders work out financing for new projects.“By encouraging new development rather than penalizingit, local governments will be helping to create a new businessenvironment that will generate jobs, stabilize property valuesand get the housing market back on track,” Dunn said.A recent NAHB study estimates that in 2008: constructionof 1,000 new single-family homes created 3,049 jobs and generatedmore than $89 million in tax and other revenues forfederal, state and local governments; construction of 1,000new multifamily rental apartments created 1,155 jobs andgenerated more than $33 million in tax and other governmentrevenues; and $100 million worth of residential remodelingactivity created 1,109 jobs and generated more than $30million in tax and other government revenues.•Please turn the pageGriffith Lumber Company, Inc.Since 1933Four Generations of Fine Appalachian Hardwoodsand Stacking Sticks1284 Charity HighwayWoolwine, Virginia 24185Ph 276-930-2727 Fax 276-930-2747www.griffithlumber.net Email: Bruce@griffithlumber.netLUMBERCall Bud Griffith or Email: Bud@griffithlumber.netWith 13,000,000 bdft production of White Poplar (4/4-12/4),Great Color in Oaks, Red Knot White Pine, Hickory, Soft Maple,House Logs and Pallet PartsSTACKING STICKS - Call Larry CockramWe ship 3.75 million stacking sticks per year to the majorindustries and they get high quality, reasonable pricesand quick delivery.Larry Cockram, Kara Griffith Ward, Bruce Griffith (President),Bill Griffith (Vice President) and Bud Griffith (Secretary-Treasurer)We are very thankful for our workers, suppliers,customers and friends and wish all a goodChristmas and prosperous New YearWe will be offering kiln dried lumber from our new dry kiln in 2009!Happy HolidaysSTEWART LUMBERCOMPANYP.O. BOX 643 • MORRISTOWN, TN 37815423-586-3531 • FAX 423-587-2210Specialties: 8/4 Red & WhiteOak In FAS/1F GradeQuality AppalachianHardwoodsBandsawn, Pre-Dried,Kilns, Rail Siding,Export PackagingContainer Loading• RED OAK • WHITE OAK• POPLAR • HICKORY• MAPLE • ASH(4/4 thru 12/4 thicknesses available upon request)SALES: EDGAR S. GRAYFrom:CHRISTMAS/2008 83


TRADE TALK - Continued CURTNER LUMBER COMPANYPhone: (870) 523-6702 FAX: (870) 523-6435P.O. Box 1028 Newport, Arkansas 72112MANUFACTURERS OFHARDWOOD LUMBERBAND MILL--CIRCLE MILL--OAK TIE SIDING--DRY KILNS--SURFACEROAK GOOD FOR COLOR TEXTURE---NORTH ARK. SOUTH MO. STOCKPROMPT SHIPMENTS--MIXED LOADS--VIA TRUCK OR RAIL“WOULD APPRECIATE HEARING FROM YOU”Boston, Mass.—According to RISI’s“Wood Biomass Market Report,”operators of new wood biomass projects,often industry newcomers,recently noted that their wood costprojections are unrealistic, and existingmills are willing to fight with dollarsto preserve their wood supplierloyalty.The Report said that these operators,who are looking for large volumes ofwood, and often backed with governmentsubsidies, are finding that theperceived overabundance of “wastewood” is not there. As a result,increased demand for more traditionalforms of wood fiber has spikedwood prices and cross-grade competitionin the tightest markets.“Recent and upcoming project startsin the energy, pellet and biofuels sectorswill add an estimated 37 milliontons per year to existing wood fiberdemand in North America, and thatnumber could easily jump to 50 milliontons in short order,” said WilliamPerritt, editor of the Wood BiomassMarket Report. “These new playersshould understand that they are goingto have to fight much harder than theymight have planned to procureenough wood fiber to run at theircapacity.”RISI is a leading informationprovider for the global forest productsindustry. The company works withclients in the pulp and paper, woodproducts, timber, tissue, nonwovens,printing and publishing industries tohelp them make better decisions.•Klamath Falls, Ore.—ColumbiaForest Products, located here, recentlyconverted all of its Hardwood plywoodand particleboard facilities to aproprietary formaldehyde-free manufacturingsystem called PureBond.As a result of the switch, theCalifornia Air Resources Board(CARB) also recognized the firm’sseven North American plywood millsas certified to produce panels compliantwith CARB Airborne ToxicControl Measure standards.Todd Vogelsinger, director of marketing,said, “Not only does this makeColumbia Forest Products’ PureBondveneer core the first Hardwood plywoodto achieve CARB certification,but it was done at the more challengingPhase 2 level — over a year aheadof the regulation’s deadline.”•84 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


OBITUARIESBen Hill FranklinHigh Point, N.C.—Ben HillFranklin Jr., former owner ofFranklin Lumber Sales, based inGreensboro, N.C., recently passedaway.Franklin was born Jan. 29, 1918, inScreven County, Ga., to the lateHelen Glover and Ben Hill Franklin.In 1941, he graduated from TheCitadel, the Military College of SouthCarolina, with a bachelor’s degree inbusiness. He then reported for activeduty as a second lieutenant in theU.S. Army, and was assigned to the70 th Coast Antiaircraft Artillery. Heserved for over five years duringWorld War II, including two tours ofduty in the Pacific Theatre. Heretired from the U.S. Army Reservesin 1953 as a captain.Franklin was a resident of HighPoint since 1947. Soon after WorldWar II, he joined Georgia-PacificCorp., where he began a long careerin Hardwood lumber sales. He joinedNational Lumber Sales Co. in 1973,and in 1981, formed FranklinLumber Sales. He retired in 2000.Since 1972, Franklin enjoyed avacation home in Myrtle Beach, S.C.,where he pursued his passion fordeep-sea fishing. He was a member ofWesley Memorial United MethodistChurch. He was preceded in death byhis wife of 60 years, Frances CaterFranklin, in 2001.Franklin is survived by two children,Ben Hill Franklin III ofGreensboro, N.C., and Frances CaterFranklin of Atlanta, Ga.; threegrandchildren, Melanie FranklinLinkous and Jordan ChristopherFranklin, both of Greensboro, andAshley Franklin Matthews ofAsheville; and two great-grandchildren,Tara Matthews and CraigMatthews of Asheville.Funeral services were held atWesley Memorial United MethodistChurch with the Rev. Ashley CrowderStanley officiating. Interment was inFloral Garden Memorial Park.Memorial contributions may be madeto Wesley Memorial UnitedMethodist Church, 1225 ChestnutDrive, High Point, N.C., 27262, or tothe charity of the donor’s choice.•Please turn the pageJ.W. McKittrick Lumber CompanyP.O. Box 2004Camden, South Carolina 29020Tel: (803) 432-4108 • Fax: (803) 432-4915e-mail: mcklumbr@bellsouth.netSALES: Jack McKittrick and Cliff McKittrickWarmest Wishes for a Happy HolidaySeason from all of us atJ.W. McKittrick Lumber CompanyWe’d like to thank all of our customersand lumber suppliers who have helped usthrough the years.For those in need of fine Appalachian and/or SouthernHardwood lumber in 4/4 through 8/4 thickness (greenor kiln dried) in all grades, please contact...Buehler Lumber Co., Inc.260 West Main Street, Ridgway, PA 15853Tel. (814) 776-1121, (877) 252-9663FAX (814) 772-0222Email: blumber@ncentral.comLOG SALES: Amy EllisHardwood Lumber - Veneer LogsSpecies: Ash, Poplar, Cherry,Red & White Oak, Hard & Soft MapleTotal Annual Production: 6,000,000 BFLakeland Hardwood Sales Co.Established in 1998* Over 40 years Experience in Lumber Business* Handling White Ash, Basswood, Beech, WHAD and WHNDSoft Maple through Kilns Located in Allegan and Traverse City, MI* Ability to Surface, Straight Line Rip, Mould to Pattern* Shipment via Truck or ContainerWE ALSO WHOLESALE ALL OTHER NATIVE AND FOREIGN SPECIESBY TRUCK, CONTAINER AND RAILCall Lynn NorlinTel: (888) 606-7560 • (231) 652-3050 • Fax: (231) 652-1244P.O. Box 286 • Newaygo, MI 49337-0286Email: lakelandhardwood@earthlink.netSEASON’SGREETINGSCHRISTMAS/2008 85


SEASNON’SGREETINGSFRED NETTERVILLELUMBER COMPANYManufacturers of Band Sawn Southern Hardwoods & CypressDry Kiln Capacity - 670,000 BFYates American B26 Planer2 million ft. dry storage8 million ft. inventory 30 million feet per yearNationwide delivery by our own trucksE-mail: charlie@nettervillelumber.com Web site: nettervillelumber.comE-mail: scottw@nettervillelumber.comP.O. Box 857, Woodville, Mississippi 39669NETCOPhone: 601/888-4343, FAX 601/888-6469FACILITIES: Distribution Yard • Dry Kilns • Own Trucks • S-382Newman Whitney Planer • Diehl Straight Line Rip • Whitney DS-802SPECIES: OAK • POPLAR • WHITE ASH • HICKORY • BASSWOOD• WALNUT • CHERRY • BIRCH • HARD & SOFT MAPLECall (574) 753-3151 or (800) 536-3151FAX: (574) 753-2525 or (800) 536-2526Logansport, Indiana 46947The entire North Pacific Hardwoods teamwishes you peace and happiness this HolidaySeason and throughout the New Year.North Pacific. Taking care of you and your business.Portland, OR 800.547.8440West Plains, MO 888.257.2054Advanced WoodDrying Technology.When it comes to drying wood, no one in theindustry can match the advanced technology ofVacDry. With VacDry’s patented process you get shorter schedules, better lookingwood, less degrade and significant energy savings.Learn more at www.vacdry.com or call 888.482.2379.VacDry kilns are available in kiln sizes up to 20,000 BFWeb Site: www.colehardwood.come-mail: dave@colehardwood.comAdvanced Wood Drying TechnologyOBITUARIES - ContinuedAndrew Gennett Jr.Asheville, N.C.—Andrew GennettJr., former president of GennettLumber Co., headquartered here,recently passedaway.A longtimeresident ofAsheville, N.C.,Gennett wasborn to AndrewGennett Sr. andJulia TateGennett. Hewas a graduateof the University of North Carolina,where he was captain of the boxingteam and a Southern Conference boxingchampion. Gennett served aslieutenant commander in the U.S.Navy during World War II. Gennettwas also an Eagle Scout, andreceived the Silver Beaver award. Hewas a past president of the DanielBoone Council of Boy Scouts ofAmerica.Gennett had a long career in theHardwood lumber business, servingas president of the AppalachianHardwood Manufacturers Inc. andthe Appalachian Lumbermen’s Club.He was also vice president of theNational Hardwood Lumber Assoc.,and director of the First UnionNational Bank Trust Committee.Gennett was an avid outdoorsman,traveling around the world with hiswife, Mary, on hunting and fishingtrips. He was a council member ofThe Cradle of Forestry, and memberof the North Carolina Board ofConservation and Development. Hisfamily was instrumental in thefounding of the Joyce KilmerMemorial Forest.Survivors include his wife, MaryDallam Gennett; son, Philip RobiouGennett of Asheville, N.C.; daughter,Shelby Gennett Cloud of Atlanta,Ga.; four grandchildren, SarahRobiou Gennett, Philip AndrewGennett, Katherine Bell Cloud andJessica Rose Cloud; and severalnieces and nephews.Memorial services were held at St.Mary’s Episcopal Church inAsheville. Contributions may bemade in memory of Andrew Gennettto the Deerfield EpiscopalRetirement Community for theResident Assistance Fund, 1617Hendersonville Rd., Asheville, N.C.,28803.•86 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


OBITUARIES - ContinuedWyatt StrongSomerset, Ky.—Wyatt Strong,owner of Strong Forest Products,headquartered here, recently passedaway.Strong was born Sept. 29, 1956, toDorothy Starr and the late WilliamCollier Strong. He attendedMississippi State University, wherehe played football. Strong was amember of Eagle Heights BaptistChurch, the Sons of the AmericanLegion Post No. 38, Pulaski Vets PostNo. 269 and the Fort Wayne, Ind.,Shriners.Strong was a graduate of theNational Hardwood Lumber Assoc.Inspection School in Memphis, Tenn.He enjoyed skydiving, scuba diving,music, cooking, hunting, fishing andspending time with his family andfriends. Strong was an avid footballfan, especially of the Ole Miss Rebels.He is survived by his wife, TeresaHall Strong; two daughters, Ashleyand Miranda Strong, Somerset, Ky.;two brothers, Stephen A. Strong(Jean) of Collierville, Tenn., andDavid W. Strong (Jamie) ofGermantown, Tenn.; and a host ofother relatives and friends.Funeral services were held atPulaski Funeral Home in Somerset,Ky., with Bro. Ed Byland officiating,and at Forest Hill Funeral Home inMemphis, Tenn., with Dr. Ernie Freyofficiating. Interment was in ForestHill Cemetery in Memphis.•Graham Lumber Co.P.O. Box 679, U.S. 412 W., Linden, TN 37096 (931) 589-2143 FAX: (931) 589-5914e-mail: rbarber@ahwood.comAPPALACHIAN SPECIES HANDLED:70% Red & White Oak; 15% Poplar; 5% Hickory; 5% Hard Maple,Cherry, Walnut, Beech and Sap GumSeason’s GreetingsSpecializing in Random, Pulled to Width and Fixed Width Stripsin FAS & Common 4/4 & 5/4 Red & White Oak, Green & Kiln DriedLumber, Crossties & CantsFACILITIES INCLUDE:• Bandmill - Linden and Selmer, TN, Fulton, MS• Production - 35,000,000’• Concentration Yard• Dry Kiln Capacity: 500,000 BF per charge• Planer: S-382 Double Surfacer• FSC Certified LumberCONTACT: Roger BarberToal Lumber Co.Wholesale Hardwoods - Re-man FacilitiesCarloads & TNTs - Local InventoryDirect Mill ShippersServing the West Coast for 54 Years.Joe Purcell Frank McLean Wendy Purcell Todd PurcellP.O. Box 5465Whittier, CA 90607562-945-3889Fax: 562-693-5528Carl L. Rosenberry & SonsLumber, Inc.7446 Path Valley Road Fort Loudon, PA 17224FAX: (717) 349-2044 Phone: (717) 349-2289Email inquiries to Jackie Kriner atjackierosewood@innernet.netFine Pennsylvania Hardwoods75% Red and White OakMaintaining 700,000’ K.D. Inventory and1,000,000 bd. ft. of Green and Air Dried lumber300,000 bd. ft. Kiln Capacity • Annual Production 7,000,000’BJBruce & JenkinsLumber Co., Inc.ESTABLISHED IN 1943Hardwood Lumber, Squares, Rounds, TurningsSolid and Glued-up Furniture Dimension Rough or MouldedHandling Appalachian, Northern & Southern HardwoodsP.O. Box 10327 Greensboro, N.C. 27404Tel: (336) 275-9796 FAX: (336) 275-9755SALES: David K. McLean and Finn GrubbeE-mail: bjlbr@triad.twcbc.comCHRISTMAS/2008 87


933127738National HardwoodBuyer’s GuideBLANKSBabcock Lumber Co......................................63Gutchess Lumber ..........................................67Hawkeye Forest Products, Inc. ...................51Huntersville Hardwoods, Inc......................65McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76Midwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59Miller, R.A., Hardwood Co., Inc. ................13Netterville, Fred, Lumber Co. .....................86Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Somerset Wood Products, Inc......................62BOARDROAD TIMBERSAl-Tom Forest Products, Inc........................80Netterville, Fred, Lumber Co. .....................86Rutland Lumber Co., Inc. ............................75CABINET STOCKBabcock Lumber Co......................................63Gutchess Lumber ..........................................67Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71Wilson Lumber Co., Inc. ..............................13CRANE MAT TIMBERSAl-Tom Forest Products, Inc........................80Netterville, Fred, Lumber Co. .....................86Rutland Lumber Co., Inc. ............................75CRATING & BLOCKINGBabcock Lumber Co......................................63Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85Mueller Bros. Timber, Inc.............................16Tanner Lumber Co. .......................................13Valley View Hardwoods, Inc.........................4Wilson Hardwoods .......................................77CROSS TIES -SWITCH TIESAl-Tom Forest Products, Inc........................80Averitt, J.V., Lumber Co. ..............................60Babcock Lumber Co......................................63Beasley Forest Products, Inc........................76Bee Forest LLC...............................................12Graham Lumber Co......................................87Kepley-Frank Hardwood Co., Inc. .............23Midwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59Pine Mountain Hardwood Lbr. Co.............61Stewart Lumber Co.......................................83Tuscarora Hardwoods, Inc...........................58Wolf River Lumber Inc................................FCCUSTOM KILN DRYING &MILLING IN TRANSITBabcock Lumber Co......................................63Chaney Lumber Co., Inc. .............................84Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80Meeder’s Lbr. andMeeder’s Dimension & Lbr. Products Co. 82DIMENSION -FURNITURE PARTSAtlanta Hardwood Corp..............................65Babcock Lumber Co......................................63Bruce & Jenkins Lumber Co........................87Goodman, C.B., and Sons Lbr., Inc.............44Gutchess Lumber ..........................................67Indiana Dimension, Inc. ...............................11Irving, J.D., Limited ......................................15Kitchens Brothers Mfg. Co...........................74Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80Meeder’s Lbr. andMeeder’s Dimension & Lbr. Products Co. 82Midwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59Miller & Co., Inc. ........................................IBCMorris Lumber Co., Inc................................13Mueller Bros. Timber, Inc.............................16Netterville, Fred, Lumber Co. .....................86North Pacific ..................................................86Northland Forest Products, Inc.....................2O’Shea Lumber Co..........................................2Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Salamanca Lumber Co. ................................66Somerset Wood Products, Inc......................62Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71Taylor Lumber, Inc........................................33Wheeland Lumber Co., Inc..........................69Wilson Lumber Co., Inc. ..............................13Yoder Lumber Co., Inc. ................................84FIGURED HARDWOODSBatey, Ltd........................................................81Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76Miller, R.A., Hardwood Co., Inc. ................13Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71FLOORINGAnderson-Tully Co. (Laminated)................85Downes & Reader Hardwood Co., Inc. .......3Graf Brothers Lumber & Flooring ..............25Gutchess Lumber ..........................................67Hawkeye Forest Products, Inc. ...................5188 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


Kitchens Brothers Mfg. Co...........................74Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76Miller & Co., Inc. ........................................IBCMorris Lumber Co., Inc................................13Oakcrest Lumber, Inc....................................77Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Somerset Wood Products, Inc......................62Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71Wheeland Lumber Co., Inc..........................69LUMBER - HARDWOODS(Appalachian Hardwoods)Abenaki Timber Corp...................................64Atlanta Hardwood Corp..............................65Averitt, J.V., Lumber Co. ..............................60Babcock Lumber Co......................................63Baillie Lumber Co., Inc.................................47Banks Hardwoods, Inc. ..................................1Batey, Ltd........................................................81Bruce & Jenkins Lumber Co........................87Buehler Lumber Company ..........................85Chaney Lumber Co., Inc. .............................84Coleman, Robert S., Lumber Co., Inc.........79Cramer, W.M., Lumber Co...........................26Cummings Lumber Co., Inc. .......................74DJM Hardwoods & Veneer..........................46Evarts, G.H., & Co., Inc. ...............................78G.F. Hardwoods, Inc.....................................70GILCO Lumber, Inc. ....................................BCGoodman, C.B., and Sons Lumber, Inc......44Graf Brothers Lumber & Flooring ..............25Graham Lumber Co......................................87GreenTree Forest Products, Inc. ....................4Griffith Lumber Co., Inc...............................83Gutchess Lumber ..........................................67Hawkeye Forest Products, Inc. ...................51Hermitage Hardwood Lumber Sales, Inc. 72Highland Hardwood Sales, Inc...................48Holmes & Company, Inc................................9Huntersville Hardwoods, Inc......................65Industrial Timber & Lumber Corp.............31Jones, J.E., Lumber Co. .................................10Jones, Ron, Hardwood Sales, Inc................53Kepley-Frank Hardwood Co., Inc. .............23Kuhns Bros. Lumber Co., Inc. .....................19Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85Liberty Lumber Co........................................52Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76McKittrick, J.W., Lumber Co. ......................85Meridien Hardwoods of PA., Inc. ............IFCMidwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59Miller, Frank, Lumber Co., Inc....................73Missouri-Pacific Lumber Co........................56Morris Lumber Co., Inc................................13Neff Lumber Mills, Inc. ................................54North Pacific ..................................................86North State Hardwoods, Inc. ......................55Northland Corp.............................................68Northland Forest Products, Inc.....................2Oakcrest Lumber, Inc....................................77Oaks Unlimited .............................................82O’Shea Lumber Co..........................................2Pine Mountain Hardwood Lbr. Co.............61RAM Forest Products, Inc............................11Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Salamanca Lumber Co. ................................66Shannon, J.T., Lumber Co., Inc....................21Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Somerset Hardwoods, Inc............................62Stewart Lumber Co.......................................83Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71T & S Hardwoods, Inc. .................................17Tanner Lumber Co., LLC .............................13Taylor Lumber, Inc........................................33Toal Lumber Co.............................................87Tuscarora Hardwoods, Inc...........................58Valley View Hardwoods, Inc.........................4Wheeland Lumber Co., Inc..........................69Wilson Hardwoods .......................................77Yoder Lumber Co., Inc. ................................84(Canadian Hardwoods)Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76Miller, R.A., Hardwood Co., Inc. ................13North Pacific ..................................................86Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Salamanca Lumber Co. ................................66Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71(Northern Hardwoods)Abenaki Timber Corp...................................64American Lumber Co...................................45Atlanta Hardwood Corp..............................65Baillie Lumber Co., Inc.................................47Banks Hardwoods, Inc. ..................................1Bee Forest LLC...............................................12Bingaman & Son Lumber, Inc. ....................50Bruce & Jenkins Lumber Co., Inc. ..............87Champlain Hardwoods Inc. ........................14Cole Hardwood, Inc. ....................................86Cramer, W.M., Lumber Co...........................26Cummings Lumber Co., Inc. .......................74DJM Hardwoods & Veneer..........................46Deer Park Lumber, Inc. ..................................9Downes & Reader Hardwood Co., Inc. .......3Evarts, G.H., & Co., Inc. ...............................78Graham Lumber Co......................................87Gutchess Lumber ..........................................67Hawkeye Forest Products, Inc. ...................51Hermitage Hardwood Lumber Sales, Inc. 72Highland Hardwood Sales, Inc...................48Indiana Wood Products, Inc. .......................75Industrial Timber & Lumber Corp.............31Irving, J.D., Limited ......................................15Jones, J.E., Lumber Co. .................................10Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85Liberty Lumber Co........................................52Manchester Lumber, Inc...............................12Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76Meeder’s Lbr. andMeeder’s Dimension & Lbr. Products Co. 82Meridien Hardwoods of PA., Inc. ............IFCMidwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59Miller, Frank, Lumber Co., Inc....................73Miller, R.A., Hardwood Co., Inc. ................13Missouri-Pacific Lumber Co........................56Morris Lumber Co., Inc................................13Mueller Bros. Timber, Inc.............................16North Pacific ..................................................86Northland Corp.............................................68Northland Forest Products, Inc.....................2CHRISTMAS/2008 89


O’Shea Lumber Co..........................................2RAM Forest Products, Inc............................11Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Rosenberry, Carl L., & Sons Lumber Co....87Salamanca Lumber Co. ................................66Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71Taylor Lumber, Inc........................................33Toal Lumber Co.............................................87Wheeland Lumber Co., Inc..........................69Wolf River Lumber, Inc. ..............................FCYoder Lumber Co., Inc. ................................84(Northeastern Hardwoods)Champlain Hardwoods Inc. ........................14Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76North Pacific ..................................................86Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Salamanca Lumber Co. ................................66Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71(Southern Hardwoods)Al-Tom Forest Products, Inc........................80Anderson-Tully Co........................................85Baillie Lumber Co., Inc.................................47Beasley Forest Products, Inc........................76Bruce & Jenkins Lumber Co........................87Cramer, W.M., Lumber Co...........................26Curtner Lumber Co. .....................................84Hermitage Hardwood Lumber Sales, Inc. 72Highland Hardwood Sales, Inc...................48Jones, J.E., Lumber Co. .................................10Kitchens Brothers Mfg. Co...........................74Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85Liberty Lumber Co........................................52Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80McKittrick, J. W., Lumber Co. .....................85Meridien Hardwoods of PA., Inc. ............IFCMiller & Co., Inc. ........................................IBCMoore Forest Products, Inc..........................10Morris Lumber Co., Inc................................13Netterville, Fred, Lumber Co. .....................86North Pacific ..................................................86Northland Corp.............................................68Oakcrest Lumber, Inc....................................77O’Shea Lumber Co..........................................2Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Rutland Lumber Co., Inc. ............................75Shannon, J.T., Lbr. Co., Inc...........................21Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71T & S Hardwoods, Inc. .................................17Toal Lumber Co.............................................87Wilson Lumber Co., Inc. ..............................13Yoder Lumber Co., Inc. ................................84(South Central Hardwoods)Baillie Lumber Co., Inc.................................47Cramer, W.M., Lumber Co...........................26Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80North Pacific ..................................................86Reelfoot Lumber Co., Inc. ............................81Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Rutland Lumber Co., Inc. ............................75Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71(Walnut)Averitt, J.V., Lumber Co. ..............................60Baillie Lumber Co., Inc.................................47Batey, Ltd........................................................81Cramer, W.M., Lumber Co...........................26G.F. Hardwoods, Inc.....................................70Griffith Lumber Co., Inc...............................83Hawkeye Forest Products, Inc. ...................51Hermitage Hardwood Lumber Sales, Inc. 72Holmes & Company, Inc................................9Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80Midwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59Miller, Frank, Lumber Co., Inc....................73Missouri-Pacific Lumber Co........................56North Pacific ..................................................86Northland Corp.............................................68O’Shea Lumber Co..........................................2Reelfoot Lumber Co., Inc. ............................81Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Salamanca Lumber Co. ................................66Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71Wilson Hardwoods .......................................77LUMBER - SOFTWOODSAromatic Red CedarCramer, W.M., Lumber Co...........................26Hawkeye Forest Products, Inc. ...................51Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85Missouri-Pacific Lumber Co........................56O’Shea Lumber Co..........................................2Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71CypressBeasley Forest Products, Inc........................76Cramer, W. M., Lumber Co..........................26Downes & Reader Hardwood Co., Inc. .......3Miller & Co., Inc. ........................................IBCMoore Forest Products, Inc..........................10Morris Lumber Co., Inc................................13Netterville, Fred, Lumber Co. .....................86North Pacific ..................................................86Reelfoot Lumber Co., Inc. ............................81Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71T & S Hardwoods, Inc. .................................17Wilson Lumber Co., Inc. ..............................13White PineBaillie Lumber Co., Inc.................................47Cramer, W.M., Lumber Co...........................26Downes & Reader Hardwood Co., Inc. .......3Griffith Lumber Co., Inc...............................83Kuhns Bros. Lumber Co., Inc. .....................19Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76Meeder’s Lbr. andMeeder’s Dimension & Lbr. Products Co. 82North Pacific ..................................................86North State Hardwoods, Inc. ......................5590 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


Northland Forest Products, Inc.....................2O’Shea Lumber Co..........................................2Rosenberry, Carl L., & Sons Lumber Co....87Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71Wolf River Lumber, Inc. ..............................FCYellow PineDownes & Reader Hardwood Co., Inc. .......3Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80Morris Lumber Co., Inc................................13North Pacific ..................................................86North State Hardwoods, Inc. ......................55O’Shea Lumber Co..........................................2Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71WEST COAST WOODSBabcock Lumber Co......................................63Downes & Reader Hardwood Co., Inc. .......3Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76North Pacific ..................................................86Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71Toal Lumber Co.............................................87IMPORTED WOODSAmerican Lumber Co...................................45Babcock Lumber Co......................................63Cramer, W.M., Lumber Co...........................26Downes & Reader Hardwood Co., Inc. .......3Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85Liberty Lumber Co........................................52Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76Midwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59Miller, R.A., Hardwood Co., Inc. ................13Newman Lumber Co. (Gulfport, Miss.) ......7North Pacific ..................................................86Northland Corp.............................................68O’Shea Lumber Co..........................................2Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71Toal Lumber Co.............................................87MahoganyCramer, W.M., Lumber Co...........................26Downes & Reader Hardwood Co., Inc. .......3Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85Liberty Lumber Co........................................52McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76Midwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59Newman Lumber Co. (Gulfport, Miss.) ......7North Pacific ..................................................86Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71MILLWORK,MOULDINGS & TRIMAtlanta Hardwood Corp..............................65Babcock Lumber Co......................................63Chaney Lumber Co.......................................84Gutchess Lumber ..........................................67Indiana Dimension, Inc. ...............................11Kitchens Brothers Mfg. Co...........................74Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76Midwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59Miller, R.A., Hardwood Co., Inc. ................13Netterville, Fred, Lumber Co. .....................86North Pacific ..................................................86Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71Wheeland Lumber Co., Inc..........................69Wilson Lumber Co., Inc. ..............................13PALLETS - PALLETLUMBER - CANTSAveritt, J.V., Lumber Co. ..............................60Babcock Lumber Co......................................63Beasley Forest Products, Inc........................76Bee Forest LLC...............................................12Coleman, Robert S., Lumber Co., Inc.........79Curtner Lumber Co. .....................................84GreenTree Forest Products, Inc. ....................4Griffith Lumber Co., Inc...............................83Industrial Timber & Lumber Corp.............31Kepley-Frank Hardwood Co., Inc. .............23Kuhns Bros. Lumber Co., Inc. .....................19Midwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59Miller & Co., Inc. ........................................IBCMueller Bros. Timber, Inc.............................16Neff Lumber Mills, Inc. ................................54Oakcrest Lumber, Inc....................................77Pine Mountain Hardwood Lbr. Co.............61Reelfoot Lumber Co., Inc. ............................81Rutland Lumber Co., Inc. ............................75Stewart Lumber Co.......................................83T & S Hardwoods, Inc. .................................17Valley View Hardwoods, Inc.........................4Wilson Hardwoods .......................................77Yoder Lumber Co., Inc. ................................84PANELS - LUMBER COREAtlanta Hardwood Corp..............................65Babcock Lumber Co......................................63Gutchess Lumber ..........................................67Indiana Dimension, Inc. ...............................11Meeder’s Lbr. andMeeder’s Dimension & Lbr. Products Co. 82Midwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59North Pacific ..................................................86Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71Wheeland Lumber Co., Inc..........................69Wilson Lumber Co., Inc. ..............................13PLYWOOD HARDWOOD(Curved, Flat & Marine Grade)Atlanta Hardwood Corp..............................65Downes & Reader Hardwood Co., Inc. .......3Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76Midwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59North Pacific ..................................................86Northland Corp.............................................68Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71Wilson Lumber Co., Inc. ..............................13CHRISTMAS/2008 91


RAILROAD TIES, DECKINGAnderson-Tully Co........................................85Averitt, J.V., Lumber Co. ..............................60Babcock Lumber Co......................................63Baillie Lumber Co., Inc.................................47Beasley Forest Products, Inc........................76Bee Forest LLC...............................................12Curtner Lumber Co. .....................................84Graham Lumber Company .........................87Gutchess Lumber ..........................................67Irving, J.D., Limited ......................................15Midwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59Mueller Bros. Timber, Inc.............................16Pine Mountain Hardwood Lbr. Co.............61Reelfoot Lumber Co., Inc. ............................81Stewart Lumber Co.......................................83T & S Hardwoods, Inc. .................................17RIFT & QUARTER SAWNBabcock Lumber Co......................................63Baillie Lumber Co., Inc.................................47Graf Brothers Lumber & Flooring ..............25Hawkeye Forest Products, Inc. ...................51Lakeland Hardwood Sales Co.....................85McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76Midwest Hardwood Corp. ..........................59Miller, Frank, Lumber Co., Inc....................73Pine Mountain Hardwood Lbr. Co.............61Rex Lumber Co..............................................27Sitco Lumber Company .................................5Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71Taylor Lumber, Inc........................................33SERVICESEagle Machinery & Supply, Inc...................49McIlvain, J. Gibson, Co.................................76PCS VacDry USA, LP....................................86Stiles, A.W., Contractors, Inc. ......................57Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71SQUARESBabcock Lumber Co......................................63Baillie Lumber Co., Inc.................................47Bruce & Jenkins Lumber Co........................87Gutchess Lumber ..........................................67Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80Meeder’s Lbr. andMeeder’s Dimension & Lbr. Products Co. 82Morris Lumber Co., Inc................................13Newman Lumber Co. (Gulfport, Miss.) ......7Northland Corp.............................................68Salamanca Lumber Co. ................................66Taylor Lumber, Inc........................................33STACKING STICKSDownes & Reader Hardwood Co., Inc. .......3Griffith Lumber Co., Inc...............................83TIMBERS, TRUSSES & BEAMSAveritt, J.V., Lumber Co. ..............................60Babcock Lumber Co......................................63Beasley Forest Products, Inc........................76Coleman, Robert S., Lumber Co., Inc.........79Morris Lumber Co., Inc................................13Netterville, Fred, Lumber Co. .....................86Reelfoot Lumber Co., Inc. ............................81Stewart Lumber Co.......................................83T & S Hardwoods, Inc. .................................17Tanner Lumber Co. .......................................13Wilson Lumber Co., Inc. ..............................13Yoder Lumber Co., Inc. ................................84TRUCK FLOORING,STAKES, ETC.Babcock Lumber Co......................................63Mann & Parker Lumber Co., The ...............80Neff Lumber Mills, Inc. ................................54Rex Lumber Co..............................................27VENEERS - SINGLE PLYNorthland Corp.............................................68Sweeney Hardwoods....................................71VENEER LOG SUPPLIERSBabcock Lumber Co......................................63Baillie Lumber Co., Inc.................................47Batey, Ltd........................................................81Bee Forest LLC...............................................12Buehler Lumber Co.......................................85DJM Hardwoods & Veneer..........................46Graf Brothers Lumber & Flooring ..............25Graham Lumber Co......................................87Griffith Lumber Co., Inc...............................83Hawkeye Forest Products, Inc. ...................51Industrial Timber & Lumber Corp.............31Kuhns Bros. Lumber Co., Inc. .....................19Miller, Frank, Lumber Co., Inc....................73Missouri-Pacific Lumber Co........................56Mueller Bros. Timber, Inc.............................16North State Hardwoods, Inc. ......................55Tuscarora Hardwoods, Inc...........................58Wheeland Lumber Co., Inc..........................69Wilson Hardwoods .......................................77Season’s Greetings92 Merry Christmas From NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


Merry Christmas and aHappy New Yearfrom all of us atMiller and Company.We appreciate your patronageand thank you for your friendship.Hardwood Lumber Flooring DimensionMiller & Co. Inc.Since 1928 at the Selma, AL facility;Since 1923 at the Jackson, TN facilityWe offer you the finest Hardwood lumber andCahaba Brand Oak flooring from our own productionfacilities which include:1,200,000 BF Kiln Capacity, 2 Planing Mills,4 Resaws, Rail Car & Truck Deliveries from allfour millsCall us for your lumber requirements,P.O. Box 770 P.O. Box 387Selma, AL 36702 Jackson, TN 38301Phone: 334/874-8271 Phone: 731/427-8621Fax: 334/875-9109Web Page: www.millerlbr.comSales: Bobby Buchanan - bbuchanan@millerlbr.bizCharlton Harris - charris@millerlbr.biz


Happy Holidays from all of us at Gilco Lumber Inc.Boards InThe World Are Made HereThe MostBeautifulAll of us at Gilco Lumber Inc. are very proud of our logowhich is shown above on a bundle of our Poplar lumber.Our dedication to quality at our GILCO facility is obvious to any visitor. Our 20 acre site in Roderfield, West Virginiaincludes a 1,000,000 board feet capacity pre-dryer, 16 Irvington Moore dry kilns, air drying sheds and yard with 5million board feet of open air drying capacity. We have two grading chains; one to grade inbound green lumber,and the other to grade, sort and surface dried lumber to customer specifications. At the end of this grading chain,we have two 1,000,000 board feet kiln dried storage warehouses, which enable us to provide our customers with“just-in-time” shipments to any location in the world by route of truck, railcar or container. This facility was constructedwith three things in mind: Quality, Service and Consistency.QUALITY • The latest technology in quality lumber production. • All lumber trimmed after drying.• Highest quality Appalachian hardwoods. • GILCO quality Assurance.SERVICE • Controlled “just-in-time” shipments by rail, truck or container. • Ability to surface and trim to yourspecifications. • Dedicated employees committed to providing you with the highest quality of goods and services.• Flexibility to meet your needs.CONSISTENCY • Select harvest area from over 1,200,000 acres we own or manage insures you betterconsistency in grain and color. • Length and width tallies on each bundle. • Lumber produced by four GILCOsawmills with over 70,000,000 board feet annual production.*We recently acquired a new Hardwood lumber concentration yard in Marion, N.C., which will produce an additional15,000,000 board feet of kiln dried lumber annually.*a division of International Lumber Inc.Contact us when we can be of service.Phone: 304-746-3160 1-800-718-1488 FAX: 304-746-2999 www.gilcolumber.com96 MacCorkle Ave., SW P.O. Box 18370South Charleston, WV 25303-8370Sales - Scott England, Hank Bishop, Tony Love and Chris Buck

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